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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 113166 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #450 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 7:58pm »

We have vote by mail in Whatcom County, we just filled out our little voting papers. Anti-incumbent all down the line. Probably won't make one bit of difference but it was FUN!!! grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #451 on: Aug 4th, 2010, 8:24pm »

Good evening Crys grin

Remember when we were talking about the alligator I took photos of that was around 4ft long....and I wasn't afraid of it. Take a read of this news story and you will see why I wasn't afraid. Croc's up the north of Australia grow huge.... this particular one I put the size into our converter and it came out to 20ft 9inches long..... now that would scare the heck out of me.... I would be running in the other direction! shocked

Also thank you so much for the video clips on the Mexican encounter.... I so appreciate it. smiley I haven't had time to watch them all yet.

NT locals kill 6.5m cow-eating croc

Locals in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory have killed a 6.5m crocodile because it had been eating cattle.

The massive saltwater croc needed two semi-trailers to pull it out of a river in Manangoora, 1000km south-east of Darwin, the NT News reported.

But locals of the remote outstation off the Gulf of Carpentaria say there are other massive crocodiles nearby.

"They have one croc that is still out there," 23-year-old local Jeida Francis said.

"He should be getting to this size by now."

Mr Francis said locals were forced to shoot the croc because it was "getting too nasty and too close".

Source: http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/7940234/nt-locals-kill-6-5m-cow-eating-croc
« Last Edit: Aug 4th, 2010, 8:26pm by Luvey » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #452 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:14am »

on Aug 4th, 2010, 8:24pm, Luvey wrote:
Good evening Crys grin

Remember when we were talking about the alligator I took photos of that was around 4ft long....and I wasn't afraid of it. Take a read of this news story and you will see why I wasn't afraid. Croc's up the north of Australia grow huge.... this particular one I put the size into our converter and it came out to 20ft 9inches long..... now that would scare the heck out of me.... I would be running in the other direction! shocked

Also thank you so much for the video clips on the Mexican encounter.... I so appreciate it. smiley I haven't had time to watch them all yet.

NT locals kill 6.5m cow-eating croc

Locals in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory have killed a 6.5m crocodile because it had been eating cattle.

The massive saltwater croc needed two semi-trailers to pull it out of a river in Manangoora, 1000km south-east of Darwin, the NT News reported.

But locals of the remote outstation off the Gulf of Carpentaria say there are other massive crocodiles nearby.

"They have one croc that is still out there," 23-year-old local Jeida Francis said.

"He should be getting to this size by now."

Mr Francis said locals were forced to shoot the croc because it was "getting too nasty and too close".

Source: http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/7940234/nt-locals-kill-6-5m-cow-eating-croc


Holy Cow! Holy Croc! That is one huge croc!!!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #453 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:17am »

Washington Post

FCC draws fire over talks with Internet, telecom giants on 'net neutrality'

By Cecilia Kang
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, August 5, 2010; 8:34 AM

Thwarted in his campaign to set government control over consumer access to the Internet, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski has been trying to salvage his efforts by negotiating directly with a handful of the biggest Web firms and network service providers.

His goal is for those firms to put aside their differences on how Internet service providers control content on their networks and agree on legislation that Genachowski can present to Congress.

But critics say that by handpicking Google, AT&T, Verizon and Skype for seven closed-door meetings that continue this week at the FCC, Genachowski could be determining the future of how consumers access the Web in a manner more favorable to those businesses.

(In a separate development, Google and Verizon are holding their own private talks on how to bridge differences on managing web traffic. Sources said Wednesday that they have reached an agreement, but no deal has been officially confirmed.)

Massive corporate interests are at stake as the FTC and Google, AT&T, Verizon and Skype discuss so-called net neutrality provisions, or regulations that would prevent Internet providers from blocking or slowing access to Web sites. The talks could determine, for instance, whether Verizon could provide YouTube online video with better resolution than competitor Netflix, or whether Google and Skype have to pay extra to get their online voice services onto AT&T broadband networks.

"These big companies can make deals for themselves, but they are leaving out the rest of us," said Susan Crawford, a communications law professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Wider discussions

Genachowski's chief of staff, Eddie Lazarus, has been running the meetings and said he has also talked to dozens of consumer groups, start-ups, venture capitalists and smaller network operators. Those discussions have taken place outside the hours-long sessions that continue this week with officials from Google, Skype, AT&T, Verizon and a cable trade association and coalition advocating Genachowski's net neutrality rules.

"That one room is not privileged, in my view. There have been dozens of stakeholder discussions with varied interests who are all important to this process," Lazarus said.

Free Press, Public Knowledge, Amazon.com and Sony Electronics are among parties represented by the Open Internet Coalition, which has a place at the meetings. Cable firms are also represented by a trade group, the National Cable and Telecommunications Association.

"I can't presume to speak for all of them on any given issue," said Markham Erickson, executive director of the Open Internet Coalition, which also represents Google. "We try to be a consensus-based coalition, but the challenge is that there is a diversity of points of view on any given issue when you get to very specific points."

Matt Polka, president of American Cable Association, a group that represents smaller cable broadband operators, said he agrees with the National Cable and Telecommunications Association that the FCC shouldn't pursue open-Internet rules. But, he said, "you have to hope that the interests of smaller rural providers are also being represented in these discussions and not just the biggest cable firms."

Analysts said agreements made between those parties could encourage Congress to introduce legislation as the FCC grapples with questions over its ability to regulate broadband providers.

As for wireless partners Google and Verizon, sources familiar with their separate negotiations said officials are close to announcing an agreement on ground rules that they hope to hold as an example of successful self-regulation. The firms are expected to unveil a deal soon that would allow Verizon to offer more room on its networks to content providers that pay more. But any promises regarding open-Internet access wouldn't apply to mobile phones, sources close to the companies said.

Verizon said in a statement that it will continue to participate in FCC talks. Google did not respond to requests for comment, but the company's chief executive, Eric Schmidt, told CNET that the search giant and Verizon are "trying to find solutions that bridge" their disagreements.

The two firms have stood on opposite ends of the net neutrality debate but have partnered on Android phones, based on Google's operating system and applications. In recent months, Schimdt and Verizon chief executive Ivan Seidenberg have announced in op-eds and speeches that they are finding "common ground" in the debate.

The FCC chief's goal

Such an agreement could frame discussion on legislation in Congress. And it would enable Genachowski to address his biggest policy goal -- open Internet access -- without having to follow through on a separate, controversial proposal to redefine broadband access providers as telecommunications services. That promise of open-Internet rules was touted by President Obama during his campaign but was derailed by a federal court decision that questioned the FCC's authority over broadband. And amid growing opposition in Congress, the FCC has sought to find a way out by asserting its authority to regulate broadband.

"These matters clearly are important to both network and apps providers, and it remains to be seen whether the difference can be overcome," said Paul Gallant, an analyst at Concept Capital. "If they are not, Chairman Genachowski is expected to move toward a reclassification ruling that would be negative for cable, telcos and possibly telecom equipment suppliers."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/05/AR2010080502423.html?hpid=topnews

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« Reply #454 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:23am »

New York Times

August 4, 2010
Hard Science, Softened With Stories
By JANET MASLIN
THE DISAPPEARING SPOON

And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of Elements

By Sam Kean

391 pages. Little, Brown & Company. $24.99.
On the one hand, as Sam Kean points out at the start of “The Disappearing Spoon,” the periodic table of the elements is a clear, accessible-looking chart that ought to make sense to anyone who ever set foot in a chemistry classroom. On the other, many a would-be chemist has found it as impenetrable as it is alluring.

“People remember the table with a mix of fascination, fondness, inadequacy and loathing,” Mr. Kean writes in the book, a work of chatty popular science that means to rekindle affection for the table and its many mysteries.

Though he is obviously quite knowledgeable about chemistry, Mr. Kean knows that “probably the biggest frustration for many students was that the people who got the periodic table, who could really unpack how it worked, could pull so many facts from it with such dweeby nonchalance.” Mr. Kean’s book means to override that frustration by making some of those facts available to anyone.

Here is what “The Disappearing Spoon” does not do: really unpack how the periodic table works. Nor does it provide clear and consistent illumination about, say, what electrons do in s-shells versus what they do in p-shells, let alone in the more daunting d-shell configuration. Inevitably some of what he discusses will be out of reach for the lay reader. And Mr. Kean does not have the teacherly patience of Brian Greene, a science writer who can make string theory sound like child’s play.

What Mr. Kean does have is a big supply of odd facts and anecdotes related to the periodic table. He uses these to turn “The Disappearing Spoon” into a nonstop parade of lively science stories. Here is a book that shows off the longest chemistry-related anagram ever written, the 1,185-letter technical term for “tobacco mosaic virus”; gives an explanation of why the element europium makes the euro note “the most sophisticated piece of currency ever devised”; and tells of a purported C.I.A. plan to poison Fidel Castro by putting thallium in his socks.

Such factoids might seem more specious if the periodic table were not such a familiar and popular scientific artifact. But elements are the new dinosaurs: they’re available via placemats, posters, T-shirts, a fine coffee-table book (“The Elements”), a 3-D app for mobile devices and, of course, that heavenly old Tom Lehrer song (also called “The Elements”) speedily set to its Gilbert and Sullivan melody. In this bustling atmosphere “The Disappearing Spoon” is a timely conversation piece, what with chapter headings like “Take Two Elements, Call Me in the Morning” (about elements used for medical purposes) and “Poisoner’s Corridor: ‘Ouch-Ouch.’ ”

Mr. Kean clearly knows that his stories and insights require a very user-friendly presentation. So he begins this book by describing his own boyhood fascination with mercury. He refers to loose mercury as “supple spheres,” a “silver lentil,” “futuristic metal” and “a pecan-sized glob,” illustrating this book’s eagerness to present elements as slangily, irreverently and colorfully as possible. Here is the place to find about how mercury laxatives were carried on the Lewis and Clark expedition, and about how the expedition’s route could thus be tracked by the mapping of mercury-tinged latrines.

Mr. Kean also makes the excellent point that he learned about history, etymology, alchemy, mythology, literature, poison forensics and psychology all by studying extensive mercury lore. That offers some indication of how sprawling and scattershot “The Disappearing Spoon” turns out to be. For instance, Mr. Kean goes out of his way to provide elements with outsize personalities. Antimony has “probably the most colorful history on the periodic table,” and draws upon Mr. Kean’s most exotic-sounding reference book (“The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony,” written by Johann Tholde in 1604). Carbon “latches onto virtually anything” and is thus notable for its “promiscuity.”

Tungsten was “the ‘it’ metal of the Second World War” because of its use in weaponry. Element No. 43, now known as technetium, has been discovered on so many separate occasions, and given so many names, that “it’s the Loch Ness monster of the elemental world.”

Mr. Kean devotes as much attention to the personalities of scientists as he does to those of elements. “The Disappearing Spoon” tells many tales of how future Nobel laureates made their great discoveries, and calls Glenn Seaborg and Al Ghiorso “the Ernest Hemingway and Theodore Roosevelt” of the periodic table because they bagged so many specimens. (Seaborg and his Berkeley colleagues came up with the structure of the periodic table that is commonly used today.)

Then of course there is Dmitri Mendeleev, the 19th-century Russian innovator who came up with the idea of arranging elements in a chart in the first place and prompted his czar to ignore the great scientist’s bigamy, saying: “I admit, Mendeleev has two wives, but I have only one Mendeleev.” A couple of paragraphs after Mr. Kean tells this story, he somehow segues into a discussion of gallium, which looks like a solid metal at room temperature but melts into a puddle if held in the hand, giving rise to the disappearing spoon trick of the title.

No serious chemistry text could make so drastic a leap so easily. But leaps are the specialty of “The Disappearing Spoon”; this book is more notable for its gymnastics than its coherence. The reader winds up able to explain why Paul McCartney was once awarded a rhodium record, why Gyorgy Hevesy put radioactive lead in his landlady’s goulash, and why Mark Twain envisioned a sci-fi Satan made of radium. Just don’t expect to understand cold fusion when Mr. Kean’s ebullient tale telling is over.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/books/05book.html?ref=science

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« Reply #455 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:32am »

Mom lost her dog last month and she's 83 years old. So now she calls me the minute she gets up in the morning........................ tongue And the husband just woke up so I haven't had a chance to go through the news this a.m. Crap! Everyone is awake! shocked

Be back later.
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« Reply #456 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:52am »

Wired

Darpa’s Inhaled Drugs to Boost Troops at Extreme Altitudes
By Katie Drummond August 5, 2010 | 8:55 am

Extreme altitudes are a major barrier for troops fighting in the mountains of Afghanistan, and the military’s spent millions trying to minimize altitude’s impact on physical and cognitive ability. Now, Darpa-funded researchers are making impressive progress towards inhaled drugs that would pump up troop performance by fast-tracking the body’s natural adaptations to altitude.

The Pentagon’s blue sky research arm has awarded $4.7 million to scientists at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, to develop pharmaceuticals that can rapidly boost oxygen delivery. Blood carries less oxygen at high altitudes, leading to a lack of oxygen in bodily tissue, called hypoxia. That, in turn, can cause nausea, confusion and fatigue — hardly the attributes the military’s after in battle-ready troops. By augmenting blood flow to tissues, the research team hopes to enhance oxygen delivery too.

That’s an adaptive process the human body is already capable of, but the necessary acclimatization can take weeks. Dr. Jonathan Stamler, who’s leading the research at Case Western, says the drugs will essentially do what we already can.

“We’re essentially mimicking nature here,” he tells Danger Room. “Take people climbing mountains, who will set up base camps at varying altitudes to give their bodies time to adjust. We’re making these mechanisms much, much more acute — a matter of minutes, rather than days.”

The drugs will work by increasing blood levels of nitric oxide, which is naturally released by red blood cells to dilate vessels and increase blood flow.

Within three years, Darpa wants to see animal models and human subjects capable of immediately exercising more efficiently at altitude after taking the drugs. Stamler and co. are well on their way to meeting the ambitious goal: they’re already performing tests on animal models, and have applied for FDA approval to try the approach in people.

Stamler also anticipates widespread civilian applications for the drug, which will likely be dispensed in portable inhalers.

“A deficiency of nitric oxide has been observed in a number of conditions, from sickle cell disease to heart attacks and strokes,” he says.

Figuring out a quick way to increase nitric oxide levels might also help the military solve another major problem: donated blood that’s weeks old by the time it hits the front lines. Older blood is low on nitric oxide, which some scientists now suspect leads to risk of heart attack and stroke among transfusion recipients.

“If we can get this right for Darpa,” he says, “Then the actual approach could apply to much more than just altitude adaptations.”

Read More http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/darpas-inhaled-drugs-to-boost-troops-at-extreme-altitudes/#more-28959#ixzz0vju1TyS8

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« Reply #457 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:55am »

Wired

Sikorsky X2 Breaks Helicopter Speed Record
By Jason Paur August 4, 2010 | 2:17 pm

Two hundred and fifty-nine miles per hour. That’s how fast the Sikorsky X2 flew during a recent test flight in Florida. The flight broke a record that had stood since 1986 when a Westland Lynx managed 249 mph.

And Sikorsky isn’t done yet.

The X2 is a technology demonstrator aimed at developing helicopters that easily cruise up to double the speed of traditional helicopters. Using a twin rotor design, a pusher prop and numerous aerodynamic improvements, Sikorsky says this type of design could lead to helicopters that are easily capable of even higher cruise speeds.

After setting the helicopter speed record with the 259 mph flight, X2 program manager Jim Kagdis said the helicopter is performing better than expected so far.

“Vibration levels and aircraft performance have continued to meet or exceed our expectations, so we are pleased to report that all systems are ‘go’ in our mission to achieve a 250-knot [288 mph] cruise speed later this year,” he said.

Helicopters traditionally are limited by the complex aerodynamics created with the moving rotor blades losing lift when they are moving backwards relative to the direction of flight. A propeller at the rear of the helicopter allows the X2 pilot to fly at higher speeds while minimizing the problems associated with high speed flight and the main rotors.

Sikorsky believes there is a marketplace for a fast moving helicopter in the military and civilian world. Both markets are interested in faster medical helicopters to reduce response times for transporting patients in and out of remote areas. The company hasn’t released details about plans for a production version of the X2, but has said the technology will find its way into a future model.

Read More http://www.wired.com/autopia/2010/08/sikorsky-x2-breaks-helicopter-speed-record/#ixzz0vjurZtLg

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« Reply #458 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 08:58am »

Wired

Lenovo IdeaCentre Q150
Reviewed by Christopher Null • August 04, 2010

$400 •
lenovo.com 7 out of 10

Razor-Thin Desktop PC Has Price, Performance to Match
Some people wear their technology on their sleeve, modding their desktops with Giger motifs (or worse) that are designed to stand out.

Others want technology to disappear into the ether, to be invisible.

Such is the promise of Lenovo's IdeaCentre Q150, a PC about the size of your double-CD copy of Ummagumma, and about as momentous, too.

The specs are modest, as one would expect from a machine that weighs all of 1.4 pounds: 1.66-GHz Intel Atom D510 CPU, 2 GB of RAM, and 802.11n Wi-Fi (plus ethernet). However, there's no optical drive and the only video outputs are VGA and HDMI. The Q150 also adds an S/PDIF port for connecting the device to your stereo rack — with its 500-GB hard drive and ultraquiet operation, there's a case to be made for using the Q150 as a multimedia server that can vanish into your home-theater cabinet without any effort.

Performance is roughly on par with a high-end netbook, although the addition of Nvidia's ION graphics at least bumps its video capabilities into the acceptable range. It's not a hard-core gaming system by any stretch, but graphics performance is passable to the point where recent games are at least within the realm of playability.

That said, the Q150 occupies a niche so narrow (literally, it's less than an inch thick) that its purchase by anyone is going to be heavily determined by its form over its function. If you need a PC that takes up as little physical space as possible, this computer gets the job done and costs next to nothing, too.

WIRED Acceptable performance in a bare-minimum chassis. Surprisingly stable in operation.

TIRED Doesn't sit upright without stand (included). Not quite enough graphics oomph for a multimedia system. No optical drive, somewhat glaring for an entertainment PC. Included keyboard feels cheap. An SD slot would have been a nice addition.

Manufacturer: Lenovo
Price: $400 (as tested)

http://www.wired.com/reviews/product/pr_lenovo_Q150

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« Reply #459 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 09:02am »

Phantoms and Monsters

Wednesday, August 04, 2010
Berwyn UFO Incident: Combination of an Earthquake and Meteor?

BBC - A 1974 'UFO incident' in the Berwyn Mountains, dubbed the Welsh Roswell, was dismissed as an earthquake and a meteor combining, official files show.

A huge bang and a brilliant light in the sky were seen over north east Wales and there were later claims a spaceship crash was concealed.

Comparisons were drawn with Roswell, New Mexico in 1947, where it is claimed an alien crash was concealed

A Ministry of Defence investigation said there was no Welsh UFO.

The files show it was explained a noisy earth tremor coinciding with a meteor burning up in the atmosphere.

A search and rescue team was scrambled from RAF Valley on Anglesey, but found no wreckage on the mountainside.

The MOD investigation found that there were five other reports of UFOs seen over the UK at about 10pm on 23 January 1974, when the Berwyn Mountains incident happened.

Three sightings were in the Home Counties, one in Lincolnshire and another in Sussex.

Witnesses reported seeing a bright light in the north west whcih seemed to fall towards the horizon.

It is certain to the minds of both my friends who came with me and to me that we were visited by an object that evening”

An expert who undertook independent research into the Berwyn Mountains incident for the British Astronomical Society reported that a "fireball" was visible over most of the UK that night.

Sightings were received from Somerset, Norfolk, Manchester and Edinburgh, the files notes.

The fireball descended from about 120km in the sky to about 35km before disintegrating over Manchester, the expert found.

Brynmor John, who was then junior RAF minister, explained the official position in a letter to Dafydd Elis-Thomas, then a local MP, in May 1974.

Mr John wrote: "As suggested by the descriptions reported, it seems the phenomena could well have been caused by a meteor descending through the atmosphere burning up and finally disintegrating before it reached the ground.

"Such a hypothesis would also explain the absence of any signs of impact.

"It has also been suggested that at 8.32pm that evening there was an earth tremor in the Berwyn Mountains which produced a landslide with noises like detonation.

"The latter aspect is however outside the field of this department," Mr John added.

But the MoD's conclusions did not convince all those who witnessed the "Welsh Roswell".

The files also include a letter from one local who wrote: "That 'something" came down in the Berwyn Mountains on that night I am certain.

"It is certain to the minds of both my friends who came with me and to me that we were visited by an object that evening."

NOTE: "Welsh Roswell...dismissed as an earthquake and a meteor combining." Wow...that's some coincidence! Honestly, after all the hoopla about British MoD deciding to disclose UFO files, it seems that the flow of information is suddenly slowing or being altered. I have to wonder if something really is in store for us in the near future. Below are some previous postings on the Berwyn Incident...Lon

**********
Originally posted 7/2/2008

New 'Welsh Roswell' Witness Emerges After 34 Years

dailymail - One of Britain’s greatest UFO mysteries deepened last night after a new witness emerged after 34 years.

The Government allegedly covered up the “Welsh Roswell” incident, in the Berwyn mountain range in 1974, after scores of residents reported a massive tremor, strange lights in the sky and “Men in Black” scouring the area.

Claims that aliens crash-landed and their bodies were then transported by the Ministry of Defence to the top-secret research base Porton Down in Wiltshire were dismissed by Whitehall officials.

But suspicions about what really happened were re-ignited in May this year when hundreds of MoD documents about UFO sightings were released, with none containing any details about the Berwyn incident, reviving rumours of a cover-up.

Now, fresh evidence by retired gamekeeper Geraint Edwards, of Llandderfel, Denbighshire, has reopened the debate.

He told the makers of a new Channel Five documentary, which is being broadcast tonight, how he stood in amazement as a flying saucer hovered for 10 minutes above the mountains before it disappeared into space at impossible speed.

He said: “It was definitely a flying saucer. It was a pity I didn’t have a camera because it was there for at least 10 minutes, just hovering.

“We were on the way down to play darts when something caught our eye in the south-east, so we stopped.

“It looked like a rugger ball, but the ends of it were more pointy.

“When it took off, it just went like lightning on the same line as it hovered.

“It hovered back to the mountain, and (then it was) gone.

“I wrote it down in my diary. It was 6.45pm on the Friday night.

“If we were coming back from the pub, people would be saying, ‘they’ve had one or two (drinks)’ but we were going to the pub.”

His former neighbour, Pat Evans, a district nurse who gave a detailed eye-witness account of the phenomenon at the time, moved abroad to escape the mass attention she attracted from the media, UFO investigators and scientists.

But Mr Edwards has decided to speak out for the first time about his close encounter on February 15, 1974, for tonight’s television programme re-examining the evidence.

Three weeks earlier, on January 23, the villages of Llandrillo and Llandderfel, near Corwen, were rocked by a tremor measuring 3.5 on the Richter scale.

Reports of unexplained strange coloured lights and objects in the sky immediately afterwards and unusual military activity in the following weeks fuelled speculation that a UFO had crash-landed.

Sceptics maintain the explanation was an unlikely combination of an earthquake which struck Wales at the same time that a meteor shower passed overhead, and that “Men in Black” who residents reported seeing were actually seismologists researching the quake.

They also insist Pat Evans, who saw a “bright orb, the size of the Moon” with twinkling around the edges, was actually looking at a lamp carried by poachers on a nearby mountainside.

The absence of any material on the incident from the newly released MoD documents in May has roused suspicions from other eye-witnesses.

Farmer Huw Lloyd, 48, who was a teenager at the time, said: “Whatever it was, it was kept quiet. And things that have happened have been covered up.”

Retired North Wales Police Assistant Chief Constable Elfed Roberts, who was a sergeant at the time of UFO incident, was rushing to Llandrillo moments after the tremor with his superior when they saw the mysterious lights.

He said: “As we were driving, all of a sudden we saw this green light in the sky ahead of us and it seemed to be an arcing light, but it was very sudden, totally unexpected, different to anything ever seen before.”

**********
Originally posted 5/15/2008

New Information On Berwyn UFO Incident

dailymail - Documents have surfaced which could shed new light on one of North Wales' greatest UFO mysteries.

The Berwyn mountains incident in 1974 has remained an enigma ever since, with reports of lights in the sky, an earthquake, claims of a crashed object and a cover up afterwards.

In fact some claim a UFO crashed, and “bodies” were retrieved and taken away by soldiers.

Now the Daily Post has acquired official documents showing how police were bombarded with calls and eye witness accounts of the strange event.

The “Welsh Roswell” incident happened one dark winter’s night on January 23, 1974, in the Berwyn Mountains between Bala and Corwen.

Families in the villages of Llandderfel and Llandrillo were settling down to watch TV, an explosion was heard and the ground shook. It measured 3.5 on the Richter scale.

As people ran from their houses, fearing another tremor, they saw a blaze of light on the mountainside above.

A local nurse, who believed an aircraft had crashed, drove to the site and saw a pulsating orange and red glow on the hillside and other lights.

Police converged on the area and emergency services were put on standby.

Searches were undertaken but, surprisingly, officially nothing was found.

Gwynedd Police received a number of reports that night from people claiming they had seen a UFO. The documents give a fascinating insight into what went on.

l Gwynedd Police Constabulary Major Incident Log – explosion – 21.10pm PC receiving 999 calls of UFO.

l A witness who saw an object on the hillside said in a statement: “Saw bright red light, like coal fire red. Large perfect circle. Like a big bonfire. Could see lights above and to the right and white lights moving to bottom. Light changed colour to yellowish white and back again.”

l A message in a police log said: “There’s been a large explosion in the area and there is a large fire in the mountainside. I am speaking from... and can see the fire where I am.”

l Telex message to chief constable Gwynedd constabulary. 22.00pm approx 23/1/74: Saw bright green lights, object with tail – travelling west. Saw about Bangor direction – dropped down.

l At approx 10pm on 23/1/74: Saw a circular light in the sky at an estimated height of 1,500 feet. This object exploded and pieces fell to the ground. Mr ...... estimates the pieces would have fallen into the sea between Rhyl and Liverpool.

UFO researcher Russ Kellett has studied the event and is convinced something extraordinary happened.

He said: “There is conclusive evidence because of other documents I have that mention these objects on that night from Newcastle down to the Home Counties up to Coventry being seen in the sky.

more after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/08/berwyn-ufo-incident-combination-of.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #460 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 09:28am »


The pastor asked if anyone in the congregation would like to express praise for answered prayers.
Suzie Smith stood and walked to the podium. She said, "I have a praise. Two months ago, my husband, Tom, had a terrible bicycle wreck and his scrotum was completely crushed. The pain was excruciating and the doctors didn't know if they could help him." You could hear a muffled gasp from the men in the congregation as they imagine the pain that poor Tom must have experienced.

"Tom was unable to hold me or the children," she went on, "and every move caused him terrible pain." We prayed as the doctors performed a delicate operation, and it turned out they were able to piece together the crushed remnants of Tom's scrotum, and wrap wire around it to hold it in place."

Again, the men in the congregation cringed and squirmed uncomfortably as they imagined the horrible surgery performed on Tom. "Now," she announced in a quivering voice, "thank the Lord,
Tom is out of the hospital and the doctors say that with time, his scrotum should recover completely."

All the men sighed with unified relief.

The pastor rose and tentatively asked if anyone else had something to say.

A man stood up and walked slowly to the podium. He said, "I'm Tom Smith."

The entire congregation held its breath. "I just want to tell my wife the word is sternum."

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« Reply #461 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 10:29am »

Poor Tom! grin

Thanks SwampRat. That is a good laugh this morning.
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« Reply #462 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 10:59am »

grin

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« Reply #463 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 11:07am »

War On Terror News

Monday, August 02, 2010
Iraq Every Dog Has Its Day, Including Military Working Dogs
2nd Stryker Brigade 25th Infantry Division
Story by Pfc. Robert M. England

07.31.2010 FORWARD OPERATING BASE WARHORSE, Iraq – Sgt. 1st Class Rudder and Staff Sgt. Rochan Turner were conducting a routine route clearance mission on a sweltering, summer afternoon in Afghanistan when Sgt. 1st Class Rudder indicated a potential hazard ahead in the convoy’s path. Upon closer inspection, his observation proved correct as two mortars, rigged to an improvised explosive device, were unearthed from the roadway, preventing 20 vehicles from suffering catastrophic damage.

The most impressive aspect of the situation was the fact that Sgt. 1st Class Rudder was a labrador retriever trained as a specialized search dog, operating off of his leash up to 100 meters away from his handler, Staff Sgt. Rochan Turner. This dynamic duo has been working together for four-and-a-half years, placing them in countless situations similar to the one in Afghanistan.

Turner, a Houston native, is the kennel master attached to the Headquarters and Headquarters Operations Company, 3rd Infantry Division, in Iraq. He manages K9 teams at Forward Operating Base
Warhorse, FOB Edge and Contingency Operating Base Cobra, ensuring each team has the tools and training necessary to accomplish their missions. He also acts as the advisor to the 2nd Stryker Advise and Assist Brigade, 25th Infantry Division Provost Marshal’s office in utilizing K9 teams.

Warriors from the 2SAAB, 25th ID assisted dog handlers and trainers conducting coalition training with Iraqi Police K9 teams July 20, on the latest U.S. Army Military Police tactics based around working dogs. This training covered basic commands and what they do, recognizing changes in the dog’s behavior and what those changes may indicate.

After the training, Lt. Col. John Shattuck, the Diyala provincial police team chief from the Stability Transition Team, 2SAAB, 25th ID, and Capt. Maurice Mckinney, the Provost Marshall, 2SAAB, 25th ID, discussed ways the brigade could support IP forces and improve their overall readiness to assume control of all missions following the American transition to contingency operations within the region.

“We talked about near-future goals and long-term projects the brigade could assist the IPs with,” said Mckinney. “Capt. Moufaq, the canine manager for the Diyala Provincial Police Headquarters, mentioned needing a canine training area with obstacles, and the construction of that kind of training pen is something we would assist with.”

Laying this foundation and strengthening familiarization in core training is vital in realizing the potential of the working dog program, as IPs have only recently embraced the idea of utilizing canines for counter-insurgency purposes.

“Iraqi police forces have only been using K9 teams for a few years, so it’s important we train them right,” said Turner.

Before they have the opportunity to assist in teaching IP K9 teams, U.S. Army canines must complete “basic training” at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, introducing them to odors and basic commands. Handlers learn how to observe and properly react to changes in the dog’s behavior as well as techniques for instilling obedience.

Once training is completed, K9 teams receive specific orders, sending them to units in-theater to support that unit’s mission. A typical deployment for a K9 team ranges from six to 12 months.

“We train for war every day,” said Turner. “We can get the call at any time and then move out with those orders.”

In order to effectively augment each unit during a deployment, certain dogs have extended skill sets. Specialized search dogs can travel up to 150 meters off the leash. Handlers use voice commands and hand and arms signals to communicate with the dogs. Patrol explosive dogs specialize in sniffing out a variety of materials used in the construction of explosive devices.

When a K9 team is not deployed, they are training. There are countless certifications that handlers and their dogs can obtain, in addition to the mandatory annual certifications that require handlers to update their dog’s odor recognition set.

The canines are hydrated and fed food rich in protein, in order to maintain the energy and acute awareness necessary to effectively carry out their missions. Handlers often stockpile food prior to deployments and can order more as their supplies dwindle.

Turner said a portion of the Iraqi population doesn’t like dogs and views them as dirty animals, though it depends largely upon the region and the prominence of Western influences. All members of the Iraqi police force that are trained to work with canines, have a deep appreciation for their animals. U.S. Army dog handlers often stress the importance of developing a strong bond with the dogs.

“We teach the IPs that it’s important to love the dog, to take care of it. The biggest reward for the dog is love,” Turner said. “Everything the dog does, is done to please the handler.”

All work and no play makes for anxious, exhausted hounds. Between missions and training exercises, handlers understand the importance of letting their dogs off the leash for some quality playtime.

“We give them breaks,” said Turner. “Before we train, we let them run around and play and just be dogs.”

Turner said the most rewarding part of his job is the constant companionship found in his loyal buddy, Sgt. 1st Class Rudder, a feeling shared by many dog handlers.

“He’s a good boy, a hard worker and he doesn’t talk back,” Turner said with a hearty chuckle. “I love working with him.”

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http://waronterrornews.typepad.com/home/2010/08/every-dog-has-its-day-including-mwds.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+WarOnTerrorNews+%28War+On+Terror+News%29&utm_content=Twitter

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #464 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 12:12pm »

on Aug 5th, 2010, 08:32am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Mom lost her dog last month and she's 83 years old. So now she calls me the minute she gets up in the morning........................ tongue And the husband just woke up so I haven't had a chance to go through the news this a.m. Crap! Everyone is awake! shocked

Be back later.
Crystal

Oh, am so sorry to hear that. I could imagine that this older lady loved her doggy. sad

Hope the coffee was tasting good today anyway. wink

@swamp
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