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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 25514 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #585 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 08:12am »

UFO Digest. I wonder if Lou Grant got Ted Baxter to read it without giggling? grin

Minneapolis-St. Paul news station captures UFO footage
Submitted by Roger Marsh on Tue, 08/10/2010 - 22:41
A Minneapolis-St. Paul television news crew shot video of anomalous lights in the sky from the east side of St. Paul Monday night, August 9, 2010, according to a statement and video at the station's web site.

http://kstp.com/news/stories/S1690956.shtml?cat=1

shows a series of lights in different formations. The images were shot late Monday night into early Tuesday morning.

During most of the video footage, you see five lights appearing in a straight line.

Article and video continues here: www.examiner.com

http://www.ufodigest.com/article/minneapolis-st-paul-news-station-captures-ufo-footage

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« Reply #586 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 08:17am »

Wired Danger Room

Pentagon Disbands Network Warfare Shop
By Noah Shachtman August 10, 2010 | 1:53 pm | Categories: Info War

At the turn of the milenium, they were some of the most influential thinkers in the military — promoters of a new, “network-centric” style of warfare that would be ruthlessly efficient, Internet-quick, and largely bloodless. They promised “a revolution in military affairs unlike any seen since the Napoleonic Age.” And the top brass believed them, using their theories to help plan the invasion of Iraq and guide investments in new weapons worth hundreds of billions of dollars.

But that was before the Iraq war morphed into a bloody counterinsurgency, and before those weapons programs collapsed under their own weight. The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration began to lose influence. Sure, “NII” still continued to craft policy on how troops could use social networking sites, employ open source software, or register XML components. (The head of NII also shared the title of Defense Department Chief Information Officer, after all.) But NII’s authority dwindled, even as it retained theoretical responsbility to oversee the military’s “Global Information Grid,” manage the electromagentic spectrum, and help buy new IT systems. There hadn’t been a permanent head of the Office since January, 2009.

So when Defense Secretary Bob Gates announced earlier this year that he was looking for offices to shutter as part of his drive to make the Pentagon more efficient, NII became an obvious target. Yesterday, he announced that the office would be dissolved, along with Joint Forces Command and the Joint Staff’s office for command, control, communications, and computer systems.

In the armed forces’ geek community, reactions are mixed. “NII put out some good policies. But, in general, they were in the bad spot of all the responsibility but no authority — the usual for federal CIOs,” e-mals one military IT contractor. “Merely a Congressionally-required appendix.”

“The only useful thing that they did was to somewhat grease the community of interest process,” e-mails another contractor. “They attempted to break the logjam of services arguing over XML vocabularies (‘your tank is not the same as my tank’) – and were marginally effective.”

But Bob Gourley, the former Chief Technology Officer of the Defense Intelligence Agency, defends NII, and says the office would be missed.

“I personally don’t agree that this is a smart move,” Gourley writes.

“For sure, NII is more bureaucratic and policy-oriented than operational,” adds Information Week’s Nick Hoover. “Despite concerns I’ve heard about its effectiveness, such as dismissals of the CIO office’s enterprise architecture efforts, there’s still value in a central IT organization at the DoD.”

Part of NII’s downfall, ironically, came as so-called “cyber” activities became more and more central to the military’s intelligence efforts and combat operations. In a way, IT became too important to leave to the techies.

“Our networks are really weapons. We treat them as weapons systems,” Defense Comptroller Robert Hale told reporters yesterday. “And if our networks aren’t organized in such a way — to be able to accommodate that, we’re disadvantaged. And so much of what we’re trying to do is now consolidate this work, get it organized it — like we would organize a weapons system, and get policy and oversight put together in one organization so that we know where it is, it’s coherent, and it’s managed, and it’s managed inside the department and beyond.”

To Hale and his boss, Bob Gates, that meant NII had to go. Exactly who picks up the office’s responsbilities is still to be determined. But my guess is a lot of ‘em will be transfered up to Fort Meade, Maryland, where a new group is weilding outsized influence on the defense establishment’s imaginagtion: Cyber Command.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/pentagon-disbands-network-warfare-shop/#ixzz0wIqS2gFV

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #587 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 08:19am »

on Aug 11th, 2010, 07:47am, Luvey wrote:
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'Wheel-like' galaxy photographed by the Hubble

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/7943523/wheel-like-galaxy-photographed-by-the-hubble


Beautiful! Good morning and thank you for that Pen.
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« Reply #588 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 11:49am »

Phantoms and Monsters

Wednesday, August 11, 2010
Senior Citizens, Pets And Abduction....Not A Happy Story

Chris Holly's Paranormal World - About five years ago I talked to a very frightened young woman who was a North American Indian. Her family lived in a isolated part of the West in the United States on a reservation.

She belonged to a tight knit family who were very protective of one another. She was very shy and very nervous about talking to me. It took some time but I finally convinced her I would never use her name or location and would not write anything that would cause her family harm.

She then told me the story of what happened to her grandparents while they were on their weekly outing to do their shopping and errands in the town closet to their reservation and home.

She told me they were both in their late 70's. The couple had a weekly ritual of going to town to shop and do their errands making sure they were back home well before dark . They were nervous being out at night as age made driving and the long dark deserted roads from town to the reservation frightening for the couple.

This one particular trip to town was like most all other trips to town. They started off early with their beloved dog in tow. They took care of their errands and stopped for lunch at their favorite spot before packing up their truck for the trip home.

The older couple and their dog were happily driving back home along the winding deserted roads common to their part of the country. It was only 3 in the afternoon leaving them plenty of time to make it back home before nightfall.

Suddenly a small deer came bounding out of the woods and clipped the side of the old couples truck. The couple , dog and deer bounced around before the old man managed to pull off the road.

They got out to inspect the damage and found the truck was incredibly barely touched however the deer was dead. The old man his wife and dog all stood on the side of the road next to the wide open wilderness that surrounded them.

The elderly couple decided to pull out their tool box to try to butcher whatever they could of the deer so the meat would not be wasted.

The old man was busy pulling out what he needed as the woman tugged and dragged the deer off of the road. Their dog was busy sniffing around and wagging his tail rather happy with the entire event.

As he wondered about the edge of the woods the dog suddenly began barking and growling almost in a rage. Both the man and woman stopped what they were doing and called the dog over to them behind the truck on the side of the road.

The dog came running to them with his tail tucked tightly beneath him. The old couple comforted the dog . The woman heard it first, a strange noise like a low hum coming from the woods.

As the couple stood by their truck with their dog they could see what appeared to be a bright white light coming up from the ground making its way towards them and the road.

At once the couple decided to leave the deer and threw their tools in to the back of their truck. They pushed the dog into the cab of the truck between them and took off down the road. All three of them were terrified at what was coming towards them from the woods.

The next thing the couple remembers is driving into the reservation and pulling up in front of their daughters house. It was 10 P.M at night.

The family had been out looking for them and were frantic about where they may have gone. They always were home before dark and never went anywhere the family did not know about.

The family heard the old couple pull into the driveway and went running out to greet them and to find out where they had been.

The old couple seemed dazed. The old man was completely disoriented and confused. He felt weak and needed help getting out of the truck. When questioned to where they had been he seemed confused and could not answer. The old woman had been asleep. When they woke her she said her head hurt and did not know where she was. Laying across the old woman was the couples beloved pet. He was dead.

The couple had no idea where they had been or why they had lost hours of time. They were crushed to find their dog had died and had no idea what had happened to him.

The old couple told their family about the deer and the strange light coming from the woods towards the road. The old man described it as if the sun was rising from the earth and streaking across the woods towards him. The old couple were heartbroken that their dog had died and had no idea why the perfectly healthy pet died on the way home.

The couple felt ill for a few days after this event. The man had a decline in his health after this encounter.

They do not understand what happened or where they were during this lost time event.

The family does not want this made public or for the old couple to endure any discomfort due to this story becoming known in their area.

I do not know why I never wrote about this incident before. I have thought about it often but kept it on my list of things to get to until now.

I recently received a phone call and the story of this elderly couple came clearly back to my mind.

The phone call came a few weeks ago from long time acquaintance who wanted to tell me about a very odd experience that happened to her parents while they were on vacation.

It seems her parents both in their late 70's decided to go on a last minute trip to Maryland to visit old friends who were living there.

They packed up their minivan and their little dog and took off for a visit with their friends. They were leaving from New Jersey and planned to travel down the east coast via the long scenic route with less traffic and less large trucks to deal with.

They were driving along when they decided to stop for lunch around noon.

Nothing unusual took place . They ate lunch and continued on their way. The elderly pair and their little dog drove for a bit longer when they realized they needed to stop for gas.

They were now driving along roads that were lightly traveled and no longer saw many other cars.

The couple stopped for gas. Both the woman and the man and dog got out while filling up to stretch their legs and take the dog for a short walk. As they walked along the side of the gas station with the dog both of them mentioned to the other how odd and bright the sun had become.

They could barely see even though both of them had on sunglasses.

They got back into their car with the dog sitting on the woman's lap and started off down the deserted highway towards their destination. They had just entered Delaware.

They recall taking off in the car and driving along the road away from the gas station.

Hours later the couple's first memory is of pulling over to the side of the road. The man who had been driving was confused and disoriented. The woman was slumped over her seat in a deep sleep.

The man got out of the car and began to walk around the front of the car confused and disoriented. He started to call out for his wife. She heard him calling and started to wake up. When she finally was able to shake herself awake she saw that her husband was pacing back and forth in front of their van calling her name. She looked down into her lap to find her little dog limp and gasping for air.

She opened her door and called to her husband. He seemed to snap out of his pacing and ran over to her door.

more after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/

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« Reply #589 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 11:55am »

Daily Hadith tweets. I don't know why I'm surprised but I am. How do they know if I'm wearing a burka while I'm reading their tweets? grin

http://twitter.com/DailyHadith

Hadith:
Qur'anic Verses

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« Reply #590 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 4:43pm »

Evening all smiley.
Gosh, I'm so tired. Anything interesting happened today?
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« Reply #591 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 5:30pm »

on Aug 11th, 2010, 4:43pm, CA519705950 wrote:
Evening all smiley.
Gosh, I'm so tired. Anything interesting happened today?


Hi CA519705950,
I have to go to the dentist but that's not very exciting. tongue
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« Reply #592 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 5:32pm »



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« Reply #593 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 5:39pm »



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« Reply #594 on: Aug 11th, 2010, 6:53pm »



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« Reply #595 on: Aug 12th, 2010, 08:24am »

Telegraph

'Cancer' patient grows pea plant in his lung
A patient who feared he had cancer was told he had grown a pea plant which had sprouted leaves in his lung.

By Ben Leach
Published: 12:37PM BST 12 Aug 2010

Doctors found a grainy spot on an X-ray of Ron Sveden's chest Photo: Chris Murphy Ron Sveden, a retired teacher from Brewster, Massachusetts, in the US, had been short of breath for months and was taken to hospital in May.

Doctors found a grainy spot on an X-ray and he prepared himself for a diagnosis of cancer.

The 75-year-old said: "I was told I had a pea seed in my lung that had split and had sprouted. It is probably about a half-an-inch which is a pretty big thing."

Doctors believe Mr Sveden ate a pea that "went down the wrong way" before sprouting to 12mm (0.5ins) in size. The warm and moist conditions are thought to have encouraged it to grow.

Mr Sveden had been suffering from emphysema prior to being taken to hospital. His left lung was found to have collapsed but doctors could find no evidence of cancer.

He underwent more tests over the next two weeks, but they all came back negative for cancer.

Mr Sveden added: "Whether this would have gone full-term and I'd be working for the Jolly Green Giant, I don't know. But the thing that finally dawned on me is that it wasn't the cancer.

"One of the first meals I had in hospital after the surgery had peas for the vegetable. I laughed to myself and ate them."

His wife Nancy added: "God has such a sense of humour. I mean it could have been just nothing, but it had to be a pea, and it had to be sprouting."

He said he never felt anything growing in his chest and repeated coughing fits had failed to dislodge the legume.

He is now recovering from surgery.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/7940710/Cancer-patient-grows-pea-plant-in-his-lung.html

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« Reply #596 on: Aug 12th, 2010, 08:29am »

New York Times

August 11, 2010
Debts Rise, and Go Unpaid, as Bust Erodes Home Equity
By DAVID STREITFELD

PHOENIX — During the great housing boom, homeowners nationwide borrowed a trillion dollars from banks, using the soaring value of their houses as security. Now the money has been spent and struggling borrowers are unable or unwilling to pay it back.

The delinquency rate on home equity loans is higher than all other types of consumer loans, including auto loans, boat loans, personal loans and even bank cards like Visa and MasterCard, according to the American Bankers Association.

Lenders say they are trying to recover some of that money but their success has been limited, in part because so many borrowers threaten bankruptcy and because the value of the homes, the collateral backing the loans, has often disappeared.

The result is one of the paradoxes of the recession: the more money you borrowed, the less likely you will have to pay up.

“When houses were doubling in value, mom and pop making $80,000 a year were taking out $300,000 home equity loans for new cars and boats,” said Christopher A. Combs, a real estate lawyer here, where the problem is especially pronounced. “Their chances are pretty good of walking away and not having the bank collect.”

Lenders wrote off as uncollectible $11.1 billion in home equity loans and $19.9 billion in home equity lines of credit in 2009, more than they wrote off on primary mortgages, government data shows. So far this year, the trend is the same, with combined write-offs of $7.88 billion in the first quarter.

Even when a lender forces a borrower to settle through legal action, it can rarely extract more than 10 cents on the dollar. “People got 90 cents for free,” Mr. Combs said. “It rewards immorality, to some extent.”

Utah Loan Servicing is a debt collector that buys home equity loans from lenders. Clark Terry, the chief executive, says he does not pay more than $500 for a loan, regardless of how big it is.

“Anything over $15,000 to $20,000 is not collectible,” Mr. Terry said. “Americans seem to believe that anything they can get away with is O.K.”

But the borrowers argue that they are simply rebuilding their ravaged lives. Many also say that the banks were predatory, or at least indiscriminate, in making loans, and nevertheless were bailed out by the federal government. Finally, they point to their trump card: they say will declare bankruptcy if a settlement is not on favorable terms.

“I am not going to be a slave to the bank,” said Shawn Schlegel, a real estate agent who is in default on a $94,873 home equity loan. His lender obtained a court order garnishing his wages, but that was 18 months ago. Mr. Schlegel, 38, has not heard from the lender since. “The case is sitting stagnant,” he said. “Maybe it will just go away.”

Mr. Schlegel’s tale is similar to many others who got caught up in the boom: He came to Arizona in 2003 and quickly accumulated three houses and some land. Each deal financed the next. “I was taught in real estate that you use your leverage to grow. I never dreamed the properties would go from $265,000 to $65,000.”

Apparently neither did one of his lenders, the Desert Schools Federal Credit Union, which gave him a home equity loan secured by, the contract states, the “security interest in your dwelling or other real property.”

Desert Schools, the largest credit union in Arizona, increased its allowance for loan losses of all types by 926 percent in the last two years. It declined to comment.

The amount of bad home equity loan business during the boom is incalculable and in retrospect inexplicable, housing experts say. Most of the debt is still on the books of the lenders, which include Bank of America, Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase.

“No one had ever seen a national real estate bubble,” said Keith Leggett, a senior economist with the American Bankers Association. “We would love to change history so more conservative underwriting practices were put in place.”

The delinquency rate on home equity loans was 4.12 percent in the first quarter, down slightly from the fourth quarter of 2009, when it was the highest in 26 years of such record keeping. Borrowers who default can expect damage to their creditworthiness and in some cases tax consequences.

Nevertheless, Mr. Leggett said, “more than a sliver” of the debt will never be repaid.

Eric Hairston plans to be among this group. During the boom, he bought as an investment a three-apartment property in Hoboken, N.J. At the peak, when the building was worth as much as $1.5 million, he took out a $190,000 home equity loan.

Mr. Hairston, who worked in the technology department of the investment bank Lehman Brothers, invested in a Northern California pizza catering company. When real estate cratered, Mr. Hairston went into default.

The building was sold this spring for $750,000. Only a small slice went to the home equity lender, which reserved the right to come after Mr. Hairston for the rest of what it was owed.

Mr. Hairston, who now works for the pizza company, has not heard again from his lender.

Since the lender made a bad loan, Mr. Hairston argues, a 10 percent settlement would be reasonable. “It’s not the homeowner’s fault that the value of the collateral drops,” he said.

Marc McCain, a Phoenix lawyer, has been retained by about 300 new clients in the last year, many of whom were planning to walk away from properties they could afford but wanted to be rid of — strategic defaulters. On top of their unpaid mortgage obligations, they had home equity loans of $50,000 to $150,000.

Fewer than 5 percent of these clients said they would continue paying their home equity loan no matter what. Ten percent intend to negotiate a short sale on their house, where the holders of the primary mortgage and the home equity loan agree to accept less than what they are owed. In such deals primary mortgage holders get paid first.

The other 85 percent said they would default and worry about the debt only if and when they were forced to, Mr. McCain said.

“People want to have some green pastures in front of them,” said Mr. McCain, who recently negotiated a couple’s $75,000 home equity debt into a $3,500 settlement. “It’s come to the point where morality is no longer an issue.”

Darin Bolton, a software engineer, defaulted on the loans for his house in a Chicago suburb last year because “we felt we were just tossing our money into a hole.” This spring, he moved into a rental a few blocks away.

“I’m kind of banking on there being too many of us for the lenders to pursue,” he said. “There is strength in numbers.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/12/business/12debt.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #597 on: Aug 12th, 2010, 08:32am »

New York Times

August 11, 2010
Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Moving From South Asia to U.S.By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

A dangerous new mutation that makes some bacteria resistant to almost all antibiotics has become increasingly common in India and Pakistan and is being found in patients in Britain and the United States who got medical care in those countries, according to new studies.

Experts in antibiotic resistance called the gene mutation, named NDM-1, “worrying” and “ominous,” and they said they feared it would spread globally.

But they also put it in perspective: there are numerous strains of antibiotic-resistant germs, and although they have killed many patients in hospitals and nursing homes, none have yet lived up to the “superbug” and “flesh-eating bacteria” hyperbole that greets the discovery of each new one.

“They’re all bad,” said Dr. Martin J. Blaser, chairman of medicine at New York University Langone Medical Center. “Is NDM-1 more worrisome than MRSA? It’s too early to judge.”

(MRSA, or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, is a hard-to-treat bacterium that used to cause problems only in hospitals but is now found in gyms, prisons and nurseries, and is occasionally picked up by healthy people through cuts and scrapes.)

Bacteria with the NDM-1 gene are resistant even to the antibiotics called carbapenems, used as a last resort when common antibiotics have failed. The mutation has been found in E. coli and in Klebsiella pneumoniae, a frequent culprit in respiratory and urinary infections.

“I would not like to be working at a hospital where this was introduced,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University. “It could take months before you got rid of it, and treating individual patients with it could be very difficult.”

A study tracking the spread of the mutation from India and Pakistan to Britain was published online on Tuesday in the journal Lancet.

In June, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted the first three cases of NDM-1 resistance in this country and advised doctors to watch for it in patients who had received medical care in South Asia. The initials stand for New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase.

“Medical tourism” to India for many surgeries — cosmetic, dental and even organ transplants — is becoming more common as experienced surgeons and first-class hospitals offer care at a fraction of Western prices. Tourists and people visiting family are also sometimes hospitalized. The Lancet researchers found dozens of samples of bacteria with the NDM-1 resistance gene in two Indian cities they surveyed, which they said “suggests a serious problem.”

Also worrying was that the gene was found on plasmids — bits of mobile DNA that can jump easily from one bacteria strain to another. And it is found in gram-negative bacteria, for which not many new antibiotics are being developed. (MRSA, by contrast, is a gram-positive bacteria, and there are more drug candidates in the works.)

Dr. Alexander J. Kallen, an expert in antibiotic resistance at the C.D.C., called it “one of a number of very serious bugs we’re tracking.”

But he noted that a decade ago, New York City hospitals were the epicenter of infections with other bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. Those bacteria, which had a different mutation, were troubling, but did not explode into a public health emergency.

Drug-resistant bacteria like those with the NDM-1 mutation are usually a bigger threat in hospitals, where many patients are on broad-spectrum antibiotics that wipe out the normal bacteria that can hold antibiotic-resistant ones in check.

Also, hospital patients generally have weaker immune systems and more wounds to infect, and are examined with more scopes and catheters that can let bacteria in.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/12/world/asia/12bug.html?ref=world

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« Reply #598 on: Aug 12th, 2010, 08:36am »

Wired Danger Room

Darpa Turns to Canadian Tobacco to Fight Viral Terror
By Katie Drummond August 11, 2010 | 4:14 pm | Categories: DarpaWatch

The Pentagon’s after a faster, more reliable way to fight pandemics and viral terror threats by mass producing vaccines. So far, plant-based approaches seem to be their top pick to replace old-school methods. Now, in a bid to hasten the development of vaccines that are ready for human use before the next H1N1 emerges, the military’s looking for a little help from our northern neighbors.

Darpa, the Pentagon’s blue-sky research arm, handed out $21 million to Canadian biotech firm Medicago Inc. The company, based in Quebec City, will use the money to build a 90,000-square-foot facility that’ll use tobacco plants to produce 10 million monthly doses of influenza vaccine.

The funding is a smaller part of Darpa’s burgeoning Accelerated Manufacture of Pharmaceuticals, or AMP, program, which aims to revolutionize current, egg-based vaccine production models, and yield vaccines within three months of “emerging and novel biological threats.” In February, the agency gave $21 million to Texas A&M for the construction of a 145,000 square-foot “biotherapeutic production facility” that uses mobile “pods” to grow vaccine-infused tobacco plants.

Already, the method has yielded promising results. IBio Inc, another biotech firm that’s working on plant-based vaccines, plan to conduct human trials of an H5N1 vaccine this year. Medicago has similar plans, and also announced the successful development of a candidate H1N1 vaccine less than a month after the strain was identified last spring. Compare that to the six months it took for the egg-based, “fast tracked” H1N1 vaccine to be available for public use.

“In general terms, we’ve probably got several years ahead of most of the people that might be doing similar things,” company CEO Andy Sheldon told Reuters.

And before you give the Pentagon too much heat for outsourcing their vaccine greenhouses: Medicago is based in Canada, but the new facility will be built in Durham, North Carolina.
“It opens the door for other potential contracts with the U.S. government,” Medicago’s chief financial officer, Pierre Labbe, told Dow Jones. “Even if there’s no guarantee at this time, it’s a good way to start.”

Sure, a faster way to stop deadly global pandemics is one good way to get a foot into the American market. But given Canada’s renowned talents in other horticultural matters, Danger Room suggests that next time Medicago builds a mega-greenhouse, they opt to grow something a little more fragrant. grin

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/darpa-turns-to-canadian-tobacco-to-fight-viral-terror/#ixzz0wOlP8ufZ

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« Reply #599 on: Aug 12th, 2010, 08:40am »

Wired

Amateurs Fling Their Gadgets to Edge of Space
By Priya Ganapati August 12, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: Hacks, Mods and DIY, Phones

A ride to the stratosphere and back has now become a rite of passage for smartphones.

Space enthusiasts are attaching devices such as the Motorola Droid, G1, HTC Evo, and Nexus One -- not to mention an array of digital cameras -- to weather balloons or rockets, then sending them high into the stratosphere and beyond.

With integrated GPS systems, cameras and fast processors, smartphones are computing devices available to all. That’s why space enthusiasts are turning to them to do things that would have otherwise required custom components or a number of specialized devices.

“What you are seeing is a grassroots initiative to reach for the stars,” says Bobby Russell, founder of Quest for Stars, a non-profit organization that works with high school students to promote science and technology.

Driving the interest of hobbyists are the latest crop of smartphones and even digital cameras because the devices are cheap and fairly rugged.

“Now, it’s all there off-the-shelf for the taking,” says Russell. “So why reinvent the wheel?”

Photo: A Google G1 phone gets ready to head into the atmosphere, surrounded by members of the Noisebridge hacker space. Photo courtesy: Mikolaj Horbyn, Andrew Gerrand, Christie Dudley.

Have you tried to launch a gadget into space? Submit a link to a photo and website where we can learn more about it. If we get enough great submissions, we’ll publish a gallery of your submissions! Your photo needs to be on Flickr, Picasa or another website. Give us the URL of the image file (.jpg, .gif or .png), not the web page containing it.

photos after the jump
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/08/gallery-gadgets-in-space#ixzz0wOmZGa9m


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