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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 3272 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #435 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 07:58am »

Good morning/evening Pen,
I saw one police officer on a television program that had a run in with one of these witches and he was scared silly. As you said, I don't think he would have reported it if he hadn't had a spectacular experience. And not in a good way!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #436 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:02am »

Here is the officer I saw on "UFO Hunters" I believe.



Crystal



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« Reply #437 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:07am »

Washington Post

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's convoy attacked according to Iranian media

By Kay Armin Serjoie and Thomas Erdbrink
Wednesday, August 4, 2010; 8:55 AM

TEHRAN -- An explosive was thrown at the motorcade convoy of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in a central Iranian city Wednesday, but the controversial leader was not injured.

Ahmadinejad's office quickly denied any attack had taken place, saying a "firecracker" had gone off. Witnesses described the incident as minor. One person was arrested, according to accounts posted on Iranian Web sites.

After the explosion, Ahmadinejad gave a previously scheduled speech, which was broadcast live on state television. He appeared completely unhurt. Media reports said his car was about 100 yards from the site where the explosion occurred.

"On the path between the airport and stadium, while the convoy was crowded with people, there was suddenly a relatively loud sound, and some smoke," said a local reporter who was on the scene but asked to remain anonymous. "It did not even warrant Ahmadinejad's security team to act."

Iranian Web sites initially reported that the explosive device was thrown by a man who was standing in the crowd of people that lined the streets of the city of Hamedan on the route to the stadium where Ahmadinejad was scheduled to speak.

Photos released by the semi-official Fars News agency showed the president standing up and extending his head and body through the sun roof of his armored sport utility vehicle. Onlookers waved flags, and families lifted up their children in hopes that Ahmadinejad would kiss them.

Officials close to Ahmadinejad said the incident was a misunderstanding. "There was an accident, a loud bang, but no attack whatsoever," an aide to the president said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Khabar Online and other Web sites later removed the news of the incident from their sites. The official, state-run media has not carried any images of disturbances.

"On the sidelines of the welcome of Dr. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad by the people of Hamedan, in one of the routes the sound of a firecracker was heard. This event did not inflict any injuries," the semi official ISNA News Agency reported from Hamedan.

Ahmadinejad travels regularly among Iran's 30 provinces. While these events normally attract thousands of visitors who are given relatively easy access to the President, security incidents are highly uncommon.

The incident comes two days after Ahmadinejad accused Israel in a speech of hiring people to kill him.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/04/AR2010080401020.html?hpid=topnews

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« Reply #438 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:15am »

New York Times

August 3, 2010, 4:28 pm

As Iraq Drawdown Nears, a Soldier Shares Hopes and Fears
By HENRY BREWSTER

Courtesy of Henry Brewster American and Iraqi soldiers.
President Obama marked the coming end of the combat mission in Iraq “as promised and on schedule” in a speech to veterans in Atlanta on Monday. As Mr. Obama outlined the drawdown of United States forces in Iraq and the changing nature of the engagement in Iraq from military to diplomatic, he noted that this new chapter in the conflict will get a new name. Operation Iraqi Freedom will become Operation New Dawn. The change is meant to be symbolic of the new, more tacit role the United States will play in Iraq’s evolving internal affairs.

The operational name change has also created what I suppose was an intended mind shift in me – a sense of impending finality. I now view the questions I often receive about Iraq’s successes and failures in a new light. As the Pentagon prepares to wind down the conflict that has defined my life for the past several years, I want to bring more clarity to my view of Iraq’s state for myself and for how I answer questions about the American legacy in Iraq.

For this blog, I offer a disclaimer: I am not an expert. What I offer is an overview of what I deem the milestones of American-Iraqi joint progress based on my personal experiences in the country and my reading of books and articles on the subject. It is neither exhaustive nor exclusive; I invite others who have their own expertise and experience with Iraq to add their thoughts below.

In my opinion, American progress in Iraq can be narrowed to two major accomplishments: the recreation of an Iraqi Army and national police force and the nearly complete defeat of a foreign-led insurgency within Iraq.

Many will recall the catchphrase from the early days of President George W. Bush’s second term: “As the Iraqis stand up, we will stand down.” In a sense, helping the Iraqis stand on their own became the mission of United States nd coalition forces from 2005 onward, and the most prominent manifestation of this effort came with the focus on building Iraq’s own security forces. Normally, training foreign militaries and militias falls under the purview of United States Army Special Forces, but this elite community of soldiers was simply not large enough to supply adequate military trainers for so large an operation. And so the mission became military-wide.

Before the 2003 invasion, Iraq’s military ranked in the top 10 most powerful conventional forces worldwide, but for a number of reasons, rebuilding it has proven slow and difficult. Most Iraq veterans – myself included — will tell you that the units of today’s Iraqi Army are far from perfect, but I am mostly optimistic about their capabilities. I witnessed and took part in operations that were for the most part planned and led by Iraqis. And when I worked in intelligence, I often had to admit that the Iraqis were just as good, if not better, at assessing the battle space despite all our sophisticated collection platforms. They knew the people, spoke the language, and understood the nuances.

The Iraqi Army, however, still has two major weaknesses. The first is its lack of self-sustaining logistical support. On more than one occasion, my platoon and I had to offer our counterparts fuel or water to get them to acquiesce to conducting a joint patrol. The supply chains improved during my time there, but often they were slow or corrupted by various echelons that siphoned off some of the supply. The second weakness is a lack of quality subordinate leadership. The Iraqi Army is commander-centric, which means that units suffer greatly in motivation and initiative when the commander is absent or on leave. The importance of subordinate leadership can be seen in the United States military, where junior noncommissioned and commissioned officers have been cultivated in a culture that rewards enterprise and risk-taking. I found that it was like pulling teeth to get an Iraqi captain or lieutenant to make his own decision during an operation when radio communication with his commander had failed.

Given all this, one of the so-called paradoxes of counterinsurgency outlined in the Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual states, “The host nation security force doing something tolerably is often better than us doing it well.” I saw my share of ineptitude and laziness, but I also witnessed real cunning and military prowess on more than one occasion.

This strength and potential gives me the greatest hope for Iraq’s future, but it also gives me pause. Until recently, Iraq’s security forces were almost the sole receivers of American support within the government of Iraq. As a result, the military’s operational capability is significantly more advanced relative to many of the other Iraqi government agencies. I fear that the United States’ efforts may have set the stage for a military coup a few years down the road, and I do not have high hopes for a benevolent ruling regime in such a case.

Success in building Iraq’s security forces has in large part helped create what I deem the second joint achievement. There is no longer a coherent insurgency in Iraq. Vice President Dick Cheney made the infamous connection between Iraq and Al Qaeda in the 2003 run-up to the invasion. We now know that even though the connection did not exist at that time, it became all too real later.

Al Qaeda saw an opportunity to bleed another superpower dry on the world stage, and it exported its brand of insurgency to Iraq complete with many of its hardened Afghan foreign fighters. The foreign fighters provided valuable leadership capable of cultivating violent dissidents from the disenfranchised Sunni population. The organization was responsible for some of the most horrific attacks in the dark days of 2006 and 2007, including the capture and killing of several American service members on what would eventually become the southern edge of my battalion’s battle space. In what for many was a painfully slow process, the United States military figured out and implemented an effective counterinsurgency campaign. We worked to protect civilian populations, built the internal security forces and hunted terrorist cells — from the trigger pullers and bomb makers to the financiers and leaders — thus devastating the insurgent efforts.

Al Qaeda and other Sunni extremist factions are still able to execute large-scale bombings in Baghdad from time to time, but the attacks often prove counterproductive to the insurgents’ cause. Al Qaeda in Iraq now lacks the wherewithal to exploit the attacks with a coordinated, follow-up propaganda campaign, and the carnage now tends to send the country into mourning rather than a sectarian-fueled bloodbath like the one following the 2006 bombing of the Askariya Shrine in Samarra. But most important, many Iraqis damn the insurgents for the unnecessary loss of innocent Muslim lives, and this causes their leaders to strengthen their resolve to rid the country of their presence.

The establishment of Iraq’s internal security forces and the defeat of Al Qaeda and its offshoots are certainly not the sum total of the last seven years of work. There has been a coordinated effort on the part of several American agencies — the Departments of State, Justice, Agriculture and Treasury — to build the many facets of effective governance. However, the work of all these civilian agencies could not have even begun without the establishment of security.

Despite my tentatively optimistic outlook, there are still some significant hurdles with which the government and people of Iraq must contend. The Iraq of the future will not be a perfect bastion of democracy, but with continued work, it will be a country capable of reaching legislative consensus, defending its borders, protecting its populace from myriad internal threats, and eventually allocating its oil revenue toward desperately needed infrastructure investment.

The question that follows the one about progress thus far is one about the future role of the United States in Iraq. I will address this aspect in my next posting.

Henry Brewster is a captain in the United States Army stationed at Fort Riley, Kan. Captain Brewster, a native of Youngstown, Ohio, recently returned from a one-year tour in Iraq. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author, and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense or the United States government. If you have recently served in Iraq or Afghanistan or are an active-duty service member and would like to submit a post, please e-mail us at AtWar@nytimes.com.

http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/as-iraq-drawdown-nears-a-soldier-shares-hopes-and-fears/?ref=world

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #439 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:22am »

Telegraph

Eurotunnel passengers go to France and back again without being able to get off train
Around 20 Eurotunnel passengers travelled to France and back again without being able to get off their shuttle train.

Published: 12:14PM BST 04 Aug 2010

The "forgotten" passengers, going through the Channel Tunnel from Folkestone to Calais, were in seven vehicles which were loaded behind a wagon that had been left empty after an earlier fuel spill.

Eurotunnel staff at Calais unloaded the front vehicles on the train but did not realise there were seven cars behind the empty wagon.

The unfortunate passengers ended up travelling back to Folkestone where red-faced Eurotunnel management staff met them, apologised and got them to Calais on the next available train.

The passengers, who had originally left Folkestone at 8.50am last Saturday, were given a refund and also a free crossing in the future.

A Eurotunnel spokesman said: "We have apologised profusely. Something like this has never happened before in our 16-year history and it's very embarrassing for us."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/7926138/Eurotunnel-passengers-go-to-France-and-back-again-without-being-able-to-get-off-train.html

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« Reply #440 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:35am »

Science Daily

Generating Energy from Ocean Waters Off Hawaii
ScienceDaily (Aug. 3, 2010) —

Researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa say that the Leeward side of Hawaiian Islands may be ideal for future ocean-based renewable energy plants that would use seawater from the oceans' depths to drive massive heat engines and produce steady amounts of renewable energy.

The technology, referred to as Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), is described in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, which is published by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It involves placing a heat engine between warm water collected at the ocean's surface and cold water pumped from the deep ocean. Like a ball rolling downhill, heat flows from the warm reservoir to the cool one. The greater the temperature difference, the stronger the flow of heat that can be used to do useful work such as spinning a turbine and generating electricity.

The history of OTEC dates back more than a half century. However, the technology has never taken off -- largely because of the relatively low cost of oil and other fossil fuels. But if there are any places on Earth where large OTEC facilities would be most cost competitive, it is where the ocean temperature differentials are the greatest.

Analyzing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Oceanographic Data Center, the University of Hawaii's Gérard Nihous says that the warm-cold temperature differential is about one degree Celsius greater on the leeward (western) side of the Hawaiian Islands than that on the windward (eastern) side.

This small difference translates to 15 percent more power for an OTEC plant, says Nihous, whose theoretical work focuses on driving down cost and increasing efficiency of future facilities, the biggest hurdles to bringing the technology to the mainstream.

"Testing that was done in the 1980s clearly demonstrates the feasibility of this technology," he says. "Now it's just a matter of paying for it."

More information in the project, see: http://hinmrec.hnei.hawaii.edu/ongoing-projects/otec-thermal-resource/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100803175019.htm

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« Reply #441 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 08:39am »

UFO Digest

Anthony Sanchez's Soon To Be Published Book: UFO Highway
Submitted by Norio Hayakawa on Tue, 08/03/2010 - 20:57
by Norio Hayakawa
August 3, 2010

Once in a while comes a book that that changes our pre-conceived notions of a subject matter.
The soon-to-be-published book, UFO HIGHWAY (http://www.ufohighway.com/)
by Anthony Sanchez, could just be such a book.

Anthony Sanchez has spent over 20 years accumulating a wealth of pertinent information on the subject of the rumors behind UFOs in conjunction with some of the most significant military installations in the U.S., especially in the American Southwest.

His new book, UFO HIGHWAY, is a fresh new look at the military's "connection" to the rumors about UFOs.
This is not a book about whether UFOs exist or not.
It is neither a book about "reptilians" eating humans in a secret underground facility.
It goes beyond that.

This book is filled with information previously not published in any other books of this nature.
His fascinating, recent interview with a retired USAF colonel is probably one of the highlights of this book.
This interesting interview took place, in May of 2010, only a few months before the completion of this book.

Just like the author, Anthony Sanchez, I myself also have done an extensive research on similar topics for over twenty years, spending many years investigating locations such as Area 51 in Nevada and its connections with other important sites such as southern California's Edwards AFB and remote aerospace facilities in the Antelope Valley, most of which had the outward facade of radar cross section testing sites.
I had also visited the surrroundings near China Lake Naval Weapons Testing Center in the California desert.
Yes, there is no doubt in my mind, just as Anthony Sanchez suggests, that there are "connections" among these facilites, including the Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah.

I also had a tremendous interest in Colorado's Cheyenne Mountain and its NORAD underground complex (not only because my wife had a unique oppportunity to go through a special, military-guided "tour" inside the complex in late 1978 through her brother's military connections - and, interestingly, a year before some strange things started happening in neighborning northern New Mexico.)

I also had taken a special interest in New Mexico's White Sands Missile Testing Ranges (where today, the leading-edge directed energy weapons systems are being tested), as well as Los Alamos National Laboratories (site of the world's foremost human genome research), Sandia Laboratories and Phillips Laboratories, the latter two of which are inside Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque.

Just as Anthony Sanchez seems to suggest in his book, there is no doubt in my mind that the regions especially east of the Four Corners area of New Mexico contain some of the most important U.S. government secrets, hidden from the public.

Yes, and above all, my greatest curiosity has been the long-persisting rumors about the alleged Dulce underground base in New Mexico.
I am convinced that although we have not come up yet with any solid, physical, tangible, irrefutable evidence that there is such a facility in Dulce, there are plenty of circumstantial evidences that point to the possibility that there is "something" there.

I have a trusted friend who was a former proprietor of one of the largest ranches in Dulce who declared to me this year that indeed there is a facility there. Beyond that, he could not make a comment.
At the present time he has a sensitive position as the department head of the Department of Agriculture in a well-known state university in New Mexico.
After retirement from his present position, he, too, will soon come out and will help us expose the truth about Dulce.

As for Area 51 in Nevada, sure, it is public knowledge now that Area 51 is a vibrant military research, development and testing complex conducted by many defense contractors who provide a variety of highly compartmentalized projects.

But there is no proof that there could not be something "more" besides all the superficial facade of the complex.

Yes, practically the whole world has already heard of the claims of Bob Lazar concerning Area 51.
For now, there seems to be nothing that can back up his claims.
However, at the same time, there is no way to disprove his claims either.

Anthony Sanchez' new book, UFO HIGHWAY, appparently derives its title from the actual Highway 375 in Nevada which was officially declared by the State of Nevada as EXTRATERRESTRIAL HIGHWAY in the late 1990's because of its proximity to Area 51.

However, Anthony's UFO HIGHWAY goes beyond that.

All these significant military bases are interconnected through a symbolic "highway".
There is plenty of commonality among these interesting facilities.
And they all relate to the rumors concerning UFOs and how "beliefs" play a major role in the military's maintenance of secrecy.

Yes, we all know that there doesn't seem to be any hard, solid, tangible, physical evidence to say that there is more than just the superficial structures behind all these facilities.
Yet there are cicrumstantial evidences that seem to point out that there is "something" under the physical facade of these facilities.

Anthony F. Sanchez received his BSc. in Computer Information Systems from Western Governors University of Salt Lake City, UT in 2008.
In addition to being a Software Consultant for the State of California through his own company, Matrix Innovative Systems, Inc., Anthony has been employed for 15 years as a Software Engineer working for 3Com, Intel, Acer, Netscape Communications, and Hewlett Packard performing high-level software development supporting scientific engineering and business intelligence projects.

He became interested in UFOs back in 1989, at the time Area 51 surfaced as a public phenomenon. Since 2000 he has researched the subject matter thoroughly employing various scientific methods and hands on approaches, thus compiling over 20 years worth of UFO related research data.

Anthony Sanchez' UFO HIGHWAY may be a very important book that could make us think again and take a fresh new look at things behind the facade of these facsinating locations.

The timing of this book couldn't be better.
There is talk among a segment of the population concering the upcoming December 21, 2012 scenario and its possible UFO connections.
However, probably nothing catastrophic will take place on that date.
Rather, in my opinion, December 21, 2012 could simply be a beginning of a gradual shift in human consciousness, a beginning of a gradual personal transformation in each of us, a beginning of a new understanding of the relationship of this earth and its inhabitants to other "realities" that affect us.

It will be up to the readers who will read this book to decide what that personal transformation will bring in their individual lives.

Anthony Sanchez' new book:
UFO HIGHWAY
http://www.ufohighway.com/

http://www.facebook.com/norio.hayakawa

http://www.ufodigest.com/article/anthony-sanchezs-soon-be-published-book-ufo-highway

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #442 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 11:24am »

on Aug 4th, 2010, 07:58am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning/evening Pen,
I saw one police officer on a television program that had a run in with one of these witches and he was scared silly. As you said, I don't think he would have reported it if he hadn't had a spectacular experience. And not in a good way!
Crystal


Good morning Crys or should I be saying good afternoon grin

Thank you so much for the video clip... that poor officer looked like he was on the verge of a breakdown. To be like that it must have been a terrifying experience. Not something I would like to experience.... poor guy.

Have a great day Crys.... and thanks again. smiley

Pen
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« Reply #443 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 11:38am »

on Aug 4th, 2010, 11:24am, Luvey wrote:
Good morning Crys or should I be saying good afternoon grin

Thank you so much for the video clip... that poor officer looked like he was on the verge of a breakdown. To be like that it must have been a terrifying experience. Not something I would like to experience.... poor guy.

Have a great day Crys.... and thanks again. smiley

Pen


My pleasure Pen. laugh
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« Reply #444 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 11:45am »




part two:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G52M_dJhB2Q&feature=related

part three:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N44mRCM14yo&feature=related

part four:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tDyOyqulXw&feature=related

part five and final clip:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRz96TyocRI&feature=related

edit to add additional links.
Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #445 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 12:23pm »

Man’s best friend?!


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,598604,00.html?test=latestnews

Fox News

Dog Saves Michigan Man's Life by Chewing Off His Toe


Wednesday, August 04, 2010

ROCKFORD, Mich. — A Michigan man says he's grateful his dog ate most of his toe while he was passed out drunk.
Jerry Douthett of Rockford says his Jack Russell terrier, Kiko, helped uncover an undiagnosed diabetic condition and led to treatment that could save his life—even if it meant losing his toe.

The Grand Rapids Press reported that the 48-year-old musician knew for a while something was wrong with his foot. He resisted seeking care until giving in to his wife's pressure one day last month.

Before going for an appointment, Douthett says he went out drinking, then came home and passed out. When he awoke, the terrier was beside him in bed and lots of blood was where his toe used to be.

"But then I heard these screams coming from the bedroom, and he was yelling, 'My toe's gone, my toe's gone!'" Douthett’s wife, Rosee told the Grand Rapids Press.

Kiko had sniffed out a major problem that Douthett had been hiding—Type 2 diabetes.

Dogs have 220 million olfactory receptors in their noses, compared to only 50 million in humans.

"It smelled, and I look back now and realize every time we'd visit someone with a dog, their dog would be sniffing all over my foot," Douthett said.

His wife, a registered nurse, rushed him to Spectrum Health Blodgett Campus, where doctors found a serious bone infection and amputated the rest of the toe.

When admitted to hospital, Douthett had a dangerously high blood-sugar level of 560, significantly higher than the recommended 80 to 120.

Douthett joked with a nurse before the amputation that he would like to keep the rest of the toe as a treat for Kiko.
"If it hadn't been for that dog, I could have ended up dead," Douthett said.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #446 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 12:45pm »

on Aug 3rd, 2010, 4:00pm, philliman wrote:
Someone recently told me about some beautiful music which you could hear in such an online game. This reminded me of that beautiful music from the game "Heroes of Might and Magic 4":












Enjoy! smiley


Those are so beautiful!! Is it possible to download them to a My Music file that can be replayed on Windows Media?
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« Reply #447 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 7:40pm »

Hey SwampRat!
I saw this on the news.............eeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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« Reply #448 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 7:42pm »

Hi Seeker,
Sorry but I don't know the answer to that. I'll bet Phil does.
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« Reply #449 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 7:45pm »

MSNBC
(Reuters)
British X-Files describe secret UFO study
Letter says Churchill, Ike hushed up WWII sighting; probe goes nowhere|
By Maria Golovnina

Britain released hundreds of previously secret "UFO files" on Thursday, including a letter saying that Winston Churchill had ordered a 50-year cover-up of a wartime encounter between an unidentified flying object and military pilot.

The files, published by the National Archives, span decades and contain scores of witness accounts, sketches and classified briefing notes documenting mysterious sightings across Britain.

One Ministry of Defense note refers to a 1999 letter stating that a Royal Air Force plane returning from a mission in Europe during World War II was "approached by a metallic UFO."

The unidentified author of the letter says his grandfather attended a wartime meeting between Churchill and Dwight Eisenhower during which the two expressed concern over the incident and "decided to keep it secret."

The Ministry of Defense subsequently investigated the case but found no written record of the incident, the files say. In a 1999 note, the ministry said it "does not have any expertise or role in respect of 'UFO/flying saucer' matters or to the question of the existence or otherwise of extraterrestrial lifeforms, about which it remains totally open-minded."

Britain has been slowly releasing long-classified files related to sightings of mysterious craft in the skies above its cities, compiled and investigated by the Ministry of Defense over past decades.

Some cases subsequently received rational explanations, such as meteors burning up in the atmosphere, but many are unsolved.

One memo, dated 1997, contains reports of "sonic booms" and a mysterious plane crash in northern England. No wreckage was found in an ensuing search by the police and rescue teams.

Another incident refers to sightings of a "black triangular UFO" over the home of the shadow home secretary in Kent in the late 1990s. An investigation showed no breach of security.

In a case filed in 1995, the captain of a plane approaching Manchester's airport reported a near-miss with an "unidentified object," and a witness on the ground separately provided a sketch showing a UFO "20 times the size of a football field."

An inquiry failed to indentify the object, the memo said.

Buried deep among meticulous sketches and ministry memos, some files refer to curious episodes in Britain's history. During the Cold War, Britain sent fighter jets to intercept Soviet aircraft as often as 200 times a year, one document from the ministry showed.

The note, filed in 1996, said mystery sightings picked up on radar during the Cold War were invariably proved to be Soviet anti-submarine or long-range reconnaissance planes.

"Prior to the demise of the Former Soviet Union, aircraft were scrambled some 200 times annually to intercept and investigate uncorrelated tracks penetrating the UK Air defence region (AKADR) from the north," it said.

The last such scramble was in September 1991 — around the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Copyright 2010 Reuters.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38566733

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