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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 91768 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #5580 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 07:42am »

Seattle Times

Originally published Wednesday, November 23, 2011 at 5:39 PM

'Superhero' won't face charges in pepper-spray incident

"Proof problems" were behind Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes' decision Wednesday not to file misdemeanor assault charges against Benjamin Fodor, the 23-year-old self-proclaimed superhero better known as Phoenix Jones.

By Sara Jean Green
Seattle Times staff reporter

Proof problems were behind Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes' decision Wednesday not to file misdemeanor assault charges against Benjamin Fodor, the 23-year-old self-proclaimed superhero better known as Phoenix Jones.

Fodor was arrested Oct. 9 after he pepper-sprayed a group of people near First Avenue and Columbia Street, claiming he was attempting to break up a fight. Members of the group told officers they were fooling around and dancing in the street, not fighting.

In a news release, Holmes said a complicating factor in the investigation was Fodor's claim that he was coming to the aid of people involved in an altercation. State law allows a person to use force if he or she reasonably believes someone is about to be injured, so long as the force is not excessive.

While members of Holmes' staff interviewed two of the four alleged victims, "the two men at the heart of the alleged fight ran from the scene, and attempts to identify and interview them have been unsuccessful," the release says. As a result, Holmes determined it is unlikely a jury would find beyond a reasonable doubt "that Fodor intentionally sprayed all of the people at the scene," it says.

Still, Holmes warned that Fodor could be opening himself up to civil litigation "if he persists with his vigilante alter ego." He also said he would ask state lawmakers to enact legislation barring individuals from carrying large quantities of pepper spray, like the can Fodor used to spray the group.

"Mr. Fodor is no hero, just a deeply misguided individual. He has been warned that his actions put himself in danger, and this latest episode demonstrates that innocent bystanders can also be harmed," Holmes said in the news release.

Jones is the leader of the Rain City Superhero Movement, according to one of his Facebook pages. He claims he is a symbol "that the average person doesn't have to walk around and see bad things and do nothing." He wears a masked costume and identifies himself as "a crime fighter from Seattle."

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2016840461_phoenixjones24m.html

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« Reply #5581 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 07:49am »

Scientific American

Should pepper spray be put on (clinical) trial?
By Judy Stone | November 23, 2011

Pepper spray is all over the news, following the Occupy Wall Street protests, particularly following the widely disseminated images and videos of protestors being sprayed in NY, Portland, and UCDavis.

Before that, I knew and occasionally used its main ingredient, capsaicin, as a treatment for my patients with shingles, an extremely painful Herpes zoster infection. And I knew about the many of the serious side effects of pepper spray, well-described by Deborah Blum.

Recently though, other questions arose, like “How was this learned?”. So off I went, looking for clinical trials to see what, if anything, had been studied, beyond the individual patient, poison control, and toxicology reports. Here’s what I learned:

There are reports of the efficacy of capsaicin in crowd control, but little regarding trials of exposures. Perhaps this is because pepper spray is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, as a pesticide and not by the FDA.

The concentration of capsaicin in bear spray is 1-2%; it is 10-30% in “personal defense sprays.”

While the police might feel reassured by the study, “The effect of oleoresin capsicum “pepper” spray inhalation on respiratory function,” I was not. This study met the “gold standard” of clinical trials, in that it was a “randomized, cross-over controlled trial to assess the effect of Oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray inhalation on respiratory function by itself and combined with restraint.” However, while the OC exposure showed no ill effect, only 34 volunteers were exposed to only 1 sec of Cap-Stun 5.5% OC spray by inhalation “from 5 ft away as they might in the field setting (as recommended by both manufacturer and local police policies).”

By contrast, an ACLU report, “Pepper Spray Update: More Fatalities, More Questions” found, in just two years, 26 deaths after OC spraying, noting that death was more likely if the victim was also restrained. This translated to 1 death per 600 times police used spray. (The cause of death was not firmly linked to the OC). According to the ACLU, “an internal memorandum produced by the largest supplier of pepper spray to the California police and civilian markets” concludes that there may be serious risks with more than a 1 sec spray. A subsequent Department of Justice study examined another 63 deaths after pepper spray during arrests; the spray was felt to be a “contributing factor” in several.

A review in 1996 by the Division of Epidemiology of the NC DHHS and OSHA concluded that exposure to OC spray during police training constituted an unacceptable health risk.

Surveillance into crowd control agents examined reports to the British National Poisons Information Service, finding more late (>6 hour) adverse events than had been previously noted, especially skin reactions (blistering, rashes).
Studies have, understandably, more looked at treatment than at systematically exploring toxic effects of pepper spray. An uncontrolled California Poison Control study of 64 patients with exposure to capsaicin (as spray or topically as a cream) showed benefit with topically applied antacids, especially if applied soon after exposure.

In a randomized clinical trial, 47 subjects were assigned to a placebo, a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, or a topical anesthetic. The only group with significant symptomatic improvement in pain received proparacaine hydrochloride 0.5%–and only 55% had decreased pain with treatment.

Another randomized controlled trial looked at 49 volunteers who were treated with one of five treatment groups (aluminum hydroxide–magnesium hydroxide [Maalox], 2% lidocaine gel, baby shampoo, milk, or water). There was a significant difference in pain with more rapid treatment, but not between the groups.

I was most impressed with the efforts of the Black Cross Health Collective in Portland, Oregon. These activists have been thoughtfully approaching studying treatments for pepper spray exposures with published clinical trial protocols, where each volunteer also serves as their own control. Capsaicin is applied to each arm; a “subject-blinded” treatment is applied to one arm, and differences in pain responses are recorded. I love that they are looking for evidenced based solutions.

So far, antacids have been the most effective.

Suggestions for further study

Pepper spray causes inflammation and swelling—particularly a danger for those with underlying asthma or emphysema. In fact, the Department of Justice report notes that in two of 63 clearly documented deaths, the subjects were asthmatic. If they don’t already, police need to have protocols in place to identify and treat “sprayees” who have these pre-existing conditions that predispose them to serious harm from the spray. This particularly holds true for people also at risk for respiratory compromise from being restrained, on other drugs, or with obesity. The study of restrained healthy volunteers exposed to small amounts of capsaicin is simply not applicable to the general population. Also, given that these compounds appear to have delayed effects, there should be legally required medical monitoring of “sprayees” at regular and frequent intervals for at least 24 hours—by someone competent. (Iraq war veteran Kayvan Sabehgi could easily have died from the lacerated spleen sustained in his beating by police. It was 18 hours before he was taken to the hospital, after the jail’s nurse reportedly only offered him a suppository for his abdominal pain. There is also an, as yet unconfirmed report, of a miscarriage after the Portland, Oregon OWS protest last week).

Unfortunately, there is an urgent need for clinical trials in this area—both retrospective assessments of “sprayees” health outcomes, and prospective randomized trials [like the trial done on subjects' arms] to elucidate the effects of various capsaicin concentrations, carrier solvents and propellents and to identify the most effective treatments for each mixture. Until those can be done, there should be a thorough outcomes registry kept, with standardized data being obtained on all those subsequent to being pepper-sprayed.

Sadly, I’m sure the Black Cross and others in the Occupy Wall Street movement will have too many opportunities to test therapies against painful crowd-control chemicals. Studies will be difficult because the settings are largely uncontrolled and because the sprays have different concentrations of capsaicin, carrier solvents, and propellants.

Until then, there should be a moratorium on the use of pepper spray or other “non-lethal” chemicals by police, except in clearly life-threatening confrontations, due to the high number of associated deaths until the risks are better understood?

Perhaps Kamran Loghman, who helped the FBI weaponize pepper spray, will be dismayed enough at the “inappropriate and improper use of chemical agents” to help the Black Cross develop effective antidotes…One can only hope.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/11/23/molecules-to-medicine-should-pepper-spray-be-put-on-clinical-trial/

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« Reply #5582 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 07:56am »

back in a bit....
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« Reply #5583 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 12:04pm »

.






Uploaded by MrThemastercleanser on Nov 24, 2011

http://www.iwipa.com/iwipa/169123933138618?pid=1
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2011/11/22
In her first two segments, investigative reporter Linda Moulton Howe discussed the unidentified balls, discs, and entity encounters in Kansas City, Missouri since April 2011 and the 125 orange spheres that flew in waves toward Lee's Summit, Missouri. She interviewed Margie Kay, the Asst. State Director of Missouri MUFON, who noted that in a one month period between the first week of October to November 2011, Kansas City Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) had received nearly 80 cases, the biggest UFO flap in such a short time in the city's history. Among the sightings were a soundless diamond-shaped craft, a large slow-moving circular disc that ejected a red sphere, a flaming orange orb, and a small orb that a dog chased into the woods.

Additionally, Kay described cases where a UFO witness with missing time had a strange crystal tooth installed in her mouth, and a retired police detective saw a small alien being, as a black triangular craft hovered over his backyard. More of Kay's interview here. Linda also spoke with witness Richard Vick,who described seeing waves of small orange spheres flying in the sky between Kansas City and the suburb, Raytown in June of 2011 (photo below). Numerous other witnesses saw the orbs, and a local TV news station reported on the event, he said. More.

In her third report, Linda shared information on how Solar Cycle 24 could be the last cycle for decades to have any sunspots at all. If that plays out, then, for the first time in 400 years, Earth will go through a solar Grand Minimum like the Maunder Minimum of 1635 to 1715, when Europe went through a 'Little Ice Age.' Solar physicist David Hathaway told her we wouldn't know for sure until 2013, but that the current & upcoming sun cycles offered a good opportunity to study how they affect global warming. In her last report, she spoke with author Philip Coppens about Erich von Daniken's latest book, Odyssey of the Gods, in which he proposes that the Greek Gods were extraterrestrials.
http://www.earthfiles.com/

Category:
Science & Technology

~

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« Reply #5584 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 12:06pm »

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Thank You



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« Reply #5585 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 1:26pm »

This is the best group in the parade!




N'Awlins I love you!

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« Reply #5586 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 1:30pm »

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

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« Reply #5587 on: Nov 24th, 2011, 2:17pm »

on Nov 24th, 2011, 1:30pm, philliman wrote:
Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

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We had a Siamese that looked like that. Cat was batsh*t crazy!

Happy Thanksgiving Phil.

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« Reply #5588 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 08:05am »

New York Times

November 24, 2011
League Warns Syria to Admit Monitors or Risk Sanctions
By NADA BAKRI

BEIRUT, Lebanon — In a humiliating affront for the Syrian government, Arab foreign ministers called Thursday for Syria to agree to admit international monitors within 24 hours or face economic sanctions, while activists reported new clashes between army troops and defectors that left 29 dead across the country.

The announcement from the Arab League ministers came after the European Union said Thursday that safeguarding civilians against President Bashar al-Assad’s ferocious crackdown had become a priority. The death toll in eight months of violence now exceeds 3,500, the figure cited by the United Nations in early November.

“Protection of civilians in Syria is an increasingly urgent and important aspect of responding to the events in country,” said Maja Kocijancic, a European Union spokeswoman, in a statement.

But the European Union stopped short of endorsing a proposal floated Wednesday by Foreign Minister Alain Juppé of France to set up humanitarian corridors — with or without the consent of the Syrian government — to allow aid groups into the country. Such a step would be a major escalation of foreign involvement in what has become one of the bloodiest of the Arab Spring uprisings.

In a special meeting in Cairo, the Arab League called on Syria to agree by Friday to admit a mission of 500 civilian and military observers to monitor the human rights situation and oversee efforts to carry out a peace plan that Syria agreed to on Nov. 2.

The Arab League suspended Syria this month after it failed to comply with the plan, under which it had pledged to withdraw all military units from the streets, stop killing protesters and allow the monitors to enter the country.

The league said that if Syria refused to admit the monitors, it would meet again on Saturday to discuss sanctions that could include the suspension of all trade except for essential humanitarian goods, a ban on flights to Syria, a travel ban on Syrian officials, and the freezing of all transactions with the central bank and of all Arab economic projects under way in Syria.

If enacted, the new penalties would deal a stinging blow to an economy already suffering under sanctions from the European Union and the United States. Syria’s two most vital sectors, oil and tourism, which account for more than a third of the government’s revenues, have all but come to a halt.

While there was no official response from the leadership in Damascus, Syrian state television said that the government would reject the deal as an infringement on its sovereignty.

While the diplomatic wheels turned, violence continued unabated throughout the country, which has appeared in recent weeks to be sliding inexorably into civil war. Activists said that at least 29 people were killed Thursday, 28 of them in Homs in central Syria and its surrounding villages, and one in Talkalakh in northern Syria, according to the Local Coordination Committees, a group of activists who are involved in planning and documenting the uprising.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said that at least 11 soldiers were also killed in Houla, a village on the outskirts of Homs, during clashes with army defectors. The group, which is based in London, added that security forces killed 15 defectors who were hiding in Rastan, one of the most volatile areas of Homs Province, where large numbers of the deserters are believed to be hiding.

Homs has been the scene of horrific sectarian clashes between the majority Muslims and sizable minorities of Christians and Alawites, the Muslim sect that provides much of the country’s leadership. In recent weeks there have been reports of beheadings, frequent drive-by shootings and revenge killings. The situation there is described by activists as grave, with shortages of food, water and medical supplies.

“We are running out of basic food items and don’t have gas to turn heaters on,” said one resident from Homs who gave his name as Muhammad. “We don’t know how we are going to survive.”

Because of the appalling conditions in Homs and some other rebellious cities, the government is reluctant to admit the monitors, said Samir Nachar, a member of the opposition Syrian National Council.

At the same time, he said, the Syrian government is desperate to avoid having the issue taken up again by the United Nations, which has yet to impose sanctions.

“They are torn between allowing the monitors in and facing a scandal, or not allowing them and facing the United Nations” and the Arab League’s sanctions, Mr. Nachar said.

In his proposal, Mr. Juppé, the French foreign minister, called for sending international monitors to Syria, with or without its approval, but he added that the observers would need an armed escort for their protection. He said he was in contact with the United Nations, the United States and the Arab League over setting up humanitarian corridors, which could be used by groups like the Red Cross to carry aid to the worst-hit areas.

Mr. Juppé called the situation in Syria “no longer tenable” and accused Mr. Assad of “repression of a savagery we have not seen in a long time.”

He told French radio that if the effort to set up the humanitarian corridors was stymied, then “we’d have to look at other solutions with international observers.”

In contrast to their stance on Libya, Arab leaders have opposed any military intervention in Syria.

Hwaida Saad and an employee of The New York Times contributed reporting.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/25/world/middleeast/arab-league-warns-syria-of-sanctions-deadline.html?_r=1&hp#

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« Reply #5589 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 08:11am »

AZCentral.com


Holiday flight became tragedy in Arizona's Superstition Mountains

Father from Safford was picking up kids

by Michelle Ye Hee Lee - Nov. 25, 2011 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic

Shawn Perry, a 39-year-old pilot and father, had planned to drive from Safford to Apache Junction to pick up his three children.

Russel Hardy, Perry's boss at a Safford-based aviation company, suggested a different plan, according to a relative -- it would be faster and easier to fly.

Joseph Hardwick, 22, another employee, was engaged to be married next month. A mechanic, he didn't normally fly as a crew member. But this time, he was aboard.

The group flew to Mesa's Falcon Field and picked up the children: Morgan, 9, Logan, 8, and Luke, 6.

Then the plane took off again, headed back for Thanksgiving. But the six aboard never made it home to Safford.

About 15 minutes after departing Wednesday evening, the twin-engine plane crashed into the side of the Superstition Mountains, sparking a fireball visible for miles and killing all six on board.

Throughout the day Thursday, emergency crews worked to reach the wreckage, which was strewn along the base of a sheer cliff in a rugged area of the mountains. Crews rappelled to reach the plane's remnants but found no survivors and quickly determined that the operation would focus on recovery instead of rescue.

Federal officials were still en route to the site Thursday afternoon. Once there, investigators would begin piecing together what took place just after sunset Wednesday on a flight that would leave Hardy, an experienced pilot, and the other passengers on the Rockwell twin-engine plane in such peril.

The children

Friends and acquaintances of the children's mother, Karen Perry of Apache Junction, expressed grief and sympathy for a selfless woman who has experienced a series of struggles in recent years. Morgan, the oldest, was diagnosed with epilepsy, undergoing multiple brain surgeries. Luke, the youngest, had autism.

"She just had some tragedies throughout her life, and some struggles," said Chandler resident Nicole Werner Hamming, who has known the mother for about 20 years through a mutual friend.

Mark Blomgren, principal at Peralta Trail Elementary in Apache Junction, said Logan and Morgan were in the school through the end of last year before they transferred schools.

Blomgren said the district's superintendent called him Thursday morning to share the news, and Blomgren immediately contacted teachers who had Logan and Morgan in their classes.

"They were just great kids," Blomgren said. "All the teachers were naturally shocked. They cared about them and wondered how their mom was doing and they were just hit pretty hard. Logan and Morgan were just special kids that the teachers really bonded with."

Karen and Shawn Perry entered divorce proceedings in Pinal County in 2009, according to public records.

The crew

Late Wednesday, LeeVon Motes, Hardy's cousin, described the story of how the men decided to take the flight.

Joseph Hardwick, the young mechanic, did not usually board a flight himself. But he did on Wednesday, likely just "tagging along" on a "nice trip on Thanksgiving Eve," said Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, whose emergency crews mounted the search effort.

Coincidentally, the picture that sheriff's deputies used to identify the remains of Hardwick, youngest of seven children, was one taken at the Superstition Mountains while he was on a hiking trip.

"These people were really close and they were all family, even though they were not all related," Babeu said.

Hardy, 31, was the co-owner of Safford-based Ponderosa Aviation Inc., which owned the plane.

Hardy is survived by his wife, Joanna, and 3-year-old son Caden.

Acquaintances and those familiar with the Safford aviation community described the company as a "big family affair" run by a tight-knit family. On its website, the company touted decades of safe flying.

Allen Kenitzer of the Federal Aviation Administration said the plane that crashed was a Rockwell Aero Commander.

The company has contracts to provide firefighting services, said Ryan Owens, a pilot who owns a similar aviation-operating company based in Mesa. Owens said he and his business partner had researched Ponderosa Aviation because they were planning to purchase a business at the Safford Regional Airport.

"Mountain flying always has its difficulties, but these guys have operated with search, rescue and firefighting. To my knowledge, that's what they've done in the past. They would be very comfortable in that situation (of the crash)," Owens said.

The crash

The cause of the crash had not been identified by Thursday afternoon, pending a federal investigation, Babeu said.

The accident happened "just at the crest of this mountain, almost as if it would make it over," Babeu said.

Experienced pilots who have flown over the Superstition Mountains were perplexed by the crash. The area is not particularly difficult to fly over, they said. And even if both engines gave out, the aircraft would have been able to turn around and return to the airport by gliding, Owens said.

"What none of us know yet is why he (Hardy) would be that low in the area. The airplane performs so well, and he kept them maintained so well, that it's hard to understand why he would've let himself get that low in that area," said Howard Jenkins, a Graham County resident who has flown airplanes for 35 years.

Jenkins said Hardy was a "very dedicated man, hard worker," and a "very experienced pilot."

The plane departed from Falcon Field at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday. An explosion at the southwest portion of the Superstition Mountains was reported at 6:31 p.m., Babeu said. The crash site was near the peaks' Flat Iron area, he said.

Sheriff's deputies camped at the crash site overnight because the area, surrounded by rugged terrain, was too treacherous for deputies to search for bodies overnight, Babeu said.

Babeu estimated the plane was traveling at about 200 mph at the point of collision. The speed, combined with reports of a fiery explosion and the amount of debris on the scene, led officials to believe all of the passengers were dead, Babeu said.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA were expected later Thursday, Babeu said. NTSB investigators issue a preliminary report within several days of an accident; a final report could take several months.

Pinal County's first responders knew they were looking at a tragedy as soon as they arrived on the scene Wednesday, Babeu said.

"No one could survive that crash," Babeu said. "All of these families are just obviously heartbroken, traumatized over the loss of their loved ones so suddenly and on Thanksgiving."

http://www.azcentral.com/community/pinal/articles/2011/11/24/20111124arizona-superstition-mountains-plane-crash-tragedy.html#ixzz1ej5HVXv0

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« Reply #5590 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 08:15am »

LA Times

Customers hit by pepper spray at Wal-Mart describe scene of chaos
November 25, 2011 | 2:26 am

Matthew Lopez went to the Wal-Mart in Porter Ranch on Thursday night for the Black Friday sale but instead was caught in a pepper-spray attack by a woman who authorities said was "competitive shopping."

Lopez described a chaotic scene in the San Fernando Valley store among shoppers looking for video games soon after the sale began.

"I heard screaming and I heard yelling," said Lopez, 18. "Moments later, my throat stung. I was coughing really bad and watering up."

Lopez said customers were already in the store when a whistle signaled the start of the Black Friday sale at 10 p.m., sending shoppers hurtling in search of deeply discounted items.

Lopez said that by the time he arrived at the video games, the display had been torn down. Employees attempted to hold back the scrum of shoppers and pick up merchandise even as customers trampled the video games and DVDs strewn on the floor.

"It was absolutely crazy," he said.

Another customer said screams erupted after about 100 people waiting in line to snag Xbox gaming consoles and Wii video games got into a shoving match.

Alejandra Seminario, 24, said she was waiting in line to grab some toys at the store around 9:55 p.m. when people the next aisle over started shouting and ripping at the plastic wrap encasing gaming consoles, which was supposed to be opened at 10 p.m.

"People started screaming, pulling and pushing each other, and then the whole area filled up with pepper spray," the Sylmar resident said. "I guess what triggered it was people started pulling the plastic off the pallets and then shoving and bombarding the display of games. It started with people pushing and screaming because they were getting shoved onto the boxes."

The pepper spray wafted through the air, Seminario said, and she breathed some in and started coughing. Her face also started itching.

"I did not want to get involved. I was too scared. I just stayed in the toy aisle," she said.

By the time she and her husband, 27-year-old Cesar Seminario, got to the cash register 20 minutes later with a Wii gaming console and some Barbie dolls, the air was still smelling of pepper spray, she said.

Wal-Mart employees were taking statements near the front of the store from about eight customers who had been pepper-sprayed, Seminario said. "After we paid, we saw five that were in really bad shape," she said. "They had been sprayed in the face, it looked like, and they had swelling of the face, really extreme swelling of face, redness, coughing."

Nakeasha Contreras, 20, of North Hollywood, said she arrived at midnight and hadn't heard what happened. Even if she had, she said, she wouldn't have minded: "I don't care. I'm still getting my TV. I've never seen Wal-Mart so crazy, but I guess it could have been worse."

Joseph Poulose, who said he was hit with the spray near the DVD and video games display, criticized the store for failing to control the crowds.

"There were way too many people in a building that size. Every aisle was full," he said. Customers were stomping on photo frames and other items on the floor, said Poulose, who tried to protect his pregnant wife from the throng of shoppers inside.

"It was definitely the worst Black Friday I’ve ever experienced," he said.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/11/at-wal-mart-pepper-spray-attack-triggered-chaos-screaming.html

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« Reply #5591 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 08:18am »

The West Australian

Australian fire claims 34 properties

November 25, 2011, 9:35 am
PERTH, Australia, Nov 25, 2011

Hundreds of firefighters pinned their hopes on cooler weather Friday as they battled a large and unpredictable blaze which has destroyed at least 34 properties including a historic house.

Scores of residents remained in evacuation centres close to the tourist township of Margaret River, a coastal area known for its wines in Western Australia, about 280 kilometres (170 miles) south of Perth.

"Twenty-five houses and nine chalets have been lost to the fire including the historic Wallcliffe House," the Department of Environment and Conservation said in an update.

The two-storey stone Wallcliffe House, built close to Prevelly Beach in 1865, has been burnt through.

"The fire threat remains and may worsen at any time," the department added.

The full extent of damage from the blaze, which began with a controlled burn-off in Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park 10 weeks ago before breaking out of control earlier this week, is not yet known.

The blaze flared amid strong winds and high temperatures on Thursday, but the forecast is now for moist westerly winds and lower temperatures, including the possibility of light rain.

"The fire is what we would call contained," incident controller Peter Keppel told ABC.

"It's relatively secure but we've still got in the southern part of the fire quite a bit of work to do to make it secure and to mop it up."

Authorities estimate it has burned about 2,865 hectares within a 42.5 kilometre perimeter, forced hundreds of residents and holidaymakers from homes, caravan parks and holiday accommodation and prompted some road closures.

Residents in the area are being urged to leave their properties unless they are prepared to stay and defend them.

As anger at how a controlled fire could end up destroying people's homes mounted, locals recounted how they were forced to cling beneath a jetty at Prevelly Beach as flames metres-high were burning on the sand.

"All 30 of us huddled underneath the jetty as the fire was raging on the dunes just above us," Joel Hodgson told the ABC.

Police Commissioner and State Emergency Coordinator Karl O'Callaghan said the fire, which comes days ahead of the start of the southern hemisphere summer, was a bad start to the season.

"The catastrophic fire conditions that we have seen... it's been a difficult start to the season," he said.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/world/12021975/australian-fire-claims-34-properties/

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« Reply #5592 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 08:28am »

Mail Online

Is this an alien skull? Mystery of giant-headed mummy found in Peru
Skull has soft spot, found in infants, yet also two large molars, found in older humans
Three anthropologists agree: 'It is not a human being'

By Paul Milligan
Last updated at 7:59 PM
24th November 2011

A mummified elongated skull found in Peru could finally prove the existence of aliens.

The strangely shaped head - almost as big as its 50cm (20in) body - has baffled anthropologists.
It was one of two sets of remains found in the city of Andahuaylillas in the southern province of Quispicanchi.

The skeletal sets were discovered by Renato Davila Riquelme, who works for the Privado Ritos Andinos museum in Cusco in south-eastern Peru.

He said that that the eye cavities are far larger than normally seen in humans.

There is a soft spot in the skull - called an open fontanelle - which is a characteristic of children in their first year of life, yet the skull also has two large molars, only found in much older humans.

Davila Riquelme said three anthropologists, from Spain and Russia, arrived at the museum last week to investigate the findings and agreed it was ‘not a human being’ and would conduct further studies.
He added: ‘Although the assessment was superficial, it is obvious that its features do not correspond to any ethnic group in the world.’

The remains of an eyeball in the right socket will help determine its genetic DNA - and clear up the controversy if it is human or not.
The second mummy is incomplete and is only 30cm (12in).
It lacks a face and seems to be wrapped in a layer as a placenta, fetal position.

The remains bear a striking resemblance to the triangular crystal skull in the 2008 Indiana Jones film Kingdom of the Crystal Skull - which turned out to be of alien origin and have supernatural powers.

photos after the jump
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2063486/Alien-skull-Peru-Mystery-giant-headed-mummy-city-Andahuaylillas.html

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« Reply #5593 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 6:41pm »

ScienceDaily

Climate Sensitivity to Carbon Dioxide More Limited Than Extreme Projections, Research Shows

ScienceDaily (Nov. 24, 2011) — A new study suggests that the rate of global warming from doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide may be less than the most dire estimates of some previous studies -- and, in fact, may be less severe than projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report in 2007.

Authors of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation's Paleoclimate Program and published online this week in the journal Science, say that global warming is real and that increases in atmospheric CO2 will have multiple serious impacts.

However, the most Draconian projections of temperature increases from the doubling of CO2 are unlikely.

"Many previous climate sensitivity studies have looked at the past only from 1850 through today, and not fully integrated paleoclimate date, especially on a global scale," said Andreas Schmittner, an Oregon State University researcher and lead author on the Science article. "When you reconstruct sea and land surface temperatures from the peak of the last Ice Age 21,000 years ago -- which is referred to as the Last Glacial Maximum -- and compare it with climate model simulations of that period, you get a much different picture.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111124150827.htm
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« Reply #5594 on: Nov 25th, 2011, 8:06pm »

on Nov 25th, 2011, 6:41pm, Swamprat wrote:
ScienceDaily

Climate Sensitivity to Carbon Dioxide More Limited Than Extreme Projections, Research Shows

ScienceDaily (Nov. 24, 2011) — A new study suggests that the rate of global warming from doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide may be less than the most dire estimates of some previous studies -- and, in fact, may be less severe than projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report in 2007.

Authors of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation's Paleoclimate Program and published online this week in the journal Science, say that global warming is real and that increases in atmospheric CO2 will have multiple serious impacts.

However, the most Draconian projections of temperature increases from the doubling of CO2 are unlikely.

"Many previous climate sensitivity studies have looked at the past only from 1850 through today, and not fully integrated paleoclimate date, especially on a global scale," said Andreas Schmittner, an Oregon State University researcher and lead author on the Science article. "When you reconstruct sea and land surface temperatures from the peak of the last Ice Age 21,000 years ago -- which is referred to as the Last Glacial Maximum -- and compare it with climate model simulations of that period, you get a much different picture.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111124150827.htm


Hey Swamprat!
Hope you are having a lovely Thanksgiving!
Crystal
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