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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 111195 times)
philliman
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4695 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:34am »

"Tresholds Into Other Realms"-radio show:
http://www.ufo-info.com/show/

It's more about nuts and bolts-research and so I thought it could be of interest to some of you (Swampy wink ).

Their recent show from last sunday with my facebook-buddy Ted Roe from NARCAP:
http://ufo-info.com/show/7312011/#comments
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4696 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:35am »

Good morning Swamprat. cheesy

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« Reply #4697 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:38am »

New York Times

August 1, 2011
Pentagon Faces Possibility of Hundreds of Billions in Spending Cuts Over 10 Years
By ELISABETH BUMILLER

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon began grappling on Monday with the possibility that it will have to cut hundreds of billions of dollars from the military budget over the next decade, but there were so few details in the debt ceiling deal reached by the White House and Congress that confusion over the actual size of the reductions was rampant.

There was at least some clarity for the immediate future: cuts in next year’s military budget are likely to be minimal or at least modest, depending on the way the counting is done. Beyond that, military budget analysts said, there was a real possibility that cuts in military spending would amount to about $550 billion over the next 10 years — or $150 billion more than what President Obama has already requested.

Still, the military cuts were sufficiently back-loaded to entice Republicans to sign on to the deal, as happened on Monday afternoon when Representative Howard P. McKeon of California, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, announced his support. Mr. McKeon, who is strongly opposed to deep military cuts, said in a statement that he backed the deal “with deep reservations” but called it “the least bad proposal before us.”

But there were potentially far more ominous signs down the road for Republicans opposed to military cuts. In an apparent strategy by Democrats to try to force Republicans’ hands, the deal says that after an immediate $1 trillion in cuts over the next decade, a bipartisan Congressional committee must come up with an additional $1.5 trillion cuts by November — or trigger automatic across-the-board spending cuts of $1.2 trillion starting in 2013. Half of those cuts would come from military spending.

As at least one Republican presidential candidate saw it, the deal would make it easier for Democrats to extract concessions on tax increases from Republicans if there is the threat of draconian military cuts hanging over Republican heads. The candidate, Mitt Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, said Monday that the deal “opens the door to higher taxes and puts defense cuts on the table.”

The apparent strategy does not necessarily apply to Tea Party-allied Republicans, who are divided on military cuts and in many cases would like to see a smaller government across the board and a less expensive American presence around the world.

Under the terms of the debt ceiling deal, agreed to on Sunday by Mr. Obama and Congressional leaders to avoid an impending default by the United States, so-called security spending would be capped at $684 billion in 2012, compared with $689 billion that is being spent this year. Security spending includes the Pentagon, the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security, part of the Department of Veterans Affairs and intelligence spending, among others.

This year, the Pentagon got $529 billion of the $689 billion in security spending. What is not yet known about the reduced total of $684 billion in security spending for 2012 is whether Congress will hit the Pentagon with the entire $5 billion cut — budget analysts said that was unlikely — or whether the reductions will be spread throughout government agencies, or perhaps even leave the Pentagon untouched.

“This is political kabuki,” said Gordon Adams, a professor at American University who oversaw military spending in the Clinton budget office. “We really don’t have anything hard to get our arms around.”

Next year’s military cuts are more substantial, however, if lawmakers look at a different number: $553 billion, the amount Mr. Obama requested from Congress for the Pentagon in the budget for the 2012 fiscal year. Congress has not passed that budget, and at least one Congressional committee has already reduced the White House request.

But Todd Harrison, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, a public policy research group in Washington, estimated that with $553 billion as a starting point, reductions in the 2012 Pentagon budget under the debt ceiling deal could amount to $37 billion less than the Pentagon was expecting. In that case, he said, “the department is going to cry foul.”

Over the next 10 years, the White House says the immediate caps on all spending will cut $1 trillion from the budget. Of that, some $350 billion is estimated to come from the Pentagon, although administration officials provided no details of how they reached that conclusion.

Over all, though, it is familiar if unhappy territory for the Pentagon. The new $350 billion projected cut over 10 years replaces Mr. Obama’s request in April that the Pentagon cut $400 billion over 12 years — more or less a wash for the Defense Department, which has already been reviewing where to make reductions.

On Monday, as the House prepared to vote on the deal, Pentagon officials were publicly cautious about what they acknowledge are inevitable spending cuts coming their way. (The debt ceiling deal, however, does not factor in any savings from winding down the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, estimated at some $1 trillion in reduced spending over the next years.)

“Like everybody else, we are waiting for the final Hill action, and then we’ll be able to review all the figures and do a more thorough analysis,” said Doug Wilson, a Pentagon spokesman.

Nonetheless, Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, President Obama’s nominee to be chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, warned last week that proposed cuts as high as $800 billion to $1 trillion to the military budget would be “extraordinarily difficult and very high risk.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/02/us/politics/02pentagon.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4698 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:40am »

.





Uploaded by rachelgfisher on Jul 27, 2011

We were driving 65 mph down a highway when my husband caught something out of the corner of this eye...a snakehead
coming out from under our hood onto our windshield! Watch what happens after that....

Category:
Pets & Animals

~

Crystal
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« Reply #4699 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:46am »

LA Times

Community policing reaches youths

Officers from the LAPD's Southeast Division are taking kids from their Watts-area neighborhood on surfing trips and to sports events in an effort to reach them before gangs do.
The result has been a marked decline in juvenile arrests.

By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
7:07 PM PDT, August 1, 2011

As morning broke over the city Monday, cops assigned to the Los Angeles Police Department's Southeast Division went about their normal routine, patrolling the streets. There was, as always, plenty to do. The division's 10-square-mile area has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in the city and is home to 120 documented gangs and three of the city's roughest housing projects.

But 18 miles and a world away, Officer Scott Burkett was working a very different beat. Having traded his uniform for a wetsuit, the 15-year LAPD veteran was in the water at Torrance Beach with about two dozen kids from the Watts-area neighborhood that Southeast patrols, teaching them to surf.

Surfing as crime-fighting strategy?

"It's about changing the relationship between the Watts community and the LAPD," said Southeast Capt. Phil Tingirides, a first-time surfer who got in the water Monday as well. "To do that, we've got to get the kids, and we've got to get them early."

In recent years, the violent crime rates in Southeast were too high to allow officers to work on anything but patrol, gang units and other traditional assignments, Tingirides said. But in 2009, after a few years of declines in crime, he asked Burkett to start a youth activities program.

"We got to the point where we felt we could move away from just violent crime suppression and make a move toward this sort of thing, which is about trying to impact the future instead of just throwing cops up against every crime that occurs."

It's not exactly revolutionary thinking: For years, police departments have been trying with varying success to implement so-called community-based policing strategies. But to try it in a place like Southeast, where distrust toward the police historically runs deep, and to commit to it so heavily — Tingirides said he has 13 officers working full time on several community-relations programs — speaks volumes.

Tingirides believes Burkett's Police Activities League, another program that focuses on at-risk children, and one for students interested becoming cops, are paying dividends. Since they started, juvenile arrests in the division have dropped about 40%, he said.

For his part, Burkett, 43, was ready for a change of pace when Tingirides approached. He had worked several assignments and spent most of his career patrolling the streets in Southeast. In 2008, he was awarded the department's highest honor, the Medal of Valor, for confronting a gunman who had shot a man with an assault rifle.

"For the most part, officers don't come on the job to work with kids. It's about hooking and booking," he says, using police jargon for making arrests. "But I had all that behind me. And this sounded like a really cool opportunity. Now that I'm in it, I see that it really does make a difference."

Working with three other Southeast officers, he has thrown himself fully into the program. Instead of waiting for kids to show up, officers went in search of the kids. They knocked on doors at area schools and persuaded principals to use the program as a reward for good grades and attendance.

Erin Craig, assistant principal at College Ready Academy High School No. 11, said the school has come to depend heavily on Burkett and the others, who are on campus several times a week. Ten of Craig's students were surfing on Monday.

"We try to keep the kids busy as much as possible," she said. "The more we can keep them off the streets, the less chance the gangs have of getting to them and corrupting them."

Each week, the officers coordinate three or four activities, Burkett said. There are frequent outings to Staples Center for Lakers, Clippers and Kings games, museum trips and other day trips. But, in an area where kids rarely venture far beyond their neighborhood, Burkett is also focused on giving kids experiences they otherwise wouldn't have. Along with the surfing, there have been kayaking outings, ski lessons at Big Bear and camping trips.

About 400 kids are involved in the program each year, Tingirides says.

Because the program is a nonprofit, Burkett leans on old friends, connections and a blunt "What are you going to do to help the kids?" approach to encourage people to donate the cash and resources needed for each outing.

For surf camp, he walked into the offices of water sports company Body Glove without an appointment and asked to speak with Russ Lesser, the company president.

"He told me what he wanted to do, and I said, 'How many wetsuits do you need?' " Lesser says. Burkett also turned to the YMCA chapter in Torrance, where he grew up. The organization provided some of the instructors and the surfboards.

After managing to get up on a board and ride his first ever wave, Johnathan Rodriguez, 14, stood shivering but smiling on the beach.

"It gives us something to look forward to," he said of the program.


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-lapd-pals-20110802,0,7019095.story

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4700 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:51am »

Wired Danger Room

U.S. Weapons Now in Somali Terrorists’ Hands
By David Axe
August 2, 2011 | 8:41 am
Categories: Terrorists, Guerillas, Pirates


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Photo: David Axe


Bad news in America’s five-year-old proxy war against al-Qaida-allied Somali insurgents. Half of the U.S.-supplied weaponry that enables cash-strapped Ugandan and Burundian troops to fight Somalia’s al-Shabab terror group is winding up in al-Shabab’s hands.

The kicker: it’s the cash-strapped Ugandans who are selling the weapons to the insurgents.

This revelation, buried in U.N. reports and highlighted by famed war correspondent Robert Young Pelton at his new Somalia Report website: http://somaliareport.com/index.php/post/1253/US_Supplying_Ammunition_To_Al_Shabaab
raises some unsettling questions about Washington’s plans to out-source more wars in the future.

The Pentagon has been striking at al-Shabab since at least early 2007, with special forces, armed drones and Tomahawk cruise missiles fired by Navy ships. But most of the fighting against the Islamic terror group, which has lured as many as 50 Somali-American kids to Mogadishu and even sent one on a suicide mission, is done by the roughly 9,000 Ugandan and Burundian soldiers belonging to the African Union’s peacekeeping force in Mogadishu, codenamed “AMISOM.”

In exchange, Washington pays the troops and sends them regular consignments of guns, rockets and ammo. Between 2007 and 2009, the bill for U.S. taxpayers came to around $200 million — and has probably doubled since then.

The problem is, the Ugandan army withholds most of the peacekeepers’ $550 monthly paychecks, keeping the money in bank accounts in Uganda accessible only by the troops’ families. Considering “limited shopping opportunities for embattled AMISOM troops, you would think that makes sense to keep their money at home,” Pelton wrote. “Except that the AMISOM payment debacle leaves thousands of troops surrounded by tons of weapons with no way to buy even ’small small’ things like personal items, sweets or mobile phone recharges to call home.”

So the Ugandans sell their excess weaponry to intermediaries who then sell it on to al-Shabab. And to keep up their racket, the peacekeepers make sure to shoot at every opportunity, burning through “an extraordinary amount of ordnance” to justify continued arms shipments from Washington.

How bad is it? “In April of 2011 the U.N. determined that 90 percent of all 12.7 x 108 millimeter ammunition [in Mogadishu] was from an AMISOM stock created in 2010,” Pelton revealed. “An RPG captured from al-Shabab was analyzed and determined to have been delivered by DynCorp to the Ministry of Defense in Uganda. The contract was to supply weapons and ammunition to the Ugandan forces in Mogadishu.”

With the U.S. effectively arming both sides of the conflict, the Somalia fighting could go on … well, forever, absent major reform. This at a time when war-torn Somalia desperately needs some peace in order to cope with the worst drought in decades.

This sort of thing has happened before, and is still happening with U.S.-paid truckers in Afghanistan. Even so, the Mogadishu arms racket casts into doubt plans for more military out-sourcing.

Weary from two long, costly Asian land wars, the Pentagon is mulling an “off-shore” strategy for future conflicts, where U.S. proxies “partners” do most of the hard fighting. Sure, the U.S. Army and Marines would help with training assistance, and the Navy and Air Force would provide high-tech support. But it would be foreign armies actually pulling the triggers.

But if, like the Ugandans, these armies end up arming their own opponents, how can we count on them to actually win their sub-contracted war?

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/08/u-s-weapons-now-in-somali-terrorists-hands/#more-53710

Crystal

edit to add link to Robert Young Pelton's website.
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:53am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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philliman
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4701 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:52am »

on Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:40am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
.





Uploaded by rachelgfisher on Jul 27, 2011

We were driving 65 mph down a highway when my husband caught something out of the corner of this eye...a snakehead
coming out from under our hood onto our windshield! Watch what happens after that....

Category:
Pets & Animals

~

Crystal

« Last Edit: Jan 3rd, 2014, 07:56am by philliman » User IP Logged

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« Reply #4702 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:55am »

on Aug 2nd, 2011, 07:52am, philliman wrote:
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Good morning Phil!


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« Reply #4703 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 08:01am »

Deadline Hollywood

TCA: NBC Lets Slip A Slight British Accent
By THE DEADLINE TEAM
Monday August 1, 2011 @ 5:13pm PDT
Tags: Alexandra Cunningham, Free Agents, Maria Bello, NBC, Peter Berg, Prime Suspect, TCA Press Tour, Television Critics Association

Diane Haithman is contributing to Deadline's coverage of TCA.

At the NBCUniversal press sessions at Monday’s TCA, not one but two of the new series introduced here are re-imaginings of British shows. In the morning, it was the comedy Free Agents. This afternoon, it was the Maria Bello starrer Prime Suspect, a re-invention of the critically acclaimed British procedural drama starring Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison, a homicide detective with a dark side. This time around, England is New York City, and Maria Bello is Jane Timoney, a brilliant “bad cop” disliked by her squad. She’s all tough and stuff. At age 44, Bello joins the ranks of glamorous middle-aged actresses who have found a place for themselves in TV's procedural dramas.

Also like the producers of Free Agents, co-executive producer/writer Alexandra Cunningham said the show would be a little less dark than seems to suit British tastes: While the New Jane drinks like the Old Jane, the story lines won’t delve into alcoholism. New Jane smokes like Old Jane -- but in the USA in 2011, she’s trying to quit. (Bello also confessed that she is a smoker.) Said Cunningham: “The thing that makes this different from other procedurals is the humor,” which she adds will harken to the style of Hill Street Blues and Barney Miller. She added, however, that there would be plenty of procedure in this procedural, making sure “there’s enough for the fans, but have a lot of fun with Maria and her personal life.” Co-executive producer Peter Berg was a little more blunt: “Let’s satisfy people like my sister, who loves procedural dramas, with a really gruesome murder at the beginning.”

http://www.deadline.com/2011/08/tca-nbc-lets-slip-a-slight-british-accent/#more-152431

Crystal
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« Reply #4704 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 09:17am »

Vladimir Putin Calls US a 'Parasite' on World Economy

Published August 02, 2011
| NewsCore

SELIGER, Russia -- Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Monday accused the United States of acting as a "parasite" on the world economy by accumulating massive debts that threaten the global financial system.

"The country is living in debt. It is not living within its means, shifting the weight of responsibility on other countries and in a way acting as a parasite," Putin told a group of pro-Kremlin youth in central Russia.

Putin has repeatedly criticized the United States' recent foreign exchange policy and its tendency to cover budget deficits with treasury bills and bonds held by sovereign clients such as China and Russia.

The value of that paper will shrink if U.S. debt is downgraded by a major Western ratings agency and Putin was insistent Monday that the world should be seeking new reserve currencies for trade and savings.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/08/02/vladimir-putin-calls-us-parasite-on-world-economy/#ixzz1TsW9CsJZ


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4705 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 2:50pm »

on Aug 2nd, 2011, 09:17am, Swamprat wrote:
Vladimir Putin Calls US a 'Parasite' on World Economy

Published August 02, 2011
| NewsCore

SELIGER, Russia -- Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Monday accused the United States of acting as a "parasite" on the world economy by accumulating massive debts that threaten the global financial system.

"The country is living in debt. It is not living within its means, shifting the weight of responsibility on other countries and in a way acting as a parasite," Putin told a group of pro-Kremlin youth in central Russia.

Putin has repeatedly criticized the United States' recent foreign exchange policy and its tendency to cover budget deficits with treasury bills and bonds held by sovereign clients such as China and Russia.

The value of that paper will shrink if U.S. debt is downgraded by a major Western ratings agency and Putin was insistent Monday that the world should be seeking new reserve currencies for trade and savings.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/08/02/vladimir-putin-calls-us-parasite-on-world-economy/#ixzz1TsW9CsJZ




That's rich coming from him.

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« Reply #4706 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 2:54pm »

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Uploaded by DocChannel on May 31, 2011

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Lt. Dan Band - For The Common Good - From the Beaufort International Film Festival

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Crystal




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« Reply #4707 on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 4:12pm »

Bin Laden Group to build world's tallest tower

August 2nd, 2011
10:46 AM ET

Saudi Arabia's Kingdom Holding has hired Saudi Bin Laden Group to build the world's tallest skyscraper in Jeddah, Gulfnews.com reports.

Jeddah Tower will be 1,000 meters (3,281 feet) tall and will contain a Four Seasons luxury hotel, apartments, condominiums and offices that overlook the Red Sea, Financial Times reported.

Kingdom Holding is paying Bin Laden Group, one of the world's largest construction companies, about $1.2 billion to take on the five-year project, according to Financial Times.

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, a nephew of Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, announced the building contract Tuesday. He owns 95% of Kingdom Holding, according to Financial Times.

When completed, Jeddah Tower will easily surpass Dubai's 828-meter (2,717-foot) Burj Khalifa as the world's tallest building.

The Chicago firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture designed the project and will oversee its development, Gulfnews.com reported. Adrian Smith was one of Burj Khalifa's designers when he was with Skidmore Owings and Merrill.

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/02/bin-laden-group-to-build-tower/?iref=NS1
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4708 on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 08:07am »

on Aug 2nd, 2011, 4:12pm, Swamprat wrote:
Bin Laden Group to build world's tallest tower

August 2nd, 2011
10:46 AM ET

Saudi Arabia's Kingdom Holding has hired Saudi Bin Laden Group to build the world's tallest skyscraper in Jeddah, Gulfnews.com reports.

Jeddah Tower will be 1,000 meters (3,281 feet) tall and will contain a Four Seasons luxury hotel, apartments, condominiums and offices that overlook the Red Sea, Financial Times reported.

Kingdom Holding is paying Bin Laden Group, one of the world's largest construction companies, about $1.2 billion to take on the five-year project, according to Financial Times.

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, a nephew of Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, announced the building contract Tuesday. He owns 95% of Kingdom Holding, according to Financial Times.

When completed, Jeddah Tower will easily surpass Dubai's 828-meter (2,717-foot) Burj Khalifa as the world's tallest building.

The Chicago firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture designed the project and will oversee its development, Gulfnews.com reported. Adrian Smith was one of Burj Khalifa's designers when he was with Skidmore Owings and Merrill.

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/02/bin-laden-group-to-build-tower/?iref=NS1


How sweet.............................. lipsrsealed


Like your new photo Swamp! cheesy

Crystal
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« Reply #4709 on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 08:10am »

New York Times

August 3, 2011

In Arab World First, Mubarak Stands Trial in Egypt

By ANTHONY SHADID

CAIRO — An ailing Hosni Mubarak, who served longer than any ruler of modern Egypt until he was overthrown in a revolution in February, was rolled into a courtroom in a hospital bed on Wednesday and charged with corruption and complicity in the killing of protesters. The trial was a seminal moment for Egypt and an Arab world roiled by revolt.

Even the most ardent in calling for his prosecution doubted until hours before the trial began that Mr. Mubarak, 83, would appear, a reflection of the suspicion and unease that reigns here. As a helicopter ferried him to the courtroom, housed in a police academy that once bore his name, cheers went up from a crowd gathered outside.

“The criminal is coming!” shouted Maged Wahba, a 40-year-old lawyer.

The sheer symbolism of the day made it one of the most visceral episodes in modern Arab history. In a region whose destiny was so long determined by rulers who deemed their people unfit to rule, one of those rulers was being tried by his public. On this day, the aura of power — uncontested and distant — was made mundane, and Mr. Mubarak, the former president, dressed in white and bearing a look some read as disdain, was humbled.

“The first defendant, Mohammed Hosni al-Sayyid Mubarak,” the judge, Ahmed Rifaat, said, speaking in a wood-paneled courtroom to a cage holding Mr. Mubarak, his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, former Interior Minister Habib e-Adly and six other senior officers.

“Sir, I am present,” Mr. Mubarak replied into a microphone, from his bed.

“You heard the charges that the prosecutor made against you,” the judge said from the podium. “What do you say?”

“I deny all these accusations completely,” he replied, wearily waving his hand.

Then he handed the microphone to his son, Gamal.

The trial began precisely at its start time, 10 a.m. While the other defendants took a seat, Mr. Mubarak’s sons remained standing, the youngest, Gamal, seeming to block the view of his father from the cameras in the courtroom. Mr. Mubarak appeared tired but alert, occasionally speaking with his sons, who both held Korans.

As Mr. Mubarak denied the charges in the proceedings, which were broadcast on a large-screen television outside the police academy, his opponents gathered there roared in disapproval.

“Then who did it?” some asked.

The scene was tumultuous there on a sun-drenched parking lot, with a few dozen of Mr. Mubarak’s supporters sharing space with his opponents. At times, they scuffled; in intermittent clashes, the two sides threw rocks at each other. As Mr. Mubarak arrived at the courtroom, some of his supporters cried, waving pictures that read, “The insult to Mubarak is an insult to all honorable Egyptians.” Others shouted adulation at the screen.

“We love you, Mr. President,” some chanted.

Those sentiments were overwhelmed by the denunciations of his critics, in a trial that seemed to incarnate all the frustrations and degradations of a state that treated its people as rabble. Someone was finally being held to account, many said Wednesday.

“Today is a triumph over 30 years of tragedy,” said Fathi Farouk, a 50-year-old pharmacist who brought his family to watch the trial outside the academy. “We suffered for 30 years, and today is our a victory. It’s a victory for the Egyptian people.”

The trial has transfixed a turbulent Arab world, where uprisings have shaken the rule of autocrats and authoritarian rule in Libya, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. Some Arab officials have said the very spectacle of the trial — a president and his family, along with his retinue of officials facing charges — would make those leaders all the more reluctant to step down. On the very day Mr. Mubarak’s trial began, President Bashar al-Assad of Syria escalated his own crackdown on a city at the heart of the uprising against him.

But many gathered here said Arabs should take the opposite lesson from the proceedings. “All of the Arab world has to know that any leader who makes his people suffer will face this fate,” Mr. Farouk said. “From today, history will never be the same.”

The appearance of Mr. Mubarak was his first since he stepped down on Feb. 11 after an 18-day uprising that brought hundreds of thousands into Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo. Since April, when he faced charges, he has resided in a hospital in the Sinai resort of Sharm el Sheik, a favorite retreat during his time in power.

Mr. Mubarak’s health has remained an issue in the proceedings. There were reports that he had stopped eating, entered a coma and become depressed, but Egypt’s health minister said the former president was well enough to make the trip to the police academy in the capital.

Only the 600 people with permits were allowed inside the courtroom, along with civil rights lawyers and a small number of the families of protesters killed in the uprising.

As late as Wednesday morning, there was speculation that Mr. Mubarak would not appear, given the remarkable humiliation that the trial represented.

The military council of 19 generals that has led Egypt since the revolution seemed loath to put one of their own — their former commander, no less — in a courtroom; in fact, many speculated that the council hoped he might die before the date arrived. Frustration has grown lately at the military council, whose decisions are opaque and occasionally incoherent at a time that Egypt feels unmoored, and some people believed that the threat of even more protests had forced the military’s hand.

“This trial is going to end a lot of our problems and restore the trust between the revolutionaries and the military council,” said Ahmed Gamal, a 65-year-old retiree, who planned to watch the trial from beginning to end. “This is the most important thing.”

Much of the trial was occupied by procedural matters, but even that came as a surprise, as many expected a quick adjournment. Mr. Mubarak and his sons were not even read their charges until the trial’s second hour, after a brief recess. Wednesday’s sessions lasted about four hours and was then adjourned until Aug. 15.

The judge promised speedy proceedings, though no one seemed to know whether that meant weeks, months or longer. Egyptian officials said Mr. Mubarak would remain in the capital for the duration of the trial, staying at a hospital on Cairo’s outskirts. Mr. Mubarak, the former interior minister and the six officers are charged in connection with killing protesters. The charges can carry the death penalty. Mr. Mubarak and his sons also face charges of corruption, though the accusations — that they received five villas to help a businessman buy state land at a cheaper price — paled before some of the more epic cases of corruption in a country riddled with patronage and misrule.

But the spectacle of the trial seemed to matter more than the charges.

As a headline in a popular Egyptian newspaper read: “The Day of Judgment.”

Heba Afify contributed to this report

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/04/world/middleeast/04egypt.html?_r=1&hp

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