Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Nov 25th, 2017, 01:49am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 388 389 390 391 392  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 16181 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5835 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 09:19am »

Telegraph

Pig manure deters teenagers from drinking in the woods

Youths have turned their noses up at a woodland drink and drugs den after it was spread with pig dung.

8:58AM GMT 28 Dec 2011

Middlesbrough Council came up with the cheap but effective method of combating anti-social behaviour in woods at Coulby Newham.

It said residents had complained about young people smoking drugs in the area and, although there is a slight smell from the pig manure, locals ''would much rather have a pong than a bong''.

Elderly people nearby had been upset by youngsters congregating in the woodland between Willowbank and Stainton Way to drink and smoke.

Council staff thinned out the trees so the area was more visible from paths, then spread a thick layer of pig manure to deter the youngsters.

A council spokesman said: ''Following complaints, an inspection of the area revealed it was being used to drink alcohol and take drugs, as paraphernalia known as bongs were found.''

Since the muck-spreading, the area has been crime-free.

The spokesman added: ''Feedback from the residents indicated that, although there was a slight whiff in Willowbank, they would much rather have a pong than a bong.''

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/8980077/Pig-manure-deters-teenagers-from-drinking-in-the-woods.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5836 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 09:23am »

Wired Danger Room

Stealth Tech, Facebook Revolutions, Shadow Wars: The Most Dangerous Year Ever
By Spencer Ackerman and Noah Shachtman
December 28, 2011 | 6:31 am

When 2011 began, Osama bin Laden was still alive, U.S. troops were still fighting in Iraq, and Iran could only dream about capturing our most advanced spy drone. By the end of the year -- everything had flipped upside-down. America's shadow wars grew, as its conventional conflicts shrank. Secret tech was suddenly not so secret any more. Dictators in place for decades suddenly found themselves out of jobs, thanks in no small part to Facebook. Even the ordinarily sacrosanct Pentagon budget was suddenly under fire. It was, in retrospect, a decidedly crazy, thoroughly exhausting, and utterly exhilarating year. It's hard to imagine what more could be in store for 2012.

Al-Qaida Loses, and Then Loses Some More

2011 was definitely the most dangerous year ever -- if you were an al-Qaida bigwig. Most famously, Navy SEALs finally killed Osama bin Laden in May, removing from the Earth the world's most infamous terrorist and puncturing al-Qaida's most potent symbol of resilience. It was an operation that showed off just how deadly the U.S. really is. Special operations forces paired with CIA operatives, prepped with spy satellites, and equipped with the latest stealth gear. Then, less than four months later, the U.S. proved its lethality again. An American missile strike in Yemen killed al-Qaida's chief online propagandist, Anwar al-Awlaki.

No wonder al-Qaida didn't come close to bombing the U.S. at home, unlike its efforts in 2009 and 2010. Instead, it lost two of its most important figures; a treasure trove of its data; and suffered the kind of setbacks that have Washington talking about capital-V Victory.

Al-Qaida looks like it's in crisis mode now. Top government officials think it's almost a spent force. Its new leader, Ayman Zawahiri, is an uncharismatic, divisive figure. The bin Laden raid gave the U.S. access to dozens of cellphones, thumb drives and computer hard drives revealing terrorist secrets. (Also, bin Laden's porn.) The costly 9/11 Era may actually soon be a relic of the past -- if, that is, we can stop being so afraid of the terrorists who got rolled in 2011.

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5837 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 09:28am »

back in a bit
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4242
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5838 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:11am »

"Who's having to do the cooking?"

Jane's sister arrived a couple of days early to help! wink
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5839 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:12am »

on Dec 28th, 2011, 10:11am, Swamprat wrote:
"Who's having to do the cooking?"

Jane's sister arrived a couple of days early to help! wink


Bless her! That is a lot of people to feed. But it sounds like so much fun.

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5840 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:17am »

Space.com

Russian Soyuz Rocket to Launch 6 Satellites Today

by Stephen Clark, Spaceflight Now
Date: 28 December 2011
Time: 10:54 AM ET

The launch of a Soyuz rocket with six Globalstar mobile communications will go forward Wednesday despite the failure of a similar booster last week, according to Globalstar and Russian officials.

The satellites will replenish Globalstar's fleet of communications satellites linking customers through voice and data messaging services.

Liftoff of the Soyuz 2-1a rocket is scheduled for 1709 GMT (12:09 p.m. EST) Wednesday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch will be at 11:09 p.m. local time at Baikonur.

The launcher uses a different third stage engine than the Soyuz rocket that crashed Friday with a Russian Meridian military communications satellite.

http://www.space.com/14062-russian-rocket-launching-6-satellites.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5841 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 12:20pm »

grin




~

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
PowerKnight
Metallic Silver Flying Saucers Exist...I Should Know I Once Experienced A Close Encounter Of The First Kind!
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

Silver Spaceships Of Sublime Beauty!


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1705
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5842 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 2:40pm »

That`s making me very hungry, have a passion for seafood...prawns and shrimps but mostly in a curry, PowerKnight wink
User IP Logged

PowerKnight`s Perchance To Dream...

Joust With Thee
For I The PowerKnight Hath Taken
Escaped From The Castle
A Damsel Distressed Unto Thee
The PowerKnight Legacy

...Composed From The Poetic Pen Of PowerKnight.
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4242
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5843 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 9:08pm »

German shepherd helps Army vet battle with PTSD

Posted 12/28/2011 12:42 PM ET

By Katie Tammen, Northwest Florida Daily News

User Image

NAVARRE, Fla. — After years of struggling to find meaning in his life, Ray Galmiche finally has found his purpose.
"God spared my life and I think now I know why," said Ray, who served in Vietnam from December 1966 to May 1968. "I've got to face (PTSD) but keep moving forward, and now I've got a goal."

The two-year study will look at how Dazzle has helped Ray deal with his disability. In exchange for the dog and $75 a month for food, Ray must send in updates every couple of months about how he is doing.

For years Ray has suffered nightmares, flashbacks, anxiety attacks and feelings of worthlessness. But the diagnosis didn't come until 2002.

"Twenty years in the Army and I didn't know what PTSD was. They didn't talk about it," Ray said. "I didn't think I was any different than anybody else."

A civilian doctor diagnosed it after Ray had some particularly debilitating episodes.

Eventually, Ray decided they needed a change of scenery and they moved from their home in Maryland to Northwest Florida where his sister lived. It was a decision that would worsen his condition.

Shortly after moving to the area, Ray concluded that Karen was unhappy because she was far from her friends and family. He became angry at himself for moving her.

"I just wanted to be left alone," Ray said. "I was doing a lot of soul searching . and thinking, 'God, I'm really hating myself.' "

For years, he thought of suicide and sought ways to be alone. He sometimes urged Karen to stay with her family up north for months at a time.

During what became a two-month trip in June, Karen came across an article that ultimately changed their lives.

It was a story about a man with PTSD who had been given a dog to help him with his condition.

"Something inside me knew that was going to work out for Ray," Karen said. "I never doubted that he'd get a dog."

The Galmiches traveled to Williston, Fla., in August for an interview to get Ray a dog from Guardian Angels Medical Service Dogs. The organization contracts with Veterans Affairs to supply dogs to veterans who suffer from PTSD.
"When Raymond came to me, he was very emotional," said Carol Borden, who owns and operates Guardian Angels. "He kept asking, 'When will my dog be ready for me.' "

Borden said she deliberately didn't answer the question. Instead, she let Ray interact with Dazzle for a while.
That's when she realized he had found his dog and told him so.

"Oh my gosh. He looked at me, he looked at Dazzle and he just buried his head in his hands and sobbed, and the dog immediately got up and went to him and began licking the tears from his face," Borden said. "I mean that was such an emotional moment. There wasn't a dry eye in the room."
Ray said since getting Dazzle his life has changed, although slowly.

"I'm so focused on him — on Dazzle — that I'm not having as many problems as I was before," Ray said.

The nightmares aren't gone, but Dazzle wakes him before they get too far. He still gets nervous around large crowds, but Dazzle will stand between him and other people so he no longer stays in the house alone all the time.

"We kept finding excuses to go out (after they got Dazzle) . It was something we haven't done in a really long time," Karen said. "It was fun."

Today, the couple isn't just focused on Ray's disability; they've turned their attention outward. Ray speaks to anyone who asks about the dog and the program. He hopes his story will help someone else.

As of now, eight veterans have been paired up with dogs. The VA ultimately plans to have 230 veterans involved in the study, Borden said.

"What it does to restore the dignity and self worth and independence of these people is absolutely just nothing short of magic, it truly is," Borden said.

The biggest issue for the program, the Galmiches and Borden said, is funding. Each dog costs about $20,000 by the time the training is complete, and the VA is only paying half the expense.

"It's given me a purpose outside of myself," Ray said. "And if (Dazzle) can do that for me, he can do that for so many others."

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://medicalservicedogs.com/
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5844 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 9:12pm »

on Dec 28th, 2011, 2:40pm, PowerKnight wrote:
That`s making me very hungry, have a passion for seafood...prawns and shrimps but mostly in a curry, PowerKnight wink


That sounds so good PowerKnight, now I want some.

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5845 on: Dec 28th, 2011, 9:14pm »

"NAVARRE, Fla. — After years of struggling to find meaning in his life, Ray Galmiche finally has found his purpose.
"God spared my life and I think now I know why," said Ray, who served in Vietnam from December 1966 to May 1968. "I've got to face (PTSD) but keep moving forward, and now I've got a goal."

The two-year study will look at how Dazzle has helped Ray deal with his disability. In exchange for the dog and $75 a month for food, Ray must send in updates every couple of months about how he is doing.

For years Ray has suffered nightmares, flashbacks, anxiety attacks and feelings of worthlessness. But the diagnosis didn't come until 2002.

"Twenty years in the Army and I didn't know what PTSD was. They didn't talk about it," Ray said. "I didn't think I was any different than anybody else."


Dazzle is one gorgeous dog, God bless him.

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5846 on: Dec 29th, 2011, 08:59am »

LA Times

Iran naval chief says closing gulf to oil traffic would be easy

Habibollah Sayyari is the second official in two days to mention closing the Strait of Hormuz, potentially disrupting the flow of Middle East oil to world markets.

By Ramin Mostaghim and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
5:14 PM PST, December 28, 2011
Reporting from Tehran and Washington

Iran's top naval commander said Wednesday that closing the Persian Gulf to oil tanker traffic would be "easier than drinking a glass of water" but that his nation would not do so for now.

"Closing the Strait of Hormuz for Iran's armed forces is really easy ... or, as Iranians say, it will be easier than drinking a glass of water," Habibollah Sayyari told the country's English language Press TV. "But right now, we don't need to shut it as we have the Sea of Oman under control, and we can control the transit."

In Washington, the Pentagon's chief spokesman, George Little, warned that interference with the passage of vessels through the Strait of Hormuz "will not be tolerated.... This is not just an important issue for security and stability in the region, but is an economic lifeline for countries in the gulf."

Mark Toner, a State Department spokesman, sounded a note of skepticism about the threat, saying it was "more rhetoric from the Iranians.... I'm saying at this point it's pure speculation."

Sayyari's statement followed by a day a similar threat from Iranian Vice President Mohammad Reza Rahimi to close the gulf to tanker traffic, potentially disrupting the flow of Middle East oil to world markets, if Iran faces any new sanctions. However, there were no immediate signs that their words were a prelude to military action or any more than verbal jousting with Iran's international critics.

The international community has already imposed some sanctions in response to Iran's pursuit of a nuclear program, which Tehran says has peaceful goals but which the West fears will lead to the creation of atomic weapons.

"What does the West expect us to do when we are threatened and attacked?" said Ali Akbar Javanfekr, a media advisor to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. "Should we just throw our hands up and give in? Mr. Rahimi's reaction was a defensive reaction and we are right to do so."

Alireza Nader, an Iran specialist at Rand Corp., said the Iranian language was intended to warn the United States and allies against proceeding with the additional harsh economic sanctions they have been preparing.

With their economy already under stress, Iranian officials are worried about the loss of their traditional oil customers and damage to the operations of their central bank. President Obama is expected to soon sign legislation designed to deter foreign companies from buying petroleum through the central bank, even as the European Union weighs an embargo on oil purchases from Tehran.

"Iran is raising the ante by saying, 'We don't have the military capability to completely close it, but we can impede traffic,'" said Nader. Though neither the United States nor Iran wants war, "tensions are so high that there's room for miscalculation."

But Nader Karimi Joni, an Iranian economic and political analyst, was dismissive of the threat. "What Rahimi as vice president said is not a big deal or new. First of all, the commander of the Iranian naval force said that Iran does not intend to do it for the time being. Secondly, IRGC [Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps] commanders on other occasions in the past have said similar things.

"It is not serious," Joni said, "and it will not be in the near future."


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-iran-threat-20111229,0,7909259.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5847 on: Dec 29th, 2011, 09:03am »

Telegraph

Syrian forces 'kill civilians' after opening fire on protesters

Regime forces fired on protesters at a protest hub near Damascus and killed at least 11 people around Syria on Thursday, even as peace monitors spread out across the country, activists said.

By Richard Spencer, Middle East Correspondent
12:12PM GMT 29 Dec 2011

At least three demonstrators were killed and several others wounded in Douma, the protest centre just north of the capital, when security forces sprayed protesters with bullets outside a mosque, a rights group said.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the shooting broke out as a Arab League observers arrived at Douma's city hall, on the third day of a mission designed to halt a lethal government crackdown on dissent.

Following a two-day visit to Homs, which has seen the worst violence of the uprising, teams of observers were due to visit the neighbouring province of Hama, Idlib in the north and Deraa, where the protests started, on the southern border with Jordan.

All three provinces have seen hundreds of deaths of protesters and, more recently, of regime troops targeted by armed rebels.

Activists said they had little confidence that the mission would achieve its purpose of overseeing a peace deal supposedly agreed by Mr Assad two months ago.

Lt Gen Mohammed Ahmed Mustapha al-Dabi, head of the mission, sparked ridicule by describing the city of Homs, where it is thought more than 1,000 people have been killed, as being “nothing frightening", although he conceded “some places looked a bit of a mess".

“Yesterday was quiet and there were no clashes,” he said on Wednesday. “We did not see tanks but we did see some armoured vehicles. But remember this was only the first day and it will need investigation.”

Observers in his mission were berated by residents who claimed they were being “slaughtered” by regime attacks.

Bab al-Amr, an enclave of Homs in the hands of the rebels, had been subjected to a four-day attack by troops and tanks, some of it captured on video posted online, which lasted until Monday, the eve of the mission’s visit to the city. Scores of people were killed When the monitors arrived, there was angry reaction to footage of one delegate appearing to turn away and light a cigarette as a man urged him to report the presence of snipers.

One monitor appeared to refuse to accompany a protester who wanted to show him the scene of a “slaughter", though another was seen on video being shown by a woman the bloodstains where her son had been shot.

Later, though, the monitors did visit a mosque where the body of a four-year-old boy, shot dead by regime troops after their arrival in the city, had been taken to await his funeral.

The opposition said that the mission was losing credibility. Radwan Ziadeh, a Syrian academic in exile and member of the Syrian National Council, said it did not have the “capacity or experience” to stop what was going on.

“What’s needed is international intervention,” he said. “We need a buffer zone along the Turkish borders where the situation is still escalating.

Maybe the UN has to declare some ’safe cities’.”

However, the Syrian Observatory of Human Rights said the mission was the "only ray of light” and was encouraging protesters to make their presence felt. “The presence of the observers in Homs broke the barrier of fear,” a spokesman, Rami Abdel Rahman, said.

The deal the mission is overseeing is supposed to include the release of prisoners, the withdrawal of the army from the streets and negotiations with the opposition.

On Wednesday, the regime released 755 political prisoners it said did not have blood on their hands. But tens of thousands more remain in jail, and since none of the other terms have been met, many opposition leaders have called the mission’s visit pointless at best and at worst a means for President Bashir al-Assad to play for time while continuing his military assault on rebellious districts.

Arab newspapers around the world have begun to highlight Lt Gen Dabi’s controversial record as former head of intelligence for the Sudanese government, which is accused of genocide in Darfur during his term in office.

Activists estimate that around a third of the 5,000 protesters, civilians and opposition forces who have died in the uprising were killed in Homs.

France, which has become increasingly critical of the regime, issued an implicit criticism of Lt Gen Dabi’s approach.

“The brevity of their stay did not allow them to appreciate the reality of the prevailing situation yesterday in Homs,” a foreign ministry spokesman said. “The Arab League monitors must be able to return quickly to this martyred city and be able to move freely and have all necessary contact with the population.”

Meanwhile, in Hama, another restive city which the mission was due to visit on Thursday, the army opened fire on protesters, killing at least six, according to local activists. Two died in Homs itself, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/8982471/Syrian-forces-kill-civilians-after-opening-fire-on-protesters.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5848 on: Dec 29th, 2011, 09:07am »

Wired

Dec. 29, 1766: He Put the Mac in Mackintosh
By Tony Long
December 29, 2009 | 12:00 am
Categories: 18th century, Inventions


User Image
Charles Mackintosh


1766: Charles Macintosh, who has no connection whatsoever to the computer of the same name, is born in Glasgow, Scotland. He will be remembered in tech annals as the inventor of rubberized, waterproof clothing. He’s remembered more generally for the raincoat that bears his name.

Macintosh, the son of a well-known dyemaker, developed an early interest in chemistry and science. By age 20 he was already running a plant producing ammonium chloride and Prussian blue dye. Around this time, he introduced some new techniques for dyeing cloth.

In partnership with a certain Charles Tennant, Macintosh developed a dry bleaching powder that proved popular, making a fortune for both men. The powder remained the primary agent for bleaching cloth and paper into the 1920s.

At the same time, though, Macintosh was experimenting with the idea of waterproofing fabric, using waste byproducts from the dye process. One byproduct he worked with was coal tar, which, when distilled, produced naphtha.

Macintosh found that naphtha — a volatile, oily liquid created in the distillation of the aforementioned coal tar, as well as petroleum — could be used to waterproof fabrics. In 1823, he patented what was the first truly waterproof fabric, supple enough to be used in clothing. He produced the desired results by joining two sheets of fabric with dissolved India rubber soaked in naphtha.

When this concoction of his was later used to make a flexible, waterproof raincoat, the garment quickly became known as the mackintosh. (The extraneous “k” has never been explained.) The coat came into widespread use, both by the British army and by the general public.

Which is not to say it was all smooth sailing for Macintosh’s process. The fabric was vulnerable to changes in the weather, becoming stiffer in the cold and stickier in the heat. It was not especially good with wool, either, because that fabric’s natural oil caused the rubber cement to deteriorate.

Nevertheless, the waterproofing process was essentially sound and was improved and refined over time. It was considered effective enough to be used in outfitting an Arctic expedition led by 19th-century explorer Sir John Franklin.

Although he enjoyed his greatest success and lasting fame for his waterproofing process, Macintosh was no one-trick pony. In his capacity as a chemist, he helped devise a hot-blast process for producing high-quality cast iron.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2009/12/1229charles-macintosh-born/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5849 on: Dec 29th, 2011, 09:10am »

Science Daily

Badwater Basin: Death Valley Microbe May Spark Novel Biotech and Nanotech Uses

ScienceDaily (Dec. 27, 2011)

Nevada, the "Silver State," is well-known for mining precious metals. But scientists Dennis Bazylinski and colleagues at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) do a different type of mining.

They sluice through every water body they can find, looking for new forms of microbial magnetism.

In a basin named Badwater on the edge of Death Valley National Park, Bazylinski and researcher Christopher Lefèvre hit pay dirt.

Lefèvre is with the French National Center of Scientific Research and University of Aix-Marseille II.

In a recent issue of the journal Science, Bazylinski, Lefèvre and others report that they identified, isolated and grew a new type of magnetic bacteria that could lead to novel biotech and nanotech uses.

Magnetotactic bacteria are simple, single-celled organisms that are found in almost all bodies of water.

As their name suggests, they orient and navigate along magnetic fields like miniature swimming compass needles.

This is due to the nano-sized crystals of the minerals magnetite or greigite they produce.

The presence of these magnetic crystals makes the bacteria and their internal crystals--called magnetosomes--useful in drug delivery and medical imaging.

The research was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Department of Energy and the French Foundation for Medical Research.

"The finding is significant in showing that this bacterium has specific genes to synthesize magnetite and greigite, and that the proportion of these magnetosomes varies with the chemistry of the environment," said Enriqueta Barrera, program director in NSF's Division of Earth Sciences.

While many magnetite-producing bacteria can be grown and easily studied, Bazylinski and his team were the first to cultivate a greigite-producing species. Greigite is an iron sulfide mineral, the equivalent of the iron oxide magnetite.

"Because greigite-producing bacteria have never been isolated, the crystals haven't been tested for the types of biomedical and other applications that currently use magnetite," said Bazylinski.

"Greigite is an iron sulfide that may be superior to magnetite in some applications due to its slightly different physical and magnetic properties. Now we have the opportunity to find out."

Researchers found the greigite-producing bacterium, called BW-1, in water samples collected more than 280 feet below sea level in Badwater Basin. Lefèvre and Bazylinski later isolated and grew it leading to the discovery that BW-1 produces both greigite and magnetite.

A detailed look at its DNA revealed that BW-1 has two sets of magnetosome genes, unlike other such bacteria, which produce only one mineral and have only one set of magnetosome genes.

This suggests that the production of magnetite and greigite in BW-1 is likely controlled by separate sets of genes. That could be important in the mass production of either mineral for specific applications.

According to Bazylinski, the greigite-producing bacteria represent a new, previously unrecognized group of sulfate-reducing bacteria that "breathe" the compound sulfate rather than oxygen as most living organisms do.

"With how much is known about sulfate-reducing bacteria, it's surprising that no one has described this group," he said.

Working with Bazylinski and Lefèvre on the project are David Pignol of the French National Center of Scientific Research and University of Aix-Marseille II; Nicolas Menguy of Pierre and Marie Curie University, France; Fernanda Abreu and Ulysses Lins of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Mihaly Pósfai of the University of Pannonia, Hungary; Tanya Prozorov of Ames Laboratory, Iowa; and Richard Frankel of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111227142623.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 388 389 390 391 392  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls