Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Sep 19th, 2017, 1:45pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 393 394 395 396 397  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 126470 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5910 on: Jan 7th, 2012, 09:44am »

Telegraph

Mystery of disappearing 3.5 ton underwater statue off Italian coast

Italian police are trying to solve the mysterious disappearance of a 3.5 ton statue of a saint which has stood on the seabed off the coast of Calabria since 2007.

By Nick Squires, Rome
3:07PM GMT 06 Jan 2012

Authorities are baffled as to who – or what – could have removed the bronze statue of St Francis of Paola, which stands 7.2ft high and was securely embedded in concrete 95ft beneath the surface of the sea.



User Image


The hooded figure, with one arm raised in supplication, is one of several saintly statues which dot the Italian coastline and are meant to protect fishermen and scuba divers.

Police and the Coast Guard are investigating a few theories, including the possibility that the statue was mistakenly snagged by the net of a large fishing boat.

If the crew of the boat were fishing in the area illegally, that would explain why the incident has not been reported.

Police are also investigating reports from the nearby town of Paola that a large statue-like object was seen on the back of a van in the days after its disappearance on Dec 30 or 31, suggesting it may have been stolen to order.

The strange disappearance of the statue has had one unexpected upside. A group of local divers who went to investigate the site chanced upon the wreck of a 49ft-long ship, which is thought to be hundreds of years old.

St Francis was a mendicant friar who was born in the town of Paola, after which he is named, in 1416.

He spent six years of his life living in a sea cave on the nearby coast, devoting himself to prayer.

He was made the patron saint of Calabria by Pope John XXIII in 1963.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8997796/Mystery-of-disappearing-3.5-ton-underwater-statue-off-Italian-coast.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5911 on: Jan 7th, 2012, 09:51am »

The Wrap

New Yahoo CEO's Compensation Package Worth Up to $27M

Published: January 06, 2012 @ 4:59 pm

Struggling Internet giant Yahoo revealed new CEO Scott Thompson’s compensation package in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission Friday, and it’s pretty cushy.

Like, $27 million cushy.

Thompson, the former CEO of PayPal, gets a base salary of $1 million, but that’s only the beginning.

He eligible for an annual bonus of anywhere form $500,000 to $2 million based on his performance. Half a million for doing a pretty good job isn't bad.

Thompson will also get a stock grant of $11 million and a “one-time inducement grant” worth $5 million.

That’s anywhere from $17.5 million to $19 million. Where's the other $8 million or so?

Thompson needs to be compensated for all that cash he would have gotten at PayPal, so Yahoo will give him a bonus of $1.5 million in cash to make up for it, along with $6.5 million in stock.

That's not bad for a company which has seen its value cut in half over the past few years.

Upon being hired, Thompson touted the company's assets but acknowledged there is work to do in building its advertising base and other revenue streams. Meanwhile, Yahoo is weighing the sale of all or part of its Asian assets as it seeks to establish a new corporate identity.

http://www.thewrap.com/media/column-post/new-yahoo-ceos-compensation-package-worth-27m-34165

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4073
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5912 on: Jan 7th, 2012, 11:12am »

US Scientists Work to Decipher Possible 'Alien' Signals

Friday, 06 Jan 2012

(NewsCore) - Scientists at the University of California-Berkeley have taken the first step in attempting to decipher signals they believe could have been sent by aliens.

New research from the university's Kepler team, a division of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project, suggests that certain radio signals picked up by the project's telescope may have been transmitted by extraterrestrials.
"These signals look similar to what we think might be produced from an extraterrestrial technology," researchers wrote on the project's website Friday.

"They are narrow in frequency, much narrower than would be produced by any known astrophysical phenomena, and they drift in frequency with time, as we would expect because of the Doppler effect imposed by the relative motion of the transmitter and the receiving radio telescope."

But scientists conducting the research were quick to point out that the signals could -- and likely do -- mean nothing.

"It's not fair to say we've taken the very first step in finding extraterrestrials. I think it's fair to say that we made some progress in the analysis of the new data," said Andrew Siemion, a University of California-Berkeley Ph.D. candidate and lead researcher on the study.

Other astronomers also stressed that the signals detected could very well be telecommunications signals sent by a familiar species -- us. "They're definitely picking up an intelligent species, but one that's likely well known to us -- ourselves," said Dr. Seth Shostak, a SETI senior astronomer.

"This is very common. It would require quite a bit of follow-up to determine whether it's E.T. or just AT&T."

Copyright 2012, the Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.myfoxny.com/dpps/news/us-scientists-work-to-decipher-possible-alien-signals-dpgonc-20110106-to_16861681
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4073
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5913 on: Jan 7th, 2012, 10:45pm »

Oh, well! rolleyes


First Kepler SETI Signals ID'd: No Aliens

By David Murphy
January 7, 2012

Here's the good news: You can turn off the loop of the song from Close Encounters of the Third Kind that you've been playing for the past hour and a half. The bad news has come to pass; We haven't found aliens yet.

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project has started its first analyses of its scans of the 86 exoplanet candidates uncovered by the Kepler space telescope. And scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, announced Friday that SETI found its first batch of "hits" within the data.

However, additional analyses have shown that the project's first candidate signals are just plain ol' terrestrial radio frequency interference.

But that's not necessarily a bad thing.

"Even though these signals are interference, detecting events with similar characteristics to what we expect from [extraterrestrial technology] is a good indication that the first steps of our detection algorithms are working properly," reads a blog post on SETI's site.

In this case, the narrow, shifting frequency of the observed signal matched the characteristics that researchers were expecting to see in an artificial radio signal generated from space. However, these characteristics are also shared by the radio signals created from humanity's own satellites orbiting Earth.

To test whether the radio signals were truly extraterrestrial, or just us, researchers moved the telescope they were using to scan the skies. After all, if a radio signal is being generated by a source up in space, then pointing the telescope elsewhere would eliminate its ability to detect the signal. In the case of SETI's discovered signals, however, they persisted: A sign that a human-launched satellite was generating a strong enough of a signal to be picked up by the telescope regardless of where it was pointing.

In short, no aliens.

The SETI project plans to continue to analyze the nearly 50 terabytes of data generated from its Kepler observations, and the group will update its blog with any additional results that pop up throughout the next many months.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2398546,00.asp
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5914 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 09:10am »

on Jan 7th, 2012, 10:45pm, Swamprat wrote:
Oh, well! rolleyes


First Kepler SETI Signals ID'd: No Aliens

By David Murphy
January 7, 2012

Here's the good news: You can turn off the loop of the song from Close Encounters of the Third Kind that you've been playing for the past hour and a half. The bad news has come to pass; We haven't found aliens yet.

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project has started its first analyses of its scans of the 86 exoplanet candidates uncovered by the Kepler space telescope. And scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, announced Friday that SETI found its first batch of "hits" within the data.

However, additional analyses have shown that the project's first candidate signals are just plain ol' terrestrial radio frequency interference.

But that's not necessarily a bad thing....

In short, no aliens.

The SETI project plans to continue to analyze the nearly 50 terabytes of data generated from its Kepler observations, and the group will update its blog with any additional results that pop up throughout the next many months.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2398546,00.asp


Well poop!
Good morning Swamprat cheesy
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5915 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:01am »

LA Times

China Communist Party bureaucrats like their cars high end

A remnant of a decades-old Communist Party perks system, the luxe wheels are a conspicuous target of growing public outrage over the privileges of the elite. Angry Chinese have started posting photos.

By Barbara Demick
January 8, 2012
Reporting from Beijing

Even the police are driving Porsches.

Chinese officials love their cars — big, fancy, expensive cars. A chocolate-colored Bentley worth $560,000 is cruising the streets of Beijing with license plates indicating it is registered to Zhongnanhai, the Communist Party headquarters. The armed police, who handle riots and crowd control, have the same model of Bentley in blue.

And just in case it needs to go racing off to war, the Chinese army has a black Maserati that sells in China for $330,000.

"Corruption on wheels is an accurate description of this problem," said Wang Yukai, a professor at the Chinese Academy of Governance in Beijing, who has been advocating restrictions on officials' cars for years.

A remnant of a decades-old party perks system, the luxe wheels are a conspicuous target of growing public outrage over the privileges of the elite.

Armed with cellphone cameras, angry Chinese have started posting photographs of the expensive government cars — identifiable by their license plates — on a microblog site called Anti-Official Cars Extravagance that was set up in August. (Government censors shut down an earlier version of the same site.)

The Chinese government doesn't release figures, but automobile industry analysts here say that spending for cars tops $15 billion annually, while some scholars believe the figure is many times that amount.

Even at more conservative estimates, the figure is greater than that allocated for low-income housing or for scientific research and development.

Not to speak of the funding for school buses.

Anger over fancy government cars has been piqued by a spate of tragic accidents in recent months involving overloaded school buses. In the worst of them, 21 kindergartners were killed in Gansu province in November in a van that was designed for nine passengers but was carrying 62 children.

"Every time I see a school bus accident and think about the great many government Audi A6s on the street, I shake my head and sigh," one microblogger who uses the name Minxingdie wrote after the accident.

The Audi A6 is the semiofficial car of the Chinese Communist Party; the German automaker's parent, Volkswagen, was an early entry in the 1980s into the Chinese market. According to industry analysts, there are more than 100,000 A6s in China, about 20% of them owned by the government. Each car costs $50,000 to $100,000, depending on engine size.

For the cops, luxury SUVs are all the rage. In the southern city of Guangzhou, police were photographed driving a Mercedes-Benz SUV, while those in the northeastern province of Jilin have another deluxe SUV, the Porsche Cayenne.

"No wonder there's no money left for school buses!" remarked one contributor to the car-outrage website. The commentators were particularly scathing about the expensive cars with military plates. "Why does the military need sports cars? Will it help them run faster when there's a war?"

Photographs also showed cars with government, police and military plates clearly being used on personal business: dropping off children at school, at a shopping mall, on a family vacation.

"You can't get evidence about other kinds of corruption, such as people accepting envelopes of cash, but this you easily see for yourself," explained the Guangzhou-based activist who started the website in response to emailed questions. He did not wish to be identified.

The high spending on cars, said Ren Jianmin, a professor at Beijing's Tsinghua University, is the result of a system set up by the Communist Party in the 1940s to allocate perks to ranking members.

"The system dictates that once an official reaches a certain level, he must be equipped with certain things, such as cars and, in the past, houses," Ren said. "This system led to a huge number of government cars. "

Although in theory a government car is for official business, most bureaucrats treat the car as their own to do with as they wish. Regulations that limit the use of the car to working hours are widely disregarded.

"The Chinese officials don't distinguish between business and personal use," Ren said.

In addition, use of the car engenders more opportunities for corruption. Once they have a car, officials will hire a chauffeur and run up large bills for gasoline and so-called repairs.

"Somebody could go to the repair shop and buy a TV for himself and get reimbursed from the government" for repairs, Ren said. "Many pay little, but they get reimbursed a lot. There are a lot of secrets in the receipts."

Nervous about heightened sensitivity to corruption, the government is trying to rein in the most extravagant cars. New regulations being drafted this year are supposed to limit the base price of cars to $11,000 for most bureaucrats, and restrict the engine size of government cars and the ranks of those entitled to a private vehicle and driver.

"Below the rank of minister or deputy minister, they won't be entitled to an exclusive car and will have to use a car from the fleet," said Zhang Yu, managing director of Automotive Foresight, a Shanghai industry consulting firm.

But this isn't the first initiative to limit government car purchases.

In 2004, municipal governments in the cities of Chengdu, Nanjing and Hangzhou sold off many of their official cars, telling bureaucrats that they could apply for reimbursements for rentals when needed. Nevertheless, spending on government cars has enjoyed double-digit growth since then.

"They have been trying to tackle this problem since the 1980s, but it never goes away," said Wang, of the Academy of Governance.

Government officials have proved ingenious, however, at getting around the regulations. One trick is to change the metal emblems on the cars to make them look cheaper than they actually are.

"Whenever a new regulation comes out, we get customers from the government," said Han Chao, who runs a small storefront shop selling Audi parts in a market in the south of Beijing.

Recently, he said, he sold 100 emblems for the Audi A6 2.0L (the smallest engine for the popular model) to officials from the city of Zhangbei, northwest of Beijing, so they could disguise the fact that their engines were larger than permitted.

"Most people want to buy logos to upgrade so they can save face," Han said. "Only the government people buy emblems to downgrade the cars."

The emblems, Han noted, cost 20 yuan each, about $3. But the officials, he said, demanded receipts saying they'd paid 120 yuan.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-china-corruption-on-wheels-20120108,0,4555295.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5916 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:05am »

The Guardian

Olympus may sue executives over £1bn scandal

Internal report blames Olympus president Shuichi Takayama and other board members for £1bn accounting scam.
Japan Times says Takayama to resign

by Rupert Neate
guardian.co.uk
Sunday 8 January 2012 10.08 EST

Olympus the Japanese camera company embroiled in one of the world's largest corporate fraud scandals, is considering suing current and former executives for failing to spot a 1.17bn yen (£1bn) scam.

The company said it would make its final decision on Tuesday after an internal report found more than 10 people were responsible for the hidden losses, including company president Shuichi Takayama. Local media reports suggested Takayama would resign by the end of the month. Olympus refused to comment.

The Japan Times said the report concluded that Takayama, five of the company's current board members and an adviser all breached their supervisory duty. The report said the executives failed to spot the 13-year cover-up or question exorbitant advisory fees for acquisitions used to hide mountains of losses.

The scandal was exposed by the British former chief executive Michael Woodford, who was then sacked just two weeks into the job. Woodford last week gave up his fight to get his job back, having failed to win the support of local shareholders after having exposed a fraud that dated back to the 1990s.

"Despite one of the biggest scandals in history, the Japanese institutional shareholders have not spoken one single word of criticism, in complete and utter contrast with overseas shareholders, who were demanding accountability," he said."I get fired ... for doing the right thing, and they [current management] are still there," he said. Woodford plans to bring a case for unfair dismissal in the UK.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/jan/08/olympus-may-sue-executives-scandal

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5917 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:08am »

The Hill

GOP debate: Gingrich, Romney trade barbs over super-PAC ads
By Gautham Nagesh
01/08/12 11:01 AM ET

Newt Gingrich criticized former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney during the Facebook/NBC debate on Sunday morning over ads run by a super-PAC supporting Romney.

The former House speaker refused to recant his accusations that Romney is lying about his ties to the organization behind the ads when asked by moderator David Gregory.

"Governor I wish you would calmly and directly state it is your former staff running the PAC. It is your millionaire friends giving to the PAC and you know some of the ads aren't true," Gingrich said.

"Of course it's former staff of mine and of course they're people who support me. They wouldn't be putting money into a PAC that supports me if they weren't people who support me," replied Romney, adding he hasn't seen the ads. "As you know under the law, I can't direct their ads. If there's anything in there that's wrong I hope they take it out."

But Romney then noted that "the ad I saw" said Gingrich had been forced out of the speakership and had sat down with current Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and argued for climate change bill, all of which Romney said were correct.

Gingrich also refused to back off suggestions that Romney's former firm Bain Capital had engaged in predatory behavior, shuttering businesses and laying off workers.

Gingrich replied that he's happy Romney has finally expressed opposition to the mistakes weeks later. He said he hopes an upcoming 27-minute film set to be released about Bain Capital and Romney’s role there that will be based on mainstream newspaper accounts is similarly accurate.

Gingrich has repeatedly blasted the super-PAC funded ads as dishonest and called on Romney to disavow them or ask his supporters to stop airing them. Gingrich has admitted the barrage of advertisements have taken their toll on his candidacy which has seen his poll numbers drop after briefly holding co-frontrunner status in several national polls.

http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/gop-primaries/202953-gop-debate-gingrich-romney-trade-barbs-over-super-pac-ads

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5918 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:22am »

Reuters

China loan growth quickens

By Kevin Yao and Judy Hua
BEIJING | Sun Jan 8, 2012 7:16am EST

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's banks ratcheted up lending in the last month of 2011 on the back of stronger money supply, reinforcing perceptions that the central bank is gently easing policy to cushion the impact of the global economic slowdown.

Chinese banks extended 640.5 billion yuan ($101.51 billion) in new loans in December, up from 562.2 billion yuan in November, data from the People's Bank of China showed on Sunday.

Annual growth in China's broad M2 money supply accelerated to 13.6 percent in December from November's 12.7 percent.

"The policy easing signal is becoming clearer," said Wang Hu, an economist at Guotai Junan Securities in Shanghai.

"We think the central bank will continue to loosen credit in the coming months."

The surge in bank lending and money supply exceeded market expectations. Analysts had expected 600 billion yuan in new loans for December and annual M2 growth of 12.7 percent in December.

Chinese policymakers have watched Europe's debt crisis with increasing alarm, but have resisted declaring an outright easing in monetary policy. Instead, they have stressed the need to "fine tune" policy, which many analysts say will mean easing of credit restrictions, particularly for small businesses.

In a separate statement on Sunday the central bank reiterated that it intended to maintain a stable monetary policy.

MORE EASING AHEAD?

The stronger-than-expected lending and money supply figures suggested that Beijing is firmly on track to unveil more pro-growth steps as inflation eases, which reduce the risk of a hard landing in the world's second-largest economy.

Contrary to its usual practice, the central bank did not release foreign exchange reserve figures along with money supply and lending data. The bank did not say when those numbers would be released.

Analysts widely expect the central bank to cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves again this month as a way of pumping more loans into the economy.

Beijing cut banks' reserve requirements by half a percentage point on the last day of November, its first in three years.

The move indicated China's central bank is shifting its policy to a pro-growth model, although the central bank continues to label its policy as "prudent," which suggests it is only easing policy gradually as it wants to tame the property sector and also fears that inflation may rebound.

Chinese banks extended a total of 7.47 trillion yuan in new loans in 2011, slightly under the government's undisclosed annual target of 7.5 trillion yuan.

China's once turbo-charged economy is on track to slow for a fourth successive quarter as global demand slackened.

China's annual GDP growth in the fourth quarter may have slowed to 8.7 percent from the 9.1 percent, according to the latest Reuters poll.

Annual inflation is expected to ease to 4.0 percent in December from 4.2 percent in November, according to a poll.

($1 = 6.3095 Chinese yuan)

(Additional reporting by Don Durfee; Editing by Jane Merriman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/08/us-china-economy-idUSTRE80707Q20120108

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5919 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:32am »

New York Times

January 8, 2012
Iran Will Soon Move Uranium Work Underground, Official Says
By REUTERS

TEHRAN — Iran will in the “near future” start enriching uranium deep inside a mountain, a senior Iranian official said Sunday, a move likely to further antagonize Western powers that suspect Tehran is seeking nuclear weapons capability.

A decision by the Islamic Republic to conduct sensitive atomic activities at an underground site — offering better protection against any enemy attacks — could complicate diplomatic efforts to resolve the long-running dispute peacefully.

Iran has said for months that it is preparing to move its highest-grade uranium refinement work to Fordow, a facility near the Shiite Muslim holy city of Qum in central Iran, from its main enrichment plant at Natanz.

The United States and its allies say Iran is trying to build bombs, but Tehran insists its nuclear program is aimed at generating power and for medical purposes.

“The Fordow nuclear enrichment plant will be operational in the near future,” said Fereydoon Abbasi, the nuclear physicist whom Iran’s mullahs have put in charge of the country’s Atomic Energy Organization.

Uranium refined to purity levels of both 3.5 percent and 20 percent can be produced at the site, he added in comments carried by Iran’s Kayhan newspaper on Sunday.

One Western official said with the start-up of Fordow, Iran would send a political signal to show it will not bow to international demands to suspend uranium enrichment, activity which can have both civilian and military uses.

The West has imposed increasingly tight economic sanctions on Tehran over its nuclear program, culminating with a law signed recently by President Obama aimed at preventing buyers from paying for Iranian oil.

Western powers have repeatedly made clear they are also ready for renewed diplomacy, but stress that Iran must show it is willing to engage in meaningful discussions and start addressing growing international concerns about its work.

Diplomats in Vienna, home to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations nuclear watchdog, told Reuters on Friday that Iran was believed to have begun feeding uranium gas into centrifuges in Fordow in late December as part of final preparations to use the machines for enrichment.

The centrifuges and other equipment needed to start enrichment were installed at Fordow last year.


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/09/world/middleeast/iran-will-soon-move-uranium-work-underground-official-says.html?hp

Crystal

edit for spacing
« Last Edit: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:33am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5920 on: Jan 8th, 2012, 10:55am »

I've been reading Jenny Randles book "Investigating The Truth Behind The Men In Black Phenomenon" ©1997

and she says on page 170:



"John Keel reports that there are a number of recorded instances throughtout history where important discoveries seem to have been handed to individuals by mysterious strangers who simply disappeared. He cites the example of Thomas Jefferson, who reputedly received the 'Great Seal', part of the United States regalia, when a man dressed in black turned up in his garden and gave it to him."


This was an interesting tidbit.

Crystal
« Last Edit: Jan 8th, 2012, 11:03am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5921 on: Jan 9th, 2012, 08:29am »

New York Times

January 9, 2012
Iran Imposes Death Sentence on U.S. Man Accused of Spying
By HARVEY MORRIS

LONDON — Iran’s Revolutionary Court has sentenced to death a former United States Marine of Iranian descent for spying for the Central Intelligence Agency, the semiofficial Fars news agency reported on Monday.

The Marine was named as Amir Mirzaei Hekmati, 28. Prosecutors charged that he received espionage training at American bases in Afghanistan and Iraq before infiltrating Iran.

The agency said he was sentenced to death for “cooperating with the hostile country and spying for the C.I.A.”

“The court found him Corrupt on Earth and Mohareb (waging war on God),” according to Fars. The formulation is routinely used in cases against alleged enemies of the Islamic Republic and the charge carries the death sentence.

Mr. Hekmati’s detention became public last month when Iranian state television broadcast video images of him. It identified him as an American-born Iranian-American from Arizona.

In the video, the man identified as Mr. Hekmati said he joined the United States Army after graduating from high school in 2001, served in Iraq and received training in languages and espionage.

He said he was sent to Iran by the C.I.A. to gain the trust of the Iranian authorities by handing over information, some misleading and some accurate. If his first mission was successful, he said he was told, there would be more missions.

The claims in the video could not be verified at the time. The C.I.A. declined to comment after the broadcast on Dec. 18.

In the televised confession, Mr. Hekmati was shown speaking in fluent English and Farsi. He said he was a C.I.A. operative sent to infiltrate the Iranian intelligence ministry.

Iranian officials said their agents had identified him at the American-run Bagram air base in Afghanistan and tracked him as he infiltrated Iran. Mr. Hekmati’s family in the United States told American news media that he had traveled to Iran to visit his Iranian grandmothers and was not a spy.

The United States had demanded Mr. Hekmati’s release and the State Department said last month that Iran had not permitted diplomats from the Swiss Embassy, which represents American interests in Iran, to see him before or during his trial.

Accusations by Iran of espionage inside its borders are common, and Iran often announces that it has captured or executed people it says are spies for Western powers and Israel.

On Sunday, Heydar Moslehi, the Iranian intelligence minister, said Iran had arrested several spies who sought to carry out American plans to disrupt parliamentary elections in March, according to Fars.

Speaking to reporters after a cabinet meeting in Tehran, Mr. Moslehi said: “Our intelligence apparatus had complete information about the activities of the arrested spies. The detainees were in contact with abroad through cyberspace networks. We arrested them after we obtained full information about their espionage activities.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/10/world/middleeast/iran-imposes-death-sentence-on-alleged-us-spy.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5922 on: Jan 9th, 2012, 08:39am »

The Telegraph

Kim Jong-il's death: news was broken by mourning North Korean magpies

The passing of North Korean strongman Kim Jong-il has been marked by plunging temperatures, mourning bears and now, according to North Korean state media, by flocks of magpies.

1:54PM GMT 09 Jan 2012

Kim, who died in December aged 69 years after 17 years running the world's most reclusive state, was reputed to be able to control the weather, as well as to have scored a miraculous 38 under par round of golf.

"At around 17:30 on December 19, 2011, hundreds of magpies appeared from nowhere and hovered over a statue of President Kim Il Sung on Changdok School campus in Mangyongdae District, clattering as if they were telling him the sad news," state news agency KCNA reported on Monday.

Kim's death was announced on Dec. 19, although he was reported by official media to have died on Dec 17 on a train journey to give guidance to his North Korean subjects.

He has been succeeded by his youngest son, Kim Jong-un, who will become the third of his line to head the world's only hereditary totalitarian Stalinist state. Mythmaking is a key part of the personality cult that surrounds the family of founding father Kim Il-sung.

KCNA reported last week that a family of bears who usually hibernate through the fierce Korean winter had been seen lamenting Kim Jong-il's death."The bears, believed to be a mother and cubs, were staying on the road, crying woefully," it said.

Mythmaking for Kim Jong-un, believed to be in his late 20s, has already started. He is portrayed as the spitting image of his grandfather and has been dubbed the "genius of geniuses" in military affairs despite having no known military experience.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/9002162/Kim-Jong-ils-death-news-was-broken-by-mourning-North-Korean-magpies.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5923 on: Jan 9th, 2012, 08:42am »

Wired

Marines Want iPads to Control Robo-Copter Brains
By David Axe
January 9, 2012 | 6:30 am
Categories: Drones

It’s been less than a month since the Marines flew their first robotic supply helicopter on its debut combat mission in Afghanistan. Already, the amphibious combat branch is working on the next generation of pilotless cargo copter — one that’s an order of magnitude more sophisticated, and can be controlled by an iPad or other tablet.

The Navy, on behalf of the Marines, launched the so-called Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility System program late last year. According to program documents, the goal of the six-year-program is to produce an “unmanned and potentially optionally-manned” robot to “provide affordable and reliable rapid response cargo delivery to distributed small units in demanding, austere locations and environments.”

Robotic supply vehicles, including the Marines’ remote-controlled K-MAX (pictured) plus driver-less Army cargo trucks and even autonomous forklifts, are one subject of my new book From A to B, just out from Potomac Books.

But AACUS, pronounced “ache-us,” isn’t meant to be just one robot design. Rather, it’s the brains of many models of robot. The idea is to produce a set of sensors, software, computers and controls that can be installed aboard almost any Vertical-Take-Off-and-Landing aircraft, including helicopters and potentially tiltrotors or even ducted-fan vehicles. “We want to show that we can plug-and-play across different rotorcraft and VTOL aircraft and get some level of guaranteed performance,” Missy Cummings, the program director, tells Danger Room.

Cummings is the perfect leader for the program. A former Navy F/A-18 jet fighter pilot, Cummings went on to design robots for MIT. For several years, she focused on building Unmanned Aerial Vehicles that required only minimal input from an unskilled operator using an iPhone or similar device. “Our philosophy is that humans have important jobs they need to do, and should not worry about low-level housekeeping, telling a UAV to go from point to point,” she told Danger Room two years ago. “UAVs are smart, and can do that on their own these days.”

If the project works out as planned, the AACUS supply robots will fly between combat outposts with no direct human control, scanning their surroundings, detecting obstacles and enemies and even zooming in for quick deliveries after spending only seconds mapping out a landing zone using lasers, radar or other sensors. The ‘bots will only need people to tell them when and where to deliver something, by tapping out a few commands on a smart tablet.

The program takes an incremental approach to developing the hardware. The first step is to select two contractors to build early prototypes, matching Cummings’ technology with existing airframes. Lockheed Martin, a backer of the Marines’ current K-MAX robot copter, is a likely bidder. So are Boeing and Northrop Grumman, developers of the A160 and Fire Scout unmanned helicopters, respectively.

The best two bidders will compete in an increasingly realistic set of tests starting in 2014, swapping the AACUS brains across multiple airframes. By 2018, Cummings wants to pick a winner — and start building production models for combat use.

Initially, the AACUS ‘bots will handle supply runs in environments too dangerous for human pilots. Later, the pilotless copters could handle medevac missions, too. Cummings asks people to imagine a furious battle in difficult terrain. “Your buddy took a bullet to the chest and no manned helicopter is crazy enough to land.” A Marine whips out a handheld device, taps a button or two and, within minutes, a medical robot is hovering overhead.

There are applications in the civilian world, too, Cummings says. “You could use it in Alaska” or other remote places with bad weather and rough terrain.

Cummings admits that it’s an ambitious vision. “There’s no guarantee we’ll be able to make this work,” she says. But even a near-miss could result in much-improved robots for a range of missions. “We are going to make substantial improvements.”

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/01/navy-supply-robot/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11998
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #5924 on: Jan 9th, 2012, 08:53am »

BBC

8 January 2012
Last updated at 19:31 ET

Alien hunters: Searching for life
By Jason Palmer

Science and technology reporter, BBC News

The hunt for signals from intelligent extraterrestrials has been in full swing for half a century. But the effort's flagship facility recently came to a grinding halt. The first of a two-part series on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (Seti) takes a look at the facility and what it means for Seti's future.

"It's never been this bad."

Seth Shostak, principal astronomer for the Seti Institute in Mountain View, California, is trying the door of an outbuilding at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). Like all the others, it is locked.

"There's always been at least one or two people around who can let you in."

The group of 42 antennas is, as the flyer posted nearby advises, "in the process of being returned to operations". Last April, there wasn't enough money in the Seti coffers to pay the staff, and the facility shut down.

A funding drive raised money from Seti enthusiasts including former astronaut Bill Anders, sci-fi author Larry Niven, and even Hollywood actress Jodie Foster. But it's only enough to keep going for a few months.

"Since 1993, Seti has had to run on private donations from people who think this is an interesting thing to do," Seth tells me.

"I remain confident that we'll find the money to make this a permanent operation. After all, you're not going to find ET unless you have the telescope operational."

Blind valley

But even if the telescope is operational, will the effort find ET? Ask Seth or his colleagues, and you'll get the same answer: it's a long shot. It may take years, or decades, or centuries to pick up a signal.

We humans have only been on the radio for about a century, and listening for cosmic signals for half of that. That is an infinitesimal slice of time in the 13 billion years that our Universe has been around.

Yet, we are probably closer, at least philosophically, than we have ever been to answering the timeless question of whether we are alone.

Fifty years ago, all we had was the Drake equation - a string of factors that, multiplied together, yielded a guess of how many ETs might be out there, phoning our home.

Many of those factors were a matter of complete guesswork in the early 1960s: the rate of star formation in the galaxy, how many stars may host planets, how many of those planets could potentially support life.

Today, some of those factors are being solidly quantified thanks to results from the Kepler space telescope, which is discovering far-flung planets - some potentially hospitable to life - at an astonishing rate.

And where once there were single radio dishes listening in on single frequencies - single radio stations - improvements in the electronics behind the scenes make it possible to sift through literally millions of stations automatically.

more after the jump
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-16265519

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 393 394 395 396 397  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls