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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 47059 times)
Swamprat
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« Reply #4530 on: Jul 13th, 2011, 2:26pm »

Alan Greenspan: It's the Gen-Xers Fault They're Out of Work

By Elizabeth MacDonald
Published July 13, 2011
FOXBusiness

Apparently the problem with the American jobs picture is the American worker.

At least that’s what Alan Greenspan thinks.

We are, he says, too young, dumb and unproductive as a workforce. The Baby Boomers were better, finding ways to do more with less, but they are retiring in droves. As they hit the links, their ranks of replacements don’t measure up.

Here are his [Greenspan’s] words, in an interview with The Globalist:
"Baby boomers are being replaced by groups of young workers who have regrettably scored rather poorly in international educational match-ups over the last two decades. The average income of U.S. households headed by 25-year-olds and younger has been declining relative to the average income of the baby boomer population. This is a reasonably good indication that the productivity of the younger part of our workforce is declining relative to the level of productivity achieved by the retiring baby boomers. This raises some major concerns about the productive skills of our future U.S. labor force."

There is, sadly, much truth in what he says. The degradation of our educational system, thanks to a lack of accountability and a general resistance to innovation, is well-documented.

It has been difficult for American students to keep pace with those from overseas when viewed through the lens of quantitative, objective metrics like standardized tests.

But the lack of productivity Greenspan frets over can arguably also be set at the feet of our growing entitlement culture, which we explored in some detail several weeks ago for Entitlement Nation Week. Being a productive worker means having a commitment to honest labor.

That has eroded as more people have relied upon the federal government for the growth of their household wealth. That, in turn, has led to a troubling change in attitude in this country.

As [Pulitzer prize winning syndicated columnist] George Will put it, “Americans, endowed by their solicitous government with an ever-expanding array of entitlements, now have the whiny mentality that an entitlement culture breeds.”

The question then becomes, “How do we fix this?” To Greenspan, it is to “Go West, young man.” Or East, North, and South for that matter.

Just go anywhere else but here and find someone who is willing and able to work:
"Most high-income people in our country do not realize that their incomes are being subsidized by their protection from competition from highly skilled people who are prevented from immigrating to the United States,” Greenspan said. “But we need such skills in order to staff our productive economy, so that the standard of living for Americans as a whole can grow."

Think of that last line for a moment. We need to import labor – intelligent, skilled labor – to guarantee that Americans’ standard of living is maintained.

Have we indeed fallen so far?

Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2011/07/13/alan-greenspan-its-gen-xers-fault-theyre-out-work/#ixzz1S0v6Pfy0
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« Reply #4531 on: Jul 13th, 2011, 7:20pm »

Turkey's Gobekli Tepe

Video: http://www.wimp.com/unexplainedstructure/

Wikipedia

Göbekli Tepe [ɡøbe̞kli ťe̞pɛ] is a hilltop sanctuary erected on the highest point of an elongated mountain ridge some 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) northeast of the town of Şanlıurfa (formerly Urfa / Edessa) in southeastern Turkey. The site, currently undergoing excavation by German and Turkish archaeologists, was erected by hunter-gatherers in the 9th millennium BC (c. 11,000 years ago).

Discovery

Göbekli Tepe is located in southeastern Turkey. Since 1995 excavations have been conducted by the German Archaeological Institute (Istanbul branch) and Şanlıurfa Museum, under the direction of the German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt (1995–2000: University of Heidelberg; since 2001: German Archaeological Institute). They soon discovered T-shaped pillars, some of which had apparently undergone attempts at smashing.

The complex

Göbekli Tepe is the oldest human-made place of worship yet discovered. Until excavations began, a complex on this scale was not thought possible for a community so ancient. The massive sequence of stratification layers suggests several millennia of activity, perhaps reaching back to the Mesolithic. The oldest occupation layer (stratum III) contains monolithic pillars linked by coarsely built walls to form circular or oval structures. Four such buildings have been uncovered, with diameters between 10–30 metres (33–98 ft). Geophysical surveys indicate the existence of 16 additional structures.

The monoliths are decorated with carved reliefs of animals and of abstract pictograms. The pictograms may represent commonly understood sacred symbols, as known from Neolithic cave paintings elsewhere. The carefully carved figurative reliefs depict lions, bulls, boars, foxes, gazelles, asses, snakes and other reptiles, insects, arachnids, and birds, particularly vultures and water fowl.

Few humanoid forms have surfaced at Göbekli Tepe, but it includes a relief of a naked woman, posed frontally in a crouched position, that Schmidt likens to the Venus accueillante figures found in Neolithic north Africa; and of at least one decapitated corpse surrounded by vultures.

Some of the pillars, namely the T-shaped ones, have carved arms,
which may indicate that they represent stylized humans (or anthropomorphic gods). Another example is decorated with human hands in what could be interpreted as a prayer gesture, with a simple stole or surplice engraved above; this may be intended to represent a temple priest.

Architecture

The houses or temples are round megalithic buildings. The walls are made of unworked dry stone and include numerous T-shaped monolithic pillars of limestone that are up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) high. Another, bigger pair of pillars is placed in the centre of the structures. There is evidence that the structures were roofed; the central pair of pillars may have supported the roof. The floors are made of terrazzo (burnt lime), and there is a low bench running along the whole of the exterior wall.

The reliefs on the pillars include foxes, lions, cattle, wild boars, wild asses, herons, ducks, scorpions, ants, spiders, many snakes, and a very few anthropomorphic figures. Some of the reliefs have been deliberately erased, maybe in preparation for new designs. There are freestanding sculptures as well that may represent wild boars or foxes.

The site was deliberately backfilled sometime after 8000 BC: the buildings are covered with settlement refuse that must have been brought from elsewhere. These deposits include flint tools like scrapers and arrowheads and animal bones.

Chronological context

All statements about the site must be considered preliminary, as only about 5% of the site's total area has been excavated as yet; floor levels have been reached in only the second complex (complex B), which also contained a terrazzo-like floor. Schmidt believes that the dig could well continue for another fifty years, "and barely scratch the surface." So far excavations have revealed very little evidence for residential use. Through the radiocarbon method, the end of stratum III can be fixed at c. 9000 BC (see above); its beginnings are estimated to 11,000 BC or earlier. Stratum II dates to about 8000 BC.

Thus, the structures not only predate pottery, metallurgy, and the invention of writing or the wheel; they were built before the so-called Neolithic Revolution, i.e., the beginning of agriculture and animal husbandry around 9000 BC. But the construction of Göbekli Tepe implies organisation of an order of complexity not hitherto associated with pre-Neolithic societies.

The complex was not simply abandoned and forgotten, to be gradually destroyed by the elements. Instead, it was deliberately buried under 300 to 500 cubic metres (390 to 650 cu yd) of soil. Why this was done is unknown, but it preserved the monuments for posterity.

Interpretation and importance


Göbekli Tepe is regarded as an archaeological discovery of the greatest importance since it could profoundly change our understanding of a crucial stage in the development of human societies.

Not only its large dimensions, but the side-by-side existence of multiple pillar shrines makes the location unique. There are no comparable monumental complexes from its time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6bekli_Tepe
« Last Edit: Jul 13th, 2011, 7:22pm by Swamprat » User IP Logged

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« Reply #4532 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 07:56am »

on Jul 13th, 2011, 12:04pm, philliman wrote:
Hope you're doggy is getting better soon. sad


Good morning Phil,

Bitsie is at the vet's. Schnauzers are prone to pancreatitis. They are running tests. Hopefully she will get to come home this afternoon.

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« Reply #4533 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 07:57am »

on Jul 13th, 2011, 2:23pm, Swamprat wrote:
Sorry to hear, Crystal! My 13 year old lab cannot get up by himself. I get him up to go outside every four hours. It's tough!

Swamp


Good morning Swamp,

They are your heart aren't they these hairy family members! Give that sweet lab a hug for me. Bitsie should be home this afternoon.

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« Reply #4534 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 08:01am »

New York Times

July 14, 2011, 7:15 am
JPMorgan’s Quarterly Profit Rises 13%, to $5.4 Billion
By ERIC DASH

JPMorgan Chase reported on Thursday that second-quarter profit rose 13 percent, to $5.4 billion, from the period a year earlier, despite lingering mortgage troubles and lackluster trading results.

It was a decent start to earnings season for the banking industry, which is confronted by a stagnant economy in the United States, fiscal troubles in Europe and global regulatory uncertainty.

Despite market weakness, JPMorgan had a solid showing in its Wall Street businesses. The results on the consumer side were varied. With credit defaults on the decline, the bank saw a $1 billion benefit from the reversal of more funds that had been set aside for loan losses. Even so, the home lending unit continued to struggle, as the bank added $1.3 billion to its litigation reserves mainly related to the mortgage business.

Overall, JPMorgan announced a profit of $5.4 billion during the second quarter, or $1.28 a share, easily besting analyst consensus estimates of $1.21 a share. Earnings were down modestly from the $5.6 billion, or $1.29 a share that it earned in the first quarter, when its investment banking unit had an unusually strong trading record.

Revenue — under pressure across the banking industry – was relatively strong. At JPMorgan, it rose 7 percent from a year earlier to $27.4 billion, even as a slowdown in mortgage lending and fixed-income trading cut into the bank’s income.

The strong earnings at JPMorgan, a diversified bank that is often considered a crucial indicator for the rest of financial industry, could give a much-needed jolt to bank stocks, which have fallen sharply over the last few weeks. Citigroup reports on Friday, while Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, Wells Fargo, and Morgan Stanley will release their results in the coming weeks.

Still, investors are increasingly worried about the banks’ prospect for growth. Troubling unemployment trends, higher capital requirements, and the eliminating of lucrative fees are raising questions about where they will find new sources of revenue. Stock and bond trading, which has helped prop up the banks results over the last two years, is waning as nervous investors rush to the sidelines with cash.

Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan’s chairman and chief executive, put a positive spin on his bank’s second quarter results. In a statement, he praised a “solid performance across most of our businesses” and noted a marked improvement in credit that was approaching a “more normalized environment” in both its consumer and corporate lending operations.

But questions loom over two of its biggest businesses: its home lending unit and its investment bank.

With mortgage losses running at almost $5 billion a year, Mr. Dimon replaced several of the managers responsible for running the unit in late June and vowed to fix past mistakes. But troubled loans keep haunting the bank.

The firm faces billions of dollars in potential legal claims stemming from the housing crisis. Federal and state regulators are leaning hard on it and other large servicers to radically overhaul servicing operations, changes that are driving up costs.

Then there’s the expected settlement over mortgage issues. Bank of America warned late last month that it planned to absorb a $20 billion hit to its earnings to clean up its mortgage – and it still could add billions more to cover future losses. Although JPMorgan moved faster that peers to address the issues, it could take awhile to put their mortgage problems behind.

In the statement, Mr. Dimon said that despite a modest improvement in loan performance, he expected that losses would remain elevated. The bank also took another $1 billion charge to cover increased foreclosure expenses, on top of the $1.1 billion hit it took in the first quarter to cover the spiraling costs of servicing loans.

“We have been working hard to fix our problems and address past mistakes,” he said. “Unfortunately, it will take some time to resolve these issues and it is possible that we will incur additional costs along the way.”

JPMorgan has added over $7.3 billion to its litigation reserves over the last five quarters, and established a separate reserve of more than $5.6 billion to cover losses stemming from the repurchase of faulty loans sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-controlled finance companies.

Banking analysts say the mortgage problems could cost the bank up to $9 billion. But armed with those reserves, JPMorgan Chase executives have said they have ample resources to cope with the expected losses.

JPMorgan’s investment bank fared better. Its fixed-income and commodities operations were particularly hard hit, falling more than 18 percent from the first three months of the year amid a sharp reversal in the markets in early May. Stock trading revenue was down 13 from the first quarter because of lower volumes.

But the investment bank benefited from an improvement in its credit portfolio as well as strong performance in its deal advisory and equity writing businesses. Investment banking fees rose 8 percent from first quarter.

The bank’s other major businesses performed well, despite the challenging economic environment. Its credit card lending arm posted a $911 million profit after yet another big release of funds it had set aside to cover losses. The big commercial banking unit booked a $611 profit, amid a 9 percent increase in revenue.

Chase Retail banking, which includes the troubled mortgage group, squeezed out a $582 million profit. Meanwhile, the asset management and treasury services units also had decent quarters amid the turbulent markets.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/jpmorgan-chase-quarterly-profit-rises-13/?hp

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« Reply #4535 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 08:03am »

Well poop! My better half is awake now and clamouring for coffee. Be back later............

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« Reply #4536 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 11:40am »

The Hill

Gang of Six talks heat up as White House debt-limit talks melt down
By Alexander Bolton
07/14/11 10:33 AM ET

Talks among the remaining members of the Senate’s Gang of Six have gained new momentum in recent days as negotiations between President Obama and congressional leaders have faltered.

The five active members of the gang met for two and a half hours in the office of Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) Wednesday evening to eat dinner and make a penultimate push to a deal.

The sixth member, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), who had taken a hiatus from the group, says he is thinking about returning, and has given the group a new round of deficit-reduction proposals to consider.

Aides to the Gang of Six members — who have taken to calling the members “five guys” since Coburn left — worked late into the night to put their progress into writing.

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), one of the members of the group, said he and his colleagues made a lot of progress Wednesday. Several members also met earlier in the day.

“We’ve worked tonight, made a lot of progress,” he said Wednesday. “We got people reducing things to writing tonight, and tomorrow and we’ll see when we get back together tomorrow if people want to go forward.”

The remaining members of the gang — Conrad, Warner, Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin (Ill.), Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) and Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) — planned to meet again Thursday.

One possible deal would be to put together a legislative package that could be unveiled soon and brought in pieces to the Senate floor as a series of amendments.

Chambliss and Warner met with women Senate colleagues Wednesday afternoon to brief them on the recent progress, according to Senate sources.

Members of the gang hope they can persuade a broader group of colleagues to buy into their efforts, which have spanned months and included countless hours of meetings.

Conrad said members of the group have gathered “several times a week” in recent weeks, and that he would welcome Coburn’s return.

Coburn said Wednesday that he is contemplating coming back to the group, and that he had floated a new round of deficit-cutting proposals to the group and is waiting on the response before deciding to rejoin.

He recently unveiled a proposal with Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) to cut Medicare costs through a variety of reforms, such as raising the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67.

Coburn did not attend Wednesday evening’s meetings.

The talks have appeared to gain momentum as the prospect of Obama and GOP leaders reaching a grand bargain to reduce the deficit by $3 trillion or $4 trillion is becoming increasingly unlikely.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) accused Obama of abruptly walking out of a meeting late Wednesday after the president gave Cantor what a Democratic source described as a “dressing down.”

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he had lost hope in a far-reaching deal to reduce annual deficits.

“After years of discussions and months of negotiations, I have little question that as long as this president is in the Oval Office, a real solution is unattainable,” McConnell said Tuesday morning.

Obama and congressional leaders are negotiating a solution to raise the debt limit by Aug. 2, while the remaining Gang of Six members are focused on a long-term deficit-reduction package separate and apart from the debt ceiling.

Those paths could cross, however, if Obama and GOP leaders cannot agree to raise the debt limit because of entrenched disagreements over how to reduce the deficit.

If a bipartisan group of senators can put together a framework to save the federal government $3 to $4 trillion over the next decade, it could be incorporated in a debt-limit deal. But with less than three weeks until the deadline, time is running out on such a complicated maneuver.

“They are working on an extension of the debt limit. We are working on a plan to deal with the debt. That is a different thing. At some point there may be some connection but we have not been working on an extension of the debt limit,” Conrad said.

http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/171453-gang-of-six-talks-heat-up-as-white-house-deficit-reduction-negotiations-melt-down

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« Reply #4537 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 11:47am »

Wired Danger Room

Senators Ask Spy Chief: Are You Tracking Us Through Our iPhones?
By Spencer Ackerman
July 14, 2011 | 9:26 am
Categories: Spies, Secrecy and Surveillance


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Two key senators want to know if the leader of the vast U.S. intelligence apparatus believes it’s legal for spooks to track where you go through your iPhone.

In a letter that Sens. Mark Udall of Colorado and Ron Wyden of Oregon will send later on Thursday, obtained by Danger Room, the senators ask Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, “Do government agencies have the authority to collect the geolocation information of American citizens for intelligence purposes?”

Both senators are members of the panel overseeing the 16 intelligence agencies. In May, they sounded warnings that the Obama administration was secretly reinterpreting the Patriot Act to allow a broader amount of domestic surveillance than it had publicly disclosed.

“[R]ecent advances in geolocation technology have made it increasingly easy to secretly track the movements and whereabouts of individual Americans on an ongoing, 24/7 basis,” they write. “Law enforcement agencies have relied on a variety of different methods to conduct this sort of electronic surveillance, including the acquisition of cell phone mobility data from communications companies as well as the use of tracking devices covertly installed by the law enforcement agencies themselves.”

Geolocation is a particular interest of Wyden’s. Technically, there are few obstacles to clandestine geodata collection, since most mobile phones feature built-in GPS. So along with a House Republican, Jason Chaffetz, Wyden introduced a bill that would require warrants for law enforcement to collect geodata. As our sister blog Threat Level has reported, a patchwork of inconsistent recent court rulings has yet to resolve whether geolocation data is protected by the Fourth Amendment.

But intelligence collection is a horse of a different color. The 2008 FISA Amendments Act that blessed the Bush administration’s warrantless surveillance programs allowed intelligence agencies greater leeway to collect metadata on Americans’ communications abroad. It’s unclear to the senators if that or any other law prompted the spy community to move into geolocation collection.

That’s why Wyden and Udall want “unclassified answers” from Clapper. If Clapper thinks his spies can go after U.S. citizens’ geodata, they want the “specific statutory basis” for that collection, along with a description of any “judicial review or approval by particular officials” that might accompany it. They also want to know if Clapper thinks there’s any affirmative legal “prohibition” to geodata collection by spies, if the spy chief doesn’t think it’s legal.

The senators note that legislative restrictions on GPS acquisition so far only apply to cops and feds, not spies. “Clearly Congress needs to also understand how intelligence authorities are being interpreted as it begins to consider legislation on this issue,” they write.

They also remind Clapper that the FISA Amendments Act is set to expire at the end of the year. The letter asks Clapper to disclose if the surveillance dragnet it authorizes includes the communications of “law-abiding Americans,” the key objection from civil libertarians to the Act, and if any “significant interpretations of the FISA Amendments Act [are] currently classified.”

That’s the “secret law” fear that vexes Udall and Wyden. And if it applies to the Patriot Act and geolocation collection, it might also apply to more traditional avenues of government surveillance.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/07/senators-ask-spy-chief-are-you-tracking-us-through-our-iphones/#more-51820

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« Reply #4538 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 11:52am »

Reuters

Suspected militants interrogated in India's Mumbai

By Swati Pandey and Tony Munroe
MUMBAI | Thu Jul 14, 2011 11:34am EDT

Indian police sifted through forensic evidence and security camera footage and questioned members of a home-grown Islamist militant group for clues to the worst bomb blasts in Mumbai since Pakistan-based militants attacked the financial hub in 2008, officials said on Thursday.

There has so far been no claim of responsibility for setting off three near-simultaneous improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which were packed with ammonium nitrate during evening rush hour on Wednesday, killing 18 people.

"There was no intelligence regarding a militant attack in Mumbai. That is not a failure of intelligence agencies," Home Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram told a news conference.

"(We) know that perpetrators have attacked and have worked in a very, very clandestine manner."

He said it was too early to point the finger at a particular group, but said the "coordinated terror attacks" could be in retaliation to a number of plots recently stopped by police or arrests, including from the Indian Mujahideen.

The home ministry said in a statement police were interrogating some Indian Mujahideen members who were arrested some days before the attack, but it had no specific leads on who could be responsible.

The Indian Mujahideen is a shadowy home-grown militant group known for its city-to-city bombing campaigns using small explosive devices planted in restaurants, at bus stops and on busy streets.

The group has been accused of ties to Pakistani militant groups involved in attacks in Indian Kashmir as well as elsewhere in the country.

"It's very likely coordinated by Indian Mujahideen looking at the severity and scale of the attacks -- in the past they've used tiffin carrier bombs and IEDs," said Rohan Gunaratna, a Singapore-based al Qaeda expert.

The bombings were the biggest attacks on Mumbai since the 2008 assaults killed 166 people, raised tensions with nuclear rival Pakistan, and left a city on edge.

After a two-year chill following the November attacks, India and Pakistan have been trying to normalize ties and later in July their foreign ministers are due to hold talks.

Pakistani leaders were swift in condemning the bombings, as was U.S. President Barack Obama. Top U.S. diplomat Hillary Clinton is also due in India for scheduled talks next week.

Any suggestion of attributing blame for the latest bombings to Pakistan-based groups would complicate a fraught relationship between the two countries, and further unravel Pakistan's ties with the United States.

"We live in the most troubled neighborhood in the world. Pakistan and Afghanistan are the epicenter of terrorism," said Chidambaram, adding that Pakistan had still not given India support in pursuing those behind the 2008 attacks in Mumbai.

India's main opposition, the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), blamed the government for its laxness toward security.

"This repeated attacks on Bombay should be viewed as a policy failure. It is not an intelligence failure," top BJP leader L.K. Advani, a former deputy prime minister, said.

Chidambaram said 18 people had died in the attacks, lowering an earlier figure of 21. He said 23 of the 131 wounded and admitted to hospitals were in a critical state.

JEWELRY TARGETS

The blasts came as beleaguered Prime Minister Manmohan Singh struggles to get past a series of corruption scandals and a resurgent opposition that has led to policy paralysis in Asia's third largest economy. A cabinet reshuffle this week was criticized as too little, too late.

Singh left for Mumbai on Thursday evening, but details of his visit were not immediately available.

Mumbai, a coastal city of 20 million people that is home to India's main stock exchanges, has a long history of deadly bombings and Wednesday's attacks did not rattle financial markets.

The bombings were centered mainly on south Mumbai's bustling jewelry market districts, crowded with diamond and precious metals traders and artisans.

The blasts occurred at rush hour at about 6.45 pm (1315 GMT) on Wednesday within minutes of each other. One bomb was placed at the side of the road, concealed under garbage and a food cart, another hidden under an umbrella near a motorbike and a third on the roof of a bus stop.

"These IEDs were not crude devices, but it seems that they were made with some sophistication. Those who made them had prior training," Home Secretary Raj Kumar Singh told reporters. He said they were detonated with some form of timers.

He said police were investigating whether electric wires found attached to a body had anything to do with the bombs. U.K. Bansal, the country's top internal security official, did not rule out the possibility of a suicide bomber but said there was no firm evidence yet.

The biggest and deadliest blast was in the Opera House area, a crowded hub for diamond traders. Pakistani-based militants carried out the rampage in 2008 near the same area.

Another blast, also in south Mumbai, was at the Zaveri Bazaar, India's largest bullion market which was hit twice in the past. The third blast was at Dadar, in a street housing Muslim and Hindu shops in the center of the coastal city.

(Writing by Paul de Bendern, additional reporting by James Pomfret, Annie Banerji and C.J. Kuncheria in NEW DELHI, Rosemary Arackaparambil, Rajendra Jadhav, Kaustabh Kulkarni and Jui Chakravorty in MUMBAI; Editing by Sugita Katyal)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/14/us-india-blast-mumbai-idUSTRE76C2Y420110714

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« Reply #4539 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 11:59am »

Geek Tyrant

Geek Belts Keep Your Pants On/Create Great Pick-Up Lines

14 July 2011
by Robot Reagan

That's right for the low price of 20 bucks, you can be the Belle of the LAN party with this nifty belt buckle courtesy of etsy.com! It's not just for the PC buffs however Mac users, you too can get a mouse of your beloved brand for a much higher price, a pretentious attitude, and same functionality (ok, same price but you know you like paying for "quality").

It's not often Geek fashion gets something this cool (see early 2000's scrolling marquee belt) so if you plan on buying one to wow the dark haired horned rimmed she-devil in your local grotto, here's some conversation starters that might help you out.

"Double click to open babe"

"Right click to move forward"

"You should see my flash drive"


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Got anything better? Put it in the comments below, and good luck...you sly devil you.

http://geektyrant.com/news/2011/7/14/geek-belts-keep-your-pants-oncreate-great-pick-up-lines.html

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« Reply #4540 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 12:01pm »

.


Please be an angel


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« Reply #4541 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 2:29pm »

Northern Light newspaper.


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Swamprat
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4542 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 2:36pm »

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"Let's see what's over there."
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4543 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 2:44pm »

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4544 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 2:52pm »

Thank you Swamprat.

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