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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44424 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #420 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:22am »

New York Times

August 2, 2010
For E-Data, Tug Grows Over Privacy vs. Security
By MIGUEL HELFT

The threat by the United Arab Emirates to shut down mobile services on BlackBerrys like e-mail and text messaging underscores a growing tension between communications companies and governments over how to balance privacy with national security.

While communications companies want to be able to ensure that their customers’ messages are shielded from prying eyes, governments increasingly insist on gaining access to electronic messages to track down criminals or uncover terrorist plots.

On Monday, Research In Motion, or R.I.M., the Canadian company that makes the BlackBerry line of smartphones, sought to reassure its customers that its services remained secure a day after the U.A.E. said it would ban many BlackBerry services because of national security concerns.

Internet security experts say the demands by the United Arab Emirates for certain access to communications flowing across the BlackBerry network echo requests of other governments around the world. Many countries have laws and regulations requiring telecommunications providers to grant government agencies access to their systems for court-sanctioned intercepts.

The demands also come as other governments, including India, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Bahrain, are reportedly considering new requirements on services like BlackBerry to ensure they can monitor electronic messages.

“These requirements for access to communications exist on a significant scale worldwide,” said Anthony M. Rutkowski, chief executive of Netmagic Associates, a consulting company specializing in technical and regulatory issues related to online security.

At the same time, electronic communications providers are increasingly offering security measures like encryption. For instance, after a cyberattack that originated in China and that targeted Google’s servers and Gmail, the company began encrypting by default all e-mail messages while in transit.

As a growing volume of communications content is encrypted, governments are demanding other information like whom customers communicate with and when, said Mr. Rutkowski. Such information can be useful to help gather intelligence.

Security experts say that BlackBerry’s service, which uses its own network to transmit e-mail and instant messages, may make access to such data more difficult, especially for countries in which the company has no servers controlling that network. The experts also say that is why Research In Motion has had frequent confrontations with governments. Other services, like Skype, have also raised concerns in some countries.

Research In Motion issued a statement on Monday that did not directly address the company’s conflict with the United Arab Emirates or its relationship with other countries, citing the “confidential nature” of its discussions with certain governments. The company said it balanced competing demands. “R.I.M. respects both the regulatory requirements of government and the security and privacy needs of corporations and consumers,” the company said in statement. In an open letter to customers, Research In Motion, which operates in more than 175 countries, also said that its security system was designed to ensure that no one, not even the company, could gain unauthorized access to customers’ data.

Security experts said that it was not clear what kind of access requirements the United Arab Emirates had requested from Research In Motion and whether those requirements were more onerous than those mandated by other governments.

“There is a lot going on that we are not seeing,” said Bruce Schneier, chief security technology officer for BT, the giant telecommunications provider based in Britain. “We don’t know what R.I.M. does for other countries.”

Experts also say that the United Arab Emirates, a major business center in the Middle East, may be focusing on BlackBerry’s service, rather than Gmail or other encrypted services, because it is being offered by local telecommunications carriers and has grown increasingly popular there.

The BlackBerry service is a frequent target because of “its convenience, its widespread use and the fact that it runs on its own network,” said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a privacy advocacy group based in Washington. “The United Arab Emirates is not in much of a position to tell Google not to encrypt e-mail.”

Many analysts agreed that the Emirati government appeared more interested in getting some concessions from Research In Motion than in actually shutting off access to BlackBerry data services. The government said the telephone service would not be affected.

“Saying that the restrictions will not kick in until October is a form of saber-rattling,” said Jonathan Zittrain, a professor at the Harvard Law School and co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. “The government is saying that as a way to get negotiations going with R.I.M., not to ease the pain of executives who fear they may have their service cut off.”

Still, some businesspeople in Dubai seemed to be digesting the news, and waiting to see whether an agreement could be worked out between R.I.M. and the Emirati government before the October deadline. “People are taking a wait-and-see attitude,” said Blair Look, the managing director of asset management at al Mal Capital in Dubai.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/technology/03blackberry.html?ref=world

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« Reply #421 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:25am »

New York Times

August 2, 2010
With a Glimmer of a Chance, Stardust Is Identified
By KENNETH CHANG

Three specks of matter captured by the NASA spacecraft Stardust may be stardust that has just entered our solar system.

“They have all the hallmarks of interstellar dust,” said Andrew Westphal of the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Westphal reported the first speck in March, and he described the second and third on Friday at a meeting of the Meteoritical Society in Manhattan. Each speck is about one-25,000th of an inch across.

The third is particularly intriguing. It is rich in carbon, raising the possibility that it is full of the molecules that could serve as the building blocks for life.

The Stardust’s primary mission was to bring back bits of a comet that it passed in 2004, but scientists also hoped that it would also trap some interstellar particles within a wispy concoction known as aerogel that served as a cosmic dust collector.

The spacecraft completed its seven-year ride through the solar system in 2006 and, as it swung past Earth, detached a capsule containing the collected particles, which parachuted down.

Then — with help from an army of amateur researchers — scientists began the painstaking process of distinguishing the interstellar specks from ordinary solar-system dust.

Like a car in a snowstorm, the solar system is flying through a cloud of interstellar gas at 55,000 miles an hour, so stardust enters from one particular direction. By analyzing the directions from which particles strike the aerogel, scientists can determine which ones are from the interstellar cloud.

Even so, Dr. Westphal said the prospect of locating the interstellar dust particles was initially hopeless. “It’s kind of the equivalent of trying to find 50 ants on a football field,” he said.

Instead — “totally out of desperation,” he said — the scientists turned to non-experts around the world to sift through thousands of images. Today, about 29,000 people — or “dusters,” as they call themselves — take part in the Stardust@Home project, which Dr. Westphal directs.

Interspersed test images allow the researchers to check how well the dusters are doing, and the dusters compete for the top scores.

The first presumed interstellar particle — actually two distinct pieces — was found by a Canadian duster, Bruce Hudson, who retired as a carpenter and groundskeeper after a stroke. Mr. Hudson said he had looked through 25,000 images, spending as much as 5 to 10 hours a day at it.

“You get so caught up in it,” he said. He named the two pieces Orion and Sirius.

The second was discovered by Naomi Wordsworth, a circuit designer in England, who heard about Stardust@Home from a BBC television program.

“I thought it was a wonderful opportunity for anyone to become involved with real space research and I joined straight away,” Mrs. Wordsworth said. “Although I spend my working days in front of a computer solving problems and verifying designs, I found it was quite relaxing to look through the photos and concentrate on the visual images.”

She named her speck Hylabrook, after the name of her parents’ house.

The researchers have yet to check their database to identify the person who turned up the carbon-rich third particle, which turned up only two weeks ago.

So far, the scientists have a rough breakdown of the chemical elements in the dust specks, based on X-ray imaging, but they do not know much else.

“We are deliberately not doing as much analysis as we could,” Dr. Westphal said. “Our great-grandchildren would curse us if we ruin these things. We’re immensely aware if we drop one on the floor, it would cost $300 million” — roughly the cost of the Stardust mission — “to get another.”

They still cannot say for certain that the three are interstellar particles. To do that, they would have to risk extracting the bits from the aerogel and analyze the oxygen isotopes.

For reasons not understood, the solar system has a higher percentage of oxygen-18 relative to oxygen-17. If the particles are indeed from beyond the solar system, their oxygen isotopes would contain the lower amounts seen elsewhere.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/science/space/03stardust.html?ref=science

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« Reply #422 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:28am »

Speaking of wasps. Telegraph

Britain's biggest wasp nest discovered with half a million wasps
The biggest wasps' nest in Britain has been discovered in a country pub loft containing half a million wasps.

By Laura Roberts
Published: 7:30AM BST 03 Aug 2010

The nest measured 6ft by 5ft and was found in Southampton, Hants.

The infestation was discovered in a chimney stack before being destroyed by Sean Whelan, a pest controller.

Mr. Whelan said: “It was scary as hell but it is what I am trained for – I just pulled out my iPod and listened to ‘Bat Out of Hell’ to get me through the job.

“I killed all the wasps but the nest is still in the attic where it will be left to disintegrate.”

Experts from Oxford University have verified the nest is Britain’s biggest ever and the biggest anywhere in the world in the last 50 years.

David Baldock, from the Bees, Wasps And Ants Records Society, added: “It is certainly an enormous nest and certainly a record. I have never seen a nest that size.”

The largest nest ever recorded was found in New Zealand in 1963 measuring 12ft by 6ft.

photo after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/7923457/Britains-biggest-wasp-nest-discovered-with-half-a-million-wasps.html

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« Reply #423 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:32am »

Telegraph

A universe could exist 'inside every black hole,' claims scientist
A hidden universe could exist inside every black hole, a Polish cosmologist has claimed.

By Amy Willis
Published: 4:25PM BST 02 Aug 2010

Using an adaptation of Einstein's general theory of relativity, Nikodem Poplawski, of Indiana University, Bloomington, analysed the theoretical motion of particles entering a black hole.

He concluded that it was possible for a whole new universe to exist inside every black hole, which could mean that our own universe could be inside a black hole as well.

"Maybe the huge black holes at the centre of the Milky Way and other galaxies are bridges to different universes," he told New Scientist.

Explaining his theory in the journal Physics Letters B, he said he used the Einstein-Cartan-Kibble-Sciama (ECKS) theory of gravity, in his analysis to account for the angular momentum of particles in a black hole. Doing this it made it possible to calculate a quality of space-time called torsion, a property believed to repel gravity.

He says instead of matter reaching infinite density in a black hole called "singularities" in Einstein's theory of relativity - the behaviour of the space-time acts more like a spring being compressed with matter rebounding and expanding continuously.

Dr Poplawski explains that this "bounce-back" effect is caused by the torsion of space-time having a repulsive force against the gargantuan strength of gravity in a black hole.

Dr Poplawski also claims that this recoiling effect could be what has led to our expanding universe that we observe today and could explain why our universe is flat, homogeneous and isotropic without needing cosmic inflation.

It is hard to see how we could test whether or not Dr Poplawski's theory is correct; the force of gravity in black holes is such that nothing can escape, so no information about what is going on inside one can ever reach us.

However, according to Dr Poplawski, if we were living in a spinning black hole then the spin would transfer to the space-time inside, meaning the universe would have a preferred direction - something we would be able to measure. Such a preferred direction could be related to the observed imbalance of matter and anti-matter in the universe and could explain the oscillation of neutrinos.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7918978/A-universe-could-exist-inside-every-black-hole-claims-scientist.html

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« Reply #424 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:36am »

Telegraph

Nasa scientists braced for 'solar tsunami' to hit earth
The earth could be hit by a wave of violent space weather as early as Tuesday after a massive explosion on the sun, scientists have warned.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 9:00PM BST 02 Aug 2010

The solar fireworks at the weekend were recorded by several satellites, including Nasa’s new Solar Dynamics Observatory which watched its shock wave rippling outwards.

Astronomers from all over the world witnessed the huge flare above a giant sunspot the size of the Earth, which they linked to an even larger eruption across the surface of Sun.

The explosion, called a coronal mass ejection, was aimed directly towards Earth, which then sent a “solar tsunami” racing 93 million miles across space.

Images from the SDO hint at a shock wave travelling from the flare into space, the New Scientist reported.

Experts said the wave of supercharged gas will likely reach the Earth on Tuesday, when it will buffet the natural magnetic shield protecting Earth.

It is likely to spark spectacular displays of the aurora or northern and southern lights.

"This eruption is directed right at us," said Leon Golub, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA).

"It's the first major Earth-directed eruption in quite some time."

Scientists have warned that a really big solar eruption could destroy satellites and wreck power and communications grids around the globe if it happened today.

Nasa recently warned that Britain could face widespread power blackouts and be left without critical communication signals for long periods of time, after the earth is hit by a once-in-a-generation “space storm”.

The Daily Telegraph disclosed in June that senior space agency scientists believed the Earth will be hit with unprecedented levels of magnetic energy from solar flares after the Sun wakes “from a deep slumber” sometime around 2013.

It remains unclear, however, how much damage this latest eruption will cause the world’s communication tools.

Dr Lucie Green, of the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Surrey, followed the flare-ups using Japan's orbiting Hinode telescope.

"What wonderful fireworks the Sun has been producing,” the UK solar expert said.

“This was a very rare event – not one, but two almost simultaneous eruptions from different locations on the sun were launched toward the Earth.

"These eruptions occur when immense magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere lose their stability and can no longer be held down by the Sun's huge gravitational pull. Just like a coiled spring suddenly being released, they erupt into space.”

She added: "It looks like the first eruption was so large that it changed the magnetic fields throughout half the Sun's visible atmosphere and provided the right conditions for the second eruption.

"Both eruptions could be Earth-directed but may be travelling at different speeds.

“This means we have a very good chance of seeing major and prolonged effects, such as the northern lights at low latitudes."

A Nasa spokesman was unavailable for comment.

video link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-video/7924167/Massive-explosion-ripples-across-the-sun.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7923069/Nasa-scientists-braced-for-solar-tsunami-to-hit-earth.html

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« Reply #425 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:43am »

LA Times

Bell withholds public records
The city has failed to respond to most requests by The Times, community activists and even a sitting councilman for public information such as the salaries of its new administrators.

By Ruben Vives and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times

August 3, 2010

Despite vowing greater transparency in the wake of a salary scandal, the city of Bell is refusing to turn over public records to The Times, community activists and even a sitting councilman.

"They continue to keep us in the dark," said Councilman Lorenzo Velez, who has been critical of the high salaries paid to top Bell administrators and other City Council members. "The problem is a continuation of so many years of doing whatever they wanted in City Hall."

The Times and others have requested records involving elections, budgets, city financing and salaries that typically are available for viewing at city halls — and in some cases can be found online.

While the city has filled some of The Times' public records requests, it has not responded to the vast majority within the time limit set by the state Public Records Act, nor have city officials given an explanation for their denials as required by the law. The requests include such basic information as the salaries of Interim City Manager Pedro Carrillo and Finance Director Lourdes Garcia.

According to state law, public records have to be made available for viewing.

Karl Olson, an attorney who specializes in public records litigation, said requests for administrators' salaries shouldn't require a formal request and should only take minutes to get.

"It's not like it will take them a bunch of time to figure out how much they make," Olson said. "Most people know how much they make. It seems what we have in Bell is some folks who paid themselves outrageous salaries, and they're mad they got caught."

Bell's lawyers have not responded to The Times' attorney, and the newspaper on Monday was preparing to file a Public Records Act lawsuit to ask a judge to compel the city to disclose the public records.

City Clerk Rebecca Valdez previously has said that Bell's priority is to meet a deadline for records set by the state attorney general's office.

"For them to essentially say we're being investigated for breaking the law, and so we don't have time to give you the records, that seems outrageous to me," said Olson, who won a landmark case involving public records related to police and other government employees' salaries before the California Supreme Court three years ago.

Bell, a city of about 37,000 residents in southeastern Los Angeles County, has been roiled by protests since top administrators' salaries were made public last month, prompting the resignations of City Manager Robert Rizzo, who made nearly $800,000 a year, and two other highly paid officials.

After the resignations, Mayor Oscar Hernandez released a letter to residents vowing greater openness: "In the coming days, weeks and months, we will solicit feedback from community members and institute new reforms to ensure that the city of Bell continues providing top-quality public services and protects our families, local businesses and taxpayers."

Not everyone sees it that way.

Dale Walker, a member of the Bell Assn. To Stop the Abuse, said his group has waited about three weeks for records, including salaries for council members, top administrators and payments to contractors. Christina Garcia, a leader of the group, said she thinks the city is "gambling on the idea that we don't have the means to sue them."

Reached by phone, the city clerk said she had no comment.

On Monday, City Atty. Ed Lee released a statement announcing that he was leaving the firm of Best Best & Krieger to focus on assisting the city of Bell. The firm also announced that it was no longer representing the city. Last week, the Downey City Council voted to terminate its contract with Lee over the Bell salary scandal.

"I am confident that my reputation will be restored in time, as events unfold," Lee said in a statement. He did not return a phone call or e-mail from The Times seeking comment.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-bell-documents-20100803,0,7427441.story

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« Reply #426 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:49am »

Wired

Video of a meteor exploding over New Mexico.

A meteor exploded in the atmosphere near Santa Fe, New Mexico just before 5 a.m. on the morning of July 31. Local amateur radio astronomer Thomas Ashcraft captured the event from his personal observatory using an all-sky optical video camera developed by Sandia National Laboratories that is specifically sensitive to the near infrared flashes that meteors create.

The soundtrack comes from Ashcraft’s forward-scatter radar array that is tuned to the plasma and ionization produced by meteors.

“I made the innovation of merging my radio meteor array with their optical and it produces a great deal of intricate data,” Ashcraft wrote in an email to Wired.com.

The video only contains the first part of the fireball’s four-minute-long echo captured by Ashcraft’s antennas. Forward scatter radar is different from traditional radar detection because instead of sending out a cone of radio waves, it uses waves that are already beaming in the ionosphere.

“When a meteor strikes the Earth’s atmosphere it makes a cone of ionization that has the capability of reflecting in the existing transmission beams,” Ashcraft wrote. “It will reflect until the cone of ionization or plasma tube dissipates in the high atmospheric winds. Forward scatter is a ‘poor man’s radar’ so to speak.”

Ashcraft also has a network of dipole antennas on his three-acre observatory that he uses to record the sun’s activity.

Read More http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/08/meteor-fireball-video/#ixzz0vYCCjbar

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« Reply #427 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:54am »

Wired Danger Room

By Katie Drummond August 3, 2010 |

The Army’s got a one-two punch to perfect vaccinations and offer scientists the ability to quickly develop inoculations that stave off new dangers. First, they’ll shoot troops up using a “gene gun,” that’s filled with DNA-based vaccines. Then they’ll follow it up with “short electrical pulses to the delivery site.”

The Pentagon’s still after a comprehensive way to inoculate troops and civilians against existing illnesses, rapidly respond to emerging threats, and even predict pathogenic mutations before they happen. To that end, the military’s already funding a handful of projects, from plant-based vaccine production to genetic signatures for ultra-early diagnosis.

In a small business solicitation released last week, the Army put out a call for “Multiagent Synthetic DNA Vaccines Delivered by Noninvasive Electroporation.” The program would start by transforming conventional development methods, like standard egg-based vaccines.

The old-school methods are slow, don’t allow for readily combined vaccines, and can pose sterility risks. DNA-based vaccines, on the other hand, would be quick to engineer and offer reliable immunity — provided the DNA can enter host cells to trigger the production of immunity proteins.

Right now, DNA-based vaccines are injected into muscles, meaning a genetically engineered plasmid is delivered to “intracellular spaces,” and “is not efficiently taken up by the host cells.” So the Army would instead like to shoot people. Seriously.

In its solicitation, the Army says it wants DNA vaccines that are painted onto microscopic beads, then “deposited into skin cells by gas propulsion.” And since that method can only inject a small dose of DNA, they want researchers to combine the approach with intramuscular electroporation, which “involves injecting the DNA then quickly applying short electrical pulses.” The electric charge creates pores in cell membranes, making it easier for DNA to enter targeted cells.

Sounds great, except that current approaches to intramuscular electroporation are invasive, and, obviously, they hurt. One study in rats also noted the “possibility of low and transient tissue damage induced by electroporation.” The Army wants a gadget that doesn’t rely on jamming needles and electrical pulses into muscle, and instead are after “injection and noninvasive electroporation [that] can be performed using a single integrated device.”

DNA-based vaccines are also still in their infancy: in 2005, the first-ever DNA vaccine for horses was approved, but human trials have yet to generate stellar results. And speaking of invasive: the Army’s delivery method of choice, gene guns, use helium gas to blast DNA into cells and often require surgically exposed muscle tissue to get the job done.

In other words, the Army’s asking for a non-invasive way to do what’s not yet possible, even using surgical methods. If researchers do come up with a device that meets the lofty criteria, though, it’d be just what the Pentagon’s looking for: a reliable way to engineer and deliver combination vaccines — not to mention a quick way to fight back against “unknown, emerging, or genetically engineered pathogens.”

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/armys-vaccine-plan-inject-troops-with-gas-propelled-electro-charged-dna/#more-28630#ixzz0vYDYVg80

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« Reply #428 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 11:25am »

cheesy

THESE ARE ENTRIES TO A WASHINGTON POST COMPETITION
ASKING FOR A TWO-LINE RHYME WITH THE MOST ROMANTIC FIRST LINE, BUT THE LEAST ROMANTIC SECOND LINE:

******************************************************************************
My darling, my lover, my beautiful wife:
Marrying you screwed up my life.

I see your face when I am dreaming.
That's why I always wake up screaming.

Kind, intelligent, loving and hot;
This describes everything you are not.

I thought that I could love no other --
That is until I met your brother.

Roses are red, violets are blue, sugar is sweet, & so are you
But the roses are wilting, the violets are dead, the sugar bowl's
empty... and so is your head.

I want to feel your sweet embrace
But don't take that paper bag off your face.

I love your smile, your face, and your eyes --
Man, I'm good at telling lies!

My love, you take my breath away.
What have you stepped in to smell this way?

What inspired this amorous rhyme?
Two parts vodka, one part lime.

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« Reply #429 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 1:16pm »

Ha ha ha! Thanks for that, Swamp! grin grin
on Aug 3rd, 2010, 07:12am, Luvey wrote:
Hi Philliman

In the discussion on OMF did you come to any conclusions about what it could be? I had a thought (not wanting to offend anyone or their beliefs) that if they are very superstitious and religious in those regions then that could be how they came up with the idea that it was witches. I do however feel that they were other dimensional beings. Whatever they were they weren't nice.

Pen


on Aug 3rd, 2010, 08:17am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning Phil!
I remember that discussion and the video you mentioned about the flying witches. One police officer had a run in with one and the way he described her it sounded much like the witches we think of. Maybe that's where the term came from.
Crystal

Hello Crystal and Luvey,
no we didn't came to any conclusion back than since most of the participants where leaning to a hoax-theory ala that it could have been a balloon or an RC plane or something like that.

Concerning the description that guy gave I wonder if that being maybe could have been something like a Harpy. huh
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpy
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« Reply #430 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 4:00pm »

Someone recently told me about some beautiful music which you could hear in such an online game. This reminded me of that beautiful music from the game "Heroes of Might and Magic 4":










Enjoy! smiley
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« Reply #431 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 5:21pm »

on Aug 3rd, 2010, 11:25am, Swamprat wrote:
cheesy

THESE ARE ENTRIES TO A WASHINGTON POST COMPETITION
ASKING FOR A TWO-LINE RHYME WITH THE MOST ROMANTIC FIRST LINE, BUT THE LEAST ROMANTIC SECOND LINE:

******************************************************************************
My darling, my lover, my beautiful wife:
Marrying you screwed up my life.

I see your face when I am dreaming.
That's why I always wake up screaming.

Kind, intelligent, loving and hot;
This describes everything you are not.

I thought that I could love no other --
That is until I met your brother.

Roses are red, violets are blue, sugar is sweet, & so are you
But the roses are wilting, the violets are dead, the sugar bowl's
empty... and so is your head.

I want to feel your sweet embrace
But don't take that paper bag off your face.

I love your smile, your face, and your eyes --
Man, I'm good at telling lies!

My love, you take my breath away.
What have you stepped in to smell this way?

What inspired this amorous rhyme?
Two parts vodka, one part lime.



Two parts vodka, one part lime. These are great SwampRat!
Crystal
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« Reply #432 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 5:30pm »

on Aug 3rd, 2010, 1:16pm, philliman wrote:
Concerning the description that guy gave I wonder if that being maybe could have been something like a Harpy. huh
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpy


Hey Phil,
It could very well be a harpie. Good thought!

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Crystal

Harpie image found here:
http://www.willsmind.com/Harpie.htm
« Last Edit: Aug 3rd, 2010, 5:33pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #433 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 6:20pm »

Lovely music Phil!
Crystal
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #434 on: Aug 3rd, 2010, 9:03pm »

on Aug 3rd, 2010, 1:16pm, philliman wrote:
Hello Crystal and Luvey,
no we didn't came to any conclusion back than since most of the participants where leaning to a hoax-theory ala that it could have been a balloon or an RC plane or something like that.

Concerning the description that guy gave I wonder if that being maybe could have been something like a Harpy. huh
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpy


Very interesting Philliman! I had never heard of a Harpy... but it seems to fit the description. I thought the police officers report interesting. He must have known prior to reporting the incident that he would have gotten a lot of ribbing and the loss of credibility from his fellow officers. That in itself lends credibility to his report. No doubt in my mind that he was telling the truth of what he saw.

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