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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 47106 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #5550 on: Nov 20th, 2011, 08:17am »

MSNBC

KITV-TV
updated 11/20/2011 4:15:08 AM ET

HONOLULU — KITV.com

What started over a dozen years ago with a few turkeys to help several families on Oahu, has turned into an island-wide project that now reaches thousands.

Saturday morning, a small army of volunteers spent their morning at Ko'Olina loading up tons of turkey, gallons of gravy and all the trimmings for a Thanksgiving feast.

Hundreds had prepared and cooked the food for this project, which has grown since it started 13 years ago.

"We started out with four turkeys for a few families. We wanted to reach more people and the only way to build relationships with the west side was to do something big," said Pele Toomata, with the Aloha Team.

The outreach is now really big, as 4,000 Thanksgiving feasts were made. Volunteer drivers then dropped off them around Oahu, so everyone could get a taste of the holidays.

"The measure, the true measure of any great society is how they treat their less fortunate and all these people coming out here, you can see our society is in good hands," said Ko Olina Resort manager Ken Williams.

All that food ended up at nearly two dozen churches, where less fortunate families and individuals were able to enjoy a Thanksgiving meal.

Hundreds lined up at the Lighthouse Outreach Center in Waipahu to take part in the day of fellowship. "I'm enjoying it. I'm here with my family meeting different people. It's good," said Kapolei resident Kerry Anduha.

Others were there to take part in the food, which helped ease the burden of providing a hot meal for families, even though it was just for one day. "It was helpful to have a free meal," said Waipahu resident Crystal Kamahalohanuilai.

Through the kindness of strangers, many island kids also got to enjoy one of the best parts of Thanksgiving: dessert.

In addition to the 4,000 meals being served up at Oahu churches, many volunteers also took food directly to homeless residents who weren't able to take part in the Thanksgiving meals.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45371041#

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« Reply #5551 on: Nov 20th, 2011, 5:02pm »

World's 'lightest material' unveiled by US engineers

18 November 2011

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Engineers say the material is less dense than aerogels and metallic foams

A team of engineers claims to have created the world's lightest material.
The substance is made out of tiny hollow metallic tubes arranged into a micro-lattice - a criss-crossing diagonal pattern with small open spaces between the tubes.

The researchers say the material is 100 times lighter than Styrofoam and has "extraordinarily high energy absorption" properties.
The research was carried out at the University of California, Irvine, HRL Laboratories and the California Institute of Technology and is published in the latest edition of Science.

"The trick is to fabricate a lattice of interconnected hollow tubes with a wall thickness 1,000 times thinner than a human hair," said lead author Dr Tobias Schaedler.

Low-density
The resulting material has a density of 0.9 milligrams per cubic centimetre.

By comparison the density of silica aerogels - the world's lightest solid materials - is only as low as 1.0mg per cubic cm.

The metallic micro-lattices have the edge because they consist of 99.99% air and of 0.01% solids.

The engineers say the material's strength derives from the ordered nature of its lattice design.

By contrast, other ultralight substances, including aerogels and metallic foams, have random cellular structures. This means they are less stiff, strong, energy absorptive or conductive than the bulk of the raw materials that they are made out of.

Robust
To study the strength of the metallic micro-lattices the team compressed them until they were half as thick.
After removing the load the substance recovered 98% of its original height and resumed its original shape.

"Materials actually get stronger as the dimensions are reduced to the nanoscale," said team member Lorenzo Valdevit.

The engineers suggest practical uses for the substance include thermal insulation, battery electrodes and products that need to dampen sound, vibration and shock energy.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15788735
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« Reply #5552 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 08:48am »

That material is amazing, thanks for that article Swamprat. And good morning to you. It's a blustery morning out this morning. Those trees are whipping around!
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« Reply #5553 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 08:50am »

New York Times

November 20, 2011
The Deficit Deal That Wasn’t: Hopes Are Dashed
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER and ROBERT PEAR

WASHINGTON — The one sliver of real hope came a week ago, in the darkened Capitol on the Sunday night after Veterans Day.

Called away from dinner tables, the Jets-Patriots game on television and, in one case, a soccer team party, several Democratic members of the special Congressional committee on deficit reduction raced to the office of Senator Patty Murray for a hasty 8:30 meeting to discuss the outlines of a potential agreement. Crucially, it appeared to have the backing of at least one Republican on the 12-member panel even though it included a tax increase.

As the members spoke, they began to see the outlines of a deal, tentatively agreeing on tax rates, revenues, spending cuts and changes to Social Security and Medicare, according to interviews with members of the committee and their aides.

Whether the committee could reach the finish line was very much in question, but at least it was in sight, for the first time in the nine weeks the group had been meeting.

It disappeared almost as quickly.

On Sunday, just one week after both sides had begun to feel hope, several members of the bipartisan panel conceded that their weeks of negotiations had failed. In the end the two sides could not agree on a mix of tax increases and spending cuts and — perhaps above all — on the fate of the tax cuts originally signed by President George W. Bush, which are now scheduled to expire at the end of 2012.

While the panel’s failure was in many ways foretold — President Obama and the House speaker, John A. Boehner, failed to reach a similar deal only this past summer — the deadlock offers fresh evidence for everyone frustrated with Congress, including its own members.

“It was a huge opportunity missed,” Representative Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, a Democratic member of the committee, said in an interview on Sunday. Representative Jeb Hensarling, Republican of Texas, who headed the committee with Mrs. Murray, of Washington, agreed. “As a nation,” he said, “I am not sure how long we have to put America on a sustainable path.”

Democrats and Republicans, as has been their wont throughout the process, could not even agree on what led the talks to slide into failure.

Democrats insist that they were closing in on the framework of an agreement, but that Republicans backed away from their willingness to accept significant revenue increases in exchange for cuts in the growth of entitlement programs. They said Mr. Boehner sealed the fate of the panel on Thursday by offering a package that had a mere $3 billion in new revenue, far less than an earlier Republican plan.

Republicans, who agreed that there was a potential framework a week ago, counter that the deal was spoiled by Democrats, who refused to lock in the level of entitlement savings or tax changes they would accept, and began to demand more revenues to match any substantive entitlement changes. Democrats also would not agree to a framework for tax reform, Republicans said.

“There were good talks on Sunday,” an aide to a Republican panel member said, referring to the Veterans Day weekend meeting. “We felt that by Monday Democrats collectively had moved the goal posts.”

Further, Republicans argue, Democrats were never really committed to a plan, as evidenced by Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York, who predicted two weeks ago that the panel would fail to reach an agreement.

The members of the committee began the process with equal parts skepticism and hope. Many lawmakers had tried and failed to reach bipartisan agreements on the same issues over the last few years. They hoped that this time, with the threat of large cuts looming in the event of their failure, would be different.

Members of the panel, the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, spent most of September and early October getting to know one another, and putting together staff. Meetings were largely friendly, with one member bringing beef jerky, another salads from a fancy take-out place near Capitol Hill. On Senator Murray’s birthday, there were frosted cupcakes.

Republicans met or spoke by phone twice a day from almost Day 1. Democrats were not as tightly organized.

Serious negotiations did not begin until Oct. 25, when Democrats offered a proposal to reduce deficits by $3 trillion over 10 years through a combination of spending cuts and $1.3 trillion of revenue, largely from tax increases.

The Democratic proposal included as much as $500 billion of savings in health care programs, higher Medicare premiums for high-income beneficiaries and use of a less generous measure of inflation that would reduce annual cost-of-living adjustments in Social Security benefits.

A day later Republicans on the committee rejected the Democratic offer and came back with a proposal that would reduce deficits by $2.2 trillion and that included $640 billion of nontax revenue that Democrats said was too modest. Things were not looking good.

The committee held its last public hearing on Nov. 1. Among the witnesses was Erskine B. Bowles, the co-chairman of Mr. Obama’s fiscal commission, who presciently told the Congressional panel, “I am worried you’re going to fail — fail the country.”

Many side conversations were held between members of every possible combination of party and chamber. But when it came down to specifics, especially on taxes, they sputtered.

Democrats felt particularly aggrieved by Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona, the second-ranking Senate Republican, citing him as the main obstacle to an agreement. Democrats spoke of Mr. Kyl as if he were an angry father arriving home to realize the children were having a party, and shutting the whole thing down. “While Kyl is in the group, it sure seems that nothing will happen,” said a Democrat close to the negotiations.

Republicans were offended by what they felt were numerous partisan public comments by two Democrats on the committee, Representative Xavier Becerra of California and Representative James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, who, they said, were rarely in the room when serious negotiations were occurring.

A potential breakthrough occurred in a meeting in the Capitol late on the night of Nov. 7, when Republicans, led by Mr. Toomey, offered a $1.2 trillion package that included $300 billion of new tax revenue. It was the first time Republicans had shown themselves open to significant amounts of new taxes.

But as Democrats studied the proposal, they found much to criticize. The proposal would have permanently reduced tax rates for all taxpayers, and Democrats objected, in particular, to lowering the rates paid by the most affluent Americans.

This is when the patient seemed to take a turn for the worse.

In the eyes of Republicans, when Democrats rejected the Toomey plan, saying it would provide a windfall for millionaires and billionaires, little more could be accomplished.

Both sides used remarkably similar language to describe their frustrations. A Democrat involved in the negotiations said: “We made a reasonable offer and got nothing in return. We got naked in the room. Republicans are standing there in overcoats, hats and gloves and are toasty warm.”

A Republican aide, who believed Mr. Toomey made a good-faith proposal and got nothing from Democrats in return, said a few days later: “We showed some leg. The Democrats want us to get completely naked.”

On Veterans Day Mr. Obama spoke separately to Mr. Hensarling and Mrs. Murray by phone from Air Force One, as he began an eight-day tour of the Pacific Rim. The president was looking for an update, and to express his hopes they could reach a deal. Call when you have one, he effectively said to both, according to White House aides.

Others began feeling panicked. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, a former chairman of the House Budget Committee, had kept a close watch on the panel, made near-daily phone calls to its members and intensified his public statements about dire consequences should the committee fail, causing automatic spending cuts.

By last Thursday Mr. Panetta had made a secret trip to Capitol Hill before heading up to Groton, Conn., for a visit to a submarine plant, and aides said he was in a bad mood on the trip north. In Groton his frustrations with the debt reduction panel seemed to boil over. “I urge this committee: suck it up,” Mr. Panetta told employees at Electric Boat. “Do what’s right for the country. That’s why we elect people: to govern, not to just survive in office.”

Over on K Street, the mood was equally glum. Lobbyists, it seemed, had more interaction with members of the committee than did many members of Congress. On Thursday, one lobbyist sent an alert to companies waiting for any bit of news. “The parties,” it said, “have stopped talking, and progress is no longer being made.”

The process that has dominated the 112th Congress was well on its way to repeating itself. Mr. Boehner took the Republicans’ final offer, for $643 billion of deficit reduction — about half of the statutory goal of the committee with less new tax revenue than Mr. Toomey’s plan — to Senator Harry Reid, the majority leader, on Thursday. Mr. Reid rejected it out of hand. The end was near.

By Friday, members were telling their staff members that little could be done to salvage the committee’s work, and began to move quickly to blaming one another along partisan lines.

Still, said some members, their work would not be for naught.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/21/us/politics/deficit-deal-fell-apart-after-seeming-agreement.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #5554 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 08:56am »

LA Times

New York police arrest 'lone wolf' bomb plot suspect

Authorities say the U.S. citizen is an Al Qaeda sympathizer who was about to test explosives he hoped to use against police and American troops.

By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
10:39 PM PST, November 20, 2011
Reporting from New York

A U.S. citizen who learned bomb-making on the Internet and considered changing his name to Osama out of loyalty to Osama bin Laden has been arrested on charges of plotting to blow up post offices and police cars and to kill U.S. troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, authorities said Sunday.

Jose Pimentel, 27, a Dominican-born convert to Islam, was on the verge of testing his homemade explosives in a mailbox when he was arrested Saturday in a Manhattan apartment, New York Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly said.

"We had to act quickly yesterday because he was in fact putting this bomb together," Kelly said at a City Hall news conference with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr. "It would have been not appropriate for us to let him walk out the door with that bomb."

Bloomberg described Pimentel as "a total lone wolf" not working in conjunction with anyone else or with terrorist groups abroad, despite his devotion to Al Qaeda. "He was not part of a larger conspiracy."

After an arraignment late Sunday, Pimentel, wearing a black T-shirt and wire-rimmed glasses, was ordered held without bail until his next court appearance Nov. 25.

It was at least the 14th plot against New York that authorities say they have foiled since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, but Pimentel appeared to have come closer than many to being in position to carry out an assault. According to prosecutors, Pimentel told police he had begun "shaving the match heads and drilling holes in the pipes" to insert the bomb parts, and he was "one hour away" from finishing.

Pimentel had been under surveillance for two years, and the five-page criminal complaint from the district attorney's office indicated that he was being closely followed in recent weeks as he shopped at Home Depot, 99-cent stores and elsewhere for the goods to build bombs.

With the help of a confidential informant, police said, they had video of Pimentel working on the devices, which were made of small clocks, nails to provide shrapnel, batteries, Christmas lights serving as electronic circuits, and wires.

Pimentel allegedly followed instructions taken from the online pro-Al Qaeda magazine Inspire, specifically from an article titled "Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom."

He was motivated by anger over the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Bloomberg and Kelly said. His extremism grew to the point "where he made even some like-minded friends nervous," Kelly said.

According to the complaint, he had considered traveling to Yemen to train in jihad, or holy war; talked with associates about changing his name to Osama Hussein to honor Osama bin Laden and former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein; and discussed killing U.S. troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. He also talked about bombing police cars and post offices.

Eventually, his behavior "morphed from simply talking about such acts to action, namely, bomb-building," Kelly said.

Pimentel appeared to have been spurred to action by U.S. forces' Sept. 30 killing of American-born cleric Anwar Awlaki in Yemen. Awlaki was a prominent voice for Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, an affiliate of Al Qaeda.

Awlaki's death "really set him off," Kelly said of Pimentel, who prosecutors say maintained a website, http://www.trueislam1.com, which expounds on jihad and praises Bin Laden, Awlaki and Aafia Siddiqui, who was convicted in New York last year of trying to kill Americans.

A post by M. Yusaf — apparently Pimentel — derides the "Arab Spring," in which Tunisia, Egypt and Libya ousted longtime rulers. "We cannot be fooled by the propaganda of Western nations that try to deceive us by telling us that separation of church and state is the 'modern' and more civilized way of life," he writes.

The website also thanks a mysterious "sister" who told him of the blogging software that would enable him to spread his message.

An attorney representing Pimentel, Joseph Zablocki, said after Sunday's arraignment that the online postings showed Pimentel was not trying to hide anything.

But Kelly said Pimentel had plans to test his homemade bombs' effectiveness by putting them into mailboxes and hoped to "get the most bang for the buck" by attacking a high-profile target such as New York City.

Pimentel faces five charges, including conspiracy, criminal possession of a weapon and soliciting or providing support for an act of terrorism.

At the news conference, officials displayed a close-up photograph of Pimentel wearing a black short-sleeve shirt and apparently working on a bomb. They also played a video to demonstrate what one of his bombs might have done had it been detonated. It showed a sedan exploding, its doors flying off and flames shooting from its interior.

At the apartment building in Manhattan's Hamilton Heights neighborhood where Pimentel lived, a man described as his uncle and speaking Spanish said Pimentel spent a lot of time in his room with the door shut. Nobody knew what he was doing in there, the man told the local ABC affiliate, WABC.

Neighbors said that Pimentel spent a lot of time standing on the street smoking cigarettes because he was not allowed to smoke inside, and that he kept mainly to himself.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-new-york-terror-20111121,0,1815595.story

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« Reply #5555 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 09:00am »

Wired Danger Room

Darpa: Do Away With Antibiotics, Then Destroy All Pathogens
By Katie Drummond
November 21, 2011 | 6:30 am
Categories: DarpaWatch

Last year, federal officials warned that Americans were on the verge of “a post-antibiotic era.” And that’s exactly what the Pentagon’s far-out research agency is after.

As long as they’ve got a replacement at the ready, of course. In the military’s latest round of small business solicitations, Darpa is making a long-shot request for an all-out replacement to antibiotics, the decades-old standard for killing or injuring bacteria to demolish a disease. In its place: the emerging field of nanomedicine would be used to fight bacterial threats. The agency’s “Rapidly Adaptable Nanotherapeutics” is after a versatile “platform capable of rapidly synthesizing therapeutic nanoparticles” to target unknown, evolving and even genetically engineered bioweapons.

It’s the latest of several Darpa programs to improve the way we deal with bacterial infections, viruses and bio-threats. The agency is already funding tobacco-based vaccine production, prescient viral infection detectors and insta-vaccines to inoculate against unknown pathogens.

Right now, antibiotics work by interfering with bacterial function or their spread. Some meds target a ton of different pathogens, while others are more highly specified. Both varieties, however, are increasingly vulnerable to bacterial resistance — bacteria that carry a genetically enhanced ability to thwart the medication survive, and continue to spread, rendering that medication useless. It means even if scientists develop new antibiotics, which they continue to do, the meds will be “prone to the same issues and may ultimately meet a similar fate” as their once-potent peers. Not to mention that where “engineered” bacterial threats are concerned, most conventional antibiotics would be useless from the get-go: Genetic tinkering can turn even benign gut bacteria into lethal, untreatable bioweapons.

Instead, Darpa wants researchers to use nanoparticles — tiny, autonomous drug delivery systems that can carry molecules of medication anywhere in the body, and get them right into a targeted cell. Darpa would like to see nanoparticles loaded with “small interfering RNA (siRNA)” — a class of molecules that can target and shut down specific genes. If siRNA could be reprogrammed “on-the-fly” and applied to different pathogens, then the nanoparticles could be loaded up with the right siRNA molecules and sent directly to cells responsible for the infection.

Replacing a billion dollar industry that’s been a medical mainstay since 1940? Far fetched, sure, but researchers already know how to engineer siRNA and shove it into nanoparticles. They did it last year, during a trial that saw four primates survive infection with a deadly strain of Ebola Virus after injections of Ebola-targeted siRNA nanoparticles. Doing it quickly, and with unprecedented versatility, is another question. It can take decades for a new antibiotic to be studied and approved. Darpa seems to be after a system that can do the same job, in around a week.

Then again, if anybody can design a new paradigm for medicine, and a new way to mass-produce it, our money’s on the military. After all, we’ve got them to thank for figuring out how to manufacture the medication that got us into this mess in the first place: penicillin.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/11/darpa-nano-antibiotics/

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« Reply #5556 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 09:08am »

Associated Press

Nov 21, 9:46 AM EST

US stocks open lower as debt talks near collapse

By MATTHEW CRAFT
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -- Stocks are falling at the opening of trading amid reports that a congressional committee will fail to agree on a plan to cut the U.S. government's budget deficit.

Minutes after the opening bell, the Dow Jones industrial average is down 141 points, or 1.2 percent, to 11,792. The S&P 500 index is down 17, or 1.4 percent, to 1,215. The Nasdaq is down 21, or 1 percent, to 2,572.

A 12-member bipartisan panel is supposed to agree on at least $1.2 trillion in budget cuts by Wednesday. But the panel appeared ready to admit failure on Monday.

If the committee fails, it will trigger automatic spending cuts over 10 years starting in 2013. Analysts say that if Congress tries to dismantle those cuts it could lead to another downgrade of the U.S. credit rating.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_WALL_STREET?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

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« Reply #5557 on: Nov 21st, 2011, 09:12am »

Deadline Hollywood

Meghan McCain Becomes MSNBC Contributor

By DAVID LIEBERMAN, Executive Editor
Monday November 21, 2011 @ 9:57am EST
Tags: Meghan McCain, MSNBC, NOW With Alex Wagner

NEW YORK – November 21, 2011 – Meghan McCain has joined MSNBC as a contributor, with her first appearance today at noon ET on “NOW with Alex Wagner.” She has been a frequent MSNBC guest since 2009.

“I couldn’t more be excited to be joining the MSNBC family,” said McCain. “It’s a unique opportunity to share my perspective as a Republican on a network I respect and have built a relationship with over the past two years.”

As the daughter of U.S. Senator John McCain, Meghan McCain was propelled into the national spotlight at an early age. Her unparalleled exposure to American politics gave her the opportunity to hear voters debate the most complex issues first-hand. McCain’s time on the campaign trail with her father inspired her acclaimed memoir, “Dirty Sexy Politics.” The book chronicles her personal journey across the American political landscape. Campaigning with her father also inspired McCain to publish “My Dad, John McCain,” an illustrated children’s book that brings her father’s heroic story to life.

As a columnist for The Daily Beast, she passionately discusses women’s issues, social issues, marriage equality and her firm belief that there is room for all walks of life in the GOP. While in college, McCain worked at Newsweek magazine and Saturday Night Live. She is a graduate of Columbia University and currently resides in New York City.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/11/meghan-mccain-becomes-msnbc-contributor/

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« Reply #5558 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 06:41am »

ScienceDaily

First System Developed for Assessing the Odds of Life On Other Worlds


ScienceDaily (Nov. 21, 2011) — Within the next few years, the number of planets discovered in orbits around distant stars will likely reach several thousand or more. But even as our list of these newly discovered "exoplanets" grows ever-longer, the search for life beyond our solar system will likely focus much more narrowly on the relatively few of these new worlds which exhibit the most Earth-like of conditions.

A modeling expert has proposed a new system for classifying exoplanets using two different indices -- an Earth Similarity Index for categorizing a planet's more earth-like features and a Planetary Habitability Index for describing a variety of chemical and physical parameters that are theoretically conducive to life in more extreme, less-Earthlike conditions.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111121104159.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fspace_time%2Fextrasolar_planets+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Space+%26+Time+News+--+Extrasolar+Planets%29
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« Reply #5559 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 08:50am »

Good morning Swamprat. cheesy
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« Reply #5560 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 08:54am »

New York Times

November 21, 2011, 9:48 pm
A Blow to Pinstripe Aspirations
By KEVIN ROOSE

Earlier this fall, Steve Ferdman celebrated getting a job offer from Credit Suisse in the usual Wall Street fashion. Over expensive oysters and dark rum cocktails at a trendy Manhattan restaurant with his parents, he toasted landing the full-time position after working six months as a consultant without benefits.

A week later, Mr. Ferdman, 28, sat alone at the same place and ordered a gin and tonic to lament getting laid off by the bank, for the second time since 2008. When he told the bartender about his misfortune, his next round was on the house.

“I did everything right. I came into work every day, I put in long hours, and I still got punched in the face,” Mr. Ferdman said. “People shouldn’t want to work in this industry anymore.”

Being young on Wall Street once meant having it all: style, smarts and too much money to spend wisely. Now, twenty-somethings in the finance industry are losing both cash and cachet.

Andrew Sullivan for The New York TimesSam Meek, 27, of Greenwich, Conn., was laid off from his job at a hedge fund. “I’m scraping by right now,” he said.Three years after the global financial crisis nearly brought Wall Street firms to the brink, the nation’s largest banks are again struggling. As profits wane, layoffs have claimed thousands of jobs and those still employed have watched their compensation shrink. These problems are set against the morale-crushing backdrop of the Occupy Wall Street movement, which has made a villain of a once-lionized industry.

Much of the burden of Wall Street’s latest retrenchment has fallen on young financiers. The number of investment bank and brokerage firm employees between the ages 20 and 34 fell by 25 percent from the third quarter of 2008 to the same period of 2011, a loss of 110,000 jobs from layoffs, attrition and voluntary departures.

By comparison, industry headcount dropped by 17 percent in the same period, according to an analysis by The New York Times of data for New York City provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of staff members over the age of 55 decreased by only 11 percent.

Young financiers have experienced setbacks in the past. Bankers and traders who rushed wide-eyed to Wall Street in the halcyon days of the 1980s were waylaid by the stock market crash of Oct. 19, 1987, known as Black Monday. Then they got pummeled in 2000 by the dot-com collapse and the recession that followed.

But experts say that today’s doldrums, unlike previous downturns, are here to stay.

“A lot of the positions that are being cut right now aren’t coming back,” said Leslie K. Hild, a vice president with the recruiting firm Right Management. “It’s an emotional roller coaster for almost everyone.”

The industry’s woes have also affected the plans of undergraduate and graduate students at the nation’s top colleges.

At Harvard Business School, where a relatively high 39 percent of this year’s graduates went into finance, compared to 34 percent last year, there has been a “heck of a lot more anxiety” about next year’s hiring season, according to William A. Sahlman, a professor of business administration.

“People used to think of some of these organizations, like a Morgan Stanley or a Goldman Sachs, as safe career bets,” Professor Sahlman said. “Those firms are not going away, but they’re going to hire half the people they hired before.”

Several large firms are not recruiting new entry-level analysts for their investment banking divisions this fall, having filled their entire incoming class with last summer’s interns. At the University of Pennsylvania, whose Wharton School is the closest thing that exists to a Wall Street farm team, Goldman Sachs canceled its informational session.

The mood is even darker outside the Ivy League. Matthew Slotnick, a senior economics major at Boston College, said that he had sent more than 100 résumés to contacts on Wall Street and received several interviews. But he has not gotten any offers. Mr. Slotnick, who has wanted to work at an investment bank since entering college, is now applying to smaller banks and firms outside of New York.

“People are saying it’s sort of a 2007, 2008-type hiring climate,” he said. “I haven’t given up, but it’s a bit depressing.”

Any sympathy for Wall Street’s huddled masses yearning to get rich should be tempered by the fact that financial sector recessions often deal a soft blow. Laid-off financial workers typically get large severance packages, including the use of outplacement services. During their job hunt, many can draw on substantial savings built off past bonuses, on top of collecting unemployment.

But for those laid-off Wall Street workers whose golden tickets have vanished, the disillusionment is real.

Sam Meek, 27, who was laid off in September when his Connecticut hedge fund decided to downsize, used to spend $500 on charity dinners and lavish golf outings. Now, it’s home-cooked meals and beer on the sofa. Recently, Mr. Meek and his roommate, another unemployed banker who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he did not want to jeopardize his job search, sat together in the kitchen filing for unemployment and drinking a bottle of Champagne.

“I’m scraping by right now,” he said.

Mr. Meek, a former Marine, says he is pursuing several job options, including an opportunity to help develop a social network for the military. But he remains reluctant to commit to a new company.

“I’m doing full due diligence,” he said.

Older financiers are having problems, too. Ian C. Horowitz, 40, a former equity researcher at Rafferty Capital Markets, was laid off in June when his firm decided to outsource its research division. Mr. Horowitz currently collects $400 a week in unemployment benefits and has been mowing lawns and doing odd jobs around his New Jersey town to support his wife and two children.

Mr. Horowitz, who lived through the downturn of 2001, said that the latest cuts felt different.

“There have been economic moments where things were bad, but you knew the pendulum would swing the other direction,” he said. “This is structural. The playing field has changed.”

Wall Street’s social scene has also changed, thanks to Occupy Wall Street and the fear of reproach from industry outsiders. Today’s young bankers no longer brag about their jobs, especially in public. One twenty-something Goldman Sachs employee, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not allowed to speak on the record, said he now told new acquaintances he worked at a consulting firm.

The mood has darkened so much that even the young Wall Street workers who still have prestigious jobs are considering letting go of the brass ring.

“It’s lost its luster,” said a former Goldman analyst who left the financial sector this year. The former analyst, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he signed a confidentiality agreement with the firm, said that in addition to losing some of the monetary benefits of their jobs, his friends who remained in finance were suffering from peer envy. “The new status jobs aren’t at Goldman Sachs. They’re at Google, Apple and Facebook.”

For many of the high-achieving, type-A young professionals who end up on Wall Street, being tossed around by an industry in tumult can amount to the first real failure of their lives. Even if the industry recovers, some may not stick around long enough to see their fortunes improve.

“I’m still scratching my head,” said a former employee of Nomura, the large Japanese bank, who was laid off on Oct. 1. “I went to the right schools, I know the right people and I’m very good at what I do. But when you have to cut costs, you have to cut costs.”

The ex-Nomura employee, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because a confidentiality clause is attached to her severance package, said she had recently come across a group of Occupy Wall Street protesters in Lower Manhattan. While she said she did not support all their ideals, she could now sympathize with their frustrations about high unemployment and a growing sense of economic hopelessness.

“I’m in the same boat as these guys,” she said of the protesters. “I just want to start working.”

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/11/21/wall-st-layoffs-take-heavy-toll-on-younger-workers/?hp

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5561 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 08:57am »

oh boy, everyone is awake. Be back in a bit.

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5562 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 11:37am »

on Sep 28th, 2011, 2:58pm, JonCurcio wrote:

Welcome! grin


on Sep 28th, 2011, 3:13pm, philliman wrote:
Dove! Welcome! Nice to see you around here!



on Sep 28th, 2011, 3:20pm, Swamprat wrote:
Hello, Dove! Nice to see you again!

Swamp, Broom....whatever wink


on Sep 28th, 2011, 3:29pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
.


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Lovely Dove!!!

Hello!!!



Crystal



LOL! Hi everyone! Thanks so much for the warm welcome. Really sorry it took me so long to come back and say that. It's been busy on my end and I guess I'm not feeling so well, though I don't want to concede to that. Anyways, thanks again for the welcome. Not sure how much I'll come by, but it's good to have a place to wander to and hang out or just say hi. I hope you're all doing well. smiley
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xx Save the Internet petition--time sensitive
« Reply #5563 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 11:45am »

I think this is a really important petition, and I hope you all take the time to check it out and sign it, no matter what country you're from. There are signers from all over the world. Sorry if this has been posted before; I looked back over the last few pages and didn't see it.

~~~~

Right now, Congress is debating a law that would give them the power to censor the world's Internet -- creating a blacklist that could target YouTube, WikiLeaks and even groups like Avaaz!

Under the new law, our government could force Internet providers to block any website on suspicion of violating copyright or trademark legislation, or even failing to sufficiently police their users' activities. And, because so much of the Internet's hosts and hardware are located here in the US, their blacklist would clamp down on the free web for all of us in America and millions across the world.

We only have days before the vote but we can help stop this -- champions in Congress want to preserve free speech and tell us that a global outcry would strengthen their hand. Let's urgently raise our voices from every corner of America and join Avaaz members across the world to build a massive call urging our decision makers to reject the bill and stop Internet censorship. Sign now and then forward as widely as possible -- our message will be delivered directly to key members of Congress ahead of the crucial vote.



http://www.avaaz.org/en/save_the_internet_us/?cl=1394839081&v=11170
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xx Re: Save the Internet petition--time sensitive
« Reply #5564 on: Nov 22nd, 2011, 1:16pm »

on Nov 22nd, 2011, 11:45am, dove wrote:
I think this is a really important petition, and I hope you all take the time to check it out and sign it, no matter what country you're from. There are signers from all over the world. Sorry if this has been posted before; I looked back over the last few pages and didn't see it.

~~~~

Right now, Congress is debating a law that would give them the power to censor the world's Internet -- creating a blacklist that could target YouTube, WikiLeaks and even groups like Avaaz!

Under the new law, our government could force Internet providers to block any website on suspicion of violating copyright or trademark legislation, or even failing to sufficiently police their users' activities. And, because so much of the Internet's hosts and hardware are located here in the US, their blacklist would clamp down on the free web for all of us in America and millions across the world.

We only have days before the vote but we can help stop this -- champions in Congress want to preserve free speech and tell us that a global outcry would strengthen their hand. Let's urgently raise our voices from every corner of America and join Avaaz members across the world to build a massive call urging our decision makers to reject the bill and stop Internet censorship. Sign now and then forward as widely as possible -- our message will be delivered directly to key members of Congress ahead of the crucial vote.



http://www.avaaz.org/en/save_the_internet_us/?cl=1394839081&v=11170


Hello lovely Dove,

Signed it just now. Come by whenever you want It's always wonderful to see you.

Crystal
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