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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1104 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #4905 on: Aug 30th, 2011, 1:02pm »

Science Daily

Mind-Altering Microbes: Probiotic Bacteria May Lessen Anxiety and Depression

ScienceDaily (Aug. 29, 2011)

Probiotic bacteria have the potential to alter brain neurochemistry and treat anxiety and depression-related disorders according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The research, carried out by Dr Javier Bravo, and Professor John Cryan at the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre in University College Cork, along with collaborators from the Brain-Body Institute at McMaster University in Canada, demonstrated that mice fed with Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 showed significantly fewer stress, anxiety and depression-related behaviours than those fed with just broth. Moreover, ingestion of the bacteria resulted in significantly lower levels of the stress-induced hormone, corticosterone.

"This study identifies potential brain targets and a pathway through which certain gut organisms can alter mouse brain chemistry and behaviour. These findings highlight the important role that gut bacteria play in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain, the gut-brain axis, and opens up the intriguing opportunity of developing unique microbial-based strategies for treatment for stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression," said John F. Cryan, senior author on the publication and Professor of Anatomy and Principal Investigator at the Science Foundation Ireland funded Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, at UCC. The APC researchers included Dr Hélène Savignac and Professor Ted Dinan.

The researchers also showed that regular feeding with the Lactobacillus strain caused changes in the expression of receptors for the neurotransmitter GABA in the mouse brain, which is the first time that it has been demonstrated that potential probiotics have a direct effect on brain chemistry in normal situations. The authors also established that the vagus nerve is the main relay between the microbiome (bacteria in the gut) and the brain. This three way communication system is known as the microbiome-gut-brain axis and these findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the communication between the gut and the brain, and suggest that certain probiotic organisms may prove to be useful adjunct therapies in stress-related psychiatric disorders.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829164601.htm

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« Reply #4906 on: Aug 31st, 2011, 08:55am »

LA Times

Tibetan monks get stiff prison terms in burning death

Chinese officials sentence three Tibetan monks as accessories to murder for having helped another monk burn himself to death in a political protest. The sentences of 10, 11 and 13 years are condemned by Tibetan exile organizations and international human rights groups.

By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
11:37 AM PDT, August 30, 2011
Reporting from Beijing

China has sentenced three Tibetan monks as accessories to murder for having helped another monk burn himself to death in a political protest.

In the closely watched case in Sichuan province, Drongdru, the uncle of the monk who committed suicide, was ordered imprisoned for 11 years for "intentional homicide" in hiding the young monk, Phuntsog, and preventing him from getting medical treatment.

Two other monks were sentenced to 10 and 13 years in prison after a separate trial Tuesday in which they were accused of "plotting, instigating and assisting" in the self-immolation of the 16-year-old monk, according to Tibetan exile groups.

"This is a whole new turn in the way the Chinese state deals with protest. We haven't seen this serpentine use of the law before," said Robert Barnett, a Tibet expert at Columbia University. He predicted that the stiff prison sentences for the three monks at Sichuan's restive Kirti monastery will only exacerbate tensions. "This is going to be seen by Tibetans as a manipulation of the law to intimidate people further."

The prison sentences were condemned Tuesday by the Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy, run by Tibetan exiles in India, as well as by international human rights groups.

Phuntsog set himself on fire in mid-March and was hidden inside the monastery by fellow monks to prevent him from being taken by the police. He died the next day.

The death triggered six weeks of the most intense clashes between Chinese and Tibetans since riots in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa in March 2008. At the end, more than 300 monks were seized from the monastery and Tibetan exiles alleged that two villagers were killed trying to prevent police from taking the monks.

Self-immolations by Tibetan monks had been relatively rare as the Dalai Lama, their spiritual leader, condemns the practice, but they have not ceased. On Aug. 15, a 29-year-old monk from Nyitso monastery doused himself with gasoline and burned to death outside local government buildings, also in Sichuan province. The monk, Tsewang Norbu, had been distributing pamphlets at the time, calling for the return of the Dalai Lama.

Tibetan exiles blame tensions at the monasteries on persecution by Chinese authorities. Since 2008, monks have been rounded up repeatedly and forced to attend "patriotic education" sessions in which they are ordered to denounce the Dalai Lama and pledge their allegiance to China. In the monasteries where monks have killed themselves, authorities have also cut off utilities as a means of applying pressure.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-china-monks-20110831,0,5947771.story

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« Reply #4907 on: Aug 31st, 2011, 11:45am »

Wired Danger Room

China Analyst: U.S. Can’t Win in Space, So Why Bother Racing?
By David Axe
August 31, 2011 | 10:30 am
Categories: China

With access to more than 400 satellites plus at least two tiny, maneuverable robotic shuttles, the U.S. military is the clear leader in military spacecraft. But with 70 orbiters of its own, China is catching up fast. Last year, Beijing matched Washington in space launches for the first time, boosting no fewer than 15 satellites into orbit. It was the first time any nation kept a celestial pace with the U.S. since the height of the Cold War.

The new space race is on. But in the view of one influential analyst, the race isn’t worth the prize. Space “is expensive to enter, hard to sustain assets in, contains no defensive ground, and — barring energy-intensive maneuvering – forces assets into predictable orbits,” Andrew Erickson, a Naval War College professor and editor of the new book Chinese Aerospace Power, told me as part of a longer interview over at AOL Defense.

No one disputes that China is gaining “ground” in space. “The [People's Liberation Army] is acquiring a range of technologies to improve China’s space and counter-space capabilities,” warned the 2011 edition of Congress’ annual report on the Chinese military (.pdf). But the Pentagon’s official response is to dig in deeper in orbit, with newer and better spacecraft costing at least $10 billion a year, in total. Erickson is virtually alone in fundamentally questioning the Pentagon’s space presence — and recommending an orbital retreat.

“Some of the most debilitating asymmetric tactics could be employed against space and cyberspace targets,” Erickson explained. In other words, spacecraft are highly vulnerable to physical and electronic attack, and so are their control stations. To avoid these “asymmetric” assaults at which China has proved particularly skilled, the Pentagon should take its current space-based equipment and move it downward to the atmosphere. The air is more secure than space, Erickson insisted.

The Pentagon is already following Erickson’s advice with a handful of new systems. The Air Force’s Battlefield Airborne Communications Node, a collection of radio relays, is the kind of thing that might normally be installed on a satellite. But for expediency, the Air Force fitted it to small jets and Global Hawk drones. Several types of high-altitude unmanned planes and blimps function essentially as low-altitude satellites, but with added flexibility and, usually, lower cost.

For a successor to the current, satellite-based GPS navigation system, the Air Force is looking at non-space systems including “cold atoms, pseudolites [satellite surrogates such as drones and blimps], and image-aided inertial navigation systems that use laser radar,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz has said.

This trend should continue, Erickson recommended, with terrestrial robots in particular standing in for orbital hardware. “Less-manned and unmanned systems, which — while they face limitations given current technologies — can already be smaller, cheaper and more disposable; enabling better persistence, maneuverability and tolerance of losses.”

In Erickson’s perfect world, U.S. forces probably wouldn’t rely on space at all. With no one to beat, China wouldn’t lose the new space race. But it wouldn’t win, either.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/08/china-space-race/

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« Reply #4908 on: Aug 31st, 2011, 11:50am »

Reuters

New blow for BP in Russia as office raided

By Vladimir Soldatkin
MOSCOW | Wed Aug 31, 2011 12:18pm EDT

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Black-clad special forces raided BP's Moscow offices on Wednesday, deepening the British company's problems in Russia after its attempts to salvage an oil exploration agreement in the Russian Arctic collapsed.

The raid, a day after ExxonMobil signed a deal giving it access to fields BP had hoped to develop, was ordered to let bailiffs search for documents in a legal battle over BP's failed bid to partner Russia in the Arctic, a spokeswoman said.

But BP, which has a long history of problems in Russia, denounced the raid and said it feared the search could continue for the rest of this week.

"It is our opinion that the court order under which ... court bailiffs are now in our office has no legal grounds. The office's work has been paralyzed," BP Russia President Jeremy Huck was quoted as saying by Interfax news agency.

"We see these actions as pressure on BP's operations in Russia," he said.

Most of BP's employees in Moscow were sent home or told not to come to work because of the raid, and the offices were sealed off.

The raid highlighted BP's problems in Russia since it fell out with authorities this year over its failed Arctic exploration alliance with state-owned oil firm Rosneft.

A group of rich minority shareholders in TNK-BP, BP's Russian joint venture, have sued BP over the failed alliance with Rosneft.

They objected to the pact, saying BP was obliged to pursue all its Russian ventures through TNK-BP and that they suffered big losses when the venture collapsed shortly after it was announced in January.

The minority shareholders also prevented a parallel $16 billion share-swap deal between BP and Rosneft going ahead.

ARCTIC DREAMS SHATTERED

Tuesday's deal between Exxon and Rosneft, signed in the presence of Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, gives BP's U.S. rival access to potentially substantial reserves in Russia, the world's top oil producer.

The deal was a big blow for BP, finally ending its chances of salvaging its own agreement with Rosneft.

Yevgeny Minchenko, director of Russia's International Institute for Political Expertise, said BP was now vulnerable to police raids -- which can happen frequently in Russia -- and short of allies.

"I don't think that it was the Kremlin or the government that sent the order to the bailiffs (to carry out the raid). It's just that the people who carry out the decision understand that the authorities won't stand up for BP," he said.

But political analyst Nikolai Petrov of the Moscow Carnegie Center said the raid did not mean BP would now face frequent harassment from the police or legal authorities.

"Although there is a coincidence in timings between what is happening with BP and the announcement of the Rosneft-Exxon deal, I wouldn't say the search is a sign that BP will be pressured by the law-enforcement bodies," he said.

It is not the first time BP has been subjected to such treatment in Russia.

Security forces searched BP's headquarters in Moscow in 2008 during a corporate stand-off at TNK-BP that resulted in TNK-BP boss Bob Dudley, who is now CEO of BP, being forced out of Russia.

(Additional reporting by Dmitry Zhdannikov, Maria Tsvetkova and Gleb Gorodyankin; Writing by Timothy Heritage; Editing by Greg Mahlich and Will Waterman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/31/us-bp-russia-raid-idUSTRE77U1EP20110831

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« Reply #4909 on: Aug 31st, 2011, 11:55am »

Space.com

NASA Jupiter Probe Photographs Earth & Moon Together

by Tariq Malik, SPACE.com
Managing Editor
Date: 31 August 2011 Time: 12:01 PM ET


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Earth (on the left) and the moon (on the right) were seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft on Aug. 26, 2011, when the spacecraft was about 6 million miles (9.66 million kilometers) away.
The photo was taken by the spacecraft's onboard camera, JunoCam



A NASA probe headed to Jupiter has snapped a striking photo of Earth and the moon, showing our home planet as it appears from 6 million miles away.

The Juno spacecraft took the new photo on Aug. 26 as part of a test of its camera imaging system called JunoCam. The result: a parting shot of the Earth-moon system as the probe sails on its five-year trip to Jupiter.

"This is a remarkable sight people get to see all too rarely," said Juno principal investigator Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio in a statement. "This view of our planet shows how Earth looks from the outside, illustrating a special perspective of our role and place in the universe. We see a humbling yet beautiful view of ourselves."

more after the jump
http://www.space.com/12789-jupiter-probe-photo-earth-moon-juno.html

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« Reply #4910 on: Aug 31st, 2011, 5:15pm »

WIRED SCIENCE

The Cutting-Edge Physics of a Crumpled Paper Ball


By Brandon Keim

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Take a piece of paper. Crumple it. Before you sink a three-pointer in the corner wastebasket, consider that you’ve just created an object of extraordinary mathematical and structural complexity, filled with mysteries that physicists are just starting to unfold.

“Crush a piece of typing paper into the size of a golf ball, and suddenly it becomes a very stiff object. The thing to realize is that it’s 90 percent air, and it’s not that you designed architectural motifs to make it stiff. It did it itself,” said physicist Narayan Menon of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. “It became a rigid object. This is what we are trying to figure out: What is the architecture inside that creates this stiffness?”

Menon’s expedition into the shadowy heart of a crumpled sheet — of aluminum foil, to be precise — was undertaken with fellow Amherst physicist Anne Dominique Cambou and published in an August 23 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences article. The pair think they’ve mapped the mathematical underpinnings of its rigidity.

Of course, it may seem surprising that a balled-up sheet of paper or foil should contort itself beyond knowledge. But Menon noted that when physicists finally described the precise dynamics of conical crumpling, which you can achieve by laying a sheet of paper over a coffee cup and poking down with one finger, it was regarded as a mathematical tour-de-force.

Read more: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/08/crumpled-paper-physics/
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« Reply #4911 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 08:23am »

Thank you for that article Swamprat.

Good morning to you! cheesy

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« Reply #4912 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 08:26am »

New York Times

August 31, 2011
WikiLeaks Prompts New Diplomatic Uproar
By SCOTT SHANE

WASHINGTON — In the Philippines this week, officials are fuming about criticism by a former American ambassador of the late Corazon C. Aquino, a national icon. Australians have learned that just two years ago American authorities were considering declaring that Australia’s air safety system no longer met international standards. People in Botswana could read a critical American account of that country’s anemic efforts against human trafficking.

In other words, WikiLeaks is at it again.

News organizations in dozens of countries are panning for nuggets in the latest and largest dump of diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks, which last week suddenly accelerated its posting of the confidential State Department documents. Over a few days, the group made public nearly 134,000 cables — more than six times the total number published by WikiLeaks and many news organizations over the past nine months.

Because the newly disclosed cables reveal the names of more than 100 people in foreign countries whom diplomats had marked for special protection, the cables raised new fears over the safety of diplomats’ sources. Previous cable releases had often removed the names of vulnerable people.

On top of the new WikiLeaks posting, news media reports have suggested that a file containing all 251,287 diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks last year might soon be made public. Late Wednesday, WikiLeaks accused the British newspaper The Guardian of revealing a secret password that could lead to the exposure of the entire cable collection. In a statement, the group said it was that expectation that prompted its release of the cables.

David Leigh, a Guardian editor, said in an e-mail that he had included the password in a book on WikiLeaks last year only after Julian Assange, the group’s founder, assured him it would expire after a few hours. He said Mr. Assange was responsible for any breach.

Interviews this week with diplomats, defense officials and human rights advocates suggested that so far their worst fears about reprisals resulting from the cables’ publication had not been realized.

“We are not aware of anyone who has been arrested or injured because they were named in the cables,” said Dinah PoKempner, the general counsel of Human Rights Watch. “We remain concerned about the potential for reprisal,” especially as a result of the new batch of cables, she added.

At the same time, Ms. PoKempner said, “there have been tremendous positive consequences in terms of people’s access to information about their own countries.” She noted that the WikiLeaks revelations about official corruption in Tunisia helped fuel the first democratic revolution of the Arab Spring.

WikiLeaks has been a magnet for controversy since it began large-scale disclosures of American documents last year, and the new release stirred the same strong emotions. A cyberattack took down the main WikiLeaks Web site for a time on Tuesday, and speculation about possible perpetrators ranged from a number of governments to former WikiLeaks associates now estranged from Mr. Assange.

Representative Candice S. Miller, Republican of Michigan, issued a statement saying, “The latest release of stolen American secrets by the organization WikiLeaks once again proves that they are a terrorist operation.” She urged the Obama administration, which is conducting a criminal investigation of the group, “to take decisive action to shut this criminal operation down.”

And the State Department spokeswoman, Victoria Nuland, while declining to confirm the cables’ authenticity, denounced the disclosure of classified information. (Most of the cables are unclassified, but some are classified up to the level of “secret.”)

“We continue to carefully monitor what becomes public and to take steps to mitigate the damage to national security and to assist those who may be harmed by these illegal disclosures to the extent that we can,” Ms. Nuland said.

After the initial publication of cables in November, the State Department began to warn people named in them, including dissidents, academics and journalists. In a small number of cases, people seen as especially vulnerable were given help to leave their countries. For instance, an Iranian quoted in the cables as sharply criticizing Iran’s government received help that enabled him and his family to move to the United States.

A Defense Department spokesman said American military officials were not aware that any Afghan citizen had been harmed as a result of being named in Afghan war documents published by WikiLeaks last year, despite Taliban threats to punish people who provided information to American troops. But the spokesman, Lt. Col. Jim Gregory, said it was hard to be certain that revenge attacks had not taken place.

A former State Department spokesman, Philip J. Crowley, said department officials knew of a few people named in the cables who were subsequently imprisoned in their own countries. But Mr. Crowley said the impact of the WikiLeaks disclosures were uncertain because those involved, whom he would not identify by name or country, were already at risk of persecution for their own political dissent.

“Was the dissident put in prison because he talked to our guy and turned up in a leaked cable?” he said. “Or was he put in prison because of what he was doing?”

Several American diplomats spoke to The New York Times about the impact of the cables, requesting anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the issue publicly. None knew of any case in which someone named in a cable had been imprisoned or physically harmed as a result, though a German party official and a Turkish journalist, among others, lost their jobs for speaking too candidly. But the diplomats said that reporting from American Embassies around the world had suffered. Foreigners are now more nervous about confiding views that could get them in trouble if leaked. “There was gallows humor at first,” one veteran diplomat said. “People would say, ‘Please quote me correctly so that when it’s leaked and published, I’ll sound good.’ ”

And diplomats themselves are more reluctant to name their sources in cables, and these omissions at least marginally reduce the precision and weight of the reports.

Steven Lee Myers and Eric Schmitt contributed reporting.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/01/us/01wikileaks.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #4913 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 11:49am »

Wired Threat Level

Feds, EFF Clash in Appeals Court Hearing on NSA Spying
By David Kravets
August 31, 2011 | 10:45 pm
Categories: Coverups, Surveillance, privacy

SEATTLE – A three-judge federal appeals court grilled government and civil rights lawyers while entertaining arguments here Wednesday concerning dozens of dismissed lawsuits alleging the National Security Agency illegally vacuumed American’s internet traffic and telephone calls from every major U.S. telecommunication company.

But after nearly three hours of back-and-forth debate that included harsh questioning by the judges of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, it was unclear whether the court would reinstate the cases that allege rampant, warrantless spying. And despite the import of the court’s pending decisions, Judge Harry Pregerson, a President Jimmy Carter appointee and one of the nation’s longest-serving jurists, joked about the subject matter.

“I’m used to electronic surveillance, I live with it every day,” Pregerson said as the roughly three dozen members of the gallery laughed out loud. Pregerson appeared via a live video feed from Los Angeles and was not present here at the William Kenzo Nakamura United States Courthouse.

One set of cases on appeal, originally brought by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in 2006, targets the nation’s telecoms. The lawsuit alleges the carriers’ alleged complicity in the electronic spying had breached federal wiretapping laws and even their own terms of service agreements with customers. Another round of litigation, brought by the EFF and others, targets the government, accusing federal officials of violating the Fourth Amendment rights of anybody who so-much as sent an e-mail in the years following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (Some of the lawsuits allege the dragnet began before 9/11.)

All the cases were previously dismissed by a San Francisco federal judge on a variety of grounds, including a decision that Americans had no legal standing to bring a challenge against the government. Many of the cases were dismissed under a law passed by Congress in 2008 that authorized the president, in this case George W. Bush, to give retroactive legal immunity to any telephone companies that cooperated with the alleged warrantless surveillance.

“We think this gives too much power to the executive. The Constitution has limits as to how much power,” Cindy Cohn, the EFF’s legal director, told the panel.

Judge Michael Daly Hawkins wondered aloud, “If these plaintiff’s don’t have standing, who would?” Judge M. Margaret McKeown said the “concern” she had was that the suits’ dismissal “cuts off the plaintiffs … from ever pursuing a claim.”

Michael Kellogg, the carriers’ attorney, argued the immunity legislation was the right thing for the nation’s carriers, which could go bankrupt under the weight of defending the accusations in court.

“Congress made a considered decision that it would be unfair if they were subject to potential suits and ruinous liability,” Kellogg said.

Department of Justice Attorney Thomas Bondy urged the panel of judges to abide by Congress’ wishes. He repeated over and again that litigating the allegations would expose national security secrets.

“Who was or who was not surveilled, that’s classified,” he said. “What any particular carrier did or did not do, that’s all classified.”

The EFF, a San Francisco-based civil rights group, believes the surveillance dragnet continues unabated today, in effect granting the government unfettered access to Americans’ private lives. The merits of the allegations have never been litigated, and the EFF is hoping the appeals court reinstates the cases toward that end.

Judge Pregerson asked Department of Justice attorney Thomas Byron III, “What role would the judiciary have if your approach was adopted. We just get out of the way, is that it?”

“We think the district court’s order of dismissal can be upheld,” Byron replied.

The The New York Times first exposed the NSA’s warrantless wiretapping of international phone calls to and from Americans in 2005. A former AT&T technician named Mark Klein later produced internal company documents — first published by Wired.com — suggesting that the NSA was surveilling internet backbone traffic from a secret room at an AT&T switching center in San Francisco, and similar facilities around the country. Klein’s evidence formed the basis of one of EFF’s lawsuits, Hepting v. AT&T.

First the Bush administration, and then the Obama administration, fiercely fought the lawsuits. Both administrations trotted out the state secrets privilege, a McCarthy-era doctrine that generally allows the government to quash a lawsuit, even if the government is not a defendant, whenever litigating the case could damage national security and expose state secrets. In an rare defeat for the government, in 2008 U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker of San Francisco allowed the Hepting lawsuit to go forward despite the state secrets claim.

After Walker’s blockbuster decision, Congress passed legislation in 2008 immunizing the telecommunication companies from the lawsuits. The legislation, which then-Sen. Barack Obama voted for, also granted the government the authority to monitor Americans’ telecommunications without warrants if an American was communicating with somebody overseas and suspected of terrorism — effectively legalizing at least one facet of the alleged NSA dragnet.

Because of the immunity legislation, Walker dismissed the case against the carriers in 2009, saying Congress had spoken.

“Congress has manifested its unequivocal intention to create an immunity that will shield the telecommunications company defendants from liability in these actions,” Walker ruled.

The EFF then sued the NSA, which is not protected by the immunity law. Walker dismissed that case, Jewell v. NSA, last year on the grounds that the lawsuit amounted to a “general grievance.”

Kevin Bankston, an EFF senior staff attorney, told the judges that the government should be held accountable, and that Jewell should be reinstated. “We’d love to get to the merits,” he said.

The court did not indicate when it would rule.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/08/warrantless-wiretapping-argument/

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« Reply #4914 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 12:27pm »

Reuters

Computers to pinpoint wild weather forecasts

By Nina Chestney
LONDON | Thu Sep 1, 2011 11:14am EDT

LONDON (Reuters) - Computer simulations of the weather workings of the entire planet will be able to make forecasts to within a few kilometers accuracy, helping predict the effects of deadly weather systems.

But the world may have to wait 20 to 40 years' for such accurate information on weather events like El Nino as computer capacity grows, a senior British scientist said Thursday.

"If we step forward 20 to 40 years into the future of climate science, it is conceivable we can have climate models down to a scale of a few kilometers' resolution," Alan Thorpe, director general of the UK-based European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), told reporters.

"That would add a huge amount of information to this variability question."

A climate model is a computer-based version of the Earth's climate system, based on physics and complex equations. Such models can be used for weather forecasting, understanding the climate and projecting climate change.

A model with a very fine resolution could produce more accurate results but this depends on computer capacity.

Thorpe said some climate models are now nearing a resolution of 100 km, compared to around 300 km 10 to 15 years ago.

"We are running global weather picture models at a 16 km resolution already so we have the science and the models to reduce the problem of high resolution but we need the computer power to do it," Thorpe said.

It would cost up to 200 million pounds to buy a top-end super computer, he added, which is around 7 percent of the UK's yearly science budget of 3 billion pounds.

"The impact of climate change needs to be seen as sufficiently important to society to devote this level of resource to it," Thorpe said.

Some experts warn that some of the most devastating impacts of climate change could be felt before and during the period 2030 to 2050.

Some climate models have been criticized for not being accurate enough or not predicting extreme events far enough into the future.

Thorpe said ECMWF scientists are doing a lot of research into so-called tipping points, when there is a rapid change in the climate which is irreversible or which would take a long time to reverse.

"Inevitably, those are the aspects of the system we have to worry about most because they are not linear behavior. How many of those there are is still an open question," he added.

"If we devoted the whole of the science budget to these questions we could make more rapid progress but we are doing a lot of research on these areas."

Some tipping points are seen happening in the coming decades, such as the loss of summer Arctic sea ice or the loss of the Amazon rainforest.

(Editing by William Hardy)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/01/us-climate-models-idUSTRE7803D120110901

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« Reply #4915 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 12:29pm »

My Fox Boston


Swedish Man Arrested for Trying to Shoot Down UFOs

Updated: Thursday, 01 Sep 2011, 1:08 PM EDT
Published : Thursday, 01 Sep 2011, 1:08 PM EDT

(NewsCore) - A Swedish man has been charged with firing gunshots into the night sky in what he told police was an attempt to thwart an alien invasion, The Local Sweden reported Thursday.

The 23-year-old grabbed his pistol after becoming convinced UFOs were circling his apartment in Dalarna, central Sweden.

He leaned out of his window, fired off several live rounds and succeeded in scaring off the extra-terrestrial aggressors -- or so his story went.

In reality, he merely succeeded in terrifying his girlfriend and landing himself under arrest.

Nobody was hurt but the Dala-Demokraten newspaper reported that police charged him with illegal weapon possession and threatening an officer.

The gunman continued to insist he had landed a direct hit on one spacecraft -- causing it to explode -- and was taken in for psychiatric evaluation.

"We do not believe that the threats voiced were anything other than the desperation of a confused person," a police memo said of the July 15 incident.

Source: The Local

http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpps/news/offbeat/man-arrested-trying-to-shoot-down-ufos-dpgonc-20110901-fc_14821683#ixzz1WistzSpo

Crystal
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« Reply #4916 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 12:32pm »

.


Please be an angel



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« Reply #4917 on: Sep 1st, 2011, 8:32pm »

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« Reply #4918 on: Sep 2nd, 2011, 06:56am »

Strong Earthquake Strikes Alaska, Sparking Tsunami Warning

Published September 02, 2011
| FoxNews.com

DEVELOPING: A magnitude 7.1 earthquake strikes Atka, Alaska, the USGS reported.

A tsunami warning has been issued for the Aleutian Islands, but the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center tells Reuters that it does not see a widespread destructive tsunami from the earthquake.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/09/02/strong-earthquake-strikes-alaska-sparking-tsunami-warning/#ixzz1WnMa7IFQ
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4919 on: Sep 2nd, 2011, 08:59am »

on Sep 2nd, 2011, 06:56am, Swamprat wrote:
Strong Earthquake Strikes Alaska, Sparking Tsunami Warning

Published September 02, 2011
| FoxNews.com

DEVELOPING: A magnitude 7.1 earthquake strikes Atka, Alaska, the USGS reported.

A tsunami warning has been issued for the Aleutian Islands, but the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center tells Reuters that it does not see a widespread destructive tsunami from the earthquake.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/09/02/strong-earthquake-strikes-alaska-sparking-tsunami-warning/#ixzz1WnMa7IFQ


Yikes. The Ring of Fire is at it again!

Good morning Swamprat. cheesy

Crystal
« Last Edit: Sep 2nd, 2011, 08:59am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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