Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Nov 19th, 2017, 11:51am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 285 286 287 288 289  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 11746 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4290 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 07:11am »

LA Times

Life expectancy of U.S. women slips in some regions

The backsliding for women began before 1997, but researchers find it has accelerated in the last decade.
Experts say smoking and obesity are partly to blame.

By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
2:23 AM PDT, June 15, 2011
Reporting from Washington

Women in large swaths of the U.S. are dying younger than they were a generation ago, reversing nearly a century of progress in public health and underscoring the rising toll of smoking and record obesity.

Nationwide, life expectancy for American men and women has risen over the last two decades, and some U.S. communities still boast life expectancies as long as any in the world, according to newly released data. But over the last decade, the nation has experienced a widening gap between the most and least healthy places to live. In some parts of the United States, men and women are dying younger on average than their counterparts in nations such as Syria, Panama and Vietnam.

Overall, the United States is falling further behind other industrialized nations, many of which have also made greater strides in cutting child mortality and reducing preventable deaths.

In 737 U.S. counties out of more than 3,000, life expectancies for women declined between 1997 and 2007. For life expectancy to decline in a developed nation is rare. Setbacks on this scale have not been seen in the U.S. since the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918, according to demographers.

"There are just lots of places where things are getting worse," said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, which conducted the research. "We're not keeping up."

The backsliding for women began before 1997, but researchers found it had accelerated in the last decade. Only 227 counties saw women's life expectancy decline between 1987 and 1997, according to the study.

The grim trend is fueled largely by smoking, high blood pressure and obesity, according to Murray and other population health experts.

American women historically smoked more heavily than women in other countries, particularly after World War II, said Samuel Preston, a University of Pennsylvania demographer who co-chaired a 2011 National Academies panel that looked at life expectancies in high-income countries.

That had a delayed effect that drove up lung cancer rates among women as those who were young adults in the 1950s aged. The trend may ease as that age group passes and the effects of more recent efforts to reduce smoking are felt, Preston said.

But Preston cautioned that other unhealthy lifestyle choices may undermine that progress. "In place of smoking, we have substituted obesity," he said.

The number of Americans who are classified as obese hit 34% in 2010, more than double the rate in 1980.

The widening gulf between the healthiest and least healthy populations is partly due to wealth. A key finding of the data is that "inequality appears to be growing in the U.S.," said Eileen Crimmins, a gerontologist at USC who also co-chaired the 2011 National Academies panel on life expectancies. "We are different than other countries."

Researchers found substantially fewer geographic disparities in Great Britain, Canada and Japan, for example.

An additional explanation appears to be cultural norms and differences in public health efforts, the researchers found.

Communities with large immigrant populations — Southern California, for example — fared considerably better than average despite relatively high poverty rates. The worst-performing counties were clustered primarily in Appalachia, the Deep South and the lower Midwest. In those places, women died as much as a year younger in 2007 than women did a decade earlier. Life expectancy for women slipped 2 1/2 years in Madison County, Miss., which recorded the biggest regression.

The research is being published in the journal Population Health Metrics.

Life expectancies for black men and women have improved faster than for whites since 1987, although blacks continue to have lower life expectancies overall than whites, the data showed.

Nationwide, women's life expectancy at birth in the U.S. hit 81.3 years in 2007, placing the country 35th in the world. That's down from 20th in 1987, according to United Nations data.

Men's life expectancy was 76.7 years, or 24th on the list, up from 32nd two decades earlier.

In general, men and women die youngest in poor, mostly rural parts of the South and in struggling urban centers like Philadelphia and St. Louis. In Baltimore, men on average live only 66.7 years.

By contrast, Americans in affluent counties near Washington, D.C., the San Francisco Bay Area and elsewhere have among the longest life expectancies in the world, outpacing even international leaders such as Japan and Switzerland.

Women in southwest Florida's Collier County, for example, live to be 86 on average, the highest in the nation. Collier is among a cluster of counties in South Florida with high life expectancies.

Twelve states, including Pennsylvania, Connecticut and the rest of New England, have no counties where life expectancies slipped backward.

Life expectancies for men and women in Los Angeles County rose in the last two decades.

Los Angeles County has among the highest life expectancies in the country despite a poverty rate above the national average. Countywide, women live more than a year longer than they do nationally, and men live more than eight months longer on average.

This may be evidence of what demographers and public health officials call the "Hispanic paradox," a long recognized phenomenon in which Latino immigrants are generally healthier than non-Latinos of similar income.

Nearly half of Los Angeles County's 10 million residents are Latino, and more than a third are foreign born, according to census data. By contrast, less than a sixth of the population nationally is Latino, and less than an eighth is foreign born.

One explanation of that phenomenon is that the people who become immigrants tend to be healthy. "These are not random people. They are the healthiest people who could get here," said Carmen Nevarez, former president of the American Public Health Assn.

But David Hayes-Bautista, who heads the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA, said other factors, including social support networks, diet and even physical labor, may play a role as well, because not all immigrants have such good health outcomes as Latinos.

Some rural parts of the nation also have done well, with areas of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa having some of the highest life expectancies.

"These are not wealthy communities," Murray said, noting that many benefit from a "cohesive community" that may improve health outcomes.

Murray and other researchers noted that the data also suggest that communities can improve their health outcomes with sustained public health initiatives.

New York City, for example, which has pursued aggressive anti-smoking and anti-obesity campaigns, has among the higher life expectancies in the nation.

Murray and his team also found very high life expectancies among a group of counties in the Mountain West such as Gunnison County, Colo., and Teton County, Wyo., that have become lifestyle destinations.

The changing demographic profile of these counties only explains part of that achievement, Murray said. "They can actually change the environment and the community's values," he said.

http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-na-womens-health-20110615,0,7351576.story

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4291 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 07:16am »

Wired Danger Room

Libya’s DIY Rebels Outfit Trucks With Copter Rockets
By Spencer Ackerman
June 14, 2011 | 5:33 pm
Categories: Gadgets and Gear





Most people look at a rocket mounted on a helicopter and their imaginations end there. In Libya, rebels seeking to oust dictator Moammar Gadhafi don’t have that luxury. They see rocket pods and think: that would look good mounted on my flatbed truck.

Our pal Brian Conley’s Alive In Libya website brings us this video, in which Abdulsalam Elshein of the “Free Libya Martyrs Brigade” explains how his colleagues in the city of Dorna stripped captured helicopters of their rockets and outfitted them on trucks the rebels drive to fight Gadhafi’s forces. (Elshein refers to these as “C5 rockets,” but I think he might mean the Soviet-made S-5 model.) Anti-Gadhafi machinists welded the rocket pods to the back of Elshein’s unarmored truck. Instant missile launcher, Mad Max-style.

“It is an effective weapon with high accuracy targeting,” Elshein says, “and praise be to God, it has an effect on the enemy.” (Translation is here.)

This is hardly the only example of Libya’s DIY weapons tech. Some string together Grad rocket pods, power them with a car battery and fire them with harvested doorbells. Others scavenge ancient guns and artillery out of decaying army depots, ending up with antique Lee-Enfield bolt action rifles. They don’t have much experience placing accurate fires, and Elshein admits he doesn’t have much training on his new rocket-enhanced truck.

But still, on Monday, they broke free of Gadhafi’s siege of Misurata and started marching to Tripoli. Score one for DIY.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/06/libyas-diy-rebels-outfit-trucks-with-copter-rockets/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4292 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 07:21am »

Science Daily

Fear Boosts Activation of Immature Brain Cells: Adult Neural Stem Cells Play Role in Creating Emotional Context of Memory
ScienceDaily (June 14, 2011)

— Fear burns memories into our brain, and new research by University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists explains how.


User Image
Emotional information from the amygdala promotes maturation of adult neural stem cells into new neurons in the hippocampus.
These neurons can be activated by fear during a critical 2-4 week period after birth, helping to imprint a memory of the fearful situation.
Without input from the amygdala (right), the hippocampus produces fewer new neurons.
(Credit: Daniela Kaufer lab, UC Berkeley)



Scientists have long known that fear and other highly emotional experiences lead to incredibly strong memories. In a study appearing online in advance of publication in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, UC Berkeley's Daniela Kaufer and colleagues report a new way for emotions to affect memory: The brain's emotional center, the amygdala, induces the hippocampus, a relay hub for memory, to generate new neurons.

In a fearful situation, these newborn neurons get activated by the amygdala and may provide a "blank slate" to strongly imprint the new fearful memory, she said. In evolutionary terms, it means new neurons are likely helping you to remember the lion that nearly killed you.

"We remember emotional events much more strongly than daily experiences, and for a long time we have known that connections between the amygdala and hippocampus help to encode this emotional information," said Kaufer, an assistant professor of integrative biology and a member of UC Berkeley's Wills Neuroscience Institute. "Our research shows that amygdala input actually pushes the hippocampus to make new neurons from a unique population of neural stem cells. This provides completely new cells that get activated in response to emotional input."

The finding has implications for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other problems caused by faulty regulation of emotional memory.

"Many affective disorders involve disordered emotional memories like PTSD, depression and anxiety. We think that newborn neurons may play a role in creating these emotional memories," she said.

The finding comes a year after brain researcher Fred Gage at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., showed that the formation of new memories is associated with increased activation of two-week-old newborn nerve cells in the hippocampus that are derived from adult neural stem cells. Adult stem cells appear to differentiate continually into new nerve cells -- nearly 100 each day -- yet half of those newborn neurons are slated for death within four weeks after their birth. If they are highly activated, however -- such as in learning new complex information -- many more of them will survive and presumably help in establishing new memories in the brain.

Kaufer, who conducts research on the effects of stress on the brain, knew that many types of positive and negative experiences, such as exercise and stress, affect the rate of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Along with graduate students Elizabeth Kirby, the lead author of the study, and Aaron Friedman, she was intrigued by the idea that emotions might affect neurogenesis in the hippocampus, since the brain's clearinghouse for emotions, the amygdala, is connected to the hippocampus via multiple neural circuits. To test this, Kirby focused on the basolateral amygdala, the region of the almond-shaped structure that handles negative emotions, including stress, anxiety and fear.

Using rats, Kirby surgically destroyed the basolateral amygdala and discovered that the production of new nerve cells in the hippocampus decreased. To make sure that the cell damage created when the amygdala was surgically destroyed was not affecting the experiment, the researchers borrowed a gene therapy technique from Robert Sapolsky's lab at Stanford University to genetically introduce potassium channels into the amygdala, which shut down the activity of the nerve cells without causing injury. This also decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

They next tested Gage's theory that new neurons are especially sensitive to input two weeks after they form. Kirby and Kaufer labeled hippocampal cells created over a three-day period in a group of rats, and then conditioned a fear response in these rats two weeks later. They then confronted the rats with the same fearful situation or a neutral yet novel context the next day. When they examined the brains, they found that the newborn neurons had been specifically activated by the fearful situation. However, when they destroyed the basolateral amygdala, new neurons were no longer activated in response to the fearful memory.

"The research suggests that newborn neurons play a role not only in the formation of memory, but also in helping to create the emotional context of memory," Kirby said. It also suggests that the basolateral amygdala drives the ability of new neurons to be part of an emotional memory.

The team now plans to see whether other negative stimuli, such as stress and anxiety, similarly cooperate with amygdala activity to alter neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

The coauthors of the paper with Kaufer, Kirby and Friedman are UC Berkeley graduate student David Covarrubias and undergraduates Carl Ying and Wayne G. Sun; Ki Ann Goosens, an assistant professor of brain and cognitive sciences in the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Stanford's Sapolsky.

Kaufer's work is funded by a 2010 BRAINS (Biobehavioral Research Awards for Innovative New Scientists) award from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health and a young investigator award from The Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, formerly the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD). Kirby is supported by a California Institute for Regenerative Medicine pre-doctoral fellowship and a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Research fellowship from the U. S. Department of Defense.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614131958.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4293 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 07:25am »

Hollywood Reporter

Academy Revises Best Picture Rules; Can Be 5 to 10 Nominees
2:47 AM 6/15/2011
by Gregg Kilday

The number won't be revealed until the best picture nominees are announced Jan. 24.

As if taking a cue from TV's reality shows, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has added what it called "a new twist" to its best picture category. At the upcoming 84th Academy Awards, there may not be 10 movies nominated for best picture. Instead, new voting rules could result in a anywhere from five to 10 nominees in the category.

Although the best picture Oscar race was expanded from five to 10 pictures just two years ago, the Academy board of governors voted Tuesday night to introduce a new procedure, which it said would add "a new element of surprise," since the number of movies that make the cut won't be revealed until the best picture nominees are revealed at the nominations announcement Jan. 24.

In order to ensure a nomination, a picture will have to collect enough first-place votes on the nomination ballots to amount to five percent of the ballots cast.

The move is sure to throw a further complication into the awards process, since studios and awards consultants will now have to decide how hard to push for movies whose chances of snaring a nomination may look more marginal if the field doesn't expand to 10. It could wreck a certain amount of havoc in future years when Oscar historians try to compare races from different years. But it also should end some of the chatter that attached to movies that the handicappers assumed snuck in in ninth or tenth position over the past two years.

The Academy also adopted several other rule changes affecting the animation category and the visual effects "bake-off" and confirmed previous changes in the eligibility period in the documentary categories.

"With the help of PricewaterhouseCoopers, we've been looking not just at what happened over the past two years, but at what would have happened if we had been selecting 10 nominees for the past 10 years," said Academy president Tom Sherak, who noted that it was retiring Academy executive director Bruce Davis who recommended the change first to Sherak and incoming CEO Dawn Hudson and then to the governors.

During the period studied, the average percentage of first-place votes received by the top vote-getting movie was 20.5. After much analysis by Academy officials, it was determined that five percent of first place votes should be the minimum in order to receive a nomination, resulting in a slate of anywhere from five to 10 movies.

"In studying the data, what stood out was that Academy members had regularly shown a strong admiration for more than five movies," said Davis. "A best picture nomination should be an indication of extraordinary merit. If there are only eight pictures that truly earn that honor in a given year, we shouldn't feel an obligation to round out the number."

If this system had been in effect from 2001 to 2008 (before the expansion to a slate of 10), there would have been years that yielded five, six, seven, eight and nine nominees.

The final round of voting for best picture will continue to employ the preferential system, regardless of the number of nominees, to ensure that the winning picture has the endorsement of more than half of the voters.

In the animated feature film category, the need for the board to vote to "activate" the category each year was eliminated, though a minimum number of eligible releases -- eight -- is still required for a competitive category.

Additionally, the short films and feature animation branch recommended, and the board approved, refinements to the number of possible nominees in the animated feature category.

In any year in which eight to 12 animated features are released, either two or three of them may be nominated. When 13 to 15 films are released, a maximum of four may be nominated, and when 16 or more animated features are released, a maximum of five may be nominated.

In the visual effects category, the "bakeoff" at which the nominees are determined will expand from seven to 10 contenders. The increase in the number of participants is related to a change made last year in which the number of films nominated in the visual effects category was increased from three to five.

The board previously approved changes to the documentary feature and documentary short category rules that now put those categories' eligibility periods in line with the calendar year and thus with most other awards categories. The change means that for the 84th awards cycle only, the eligibility period is more than 12 months; it is from Sept. 1, 2010, to Dec. 31.

The rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees. The Awards Rules Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Academy's board of governors for approval.

The 84th Academy Awards will take place Feb. 26 at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland and will be broadcast live by ABC.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/academy-revises-best-picture-rules-201404

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4234
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4294 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 10:01am »

Oil spills get all the press, but in the mean time, we continue to kill the Gulf, mile by mile, year by year........


Forecast Predicts Biggest Gulf Dead Zone Ever

Published June 15, 2011
AP

NEW ORLEANS – Scientists predict this year's "dead zone" of low-oxygen water in the northern Gulf of Mexico will be the largest in history -- about the size of Lake Erie -- because of more runoff from the flooded Mississippi River valley.

Each year when the nutrient-rich freshwater from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers pours into the Gulf, it spawns massive algae blooms. In turn, the algae consume the oxygen in the Gulf, creating the low oxygen conditions. Fish, shrimp and many other species must escape the dead zone or face dying.

Federal and university scientists predict this year's zone will be between 8,500 square miles (22,015 sq. kilometers) and about 9,400 square miles (24,346 sq. kilometers). The actual size of the dead zone will be measured over the summer.

The largest recorded dead zone was found in 2002 when 8,400 square miles (21,756 sq. kilometers) of the Gulf was found to lacking sufficient oxygen for most marine life.
The forecasts on the size of the hypoxic zone are usually close to the mark, although hurricanes have chopped them up in the past.

Eugene Turner, an oceanographer at Louisiana State University, said the dead zone has continued to get larger since it was first noticed and measured in the 1970s. He said the dead zone is getting worse with time.

The biggest contributor is the amount of fertilizer -- and the nitrates and phosphates in them -- that wind up in the Mississippi River each spring and get flushed out to the Gulf.

"The nitrogen is fertilizing the waters offshore," Turner said. He said little progress has been made in recent years to reduce the nutrient load into the Gulf.

The federal government and states in the Mississippi valley are attempting to reduce runoff from farms, lawns and cities, but those efforts have not curbed the problem.


This year, for instance, the U.S. Geological Survey said the nitrogen load that reached the Gulf was 35 percent higher than the average amount flushed into the Gulf each May over the past 32 years. The Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers dumped nearly twice as much water than normal in May, officials said.

"As usual, the size of the low oxygen offshore is driven by both the freshwater and nitrogen levels in the Mississippi, so this year we have had floods and we have had more nitrate coming into the system," said Nancy Rabalais, the executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium. Rabalais is a lead researcher into the dead zone.

She expected the dead zone to extend more to the west toward Texas and farther offshore than in past years.

Scientists said the large dead zone will complicate the Gulf's recovery from last year's massive oil spill. After the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on April 20, 2010, an out-of-control well owned by BP PLC. spewed about 206 million gallons of oil -- 19 times more than the Exxon Valdez spilled.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/06/15/forecast-predicts-biggest-gulf-dead-zone-ever/
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4295 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 7:50pm »

on Jun 15th, 2011, 10:01am, Swamprat wrote:
Oil spills get all the press, but in the mean time, we continue to kill the Gulf, mile by mile, year by year........


Forecast Predicts Biggest Gulf Dead Zone Ever

Published June 15, 2011
AP

NEW ORLEANS – Scientists predict this year's "dead zone" of low-oxygen water in the northern Gulf of Mexico will be the largest in history -- about the size of Lake Erie -- because of more runoff from the flooded Mississippi River valley.

Each year when the nutrient-rich freshwater from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers pours into the Gulf, it spawns massive algae blooms. In turn, the algae consume the oxygen in the Gulf, creating the low oxygen conditions. Fish, shrimp and many other species must escape the dead zone or face dying.

Federal and university scientists predict this year's zone will be between 8,500 square miles (22,015 sq. kilometers) and about 9,400 square miles (24,346 sq. kilometers). The actual size of the dead zone will be measured over the summer.

The largest recorded dead zone was found in 2002 when 8,400 square miles (21,756 sq. kilometers) of the Gulf was found to lacking sufficient oxygen for most marine life.
The forecasts on the size of the hypoxic zone are usually close to the mark, although hurricanes have chopped them up in the past.

Eugene Turner, an oceanographer at Louisiana State University, said the dead zone has continued to get larger since it was first noticed and measured in the 1970s. He said the dead zone is getting worse with time.

The biggest contributor is the amount of fertilizer -- and the nitrates and phosphates in them -- that wind up in the Mississippi River each spring and get flushed out to the Gulf.

"The nitrogen is fertilizing the waters offshore," Turner said. He said little progress has been made in recent years to reduce the nutrient load into the Gulf.

The federal government and states in the Mississippi valley are attempting to reduce runoff from farms, lawns and cities, but those efforts have not curbed the problem.


This year, for instance, the U.S. Geological Survey said the nitrogen load that reached the Gulf was 35 percent higher than the average amount flushed into the Gulf each May over the past 32 years. The Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers dumped nearly twice as much water than normal in May, officials said.

"As usual, the size of the low oxygen offshore is driven by both the freshwater and nitrogen levels in the Mississippi, so this year we have had floods and we have had more nitrate coming into the system," said Nancy Rabalais, the executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium. Rabalais is a lead researcher into the dead zone.

She expected the dead zone to extend more to the west toward Texas and farther offshore than in past years.

Scientists said the large dead zone will complicate the Gulf's recovery from last year's massive oil spill. After the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on April 20, 2010, an out-of-control well owned by BP PLC. spewed about 206 million gallons of oil -- 19 times more than the Exxon Valdez spilled.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/06/15/forecast-predicts-biggest-gulf-dead-zone-ever/


Heartbreaking.

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4296 on: Jun 15th, 2011, 7:54pm »

Guardian

Rescind President Obama's 'Transparency Award' now

Open letter
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 14 June 2011 18.00 BST

On 28 March 2011, President Obama was given a "transparency award" from five "open government" organisations: OMB Watch, the National Security Archive, the Project on Government Oversight, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and OpenTheGovernment.org. Ironically – and quite likely in response to growing public criticism regarding the Obama administration's lack of transparency – heads of the five organisations gave their award to Obama in a closed, undisclosed meeting at the White House. If the ceremony had been open to the press, it is likely that reporters would have questioned the organisations' proffered justification for the award, in contrast to the current reality:

• President Obama has not decreased, but has dramatically increased governmental secrecy. According to a new report to the president by the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) – the federal agency that provides oversight of the government's security classification system – the cost of classification for 2010 has reached over $10.17bn. That's a 15% jump from the previous year, and the first time ever that secrecy costs have surpassed $10bn. Last month, ISOO reported that the number of original classification decisions generated by the Obama administration in 2010 was 224,734 – a 22.6% jump from the previous year (see The Price of Secrecy, Obama Edition).

• There were 544,360 requests for information last year under the Freedom of Information Act to the 35 biggest federal agencies – 41,000 requests more than the year before. Yet the bureaucracy responded to 12,400 fewer requests than the prior year, according to an analysis by the Associated Press.

• Obama has invoked baseless and unconstitutional executive secrecy to quash legal inquiries into secret illegalities more often than any predecessor. The list of this president's invocations of the "state secrets privilege" has already resulted in shutting down lawsuits involving the National Security Agency's illegal wiretapping – Jewel v NSA and Shubert v Obama; extraordinary rendition and assassination – Anwar al-Awlaki; and illegal torture – Binyam Mohamed.

• Ignoring his campaign promise to protect government whistleblowers, Obama's presidency has amassed the worst record in US history for persecuting, prosecuting and jailing government whistleblowers and truth-tellers. President Obama's behaviour has been in stark contrast to his campaign promises, which included live-streaming meetings online and rewarding whistleblowers. Obama's department of justice is twisting the 1917 Espionage Act to press criminal charges in five alleged instances of national security leaks – more such prosecutions than have occurred in all previous administrations combined.

• The Obama justice department's prosecution of former NSA official Thomas Drake, who, up till 9 June, faced 35 years in prison for having blown the whistle on the NSA's costly and unlawful warrantless monitoring of American citizens, typifies the abusive practices made possible through expansive secrecy agreements and threats of prosecution.

• President Obama has set a powerful and chilling example for potential whistleblowers through the abuse and torture of Bradley Manning, whose guilt he has also publicly stated prior to any trial by his, Obama's, military subordinates.

• Obama is the only president who has reenacted Fahrenheit 451 by actually having his agency collect and burn a book due to a never-justified classification excuse: Lt Col Tony Shaffer's Operation Dark Heart.

• Under President Obama, the FBI has launched a series of raids and issued grand jury subpoenas targeting nearly two dozen antiwar activists. Over 2,600 arrests of protesters in the US have been made while Obama has been president, further encroaching on the exercise of first amendment rights.

• President Obama has initiated a secret assassination programme, has publicly announced that he has given himself the power to include Americans on the list of people to be assassinated, and has attempted to assassinate at least one, Anwar al-Awlaki.

• President Obama has maintained the power to secretly kidnap, imprison, rendition, or torture, and he has formalised the power to lawlessly imprison in an executive order. This also means the power to secretly imprison. There are some 1,700 prisoners outside the rule of law in Bagram alone.

• The Obama administration is also busy going after reporters to discover their sources and convening grand juries in order to target journalists and news publishers.

• President Obama promised to reveal White House visitors' logs. He didn't. In response to outrage over his refusal to reveal the names of health insurance CEOs he had met with and cut deals with on the health insurance reform bill, he announced that he would release the names going forward, but not those in the past. And going forward, he would withhold names he chose to withhold. White House staff then began regularly meeting lobbyists just off White House grounds in order to avoid the visitors' logs.

• President Obama has sent representatives to aggressively pressure Spain, England and Germany to shut down investigations that could have exposed the crimes of the Bush era, just as he has instructed the US justice department to avoid such matters. This includes his refusal to allow prosecutions of the CIA for torture, following a public letter from eight previous heads of the CIA informing him that he had better not enforce those laws.

The "transparency award" in question was described as "aspirational", similar to the rationale for awarding Obama the Nobel Peace Prize early in his presidency when he had done nothing yet to further the cause of peace. Participants admitted they used the private meeting in March to try and lobby Obama to do more to earn their award. If the president doesn't change course as a result of the lobbying and "award", there are some who would shrug and say, "no harm, no foul".

The giving of an unmerited award, however, whether for transparency or peace, is not entirely benign. No one knows better how destructive secrecy is for maintaining systems of justice, ethics and democracy than these self-proclaimed "open government" watchdogs. Especially when such a false accolade emanates, as in this case, from those who are supposed to serve as counters to secrecy and to retaliation against government whistleblowers, such appearance of approval will tend to cover up and mask the reality of the executive's increasingly undemocratic and illegal use of secrecy.

Therefore, the undersigned call on these organisations: OMB Watch, the National Security Archive, the Project on Government Oversight, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, and OpenTheGovernment.org, to publicly take back their "transparency award", as difficult as that may be, from Barack Obama. The watchdog organisations should, of course, continue to promote aspirations for open, democratic government, reduced secrecy and adherence to the rule of law, in more genuine, legitimate ways than giving unmerited awards to the executive. Such false awards only stand to backfire and hurt the cause of open government.

Drafted by FBI whistleblowers Sibel Edmonds and Coleen Rowley

Whistleblowers:

Raymond L McGovern, former analyst, CIA
Colonel Ann Wright, US Army Reserve (ret) and former US diplomat
Daniel Ellsberg, former official, department of defence and department of state
Lt Colonel Karen Kwiatkowski, US Air Force (ret), veteran policy analyst, department of defence
Lt Colonel Tony Shaffer, senior intelligence officer (Operations), DIA
Jesselyn Radack, former attorney, department of justice
John M Cole, former veteran intelligence operations specialist, FBI
David "Mark" Conrad, agent in charge (ret), internal affairs, US Customs
P Jeffrey Black, air marshal (ret), Federal Air Marshal Service, department of homeland security
Bogdan Dzakovic, former red team leader, FAA
Russ Tice, former senior intelligence analyst, NSA
Sandalio Gonzalez, special agent in charge (ret), DEA
John Vincent, veteran special agent, counterterrorism, FBI
Bill Bergman, financial market analyst, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Steve Jenkins, intelligence analyst, NGIC, US Army
Linda Lewis, policy analyst (ret), US department of agriculture
David MacMichael, PhD, former senior estimates officer, CIA
William H Russell, computer specialist, R&E Division, NSA
William Savich, special agent, bureau of diplomatic security, department of state
Julia Davis, customs and border protection officer, department of homeland security
Tom Maertens, counterterrorism official (ret), department of state
Joseph Carson, PE, nuclear safety engineer, department of energy
Gabe Bruno, manager (ret), flight standards services, FAA
Dr Jeffrey Fudin, founder, VA Whistleblowers Coalition

Organisations:

National Security Whistleblowers Coalition
National Whistleblowers Centre
Green party of the US
Citizens for Legitimate Government
Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity
Campaign for Peace and Democracy
September 11th Advocates
Code Pink
Consumers for Peace
Fellowship of Reconciliation
Global Network Against Weapons & Nuclear Power in Space
WarIsACrime.org
OSC Watch
Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence
Socialist party of Central Virginia
Environmentalists Against War
High Road for Human Rights
Broken Covenant Campaign
Bring Our Troops Home Coalition
Progressive Democrats of the Santa Monica Mountains
United for Peace and Justice
Americans Who Tell the Truth
Veterans for Peace Chapter 27
Committee to Stop FBI Repression

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/jun/14/rescind-barack-obama-obama-transparency-award

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4297 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:45am »

New York Times

June 16, 2011
Bin Laden’s No. 2, Zawahri, Takes Control of Al Qaeda
By DAVID JOLLY

Ayman al-Zawahri, Al Qaeda’s No. 2, is assuming the leadership of the organization, less than two months after Osama bin Laden was killed by American special forces, the group said in a statement posted online Thursday.

Mr. Zawahri, 59, an Egyptian who long served as second in command to Bin Laden, had been expected to inherit leadership of the terrorist organization after Bin Laden’s death in Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 2.

“The general command of Al Qaeda announces, after consultations, the appointment of Sheikh Ayman al-Zawahri as head of the group,” the statement said, according to a translation by Al Jazeera television. “We seek with the aid of God to call for the religion of truth and incite our nation to fight,” the statement said.

The announcement comes a week after Mr. Zawahri appeared in a video eulogy for Bin Laden, his first public statement following the death of the Al Qaeda leader, who Mr. Zawahri said had “terrified America in his life” and “will continue to terrify it after his death.” In the video, Mr. Zawahri vowed to continue fighting against the United States and others to “expel the invaders from the land of Islam.”

With Al Qaeda’s top leadership now formally in place, counterterrorism officials will be watching for new attacks designed by Mr. Zawahri and his followers in an effort to show the continuing strength of the terrorist network.

Mr. Zawahri, who trained as a doctor, has been described as the operational leader of the group, but he is seen as lacking Bin Laden’s charisma and natural leadership ability, leading to questions over whether he will be able to attract and inspire a new generation of jihadist recruits.

In his video statement last week, Mr. Zawahri sought to connect Al Qaeda’s mission to the wave of uprisings that have swept autocratic rulers from power during the so-called Arab Spring. He praised the revolts in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria, and called on Pakistanis to rise up against their leaders.

Speaking of Yemen, Mr. Zawahri said in the video that he hoped that the uprising there would eventually expel “the Americans and their henchmen.” Even before that country’s current political crisis, militants connected to Al Qaeda had gained a foothold in Yemen, an American ally in fighting terrorism.

Mr. Zawahri’s whereabouts are unknown, but there have been reports that he was hiding near the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The F.B.I. has offered a $25 million reward for information leading directly to his apprehension or conviction. He was indicted for his alleged role in the Aug. 7, 1998, bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi.

Mr. Zawahri was a leader of Egyptian Islamic Jihad, an organization that sought to overthrow the Egyptian government, and merged it with Al Qaeda around 1998.

J. David Goodman contributed reporting.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/17/world/asia/17qaeda.html?hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4298 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:48am »

LA Times

World leaders look for way out of Libya

Russia and Turkey join the discussion as concerns about the NATO campaign's sustainability and a pending ruling by the International Criminal Court add to the urgency.

By Patrick J. McDonnell and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
8:30 PM PDT, June 15, 2011
Reporting from Tripoli, Libya, and Washington

With questions growing about NATO's air war and international arrest warrants threatening to close off a diplomatic solution, new players are joining the search for a way out of the Libya conflict. But the efforts have stumbled so far on Moammar Kadafi's insistence that he remain in the country.

Russia and Turkey have recently added their voices to Western demands that Kadafi leave. Libyan officials long have declared that a nonstarter, and diplomats say it is unlikely they can change Kadafi's mind.

However, they hope to convince enough of the leader's children and closest associates that leaving Libya becomes the only realistic option.

Adding urgency to the diplomatic push are concerns about how long NATO can sustain its military campaign and a pending ruling by the International Criminal Court on prosecutors' request for arrest warrants for Kadafi, his son and brother-in-law.

Issuance of arrest warrants could forestall a solution in which Kadafi goes into exile. Once warrants are issued, other countries that have agreed to ICC jurisdiction would be required to arrest him.

"To insist that he both leave the country and face trial in the International Criminal Court is virtually to ensure that he will stay in Libya to the bitter end and go down fighting," the International Crisis Group, a nonprofit organization that seeks to resolve global conflicts, said in a recent report on Libya.

Britain's top naval commander, Adm. Mark Stanhope, said Monday that it could be difficult to continue the campaign in Libya past September. "Beyond that, we might have to request the government to make some challenging decisions about priorities," he said.

The overall head of the British military, Gen. David Richards, contradicted him. But the admiral's remarks reinforced criticism last week by outgoing Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates of NATO allies' faltering commitment to the Libya campaign.

Fewer than half of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 28 member nations are engaged in the conflict, Gates said, and after only 11 weeks some are beginning to run short of munitions.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday cited "numerous and continuous discussions" but acknowledged that there was not yet a clear path to forcing Kadafi to give up power.

Leading the latest effort to persuade Kadafi to go is longtime ally Russia.

Russia's Africa envoy, Mikhail Margelov, has suggested that the ICC case against Kadafi, his son Seif Islam and the regime intelligence chief could be deferred if the Libyan leader agreed to leave soon.

Margelov, who visited the rebel stronghold Benghazi last week, told Russian media that he planned to visit Tripoli on Thursday and stress to Libya's leader that time was running out.

"The main international guarantee for Mr. Kadafi is his own common sense and his understanding of the calendar," Margelov said. When ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo filed his request in mid-May, he said it would take at least three weeks for judges to make a decision. Margelov suggested that there were only a couple of weeks left.

"The clock is ticking, and there is time to do something in two weeks," he said Saturday in a television interview.

Turkey, a growing regional power, also has had cordial relations with Kadafi. But last week, it also publicly offered to facilitate his departure.

"We said we would help you leave for wherever you would like," Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said his government informed the Libyan leader. "Kadafi has no way out but to leave Libya."

In Tripoli, the government publicly continues to reject any peace blueprint that sets Kadafi's exit as a precondition.

"No one can come here with a plan that includes the departure of the leader," Musa Ibrahim, chief government spokesman, said Sunday. "This tells us that people are not interested in peace and democracy in Libya. They are interested in implementing a foreign agenda in Libya."

Nonetheless, diplomats and others say avoiding an international tribunal could be an incentive for Kadafi and his extended family to leave.

They cite the cumulative pressure of being in the cross hairs of NATO's aircraft. Although the government denies it, reports circulate that Kadafi's wife and daughter have left the country. Kadafi's youngest son and three grandchildren were reportedly killed in a NATO airstrike in April. Several people who have seen Kadafi in recent weeks said he remains visibly distressed by their deaths.

One Western diplomat said some of Kadafi's aides have started exploring what options might be open to the leader if he is willing to give up power. Aides have asked whether Kadafi could stay in Libya, perhaps with his tribe. Although the main rebel group has steadfastly rejected such suggestions, discussions continue, the diplomat said.

"Kadafi may be beginning to understand that he's in a complicated spot," the diplomat said.

A second Western diplomat said Kadafi is losing ground with a steady stream of defections. "We think we're getting closer to what we're looking for," the diplomat said. "But we're not there yet."


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-libya-diplomacy-20110616,0,3225195.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4299 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:52am »

Reuters

CIA website goes down, hackers claim responsibility

By Jim Finkle
BOSTON | Thu Jun 16, 2011 5:35am EDT

BOSTON (Reuters) - The public website of the Central Intelligence Agency went down on Wednesday evening as the hacker group Lulz Security said it had launched an attack.

Lulz Security has claimed responsibility for recent attacks on the Senate, Sony Corp, News Corp and the U.S. Public Broadcasting System television network.

The CIA site initially could not be accessed from New York to San Francisco, and Bangalore to London. Later in the evening service was sporadic.

"We are looking into these reports," a CIA spokeswoman said.

Lulz Security has defaced websites, posted personal information about customers and site administrators, and disclosed the network configurations of some sites.

Security analysts have downplayed the significance of these attacks, saying the hackers are just looking to show off and get as much attention as possible.

In the case of the CIA attack, hackers would not be able to access sensitive data by breaking into the agency's public website, said Jeffrey Carr, author of the book Inside Cyber Warfare: Mapping the Cyber Underworld.

"All they're doing is saying 'Look how good we are,'" Carr said. "These guys are literally in it for embarrassment, to say 'your security is crap.'"

Lulz only made claims that it attacked www.cia.gov, and there was no evidence on Wednesday evening that sensitive data in the agency's internal computer network had been compromised.

There also were no apparent links to more serious network security breaches recently at the International Monetary Fund and Lockheed Martin Corp. Lulz Security has not been linked to those incidents.

Lulz, whose members are strewn across the globe, announced the attack shortly before 6 p.m. East Coast time.

"Tango down," the group Tweeted, pointing to www.cia.gov.

Although the group, also known as Lulz Boat, fashions itself more as pranksters and activists than people with sinister intent, its members have been accused of breaking the law and are wanted by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies.

Lulz broke into a public website of the Senate over the weekend and released data stolen from the legislative body's computer servers.

In May, the group posted a fake story on the PBS website saying that rapper Tupac Shakur was still alive and living in New Zealand. Shakur was murdered in 1996.

(Reporting by Jim Finkle, Phil Stewart and Marius Bosch; Editing by David Lawder)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/06/16/us-cia-hackers-idUSTRE75E6JC20110616

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4300 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:54am »

Wired Danger Room

Power Struggle Threatens Outsourced Somalia War
By David Axe
June 16, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: Terrorists, Guerillas, Pirates

It began with a wrong turn on Mogadishu’s maze-like city streets. Now a top al-Qaida terrorist is dead, the victim of an internationally-backed government campaign that could help bring order to one of the world’s worst failed states, and provide a model for U.S. intervention in the post-Afghanistan era.

The June 7 death of Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, one of the masterminds of the bloody 1998 attacks on U.S. embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, is the latest sign that the 20-year old civil war in Somalia is entering a new phase.

A moderate Islamic government with strong U.S. and U.N. backing, plus a reinforced African Union army and secretive U.S. special operations forces, are working together to steadily chip away at the strongholds of al-Shabab, an al-Qaida affiliate and one of the most fearsome insurgent groups in the world.

The ongoing Somalia campaign represents a smaller, cheaper alternative to large-scale American interventions like that in Afghanistan. It has taken the U.S. time, patience, cash, restraint and the wisdom to bet on the right guy. The result, in time, could be a more peaceful and prosperous Somalia — one that does not harbor so many insurgents, terrorists and pirates, and that does not invite destabilizing foreign invasions.

The biggest question, as usual in this fractious state, is whether Somalia’s federal government can hold together long enough for military efforts to gain traction. Even as forces close in on al-Shabab, tension between the influential Somali president and his popular prime minister threatens to undo the recent progress.

And that’s the big risk as Washington mulls “off-shoring” its wars against insurgents and terrorists. Full-scale interventions like Afghanistan are probably a thing of the past. Somalia-style, “hands-off” campaigns are the future. But it’s a future rife with uncertainty, as the delicate situation in Mogadishu illustrates.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4301 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:56am »

Science Daily

Scientists Override Errant Form of Genetic Signaling for First Time: Changing Genetic 'Red Light' to Green Holds Promise for Treating Disease

ScienceDaily (June 16, 2011)

In a new study published June 15 in the journal Nature, scientists discovered an entirely new way to change the genetic code. The findings, though early, are significant because they may ultimately help researchers alter the course of devastating genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and many forms of cancer.

The genetic code is the set of instructions in a gene that tell a cell how to make a specific protein. Central to the body's protein production process is messenger RNA, or mRNA, which takes these instructions from DNA and directs the steps necessary to build a protein. For the first time, researchers artificially modified messenger RNA, and in doing so changed the original instructions for creating the protein. The end result: A different protein than originally called for.

"The ability to manipulate the production of a protein from a particular gene is the new miracle of modern medicine," said Robert Bambara, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Rochester Medical Center. "This is a really powerful concept that can be used to try to suppress the tendency of individuals to get certain debilitating, and sometimes fatal genetic diseases that will forever change their lives."

Protein production is not a perfect process -- far from it. Frequent mutations or mistakes in DNA and messenger RNA can lead to flawed proteins that have the potential to cause serious harm. In the study, researchers focused on a common type of mutation that occurs when an mRNA molecule contains a pre-mature "stop" signal, known as a pre-mature stop codon. A premature stop codon orders a cell to stop reading the genetic instructions partway through the process, resulting in the creation of an incomplete, shortened protein.

Researchers were able to alter mRNA in a way that turned a stop signal into a "go" signal. As a result, the cell could read the genetic instructions all the way through and create a normal, full-length protein. The team produced these results both in vitro and in live yeast cells.

"This is a very exciting finding," said Yi-Tao Yu, Ph.D., lead study author and associate professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the Medical Center. "No one ever imagined that you could alter a stop codon the way we have and allow translation to continue uninterrupted like it was never there in the first place."

The findings are important because current estimates suggest that approximately one third of genetic diseases are caused by the presence of pre-mature stop codons that result in shortened proteins. The results could aid the development of treatment strategies designed to help the body override stop codons and produce adequate amounts of full-length proteins, whose absence causes diseases like cystic fibrosis and contributes to different types of cancer.

Yu, along with first author John Karijolich, Ph.D., used another type of RNA -- guide RNA -- to modify messenger RNA. Guide RNAs are short RNAs that bind to specific sequences in RNA and allow just one particular site to be modified. "Guide RNAs give us tremendous power to zero in on one spot in the genome and make very targeted changes," noted Bambara.

The team developed an artificial guide RNA and programmed it to target and change a specific stop codon in an mRNA.

"The fact that this strategy worked -- that the guide RNA we created found its way to its target, the stop codon, and directed the desired structure change -- is pretty remarkable. Guide RNAs weren't thought to have access to messenger RNA, so no one believed they could target messenger RNA for modification," said Karijolich, who conducted the research as a graduate student at Rochester, but is now a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biochemistry at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. "Our results bring up the question of whether a similar process may be happening naturally."

"Previous research has presented other ways to modify the genetic code, but what is really unique about our method is that it is at the RNA level and it is site specific. We can express the artificial guide RNA in a cell and direct it to make a modification at a single site and only that site," said Yu.

Altering messenger RNA in this way may be another mechanism human cells use to create many different types of proteins. Given our complexity, humans have surprisingly few genes. While it is well established that the majority of human genes code for more than one protein, mRNA modification may be an unrealized way that humans are able to do this.

Yu plans to pursue this research further, studying whether and how targeted mRNA modification is happening naturally.

The study was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615132019.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4302 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:59am »

.


Please be an angel


User Image


http://www.soldiersangels.org/



User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4303 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 07:59am »

Thanks to Angelia Joiner for that link:

Two churches located accross the street from each other have an open debate as it seems. Hilarious:
http://tithenai.tumblr.com/post/3215186237/two-churches-located-across-the-street-from-each-other
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12167
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4304 on: Jun 16th, 2011, 08:00am »

on Jun 16th, 2011, 07:59am, philliman wrote:
Thanks to Angelia Joiner for that link:

Two churches located accross the street from each other have an open debate as it seems. Hilarious:
http://tithenai.tumblr.com/post/3215186237/two-churches-located-across-the-street-from-each-other


Good morning Phil!
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 285 286 287 288 289  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls