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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 25573 times)
philliman
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #495 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 1:07pm »

US joins Hiroshima A-bomb memorial for 1st time

By ERIC TALMADGE, Associated Press Writer Eric Talmadge, Associated Press Writer – Fri Aug 6, 7:46 am ET

HIROSHIMA, Japan – A U.S. representative participated for the first time Friday in Japan's annual commemoration of the American atomic bombing of Hiroshima, in a 65th anniversary event that organizers hope will bolster global efforts toward nuclear disarmament.

The site of the world's first A-bomb attack echoed with the choirs of schoolchildren and the solemn ringing of bells Friday as Hiroshima marked its biggest memorial yet. At 8:15 a.m. — the time the bomb dropped, incinerating most of the city — a moment of silence was observed.

Hiroshima's mayor welcomed Washington's decision to send U.S. Ambassador John Roos to Friday's commemoration, which began with an offering of water to the 140,000 who died in the first of two nuclear bombings that prompted Japan's surrender in World War II.

Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba is also hoping that President Barack Obama will visit Hiroshima, an idea that Obama has said he would like to consider but that would be highly controversial and unprecedented for a sitting U.S. president.

"We need to communicate to every corner of the globe the intense yearning of the survivors for the abolition of nuclear weapons," Akiba told the 55,000 people at the ceremony.

Akiba called on the Japanese government to take a leadership role in nuclear disarmament toward "turning a new page in human history."

"I offer my prayers to those who died — we will not make you be patient much longer."

Along with the U.S., nuclear powers Britain and France also made their first official appearance at the memorial, as well as U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Altogether, 74 nations were represented.

China, which sent a low-ranking official in 2008, was not participating. Officials said Beijing did not give a reason.

Hiroshima was careful to ensure that the memorial — while honoring the dead — emphasized a forward-looking approach, focusing not on whether the bombing was justified, a point which many Japanese dispute, but on averting any future nuclear attacks.

...


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100806/ap_on_re_as/as_japan_hiroshima
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #496 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 2:12pm »

Hello wink i see a familiar face, thought you could hide from the wookie huh! grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #497 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:00pm »

on Aug 7th, 2010, 2:12pm, Chewbacky wrote:
Hello wink i see a familiar face, thought you could hide from the wookie huh! grin


Chewbacky!!!

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Welcome!
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Crystal
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« Reply #498 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:03pm »

Hey Phil,

Very interesting article about sea sponges and humans. Now I know why my brain goes spongie once in awhile. laugh Seriously, good article, thanks.

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #499 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:09pm »

Hi love, thanks for the welcome kiss yes I saw that earlier, they reckon they have the same cells as us don't they. Hmmmm could be true I have known a lot of spongers in my life rolleyes grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #500 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:11pm »

on Aug 7th, 2010, 5:03pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hey Phil,

Very interesting article about sea sponges and humans. Now I know why my brain goes spongie once in awhile. laugh Seriously, good article, thanks.

Crystal

Well, it could possibly explain the existence of this guy: grin

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« Reply #501 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:15pm »

Glad you are here hairy one. Ask Phil about his pin-up Chewy............... laugh

Speaking of hairy ones
Phantoms and Monsters

http://inexplicata.blogspot.com/2010/08/argentina-ranchers-capture-fanged-hairy.html

Scott Corrales of Inexplicata has posted the following strange article. As well, I did a bit of research on the folklore of the supposed creature (El Ucumar), particularly in the Patagonia region:

Source: El Tribuno (Salta, Argentina)
Date: Friday, August 6, 2010

The legend of the Ucumar Zupai is reborn in a wilderness near El Creston, some 40 kilometers west of San Jose de Metan.

Farm owner and nephew had gone out to round up the cows when the strange specimen appeared.

Two ranchers in the vicinity of Cerro El Creston, some 40 kilometers west of San Jose de Metan, hunted down a strange creature of humanoid appearance, but with unusually large and sharp incisors.

The similarity between this specimen and local tales of the mythic “Ucumar” – the manlike figure covered in short black hair – has renewed the debate in Salta over the existence of the local “yeti”.

The presence of a creature having such characteristics has been news for decades in the forested areas to the south of the province, particularly in Rosario de la Frontera, where eyewitness accounts have been collected.

Photographs of the remains of the specimen gunned down in the cloud forest of Cerro El Creston were taken by Martin, a resident of Metan who did not wish to give his name, at the property belonging to the ranchers who shot it.

The photo – taken with a cell phone – clearly shows a hominid specimen with long fangs and protruding eyes.

The Story

The ranchers are an older man, 79, whose initials are J.S. and the other is his nephew, E.S. Both requested anonymity to ward off curiosity seekers.

Almost shyly, Martin told El Tribuno about his experience with the strange being during a visit to his friends the ranchers. “That Saturday I arrived and they told me what had occurred during the morning. I entered the home and there it was, hanging from its feet, its hands tied to one side and extending down to the floor.”

Unhurriedly, he continued his story: “I asked him what it was, and they couldn’t answer. They only said that in the dark of night, they thought it might have been a puma or a goblin, because they only saw its enormous green eyes shining by light of the flashlights.”

According to the young man, J.S. and E.S. had gone out on the evening of 23 July to round up cattle, as they were planning to brand the livestock on the following day.

Amid the darkness, they heard a nearly deafening sound on the edge of one of the hills surrounding their property. They cast light upon the source of the noise with the flashlight, and found themselves staring at two enormous green eyes that nearly froze their hearts. “They told me they thought it was a goblin, and to scare it away, they fired a shot. They were unlucky enough to hit it in the head.”

Apparently, the bullet entered through the lower left side of the jaw, exiting through the upper right eyebrow ridge. Due to this impact, the alleged “Ucumar” collapsed instantly. “The dogs that were with us, accustomed to finding wild pigs, ran toward the carcass, and when my friends chased them, they came across that thing.”

The two gauchos carried the remains back to their ranch to analyze it at length. The next day, with sunlight, there was no doubt about it: they had shot an Ucumar, although to confirm this, it would be necessary to go into deeper study. For the time being, all we have are speculations and suspicions.

What can indeed be confirmed is that the veterinary specialists consulted by El Tribuno state that the specimen “hunted” by accident is not native to the region.

Carcass Hurled Down a Canyon

Martin continued to relate his experiences with the ranchers of Cerro El Crestón. He noted that “On Saturday morning, J.S. asked us to cut off his head and throw the body far away, as he did not wish to be the victim of any revenge.”

The revenge that Martin referred to is that the being they had found was allegedly a “cub” of an Ucumar, which could take reprisals against him for having shot and killed its young.

The state that it was a “cub” due to the diameter of the specimen’s skull, which measured some 15 centimeters. They calculate the creature’s height at some 60 to 70 centimeters.

“Overall, the people who live in these parts believe greatly in these things: goblins, the Ucumar...matter of fact, I must admit I felt afraid. At one point I thought about bringing the body to Metán, but I got scared,” said the fellow who spoke with El Tribuno.

Martin explained that “we cut off its head, which remained at the ranch. But we wrapped up the body in several bags and threw it down a canyon.”

J.S. the owner of the ranch where the strange events transpired, lives alone in the area. His nearest neighbor is 15 kilometers away. The man is visited by his nephews every so often.

“It Had Fingers and Toes”

The witness who got to hold the body of the hunted hominid explained that “it was covered in short black hair all over its body, except for the face. It was impressive to see the size of its incisor.” He added that the manlike figure had fingers and toes.

“The truth is that it was a one of a kind experience. I had never seen anything like it. When we go to the ranch at Cerro El Creston, we find hairs stuck to the tree trunks, as though “it” was scratching itself against them. There are many animals in the area, but none with fur resembling that of the creature they hunted,” Martin explained.

“I Never Saw Anything Like It”

Marcelo Choque, a forensic veterinarian for the Provincial Police under the Environmental Division of the service, was startled to see the photographs of the strange specimen’s skull, shot by a rancher in the heights of Cerro El Creston in Metán. “I never saw anything like it. It’s clearly an anthropomorphic figure, but I can’t tell you the species. And I could much less explain the exaggerated size of its incisors, which give it a monstrous appearance.”

The expert paused to think for a moment and continued. “There are no anthropoids in the are where they shot it. And the ones belonging to our fauna do not possess in any way the humanoid characteristics showing in the photo. If it is a monkey of some sort, it would be a rarity, an unclassified species or a genetic aberration. I’m stunned and I think it would be necessary to travel with a team of experts to the area where the skull is kept in order to conduct an analysis of the remains.”

NOTE: I found the second photo of this creature at Bajaron los restos del extraño animal cazado en el cerro El Crestón . There is record of a strange hominid in this area of South America, the legendary Ucumar or Ucu. I have posted some of the information below...Lon

there's a photo also after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/08/ranchers-capture-fanged-hairy-humanoid.html

Crystal
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« Reply #502 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:47pm »

ParanormalMatrixTV

http://www.youtube.com/user/ParanormalMatrixTV



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« Reply #503 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:52pm »



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« Reply #504 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 5:54pm »



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« Reply #505 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 8:53pm »

on Aug 7th, 2010, 5:11pm, philliman wrote:
Well, it could possibly explain the existence of this guy: grin

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Hey it's Prez Karzai! grin Or as I like to call him, "He Who Dresses In The Dark"
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« Reply #506 on: Aug 7th, 2010, 8:55pm »



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« Reply #507 on: Aug 8th, 2010, 08:27am »

New York Times

August 8, 2010
South Korea Shakes Up Its Leadership
By CHOE SANG-HUN

SEOUL — President Lee Myung-bak appointed the youngest prime minister in South Korea in 39 years Sunday in a Cabinet reshuffle that retained a tough policy on North Korea.

The prime minister-designate, Kim Tae-ho, who will turn 48 on Aug. 21, will lead a cabinet filled with career bureaucrats and politicians in their 50s and 60s in a society that values seniority. In what is a largely ceremonial No. 2 post, the prime minister often presides over cabinet meetings and heads the government when the president is absent.

Mr. Kim, who served as a popular governor of South Gyeongsang Province on the southern coast for two consecutive terms until June, is little known outside his home province.

His meteoric entry into national politics adds another potential candidate to the race to replace Mr. Lee in a December 2012 election. (Under the Constitution, Mr. Lee cannot seek a second term.) But the prime minister’s relatively thankless job has proved a graveyard for presidential hopefuls.

No prime minister since South Korea switched back to a presidential system in the early 1960s after a brief experiment with a parliamentary system has ever won a presidential election. After the assassination of President Park Chung-hee in 1979, Prime Minister Choi Kyu-ha became president by default but was quickly forced to resign by a military junta led by Chun Doo-hwan.

On Sunday, seven other cabinet ministers and two minister-level officials were replaced. But the shake-up did not affect the foreign and defense ministers. The top economy minister, Minister of Strategy and Finance Yoon Jeung-hyun, also retained his job.

Midway through his five-year term, Mr. Lee has hinted at giving his government a new look since his ruling Grand National Party suffered a defeat in local elections June 2.

Prime Minister-designate Kim will help the government’s “communication with the young generation,” said Hong Sang-pyo, Mr. Lee’s top spokesman.

The outgoing prime minister, Chung Un-chan, had offered to resign last month, taking responsibility for Mr. Lee’s failure to win parliamentary approval for a controversial plan for a new town south of Seoul.

Once Mr. Kim’s appointment is approved by Parliament, where Mr. Lee’s party maintains a comfortable majority, Mr. Kim will become the country’s first prime minister in his 40s in nearly four decades.

In Sunday’s reshuffle, Lee Jae-oh, a ruling party power broker and one of Mr. Lee’s closest allies, became “minister for special affairs,” a post that deals with political affairs and can carry out special assignments related to North Korea.

By keeping his foreign policy and national security team intact, Mr. Lee demonstrated that there would be no immediate shift in his tough policy on North Korea.

Relations between the two Koreas have chilled since Mr. Lee took office in early 2008 and made any further aid to the North conditional on Pyongyang’s agreeing to dismantle its nuclear weapons program. The ties deteriorated more after the March sinking of a South Korean warship, which killed 46 sailors and has been blamed by the South on a North Korean torpedo attack.

Vice Education Minister Lee Ju-ho, Vice Culture Minister Shin Jae-min and former Vice Minister of Knowledge Economy Lee Jae-hoon were promoted to become ministers. Yoo Jeong-bok, a ruling party lawmaker, became agriculture minister. Another ruling party legislator, Chin Soo-hee, was named health and welfare minister.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/09/world/asia/09korea.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #508 on: Aug 8th, 2010, 08:30am »

New York Times

August 6, 2010
Astral Bodies
By M. G. LORD
PACKING FOR MARS

The Curious Science of Life in the Void

By Mary Roach

Illustrated. 334 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $25.95
Anyone who thinks astronauts ply a glamorous trade would do well to read Mary Roach’s “Packing for Mars.” The book is an often hilarious, sometimes queasy-making catalog of the strange stuff devised to permit people to survive in an environment for which their bodies are stupendously unsuited. Roach eases us into the story, with an anecdote that reveals the cultural differences among spacefaring nations. In Japan, psychologists evaluate astronaut candidates by, among other things, their ability to fold origami cranes swiftly under stress.

Soon, however, Roach has left all decorum behind. With an unflinching eye for repellent details, she launches readers into the thick of spaceflight’s grossest engineering challenges: disposing of human waste, controlling body odor without washing, and containing nausea — or, if containment fails, surviving a spacewalk with a helmet full of perilously acidic ­upchuck.

In a wry account, Roach herself braves motion sickness on NASA’s “Vomit Comet,” a C-9 transport plane modified to fly in parabolas — the only means of experiencing weightlessness outside of orbit. Its cabin is padded, and on its upward path, passengers are pressed against the floor with a force of roughly twice their body weight. But over the parabola’s crest and during the half-minute journey downward, fliers “rise up off the floor like spooks from a grave.” Having taken Scop-Dex, NASA’s anti-motion-sickness drug, Roach is euphoric. Other passengers — NASA regulars call them “kills” — are not so fortunate. Violently ill, they have had to be belted into their seats. “It’s like the Rapture in here every 30 seconds,” Roach declares. “Weightlessness is like heroin, or how I imagine heroin must be.”

The heroin imagery, I suspect, has as much to do with the motion-sickness meds as with the microgravity. They are a potent combination of scopolamine (an anti-emetic sedative) and dextroamphetamine (a stimulant).

Quoting the astronaut Jim Lovell, Roach exposes NASA’s untold sanitation woes. The Gemini 7 mission, he says, was “like spending two weeks in a latrine.” Roach appears to have combed every mission transcript from the 1960s and ’70s for scatological references. The astronauts in “Packing for Mars” don’t say prim things like “Houston, we have a problem.” While on the moon, sitting inside the Apollo 16 lunar module with the astronaut Charlie Duke, John Young blurts: “I got the farts again. I got ’em again, Charlie. I don’t know what the hell gives them to me.” Roach devotes careful attention to the design of Apollo’s “fecal bag,” a clumsy receptacle into which germicide had to be manually massaged. In contrast, she portrays the space shuttle’s suction toilet as a technological triumph, although docking with its tiny aperture can be a challenge — requiring ground-based practice on a “Positional Trainer.”

Admirers of “Stiff,” Roach’s droll report on the ways that science has used cadavers, will be pleased that “Packing for Mars” also contains post-mortem high jinks. The engineering team for the Orion spacecraft (a project scaled back by President Obama) couldn’t gather adequate collision data from mere crash dummies, so the team used dead people. In a wonderfully slapstick scene, Roach describes the engineers’ efforts to insert a freshly thawed cadaver into a spacecraft mock-up: “Think of wrestling a comatose drunk into a taxicab.”

Likewise, fans of “Bonk,” her look at the science of sex, will enjoy her relentless inquiry into off-planet mating. When it comes to graphic details, Roach elicits amazing confidences. NASA, she learns, doesn’t expect a celibate Mars crew, but one that will “mix and match or what­ever.” Roach persuades a Russian astronaut to explain ground control’s reason for nixing his request for a blowup sex doll: “We would need to put it in your schedule for the day.” And a bone-loss-study participant, forced to lie in bed for three months to simulate the effect of weightlessness on his skeleton, divulges where and how study participants conduct their auto­erotic lives.

Just when I thought there was no question Roach wouldn’t ask, and no subject she wouldn’t broach, one appeared: emotion. Or, more specifically, grief. While camping on Devon Island, a remote outpost in the High Arctic of Canada, Roach interviews Jon Clark, a flight surgeon who helped investigate the 2003 Columbia space shuttle disaster. He details for Roach how bodies break apart at high speeds. Then she realizes: he is the widower of the astronaut Laurel Clark, who died on Columbia. Roach — and the reader — want desperately to know how he coped with the loss, and how he continued to do this grisly work. But she refuses to find out: “It seemed insensitive to ask.”

Happily, Roach does not dwell on Lisa Nowak, the astronaut who drove from Texas to Florida, allegedly in diapers, to confront her ex-boyfriend’s new girlfriend. She does, however, point out that male astronauts have a diaper alternative that fits directly onto their anatomy. In the way of Starbucks, where a small is termed a “tall,” the men’s devices come only in L, XL and XXL.

On a long-duration Mars trip, urine would have to be recycled, which is not as vile as it sounds. “I will tell you sincerely and without exaggeration that the best part of lunch today at the NASA Ames cafeteria is the urine,” Roach writes, adding that after purification and desalination, it tastes like Karo syrup. Her husband, however, doesn’t share her keenness and protests when she stores her urine in their refrigerator.

The strongest parts of “Packing for Mars” chart the American space effort during the cold war. Roach deals less knowingly with the situation today, when space is, as the private entrepreneurs say, a place, not a program. While investigating zero-gravity sex, she mentions that Robert Bigelow, the founder of Budget Suites America, plans to build an orbiting hotel. But she doesn’t convey that NASA itself has begun spurning Big Aerospace boondoggles (like Orion) in favor of shoestring alternatives (a contract with tiny, upstart SpaceX for cargo flights to the International Space Station).

Just as Roach refuses to grapple with grief, she also plays down spaceflight’s greatest danger: radiation, for which no cost-efficient shielding has yet been engineered. Linked to brain damage and rapid-onset leukemia, it could quickly devastate a Mars crew. In contrast to excrement and sex, which have dedicated chapters, radiation surfaces in a scattershot, piecemeal fashion. Roach states that astronauts are classified as “radiation workers” because they receive such high doses. She tells us that cosmic rays — high-energy heavy ions from outside our solar system — can be damaging to cells, and that hydrogen compounds (not metal spacecraft hulls) are required for shielding. But she never directly addresses the radiation from solar flares, and makes a joke about a brilliant idea that, in my view, deserves a chapter of its own: on a Mars mission, the astronauts’ solid waste (rich in hydrocarbons) could be wrapped around the crew quarters to protect against cosmic rays.

At the book’s end, after more than 300 pages of debunking the romance of spaceflight, Roach herself buys into that idea, making a misguided, emotional pitch for a $500 billion human Mars mission — at the expense of cheap, reliable, robotic missions. I am not impervious to sentimentality. I felt a surge of tenderness when Roach described the “unlikely heroics” of a patch of moss on Devon Island: “something so delicate surviving in a place so stingy and hard.”

Yet compared with the irradiated void of space, a frozen rock in the High Arctic is as cozy as a baby’s crib. Packing for Mars, Roach has shown, can be entertaining here on Earth. But no way are humans ready to make the actual trip.

M. G. Lord is the author of “Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/08/books/review/Lord-t.html?ref=science

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« Reply #509 on: Aug 8th, 2010, 08:36am »

Telegraph

Roald Dahl was a real-life James Bond style spy, new book reveals
Roald Dahl led an extraordinary life in America during the Second World War as a philandering James Bond-style spy with a "stable" of women, a new biography of the children's author reveals.

By Andrew Alderson, Chief Reporter
Published: 8:11PM BST 07 Aug 2010

Apparently motivated by a combination of duty and lust, Dahl slept with countless high society women while gathering intelligence in the United States.

His life as a young, handsome and dashing RAF officer in the early 1940s is detailed in a new book by Donald Sturrock, Storyteller: The Life of Roald Dahl, which is serialised today in The Sunday Telegraph.

Antoinette Haskell, a wealthy friend of Dahl's who looked up to him as a brother even though he was "drop dead gorgeous", said the author had a "whole stable" of women to wait on his every need. "He was very arrogant with his women, but he got away with it. The uniform didn't hurt one bit – and he was an ace [pilot]," she said. "I think he slept with everybody on the east and west coasts that had more than $50,000 a year."

Dahl had fought as a fighter pilot earlier in the war, until injuries grounded him. He then worked for a secret service network based in the United States called British Security Coordination (BSC). It had been initially established to promote UK interests in the United States and to counter Nazi propaganda.

It is not known exactly how Dahl was recruited as a British agent, but it is thought he was working loosely for BSC by the first four months of 1944 when, officially, he had a public relations role at the British Embassy in Washington DC. He was "run" from New York by William Stephenson, a buccaneering Canadian industrialist and businessman.

Yet Dahl's secretive role went against the grain because he was a terrible gossip who frequently betrayed confidences, according to his family and friends. His daughter Lucy admitted: "Dad never could keep his mouth shut."

The new biography also examines Dahl's allegations of bullying and brutality during his public school days at Repton, which the children's author wrote about in his book Boy. Dahl blamed Geoffrey Fisher, the Headmaster of Repton and who went on to become the Archbishop of Canterbury, for a vicious caning that left him bloodied and questioning his religious faith.

However, it has emerged that Dahl, who died in 1990 aged 74, was wrong to blame Fisher for his beating in the summer of 1933. By then, Fisher had left Repton to become Bishop of Chester and so the caning was, in fact, administered by John Christie, his successor as Headmaster.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/7931835/Roald-Dahl-was-a-real-life-James-Bond-style-spy-new-book-reveals.html

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