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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 79747 times)
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« Reply #4680 on: Jul 31st, 2011, 07:55am »

Wired Underwire

Jamie XX, Quayola Collaborate on Software Language for Music
By Alice Vincent
July 30, 2011 | 8:00 am
Categories: Art, Design and Fashion, music


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Quayola's new software language Partitura will transform music into visuals during live performances.
Image: Quayola



Visual artist Quayola has been devising a new form of software “language” to translate music, which will be debuted next month in a show with Jamie XX.

The electronic musician and producer du jour may have had a busy summer, but Jamie XX has been keen to work with Quayola to provide their joint audience with a unique immersive experience called Structures.

The two will perform in a venue lit only by two 56-foot widescreens, onto which computer-generated artwork will be screened in real time to a musical performance.

Together with artists Abstract Birds, Quayola has created Partitura, software that can both interpret sounds and transform them into visuals as well as being played like an instrument. Partitura’s been two years in the making, and differs from other algorithmic music visualizers in its impeccable attention to detail.

Quayola explains to Wired.co.uk: “Partitura is completely bespoke. We’re trying to develop a kind of coherent visual system, almost like a language, which has certain types of rules and parameters. We don’t just want to engage with sound and paint it, but come up with precise systems and relationships of the elements within the music. It’s not just a plug-and-play visualizer.”

The images produced by Partitura are inspired by the geographic artwork of Kandinsky, Paul Klee and Oscar Fischinger. While the visuals produced are unique to the music they are reacting to, Partitura operates along a horizontal line, reflecting the style of written music. The software offers control of more than 500 different visual parameters, as well as algorithms for creating “hundreds of different colors,” giving the artist a huge amount of power over the way Jamie XX’s music is interpreted. You can see some of the images Quayola’s software has made in Wired UK’s gallery.

Despite the focus on technology, however, Quayola is insistent that the performance will be focused on creativity. He says, “The nature of this project allows a lot of freedom between both fields. There is no narrative structure beside that of the music — I have been given this music and what I will do is give it another dimension. We’ll move forward within the shoe but with complete freedom to improvise, it’s not a presequenced animation.”

As for the audience, they can expect only the best in multisensory disorientation: “The connection I’d like the audience to feel is this ambiguity — that they don’t know if the visuals are reacting to the sound or the other way round.”

Tickets and information for the event can be found at Rizlab: http://www.rizlab.co.uk/

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2011/07/jamie-xx-quayola-partitura/

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« Reply #4681 on: Jul 31st, 2011, 08:00am »

MSN

'Inside Scientology' Author: 'They Have the Goods on Everybody'

29 July 2011
By Brent Lang
TheWrap

Scientology operates more as a business than as a church, relying on techniques perfected by car salesmen to attract new members and celebrities to its rolls.

That's just one of the takeaways from Janet Reitman’s controversial book about the world’s most controversial and secretive religion. “Inside Scientology” chronicles L. Ron Hubbard’s creation of Scientology six decades ago and traces its development into the faith of choice for movie stars such as John Travolta and Tom Cruise.

In an interview with TheWrap, Reitman, a Rolling Stone contributing editor, addressed blackmail rumors and talked about why Kabbalah may represent a bigger threat to it than any “South Park” parody.

“They have the goods on everybody,” she said regarding blackmail rumors. “You are constantly being asked to write up your transgressions, maybe even your unspoken transgressions.”

Consequently, she said, “They know everything about you.”

Is Scientology still a big religion in celebrity circles?

I totally think that celebrity Scientologists are hesitant to be public about it these days, but I don’t think they’ve ever had as many celebrities as people think. There are really very few. Cruise is a big celebrity. Travolta is a long-time celebrity. Jenna Elfman had a TV show, but most of these people aren’t huge celebrities.

Kabbalah has gotten the superstars. Demi Moore, Ashton Kutcher, Madonna -- those are big stars.

How effective has Cruise been as the public face of Scientology?

I don’t believe he’s been an effective face in terms of getting new members, but he’s been very effective in terms of getting the existing members excited.

There was a specific strategy in place to make Cruise into the model Scientologist. It was a promotional strategy and it’s been good and bad.

Existing members are not necessarily aware, of how the church is perceived. They are told they should not read newspapers, they would not have watched the “South Park” episode that makes fun of them, and they would not have read the magazine article that became the basis for my book. So from their viewpoint, Cruise’s behavior would be perceived completely differently than what we see. It would have made them really excited to see him jumping on Oprah’s couch.

There are all these rumors that celebrities like Cruise remain Scientologists because the church knows all their secrets and they fear blackmail. Any truth to that?

I didn’t go into that too much in my book, but it seems obvious. They have the goods on everybody. A great part of the Scientology experience is the confession that happens in the auditing experience [a type of counseling members receive]. You are constantly being asked to write up your transgressions, maybe even your unspoken transgressions.

They know everything about you. They would know everything about Cruise in the same way that they would know everything about me if I were a member.

How is the celebrity experience different than that of average Scientologists?

Basically to ensure that they have a happy experience, [celebrities] are shielded from anything negative. They have church appointed minders who guide them through the process.

They have no idea the level of control they’re under. If Scientology is a parallel universe than this is really a parallel universe.

There’s been a celebrity strategy since the mid-‘80s. They are seen as cash cows, as these amazing emotional tools. It’s very savvy what’s going on, so it’s not surprising that celebrities are treated in a wonderful way, a way that’s very different than an average member.

They are often looked at as more important than the clergy. You have these people who have been serving the church for 35 years who have to salute Tom Cruise and call him sir.

Why do you think Scientology remains so controversial?

I think it has to do with its history of secrecy and also its history of litigiousness. I do think that’s changed slightly. In so many ways it tries to not be so secretive anymore. It tries to be less aggressive than it was in the past. You don’t see them filing those giant lawsuits any longer.

I think it’s a residual effect. They pled guilt to conspiracy once. They conducted a domestic espionage operation. And you have all these people who left the church coming out about their experience.

What shocked you the most about Scientology?

I didn’t expect to find out how much of a business they were. They are almost like a multi-level marketing firm. They have a very shrewd marketing sense. They are drilled on how to sell. They use a book written by a car salesman that talks about sure-fire sales techniques and it shows you how to close the deal. It’s an essential part of their training.

http://entertainment.msn.com/news/article.aspx?news=661634

The Wrap
http://www.thewrap.com/media/article/inside-scientology-author-they-have-goods-everybody-29599

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« Reply #4682 on: Jul 31st, 2011, 09:15am »

Remember, if you can HEAR thunder, you can be hit by lightning--clouds or no clouds..... shocked


Britney Wehrle, 11-Year-Old Girl, Hit By Lightning On Sunny Afternoon

Simon McCormack First Posted: 7/27/11 11:11 AM ET

CANONSBURG, Pa. (Associated Press) -- An 11-year-old western Pennsylvania girl is recovering after she was struck by a bolt from the blue.

Lisa Wehrle tells the Observer-Reporter newspaper of Washington, Pa., that the sun was shining when her daughter, Britney, was struck by lightning Friday, apparently from a storm several miles away.

Lisa Wehrle says, "There was no rain. It was a beautiful day. All she heard was some thunder."

The lightning hit Britney as she was walking down a hill in North Strabane Township with a friend about 2:30 p.m. that day. The bolt hit her on the left shoulder, leaving a burn-like mark and exited her wrist, where it left another mark.

She was treated at a Pittsburgh hospital. Doctors discovered her arm was broken, but otherwise she's OK.

http://www.aol.com/2011/07/27/britney-wehrle_n_910831.html
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« Reply #4683 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 12:07am »

Good for a few laughs.....










hahahahahahaha
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4684 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 07:53am »

on Jul 31st, 2011, 09:15am, Swamprat wrote:
Remember, if you can HEAR thunder, you can be hit by lightning--clouds or no clouds..... shocked


Britney Wehrle, 11-Year-Old Girl, Hit By Lightning On Sunny Afternoon

Simon McCormack First Posted: 7/27/11 11:11 AM ET

CANONSBURG, Pa. (Associated Press) -- An 11-year-old western Pennsylvania girl is recovering after she was struck by a bolt from the blue.

Lisa Wehrle tells the Observer-Reporter newspaper of Washington, Pa., that the sun was shining when her daughter, Britney, was struck by lightning Friday, apparently from a storm several miles away.

Lisa Wehrle says, "There was no rain. It was a beautiful day. All she heard was some thunder."

The lightning hit Britney as she was walking down a hill in North Strabane Township with a friend about 2:30 p.m. that day. The bolt hit her on the left shoulder, leaving a burn-like mark and exited her wrist, where it left another mark.

She was treated at a Pittsburgh hospital. Doctors discovered her arm was broken, but otherwise she's OK.

http://www.aol.com/2011/07/27/britney-wehrle_n_910831.html


Good morning Swamprat,

Poor thing. Thank goodness she's okay. I hear thunder and I usually make a beeline for the house. We rarely get thunder and lightning here.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4685 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 07:54am »

on Aug 1st, 2011, 12:07am, murnut wrote:
Good for a few laughs.....












hahahahahahaha



MUR!

Shouldn't this be on OM? grin

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« Reply #4686 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 07:57am »

New York Times

August 1, 2011
Global Markets Are Up After U.S. Debt Deal
By MATTHEW SALTMARSH and BETTINA WASSENER

LONDON — European and Asian financial markets heaved a sigh of relief Monday over the last-minute agreement in Washington to raise the U.S. debt limit, shrugging off for now the lingering concerns about longer-term global growth prospects and the debt crisis in the euro-area.

Stock markets rallied across the region on news that U.S. policy makers had reached the framework for a budget deal that would clear the way for an increase in Washington’s borrowing limit and could help avert a default. The agreement has yet to be approved by the Senate and the House of Representatives.

The Euro Stoxx Europe 600 Index rose 0.7 percent in London by Monday afternoon and the FTSE 100 added 1.4 percent. The benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500 futures contract rallied 1 percent, setting the tone for a stronger opening on Wall Street.

“We’re seeing a relief rally on the U.S. debt deal, which was the cause of much uncertainty last week” said Stefan de Schutter, an asset manager at Alpha Trading in Frankfurt. “There’s more of an appetite for risk today. But if we look ahead, we’ll see a return to the focus on the economic problems in Europe.”

Shares in the giant bank HSBC rose 4.7 percent in London Monday after it reported better than expected first-half profit and that it would cut 25,000 jobs in the next two years.

The key index in Japan jumped 1.3 percent and the Hang Seng index in Hong Kong added 1 percent, picking up steam after the deal in Washington was announced by President Barack Obama.

In Japan, investors were also encouraged by the fall of the yen against the U.S. dollar after the debt deal.

The U.S. debt woes had undermined the dollar’s value in international currency markets in recent weeks, especially against the yen — a worrying trend for Japanese exporters, as a strong yen makes their goods more expensive for shoppers overseas.

Around midday in London on Monday, the dollar bought 77.1 yen, about 1 yen more than on Friday in New York.

The euro rose slightly against the dollar as some investors moved into currencies previously perceived to be higher risk. The euro stood around $1.4426 in London on Monday.

Expressing a general sense of guarded optimism about the debt deal, Yukio Edano, Japan’s chief cabinet secretary, said Monday, “We welcome the deal, which we hope will lead to market stability.”

Similarly, Wayne Swan, the Australian treasurer, said the debt agreement was an important first step but that U.S. fiscal consolidation was necessary to ensure global growth.

Aside from the details of the debt reduction plans, analysts said uncertainty remained about the subsequent ratification by Congress and the reaction of the ratings agencies.

“Last night’s deal is a good step forward but uncertainty will remain,” said Elsa Lignos, a senior currency strategist at Royal Bank of Canada in London.

The debt-ceiling debate, said David Carbon, an economist at DBS in Singapore, “has made people realize just how much there is left to do on the fiscal front.”

U.S. economic growth has been slow over several quarters, Mr. Carbon said, and the risk of a double-dip recession is now much greater than it appeared a year ago.

Gold, which has struck multiple record highs amid the uncertainty of the past weeks, fell nearly 1 percent to $1,613 per ounce. Oil rose about $1 to $97 a barrel.

The announcement of a deal between the Republicans and Democrats “could take some of the froth out of the gold market,” said Caroline Bain, economist with the Economist Intelligence Unit in London. “However, we expect the market to remain strong at least until 2013 when we expect the normalization of O.E.C.D. monetary policy to start in earnest.”

Also helping market sentiment in the Asia-Pacific region was fresh evidence that the Chinese economy may not be slowing as rapidly as feared.

A manufacturing index released by the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing on Monday showed a reading of 50.7 for July. That was slightly lower than the 50.9 reading in June but better than analysts had expected.

(An index over 50 indicates an expansion.)

Similarly, a separate index compiled by HSBC came in at 49.3 on Monday, better than the preliminary reading of 48.9 that the bank had published last month.

“China’s growth is slowing, but not as much as feared,” said Dariusz Kowalczyk, a strategist at Crédit Agricole in Hong Kong. “As for the global picture, the fear of a default has been put off, that’s clearly a relief.”

Many economists in the region see the slowdown in China as a welcome development, as the red-hot pace of growth has moderated to more sustainable levels. Beijing has been engineering the slowdown by gradually reining in bank lending and raising rates since last year.

While there is some nervousness that the Chinese authorities may tighten monetary policy too much, Mr. Carbon stressed that China, unlike the United States, had the ability to react quickly if the slowdown accelerated more than intended.

“If there is one economy in the world that can fix any mistakes quickly by dialing back again if needed, it is China,” he said.

Stocks in mainland China took the manufacturing data in stride. The Shanghai composite index was up 0.1 percent by midafternoon.

Elsewhere in the region, the Kospi in South Korea closed 1.8 percent higher, and the benchmark index in Australia rose 1.7 percent.

In Singapore, the Straits Times index gained 1.1 percent and in Hong Kong, the Hang Seng rallied 1.5 percent. In India, the benchmark Sensex climbed 0.8 percent.

Bettina Wassener reported from Hong Kong. Hiroko Tabuchi contributed reporting from Tokyo.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/02/business/asian-markets-rally-after-us-debt-deal.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #4687 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:00am »

FOX News

Can Physics Explain Mysteries of Crop Circles?

Published August 01, 2011
News Corp Australian Papers

Science and UFOs, as a rule, generally don't go together.

UFOs and crop circles, however, go together like the Illuminati and the dark side of the moon. Crop circles and science? Again, not so much. But that doesn't mean the ever-increasing sophistication of corn circlework isn't beyond impressing top physicists.

In this month's edition of Physics World, Richard Taylor, director of the Materials Science Institute at the University of Oregon, claims every summer brings with it more mystery as to how the produce-punishing pranksters ply their trade.

"Crop-circle artists are not going to give up their secrets easily," Taylor wrote.

"This summer, unknown artists will venture into the countryside close to your homes and carry out their craft, safe in the knowledge that they are continuing the legacy of the most science-oriented art movement in history."

While that might be a bit of a blow for those think there's a better place out there, Taylor says the technology behind the global crop-circle phenomenon is still well-deserving of admiration.

Today's designs are more complex than ever, he says, with some featuring up to 2,000 different shapes.

Mathematical analysis has revealed the use of construction lines, invisible to the eye, that are used to create the patterns.

The difference today is that where crop-circlers once used ropes, planks of wood and bar stools, high tech has taken over: GPS helps a lot, he says. "Lasers" also have their place.

But the most innovative modern technique involves using microwaves to force corn stalks to fall over and cool horizontally. One research team claims to have reproduced damage inflicted on crops by using a handheld magnetron ripped from a microwave ovens and a 12V battery.

The microwave technique could explain the speed and efficiency of the artists and the incredible detail that some crop circles exhibit, Taylor says.

Hang on -- bar stools?

And another question -- why does an academic feel the need to get caught up in the world of alien landing conspiracies?

Matin Durrani, editor of Physics World, said Taylor was "merely trying to act like any good scientist -- examining the evidence for the design and construction of crop circles without getting carried away by the side-show of UFOs, hoaxes and aliens."


http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/08/01/physics-crop-circles/#ixzz1TmWjMXZr

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« Reply #4688 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:07am »

Wired Autopia

Vintage Race Cars Brandish Beauty and Speed at Silverstone
By Chuck Squatriglia
August 1, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: Cool Cars


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Above: A Jaguar E-Type pokes its gorgeous nose out of the garage.
Jag was especially well-represented at Silverstone, with more than 1,000 on hand to celebrate the E-Type's 50th anniversary.



The Silverstone Classic bills itself as "the world’s biggest classic racing festival." With more than 7,000 cars spanning the history of motorsports, we're not about to argue.

Anything and everything worth seeing or driving descended on Britain's storied Silverstone circuit on July 22 for a glorious weekend of racing. These cars aren't trailer queens. They're driven, and often driven hard. More than 1,000 competed in the weekend's racing as everything from Bugattis to McLarens lapped the famous track.

British photographer Rowan Horncastle filled a few SD cards with photos of what our good friends at Jalopnik called a "retrogasm." We've picked 12 of our favorites. You can see 225 photos from the Silverstone Classic 2011 on Horncastle's Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/motormorph/sets/72157627163472541/



photo gallery after the jump
http://www.wired.com/autopia/2011/08/silverstone-classic/

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« Reply #4689 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:12am »

Geeky Gadgets

By Julian Horsey on Monday 1st August 2011 1:36 pm
in Displays, Gadgets, Technology News

Panasonic have this week unveiled their first HD 3D home theatre projector the PT-AE7000U which is the worlds first 3D projector to use transparent LCD panels which are driven at 480Hz. Offering full HD 1080p 1,920 x 1,080 pixel resolution and 3D from one device and using the new transparent LCD panels and Panasonic’s own Overdrive Technology reduces cross talk and improves the image quality of the projection.


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The PT-AE7000U’s key 3D projection technologies were developed in collaboration with Panasonic Hollywood Laboratory engineers, who are heavily engaged in the creation of 3D Blu-ray discs and the projector’s Intelligent Lens Memory feature makes it possible for you to easily program up to six different zoom/focus positions.

The PT-AE7000U also features a 300,000:1 contrast ratio and 2,000 lumens of brightness and the 3D features include 2-3D conversion allowing you to enjoy 2D content in 3D. The new Panasonic PT-AE7000U projector will be arriving in September for $3,499.

http://www.geeky-gadgets.com/panasonic-introduces-its-first-full-hd-3d-home-theater-projector-01-08-2011/#more-87866

$3,499. shocked

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« Reply #4690 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:21am »

FBI: 'Credible Lead' Surfaces in D.B. Cooper Case

Published August 01, 2011
Associated Press

SEATTLE – The FBI says it has a "credible" lead in the D.B. Cooper case involving the 1971 hijacking of a passenger jet over Washington state and the suspect's legendary parachute escape.

The fate and identity of the hijacker dubbed "D.B. Cooper" has remained a mystery in the 40 years since a man jumped from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight with $200,000 in ransom.

The recent tip provided to the FBI came from a law enforcement member who directed investigators to a person who might have helpful information on the suspect, FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandalo Dietrich told The Seattle Times on Sunday. She called the new information the "most promising lead we have right now," but cautioned that investigators were not on the verge of breaking the case.

"With any lead our first step is to assess how credible it is," Sandalo Dietrich told the Seattle Post Intelligencer on Saturday. "Having this come through another law enforcement (agency), having looked it over when we got it - it seems pretty interesting."

Dietrich says an item belonging to the man was sent to a lab in Quantico, Va., for forensic testing. She did not provide specifics about the item or the man's identity.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the suspect bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle, where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man parachuted from the plane.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/08/01/fbi-credible-lead-surfaces-in-db-cooper-case/#ixzz1TmWyZqCf
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« Reply #4691 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:29am »

Geek Tyrant

Captain America rides a Harley Davidson!
31 July 2011
by Tiberius


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Did you know that Captain America rides a Harley Davidson? It is actually a take on H-D's classic WLA military motorcycles.

Captain America: The First Avenger has made the most money that that a comic book film has made so far in 2011. I finally had the chance to see this film in theaters and loved it. Be sure to check out our review of the film HERE: http://geektyrant.com/news/2011/7/21/review-of-captain-america-the-first-avenger.html

Check out a cool video that shows how Marvel came up with the idea for the bike design:





http://geektyrant.com/news/2011/7/31/captain-america-rides-a-harley-davidson.html

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« Reply #4692 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 08:32am »

on Aug 1st, 2011, 08:21am, Swamprat wrote:
FBI: 'Credible Lead' Surfaces in D.B. Cooper Case

Published August 01, 2011
Associated Press

SEATTLE – The FBI says it has a "credible" lead in the D.B. Cooper case involving the 1971 hijacking of a passenger jet over Washington state and the suspect's legendary parachute escape.

The fate and identity of the hijacker dubbed "D.B. Cooper" has remained a mystery in the 40 years since a man jumped from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight with $200,000 in ransom.

The recent tip provided to the FBI came from a law enforcement member who directed investigators to a person who might have helpful information on the suspect, FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandalo Dietrich told The Seattle Times on Sunday. She called the new information the "most promising lead we have right now," but cautioned that investigators were not on the verge of breaking the case.

"With any lead our first step is to assess how credible it is," Sandalo Dietrich told the Seattle Post Intelligencer on Saturday. "Having this come through another law enforcement (agency), having looked it over when we got it - it seems pretty interesting."

Dietrich says an item belonging to the man was sent to a lab in Quantico, Va., for forensic testing. She did not provide specifics about the item or the man's identity.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the suspect bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle, where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man parachuted from the plane.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/08/01/fbi-credible-lead-surfaces-in-db-cooper-case/#ixzz1TmWyZqCf


Thanks Swamprat,

I remember when this happened. It would be interesting to know who he is or was.

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« Reply #4693 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 2:49pm »

.


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« Reply #4694 on: Aug 1st, 2011, 4:05pm »

philly.com

Air Force vet not buying UFO stories - except the Roswell thing


By Daniel Rubin
Inquirer Columnist

Tom Carey thinks the Bermuda Triangle is hogwash and the moon landing was real. Elvis did leave the building, and 9/11 was an act of terror, not our own Reichstag fire.

But creatures from outer space? That's another story altogether.

I'm not sure what I was expecting when I dropped by his Huntingdon Valley house the other day to learn why a man would spend 20 years investigating the 1947 UFO incident known simply as Roswell, for the New Mexico community where an alien craft and its crew of little humanoids did or didn't crash.

What I didn't count on was a conservative, cautious silver-haired Air Force vet retired from the insurance industry after searching for fraud and writing payout formulas.

"Most of the UFO phenomena don't interest me," Carey, 70, said last week. "I'm not big on lights in the sky or crop circles or stories of abductions. They lead nowhere."

But the facts of Roswell led him to believe we are not alone.

"This was a nuts-and-bolts craft that apparently crashed in the New Mexico desert with humanoid beings on board. On top of that, you had a cover-up by the Army Air Force that continues today."

We sat in the living room of his split-level home, which he and his wife of 43 years have just moved back into after it mysteriously filled with steam - a mishap, it turns out, of plumbing, not the paranormal.

Carey, who grew up in Mayfair, seems extra-normal himself, a former Temple shortstop who dropped out of a Ph.D. program in human paleontology at the University of Toronto, having wasted too much time watching hockey games.

He's long been taken by the notion of another world, ever since he was 8 and his older brother showed him a newspaper article about a UFO said to have crashed in Aztec, N.M.

"As I got older, I started reading magazines about UFOs. And soon I wanted to do more than read - I wanted to investigate. Are they real or aren't they?"

The July 8, 1947, ABC radio bulletin lasts only 20 seconds, but it raised a possibility that few open to the idea of alien life have been able to ignore ever since:

"The Army Air Forces have announced that a flying disk has been found and is now in possession of the Army. Army officers say the missile, found sometime last week, has been inspected at Roswell, N.M., and sent to Wright's Field, Ohio, for further inspection."

Within hours, the Army Air Force backed hard off its original report, explaining that a weather balloon had crashed. Many witnesses clammed up or changed their stories. Many others did not. The military has since come up with three more theories as to what happened, none involving alien life.

Carey teamed up with a postal worker from Wisconsin, Donald R. Schmitt, to write Witness to Roswell in 2007. The book created a stir in the fractious community of ufologists by containing an affidavit released after the death of the Roswell Air Army Base's former public information officer, who issued the original news release about the flying saucer.

In Carey's book, First Lt. Walter G. Haut went far beyond any of his previous statements, swearing that not only were the razor-thin, superstrong metallic strips recovered from the crash something otherworldly, but that he'd also seen an egg-shaped craft in a hangar and a couple of tarp-covered alien bodies.

Only their heads stuck out - larger than human heads, and too big for their bodies, which were about the size of a 10-year-old child's.

To this day, none of this extraterrestrial metal has been found. All Carey has to go on are the similar statements of hundreds of witnesses, none more compelling than that of Haut.

Carey will talk about his work Wednesday night in Doylestown. You can read about it here: www.susanduvalseminars.com.

I arrived skeptical and I left spinning, but not before he offered to sign one of his books. In the car, I cracked its cover to find he'd written, "It's all true."

But not the part about Elvis.

http://www.philly.com/philly/columnists/daniel_rubin/126495378.html
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