Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jul 29th, 2017, 06:44am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 30 31 32 33 34  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 98313 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #465 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 5:50pm »

on Aug 5th, 2010, 12:12pm, philliman wrote:
Oh, am so sorry to hear that. I could imagine that this older lady loved her doggy. sad

Hope the coffee was tasting good today anyway. wink

@swamp
grin


Hi Phil,
She's doing a lot better, thanks for the thoughts. He lived to be 16 so that may help some later.

Coffee is always good. We are coffee nuts around here.
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #466 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 6:37pm »



User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #467 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 6:38pm »



User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #468 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 6:43pm »




Sighting report given by explorerSG1
August 04, 2010
On August 3, 2010 around 7:09PM in Mesa, AZ, I saw a lengthy flash of light in the North West that stayed in view for about 14 seconds while I was taking pictures of a jet. I took several pictures of the flash of light before it disappeared from my view. That light looked like a white/yellow color light with the intensity of a dim star.
Then about 11 minutes and 18 seconds later, I spotted a brilliant light similar to a bright star in the South West sky that just seem to just instantaneously appear in the sky not too far away from me. The color of the light appeared to be more of a lightest orange color with a hint of yellow in it. The light did flicker some but it mostly stay lit throughout my viewing. When I first spotted the object, I immediately started taking pictures of the UFO. It appeared to be very high up in the sky, and it was moving possibility at about the speed of a high altitude jet. I saw now contrails. In the beginning, the object did appeared to stay brightly lit, and it appeared to be flying in a straight path, but all that changed near the end of my picture session. At several points in the viewing, the object appeared to be move irrationally as in a sideway motion back and forth or a quick splurge in forward motion. It also appeared to be making a wide sweeping turn and at times a sudden change of direction to the right but still continue to stay on coarse westerly direction. Also towards the end of the sighting, the object began to appear varying in light intensity which eventually began to slowly dim to a point to which it appeared to vanished. I continued to take 3 to 5 more pictures after I lost visual contact with the object which those pictures shows that the object was still visible but only to the camera. That sighting lasted 6 minutes and 26 seconds.
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #469 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 7:03pm »

Michelle Obama's digs in Marbella. She brought half of Washington with her. She's staying at a place referred to as "the Millionaire's playground". She's spending money like it's ours. No wait..................it IS ours.

User Image

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #470 on: Aug 5th, 2010, 8:52pm »



User Image
Sedona

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #471 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 07:53am »

Please be an angel

User Image

www.soldiersangels.org
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #472 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 07:58am »

New York Times

August 6, 2010
Private Growth Is Tepid as U.S. Economy Sheds Jobs Overall
By MOTOKO RICH

With the American economic recovery hanging in the balance, private employers added 71,000 jobs in July, up from a revised 31,000 in June but below the consensus forecast of 90,000. The unemployment rate stayed steady at 9.5 percent.

Over all, the nation lost 131,000 jobs in July, more than expected, but many of those losses came as federal Census Bureau workers left their temporary posts. The government also sharply revised the overall June number, saying the economy lost 221,000 jobs instead of 125,000.

Figures released last week confirmed that the United States economy slowed down in the spring, and the Department of Labor’s monthly statistical snapshot of hiring pointed toward a stall in hiring this summer, as employers failed to add jobs at the rate they were earlier this year.

With some economists predicting a “double dip” back into recession and the political stakes for the Obama administration rising as the weeks tick closer to the midterm elections, Friday’s unemployment report renewed pressure on lawmakers to consider the next steps they might take to bolster the economy. Recent indicators focusing on consumer confidence, retail sales and housing appear to put the economy in a holding pattern. Earlier this week, a crucial index of manufacturing showed that activity had slipped slightly in July, chain stores reported anemic increases in sales and unemployment claims rose above the level usual for this stage of a recovery. On the more positive side, auto sales increased 5.1 percent in July compared with a year earlier, although from a very low base.

For now, companies appear nervous about expanding their payrolls too quickly. “Businesses just don’t want to hire,” said Allen Sinai, chief global economist at Decision Economics. “Workers are too costly and it’s very easy to substitute technology for labor.”

He added that with corporate earnings rising partly on the back of cost-cutting, employers are reluctant to give up profits. “So while corporate earnings were spectacular,” Mr. Sinai said, “the job market just stinks.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/07/business/economy/07econ.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #473 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:00am »

New York Times

August 5, 2010
U.S. Tells WikiLeaks to Return Afghan War Logs
By ERIC SCHMITT

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon demanded on Thursday that WikiLeaks “do the right thing” and remove from its Web site tens of thousands of classified documents about the war in Afghanistan, and return to the military thousands of others that it had not yet made public.

Geoff Morrell, the Pentagon press secretary, said the Web site’s disclosure last week of a six-year archive of some 77,000 documents gave the Taliban and other militant groups insights into American military tactics and techniques, showed how the United States protects its troops in war zones and revealed the names of Afghan informants and how the military cultivates them.

Most of Mr. Morrell’s briefing focused on the information WikiLeaks had already made public. But Pentagon officials are especially concerned about 15,000 additional documents that WikiLeaks has withheld so far to remove identifying information.

“Public disclosure of additional Defense Department classified information can only make the damage worse,” Mr. Morrell told reporters at the Pentagon. “We are asking them to do the right thing. We hope they will honor our demands and comply with our demands.”

Mr. Morrell’s appeal is the Obama administration’s latest response to the disclosure, which has set off a criminal inquiry by the Army and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, prompted a sweeping Pentagon review of the documents to hunt for any information damaging to troop safety and national security, and increased pressure on President Obama to defend his war strategy.

Mr. Morrell said the Pentagon had formed a team of 80 analysts from the military and the F.B.I. who are working around the clock to vet the documents for damaging information. So far the team, which is expected to increase to about 125 people in the coming days, has conducted about 400 “key word” searches through the 77,000 disclosed documents.

When those searches turn up information, Mr. Morrell said, it is set aside for further analysis. After this initial review is completed, the Pentagon will conduct a separate “page by page, word by word” review of each and every document, he said.

When the teams find information “of concern,” the Pentagon notifies the foreign government involved, he said. If the information identifies Afghans who provided information to allied troops or otherwise associate with the troops, the military notifies its headquarters in Kabul, which in turn is taking undisclosed steps to safeguard those people.

“I can’t say we’ve seen any direct impacts here yet,” an American officer in eastern Afghanistan said this week of the disclosure. “On the other hand, this is pure gold if you know how to read them and what you’re looking for. Without confirming or denying anything posted, it amounts to our playbook for the past several years. If we had similar insight into insurgent operations, we could use it to great effect.”

Mr. Morrell acknowledged that given WikiLeaks’ past history of disclosing confidential information, he did not have high hopes that the organization would comply with the Defense Department’s demand.

Mr. Morrell said that if asking WikiLeaks respectfully did not work, the Pentagon would resort to other steps, which he did not describe. “We will figure out what other alternatives we have to compel them to do the right thing,” he said.

When asked why the Pentagon waited until now to ask WikiLeaks to return the undisclosed documents and remove the posted information from its Web site, Mr. Morrell said senior officials had been deliberating about what steps to take.

“The only acceptable course is for WikiLeaks to take steps immediately to return all versions of all of these documents to the U.S. government and permanently delete them from its Web site, computers and records,” he said.

Neither Julian Assange, an Australian computer specialist who founded WikiLeaks, nor a spokesman for the Web site replied to e-mail messages on Thursday requesting comment on the Pentagon demand.

The New York Times, the British newspaper The Guardian and the German magazine Der Spiegel, after being given early access by WikiLeaks, published excerpts but excluded those that identified individuals or compromised operations. The Times also agreed to forward a request by the administration urging WikiLeaks not to post online any documents that would put informants in jeopardy.

Last week, WikiLeaks posted an enormous, 1.4-gigabyte file on a file-sharing network and on the Web page where it published the Afghan war logs. The file is encrypted and entitled “insurance file.” Cryptome, another Web site that posts government documents, said it was making a copy of the encrypted file and speculated that it might contain other confidential documents, “pre-positioned for public release” via a password that would be made public in the event that WikiLeaks was taken down.

The military has charged an intelligence analyst, Pfc. Bradley Manning, with downloading large amounts of classified information from a computer at a base in Iraq and sending it to WikiLeaks, which operates from servers scattered across multiple countries and solicits “classified, censored or otherwise restricted material of political, diplomatic or ethical significance.”

Military officials have said that Army investigators also consider Private Manning a “person of interest” in the investigation into the Web site’s most recent disclosures.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/06/world/asia/06wiki.html?ref=world

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #474 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:05am »

Telegraph

Government release UFO witness drawings
Published: 7:11PM BST 05 Aug 2010

The Government has released a series of hand-drawn images that witness claim are genuine UFO sightings.

video after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/weirdnewsvideo/7929131/Government-release-UFO-witness-drawings.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #475 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:11am »

Telegraph

Australian states fight over ownership of giant crocodile
A remarkable photograph of a giant crocodile measuring 22ft from nose to tail has sparked a war of words in Australia over which state the beast belongs to.

Published: 7:00AM BST 06 Aug 2010

The exceptionally large reptile was believed to have been shot after terrorising a town in the Northern Territory during the 1990s.

Jeida Francis, 23, told the Northern Territory News that the deadly saltwater crocodile was caught in Manangoora, an outstation south-east of Darwin.

User Image

Mr. Francis said that members of the community had seen others even bigger since the monster was shot.

"It was massive. There were three huge ones out there. One of them is still out there at the moment," Mr Francis said.

"It is pretty well fed," he said of the dead crocodile. "It took two LandCruisers to pull it out. They have one croc that is still out there. He should be getting to this size by now."

Mr Francis said his aunt took the photograph.

However, his claims have been disputed by a Queensland man who has claimed that the photograph was taken just four years ago.

Chas Cole, from Katherine, said the image, which has become popular on the internet, came from Queensland.

"It was a friend of mine, who was a structural engineer, who took the photo," he said.

"It tangled himself on the cables and drowned to death".

Mr Cole said his friend took the photo half way between Normanton and Karumba in North Queensland.

"He sent me an email and said, 'look at this'."

The photograph has also appeared in the Cairns Post in December 2008 with a story claiming that the crocodile was shot in the Albert River, near the border with the Northern Territory.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/7929550/Australian-states-fight-over-ownership-of-giant-crocodile.html

Crystal
« Last Edit: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:12am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #476 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:16am »

Danger Room

5 Minute Delay Scuttles Chance at $40 Billion Air Force Deal
By Noah Shachtman August 5, 2010 | 3:55 pm | Categories: Air Force

Somehow, against all odds, the already-surreal competition to build America’s next fleet of tanker planes just got sillier and more venal. A tiny, troubled aerospace firm and its Ukrainian partner have been disqualified from the bidding because they handed in their proposal five minutes too late. The companies, for their part, insist that their messenger had a few minutes to spare.

For at least a decade, the Defense Department has been trying to replace its creaky cadre of Eisenhower-era refueling aircraft — the planes that keep the entire American fleet flying. A combination of corruption, jingoism, political preening, lack of will and sheer incompetence has kept Washington from accomplishing what should have been a relatively straightforward task. (Compared to, say, fighter jets, these tankers are technically simple.)

In 2003, the Air Force gave Boeing a $20 billion deal to lease some tankers. But the contract award process turned out to be beyond-shady; the deal was canceled. In 2008, EADS and Northrop seemingly beat out Boeing in a fair fight, winning up to $40 billion in business. Then the Government Accountability Office ruled that the competition wasn’t so fair, after all.

The ongoing drama has been manna for journalists and publishers, as Nathan Hodge recently pointed out. Not only has the tanker saga included everything from back room deals to dramatic reversals to heated Congressional hearings to military officials going to the pokey. The two main competitors, Boeing and EADS, also indirectly subsidized with their advertisements and marketing just about every defense industry publication around.

Then, on July 2nd, just when the steel cage match between Boeing and EADS looked like it might be heading for some sort of final resolution, into the octagon stepped a third wrestler.

Tiny California firm U.S. Aerospace said it would enter the tanker throw-down by partnering up with Antonov, a Ukrainian plane-maker. Never mind the SEC report that noted regulators’ “substantial doubt about the [U.S. Aerospace's] ability to continue as a going concern.” Never mind that the tag team wasn’t sure which plane it would modify for tanker duty, even though bids were due just a week hence.

Aviation analyst Richard Aboulafia called the whole thing “dumb beyond belief.” U.S. Aerospace didn’t exactly work hard to disprove him. A few days later, the company asked for an extra 60 days to submit its bid. (“Somewhere inside the Pentagon, a harried staffer has received an urgent, high-level tasker to check a thesaurus for appropriate and non-profane alternatives to the term “hell, no,” quipped Flight Global’s Stephen Trimble.)

The new team scrambled to get in its proposal on time, only to be rejected by the Air Force. So U.S. Aerospace turned to the Government Accountability Office for redress. After all, the GAO had already helped overturn the tanker deal once. Maybe they’d do it again.

According to Aviation Week ace Amy Butler, the company claims its messenger delivered the proposal to the gate of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio by 1:30 pm on July 9th. But the messenger had time to spare: The deadline was 2 p.m. that day. (What, you wouldn’t leave a contract worth tens of billions of dollars to the last half-hour, too?)

Anyway, Air Force guards allegedly denied the messenger access to the base. Then the guy got lost, once he was inside.

“By the time the papers reached their destination, the Air Force stamped the proposal as being received at 2:05,” Butler reports. Too late, in other words.

Air Force officials subsequently told a company representative that delays at installation gates are common (and they are — I’ve been subject to more than a few), and that the company should have anticipated this potential snag and planned appropriately.

But, the U.S. Aerospace argument is that Air Force personnel “intentionally delayed the messenger from delivering the proposal in order to create a pretext for refusing to consider it because they have political issues” with the principal supplier, Ukrainian state owned Antonov, according to the industry executive.

If this is proven to be true, it will bring the KC-X competition and the entire U.S. Air Force acquisition system to its knees after and already rough decade of missteps and scandals.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/air-force-gas-passer-fight-somehow-gets-even-more-absurd/#ixzz0vpbNO44w

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11819
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #477 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 08:21am »

Wired

How Asimov’s Robot Laws Ended Up on Last.fm’s Server
By Eliot Van Buskirk August 5, 2010 | 12:37 pm | Categories: People

Isaac Asimov set out his famous three laws of robotics in 'I, Robot,' thereby laying the foundation for our eventual robot overlords to show us some decency.
Like many websites, Last.fm’s web server contains a file called robots.txt, whose job it is to instruct the robotic web spiders employed by search engines like Google to ignore certain directories on the site.

Unlike other websites, Last.fm’s robots.txt file includes additional instructions in the form of Isaac Asimov’s famous three laws of robotics:

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

2. A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

In classic geek style, Last.fm’s robots.txt file translates those into machine-readable commands. After all, if robots are reading this stuff anyway, why not include Asimov’s laws there — just to be on the safe side? They appeared thusly:

Disallow: /harming/humans

Disallow: /ignoring/human/orders

Disallow: /harm/to/self

After going undetected for nearly six months, the existence of this easter egg was finally tweeted by former Last.fm employee Mustaqil Ali (private feed), although the definitive record of who found it first is difficult to establish. From there, traffic spiraled up to half a million pageviews over a period of a few days, which could be a record for plain text files, and would almost certainly constitute a record in a robots.txt division.

Last week, Last.fm “bug exterminator (department of pain)” and long-time programmer Jonty Wareing admitted that he added the codes.

Curiosity got the better of us, so we contacted Last.fm “web features ninja” Matthew Ogle to find out more about how this went down (interview edited for length and clarity).

Wired.com: Let’s cut to the chase. How did Isaac Asimov’s three laws of robotics end up on Last.fm’s robots.txt file?

Ogle: Not to name names, but one of our longest-standing employees here, Jonty, which is a very English name, maintains a lot of our core web infrastructure and has written a lot of the load balancers that we use, so he’s often in the guts of the machine, as it were. We use audio fingerprinting at Last.fm to automatically correct bad spelling in song metadata. [Last.fm's audioscrobbler can track what you play in iTunes, for instance, where you might have poorly-titled songs.] Google was indexing the misspelled pages and we didn’t want that to happen.

Literally half a year ago, Jonty was looking at this file called robots.txt, which is kind of funny to start with. Most people don’t realize it exists. Being a sci-fi buff, he decided that since this is the file that controls robots, it was time to add the three laws in there. Using the syntax of these robots files, he found a fairly elegant way of expressing Asimov’s laws in that form, typed it in and hit “commit.” When you commit code at Last.fm, it goes up on a screen in the web team area and a few other places, but he picked the right time of day and nobody batted an eyelid.

Fast-forward to last week. We can’t figure out who found it first, but three or four people sort of found it at once, or word spread really quickly. We have a robot that sits in our company IRC channel and monitors mentions of Last.fm on Twitter, and all of a sudden it lit up with links to robots.txt. We had a good laugh, and then said, ‘Alright, who did this?’ But there was really no mystery, because Jonty is the only one who would have done something like this.

He ‘fessed up on Twitter, then had to answer to a lot of science fiction purists who argued that he forgot the zero-eth law, which Asimov came up with afterwards, and which had to do with it being okay to harm a single human if that protects humanity. He said he left it out on purpose because it wasn’t in the original set, and there was lots of banter back and forth.

In the few days that it was blowing up, we had more than half a million hits to our robots.txt file, including 175,000 in a single 24-hour period, which is quite a record. We also saw a slight uptick in sign-ups to the site, so it ended up being a good bit of promotion for us, all from this really good geek joke.

Wired.com: It seems like robots.txt might be the fourth, or maybe fifth robot law, if you count the zero-eth. Did Asimov leave that out? Thou shalt not access a forbidden directory on a web server?

Ogle: The way Jonty would look at it is that any file that purports to be directing the activity of robots should include these laws. We were really just correcting an oversight in the spec for robots.txt files.

http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/08/robot-laws/#ixzz0vpcSfQI3

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Luvey
UFO Casebook Staff

member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 840
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #478 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 09:25am »

Lol..... laugh Boy is this becoming confuzzling... huh Same pic, different story, different place...the croc has grown a foot longer... gee... these newspapers can't get their act together.... laugh

on Aug 6th, 2010, 08:11am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Telegraph

Australian states fight over ownership of giant crocodile
A remarkable photograph of a giant crocodile measuring 22ft from nose to tail has sparked a war of words in Australia over which state the beast belongs to.

Published: 7:00AM BST 06 Aug 2010

The exceptionally large reptile was believed to have been shot after terrorising a town in the Northern Territory during the 1990s.

Jeida Francis, 23, told the Northern Territory News that the deadly saltwater crocodile was caught in Manangoora, an outstation south-east of Darwin.

User Image

Mr. Francis said that members of the community had seen others even bigger since the monster was shot.

"It was massive. There were three huge ones out there. One of them is still out there at the moment," Mr Francis said.

"It is pretty well fed," he said of the dead crocodile. "It took two LandCruisers to pull it out. They have one croc that is still out there. He should be getting to this size by now."

Mr Francis said his aunt took the photograph.

However, his claims have been disputed by a Queensland man who has claimed that the photograph was taken just four years ago.

Chas Cole, from Katherine, said the image, which has become popular on the internet, came from Queensland.

"It was a friend of mine, who was a structural engineer, who took the photo," he said.

"It tangled himself on the cables and drowned to death".

Mr Cole said his friend took the photo half way between Normanton and Karumba in North Queensland.

"He sent me an email and said, 'look at this'."

The photograph has also appeared in the Cairns Post in December 2008 with a story claiming that the crocodile was shot in the Albert River, near the border with the Northern Territory.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/7929550/Australian-states-fight-over-ownership-of-giant-crocodile.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

~ "When you master your mind, you master your life." ~

~ In every action there is an equal and opposite reaction ~
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #479 on: Aug 6th, 2010, 11:44am »

Wow! That's a big guy! shocked

And what a beautiful picture that is of that rock. smiley

User Image
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
Pages: 1 ... 30 31 32 33 34  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls