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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 10606 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #6150 on: Feb 10th, 2012, 08:40am »

Wired Danger Room

Secretive SEALs Moonlight as Movie Stars, With Navy’s Blessing
By Spencer Ackerman
February 10, 2012 | 6:30 am
Categories: Danger Room At The Movies, Military Life, Navy





SEALs are supposed to be secretive, stealthy killers. The public will probably never know the identities of the SEAL Team Six members who killed Osama bin Laden. But the Navy and the Pentagon had no problem letting the producers of a forthcoming action movie put active-duty SEALs on camera. Their faces are on screen and their names — first names, at least — are in the credits, along with their rank.

“There were many precautions taken with the project to make sure our advantages on the battlefield would not be compromised to the enemy,” explains Amanda Greenberg, a Navy spokeswoman. Well, that and the fact that Act of Valor — in theaters next Friday! — is one giant, explicit recruiting pitch.

In fact — and this is surely a Hollywood first — Act of Valor is the direct result of a boring, bureaucratic planning document from the Pentagon called the Quadrennial Defense Review.

The 2006 edition of the review, which sketches out Pentagon priorities four years at a time, called for a dramatic expansion in Special Operations Forces — a recognition of the strain that the burgeoning Shadow Wars were placing on the U.S.’s elite troops. That got the Navy and Special Operations Command thinking about how to both boost recruitment and sell enlisted troops on the spec-ops community.

Enter a group of producers in 2006 who approached the Navy, interested in making a movie about SEALs. “The Naval Special Warfare community said, ‘Oh my gosh, how do we do this?’” says Army Lt. Col. Jim Gregory, a Pentagon spokesman.

The answer was to let the Act of Valor crew shoot real-life SEAL training sessions back home. No actual operations, nowhere within thousands of miles of an actual war zone, and no staged training for the benefit of the cameras — hence the six years it took to actually make the film. “Since the SEALs in Act of Valor are not deployed in an operational status, revealing their IDs was not determined to be a concern,” Greenberg says.

Still, it comes at a time when some in the spec-ops fraternity are expressing unease at the rise in publicity for their active-duty peers. Adm. William McRaven, the chief of U.S. Special Operations Command, was told to “get the hell out of the media” at a conference this week. And not just by anyone — by retired Lt. Gen. James Vaught, who commanded the failed raid to free the Iranian hostages in 1980, who worried too much publicity would “kill every one of your SEALs.”

McRaven’s riposte: he became a SEAL after seeing a John Wayne movie.

Not everyone shares Vaught’s fears. “I was frankly surprised when I learned of it,” emails retired Adm. George Worthington, who used to run Naval Special Warfare Command. But Worthington, who compares the movie to Top Gun, doesn’t “see a real problem with the guys ‘moonlighting.’ It’s been screened for classification, etc. So, go get ‘em.”

Judging from the trailer, they do. The SEALs in the movie try to free a captured CIA agent and prevent a terrorist group from pulling off a domestic attack. On the way they launch Raven drones for their aerial recon, board stealthy subs, and generally act bad-ass.

“It was done by real dudes so it actually looks real and in a lot of cases is real,” writes Danger Room pal Jim “Uncle Jimbo” Hanson, a retired Army Special Forces Weapons non-commissioned officer, who got an early peek at the film and loved it. “One of the best examples is when a couple of fast boats come to exfil them from a hostage rescue and the boat guys light up some bad guys and their pick up trucks with miniguns. Almost too beautiful for words.”

The military’s hoping eager young people will agree. “We aim to inspire the next generation of Navy recruits to consider the Special Warfare community,” Greenberg says. “Honestly, we’re always hiring.”

Although Gregory adds that the SEALs’ “real life has done its job for recruiting.”

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/02/act-of-valor/

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« Reply #6151 on: Feb 10th, 2012, 5:44pm »

LightYears Blog
February 10th, 2012

Astronaut feels space's toll on his body

It’s not really why he signed up to be an astronaut, but like it or not, Mike Barratt and his eyes have become a science project.

The eye charts he reads, the red drops that turn his eyes yellow and the ultrasounds being performed on him could determine whether he or any other astronaut ever journeys into deep space or sets foot on other worlds.

NASA’s new priority is how to protect astronauts from going blind on the years-long trip to get wherever they are going. “I absolutely agree that this is our number one priority,” Barratt said.

Why?

Because when Barratt blasted off to the international space station, he needed eyeglasses for distance. When he returned to Earth, his distance vision was fine, but he needed reading glasses. That was more than two years ago. And he’s not getting better.

“We really need to understand this. This is a critical point for understanding how humans adapt to spaceflight,” he said.

In the past few years, about half of the astronauts aboard the international space station have developed an increasing pressure inside their heads, an intracranial pressure that reshapes their optic nerve, causing a significant shift in the eyesight of male astronauts. Doctors call it papilledema.

Female space travelers have not been affected.
Some of the astronauts slowly recover. Others have not.

Space station astronauts typically spend about six months in orbit.
Barratt is one of 10 male astronauts, all older than 45, who have not recovered. Barratt returned from a six-month stint aboard the station in October 2009 and has experienced a profound change in his sight.

He used to be nearsighted. But now, the space veteran says he’s eagle-eyed at long distance but needs glasses for reading. There is no treatment and no answers as to why female space flyers are not affected.

Doctors have found that Barratt’s retinas have microscopic folds or wrinkles on them, and the back of his eye, the optic nerve, is no longer round but has flattened.
“I think this is showing that there are physiologic aspects of adaption to spaceflight we weren’t seeing before,” said Barratt.

This raises a red flag for all of NASA’s plans for long-duration human space flight. The space station is supposed to be the test bed for how humans would learn to live in space, but it opens profound questions on whether humans will ever venture to Mars or to an asteroid if they are unable to figure out how the outer-space environment is affecting the eyes.

“It is a serious problem and one we are going to have to understand more about before we would be able to send somebody into a long-duration mission away from Earth, where they would be away for years,” he said.

Right now, the only data that doctors have are from six-month tours of duty on the space station.

“What we’re seeing appears to occur within the first couple of months of flight and appears to level off, plateau after about four to five months,” Gibson said.
“If it’s just a matter of giving them a stronger prescription, we can live with that,” he said. “But if there is an elevated intracranial pressure as the cause of this, we have to be concerned about other neurologic effects."

That means there could be other effects on the body that haven’t become apparent.
This is why a three-year mission to Mars is in question.

It would be humans' next great leap, and NASA is spending almost $18 billion over the next five years to develop a heavy lift rocket that would take astronauts to the Red Planet or even to an asteroid. They would travel in a new spacecraft, Orion.

“I’m still hopeful that in 20 years, we’ll have advanced propulsion capabilities that can get us there in a matter of weeks to a few months. Then, a lot of these problems go away,” he said.

http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2012/02/10/astronaut-feels-spaces-toll-on-his-body/?hpt=hp_bn1
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« Reply #6152 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 06:49am »

"In the past few years, about half of the astronauts aboard the international space station have developed an increasing pressure inside their heads, an intracranial pressure that reshapes their optic nerve, causing a significant shift in the eyesight of male astronauts. Doctors call it papilledema.

Female space travelers have not been affected.
Some of the astronauts slowly recover. Others have not."



Strange. Thanks Swamprat, and Good Morning to you.

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« Reply #6153 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 06:53am »

New York Times

February 10, 2012
In a Mailbox: A Shared Gun, Just for the Asking
By MICHAEL WILSON

Shanell Crute and her boyfriend were walking toward East 163rd Street in the Bronx to buy marijuana that night. With two blocks to go, they stopped when a group of five guys called out to her. The men had been drinking and smoking.

Ms. Crute’s nickname was Sweetz because she was quite friendly, but that night, Sept. 30, 2010, she gave as good as she got for the last minutes of her 26-year-long life.

“She says, ‘I might know these guys,’ ” said Lt. James Ruane of the 44th Precinct detective squad. “She gets into a bit of an argument with them when she figures out she doesn’t know these guys. Somebody said, ‘Get the Waka Flocka.’ ”

Two men broke off, crossed East 161st Street, entered the lobby of an apartment building, approached the bank of 207 mailboxes and opened one.

Waka Flocka is the name of a rapper. But to these men, the phrase described something else.

The community gun.

Hidden and shared by a small group of people who use them when needed, and are always sure to return them, such guns appear to be rising in number in New York, according to the police. It is unclear why. The economy? Times are tough — not everyone can afford a gun. “The gangs are younger, and their resources are less,” said Ed Talty, an assistant district attorney in the Bronx.

Or perhaps it’s not that there are more communal guns, but rather, that they are easier to identify through forensic science.

“We get a lot more ballistic matches than we ever have before,” Lieutenant Ruane said. “It’s amazing. You go, how the hell did that match up to that shooting? It’s a different command, a different borough, Brooklyn or something.”

The two men who opened the Bronx mailbox may have been momentarily surprised by what they found inside — nothing. But they simply went to another hiding spot in the building, in a bag under the stairs, the police said. The building was routinely referred to as “Vietnam,” a name coined during more violent times in the 1980s.

There was the gun.

The two men emerged from the apartments on East 161st Street, and one of them, Solomon Corbett, 23, raised the gun and ended the argument with Ms. Crute by shooting her in the head and chest, the police said. He later told the police that he felt threatened by her boyfriend and intended to shoot him, but missed. That he hit her nine times seems to have weakened his case for self-defense.

Mr. Corbett has pleaded not guilty and is awaiting trial. The gun was never found. It may have been thrown away, or it may be stashed somewhere else, because when it comes to community guns, hiding holes abound.

“Wheel wells,” Mr. Talty said. “The bottom of a light pole.”

“Garbage pails are a big one,” said Capt. Richard Dee, with the Police Department’s Gang Division. “A hallway radiator.”

“Behind some bushes or under a building,” said State Senator Malcolm A. Smith, who has visited the scenes of shootings in his Queens district that were linked to community guns. “Somewhere where you can essentially borrow it for an hour if you need to use it.”

The police believe that a community gun is now in play in a series of gang-related shootings in East New York, Brooklyn, between the Rock Starz and their colorfully named rivals, the Very Crispy Gangsters.

Sharing guns predates the Wild West, but the sophistication of maintaining today’s community gun can be striking.

“You call it a community gun, so that name has to be able to market itself,” Senator Smith said. “You have a business model behind this concept, a schedule, which is a shame. If they used that intellect for something positive, who knows how successful that person could be?”

Sometimes the hiding place is human. “One guy will hold the gun down,” Captain Dee said. “They call him the ‘holster.’ Often, it’s a female. Someone who is above suspicion.”

This was the case, prosecutors said, in the 2011 arrests of several members of the 137th Street Crew, which sold crack in Harlem. One defendant, Afrika Owes, was the girlfriend of the gang’s leader, Jaquan Layne, and she visited him in jail at Rikers Island. Their conversations were recorded. They referred to times when Ms. Owes “was carrying the big old nine,” according to the indictment brought by the Manhattan district attorney. The 9-millimeter pistol “was part of defendant Africa Owes’s life,” the indictment states.

She told her boyfriend it was heavy.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/nyregion/hidden-communal-guns-are-more-common.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #6154 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 07:04am »

The Hill

CIA website reportedly crashed by Anonymous
By Alicia M. Cohn
02/10/12 04:56 PM ET

The official website for the Central Intelligence Agency crashed on Friday afternoon, in an attack claimed by activist hackers group Anonymous.

The site was down for at least an hour Friday afternoon.

Anonymous took credit for the unresponsive website on a Twitter account affiliated with the group, tweeting: “CIA TANGO DOWN.” No immediate reason was given for the apparent denial of service attack, but a follow-up tweet reads, “Anonymous - We do it for the lulz.”

Last month, the hackers group claimed to have crashed the Justice Department website, saying it was done in retaliation for prosecutors shutting down the file-sharing site Megaupload.com.

http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/210065-cia-website-reportedly-crashed-by-anonymous

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« Reply #6155 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 07:11am »

.





Uploaded by jediyves on Feb 6, 2012

Produced by The Star Trek Vancouver Fan Group

Kirk - Michael Brooks
Spock - Yves Ho
Gillian - Marie Moore
McCoy - Simon Johnston
Scotty - Russell Wallace
Sulu - Mandy Zou
Chekov - Ali Bordbar
Uhura - Mell D'Clute

and
President of the United Federation of Planets
Jamal Allan

Directed by Yves Ho
Director of Photography by Ian Gustafson
Costumes - Christine Leston

Locations:
Ecomarine Kayak Dock, Capilano University Film Center, Ambleside Beach, West Vancouver, BC

Category:
Film & Animation

~

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« Reply #6156 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 07:15am »

Washington Post

Argentina accuses Britain of sending nuclear-armed sub near disputed Falkland Islands
By Associated Press, Published: February 10

UNITED NATIONS — Argentina said Friday it has information that Britain sent a nuclear-armed submarine to the South Atlantic near the disputed Falkland Islands in the latest verbal salvo in a dispute over the territory.

Argentina’s Foreign Minister Hector Timerman told reporters at the United Nations that a submarine called the Vanguard with nuclear weapons was recently sent as part of Britain’s deployment in the Falklands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas. HMS Vanguard is one of four British submarines armed with nuclear missiles.

“Argentina has information that within the framework of the recent British deployment in the Malvinas Islands they sent a nuclear submarine ... to transport nuclear weapons to the South Atlantic,” said Timerman.

He said Argentina asked the United Kingdom through diplomatic channels if it had introduced nuclear weapons to the South Atlantic, but “thus far, the UK refuses to say whether it’s true or not.”

He said the deployment of nuclear arms in the region would violate the Treaty of Tlatelolco for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, designed to create a nuclear-free zone in the region.

Britain’s U.N. Ambassador Mark Lyall Grant said later at his own news conference responding to Timerman: “We do not comment on the disposition of nuclear weapons, submarines.”

“I don’t know how he knows about submarines,” he added. “I certainly don’t know. The whole point of nuclear submarines is that they go all around the world and you don’t know where they are. That’s why they’re a deterrent.”

As for the treaty, Lyall Grant said that there would be no violation as long as nuclear submarines stayed out of Argentine waters.

Argentina and Britain fought a war over the islands that killed more than 900 people in 1982. With the approach of the 30th anniversary of the start of that conflict, which began when Argentina invaded on April 2, tensions have risen between the countries over the status of the British overseas territory.

Argentina claims the islands they call Malvinas, as well as the British-held South Georgia and South Sandwich islands, farther off its coast. At stake are not only the islands themselves — where sheep far outnumber people — but rich fishing grounds and potential undersea gas and oil in the surrounding seas.

Timerman said Argentina accepted an offer from Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to mediate with Britain. Lyall Grant said there’s nothing to negotiate, because the Falklanders have now been there for nine generations and don’t want change.

Britain’s defense and foreign ministries on Friday also refused to discuss Timerman’s claim about nuclear weapons, citing long-standing government policy not to comment on the deployment or movements of the country’s submarines.

Britain’s navy has 11 nuclear-powered submarines, seven armed with conventional weapons, including Tomahawk missiles, and four that carry Trident nuclear missiles, which can deliver warheads more than 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers).

Last week, Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper reported the U.K. had deployed a Trafalgar-class submarine, armed only with conventional weapons, to the South Atlantic.

“We are not looking to increase the rhetoric. We have not started a war of words.” said Lyall Grant. “But clearly if there is an attempt to take an advantage of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, we will obviously defend our position and defend it robustly.”

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez initially dispatched Timerman to formally complain to the U.N. Security Council that Britain has created a serious security risk by sending the destroyer HMS Dauntless, one of its most modern warships, to the region. Britain called it routine.

Timerman also met Friday with Togo’s Ambassador Kodjo Menan, who holds the rotating U.N. Security Council presidency, and Cuban Ambassador Pedro Nunez Mosquera, who heads the U.N. Decolonization Committee.

____

Associated Press writers Edith Lederer David Stringer in London and Michael Warren in Buenos Aires contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/argentina-accuses-britain-of-sending-nuclear-armed-sub-near-disputed-falkland-islands/2012/02/10/gIQA0xGk4Q_story.html

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« Reply #6157 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 8:11pm »

r.i.p. Whitney, thank you for your lovely voice.



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« Reply #6158 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 8:45pm »

Very sad news Crystal. And she was only 48. R.I P. Whitney. sad
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« Reply #6159 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 9:08pm »

on Feb 11th, 2012, 8:45pm, Smersh wrote:
Very sad news Crystal. And she was only 48. R.I P. Whitney. sad


Hi Smersh,

The first time I heard her voice I was knocked over. And her smile was amazing. It is really sad, she was so young.

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« Reply #6160 on: Feb 11th, 2012, 10:22pm »

Hello Crystal

When I woke up this morning and pulled up the news, I sat in disbelief and shock, stunned for a while.... I could not believe what I was reading. She was just so pretty and she sang so beautifully.... its so very sad. cry
A loss to us all, even though we didn't know her personally.... sad

Luvey

on Feb 11th, 2012, 8:11pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
r.i.p. Whitney, thank you for your lovely voice.



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« Reply #6161 on: Feb 12th, 2012, 04:26am »

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« Reply #6162 on: Feb 12th, 2012, 08:13am »

on Feb 11th, 2012, 10:22pm, Luvey wrote:
Hello Crystal

When I woke up this morning and pulled up the news, I sat in disbelief and shock, stunned for a while.... I could not believe what I was reading. She was just so pretty and she sang so beautifully.... its so very sad. cry
A loss to us all, even though we didn't know her personally.... sad

Luvey



Good morning Luvey,

She certainly had the voice of an angel. She has a daughter but I don't know her age. Poor little thing lost her Mom.

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« Reply #6163 on: Feb 12th, 2012, 08:18am »

New York Times

February 11, 2012
In Charged Moment, China’s Political Heir Tries Introducing Himself to U.S.
By MICHAEL WINES and EDWARD WONG

BEIJING — When China’s vice president and presumptive next president, Xi Jinping, arrives at the White House on Tuesday, American leaders will be scrutinizing him for hints of future stances on crucial issues, from Chinese military intentions to the nuclear programs of Iran and North Korea.

But none is more important — and for now, more opaque — than the question of where Mr. Xi and the next generation of leaders want to take China’s economy, which is still growing rapidly but shows signs of stress and structural instability, economists say.

Mr. Xi’s cross-country swing, from Washington to an Iowa farm town to Los Angeles, comes at a politically charged moment in American relations with China. China’s economic competition with the United States has already become a theme in this year’s Republican presidential primaries, and President Obama has toughened his tone on Chinese trade and fiscal issues.

In meetings with Mr. Xi at the White House on Tuesday, a stock list of economic demands — that China lower barriers to American investment, build a consumer-driven economy that would buy more American imports and allow the renminbi to rise against the dollar more quickly — seems likely to dominate Mr. Obama’s side of the conversation, according to officials in Washington.

For his part, Mr. Xi, introducing himself to the American public, will showcase a down-home personality in contrast to that of China’s stoic current president, Hu Jintao. He will announce some business deals with American companies and, like every Chinese visitor, pledge to improve bilateral relations. But given the domestic pressures over this year’s once-a-decade leadership transition in China, the odds that Mr. Xi will accede publicly to Mr. Obama’s requests are practically nil.

There is a longer-term debate about reforms going on even now, however. In recent months, some Communist Party elites have privately debated the necessity of those reforms with renewed vigor; some of the discussion has crept into public discourse, and there are a growing number of attacks by intellectuals and former officials on what they call the “vested interests” that threaten to take China further down the road of crony capitalism.

But the delicacy of the leadership transition and the structural limits on Mr. Xi’s authority, particularly in his first five-year term in office, would hamper attempts by him or his colleagues to push reforms even if they are inclined to do so.

He and a new leadership team are set late this year to inherit a quasi-market economy geared above all else to generate fast growth.

The state-owned industries that have ballooned in size, the coastal provinces that have grown rich on exports, the local governments that have reaped billions from land sales and poured billions more into building glittering cities — all have interests in that economic policy. Economists agree that reforms are needed to land ownership, the social welfare system and the financial sector, and that China must overhaul its investment-driven growth model, but all of that would work against those interest groups.

The big state corporations, in particular, have gained political clout alongside their wealth. They have monopolies on the most important industries — banking, oil, aviation, construction, telecommunications — and they maintain close ties to the top party officials. Two former executives of mammoth oil and machinery companies sit on the current Standing Committee of the Politburo, the nine-member body that essentially runs China by consensus.

The officials expected to take posts on the Standing Committee this October all have ties of some kind to the heads of state enterprises; for example, Wang Qishan, who is seen as relatively liberal on economic policy, was a top state bank executive himself. Corporate executives regularly rotate into top provincial posts, and still more sit on the Communist Party’s Central Committee.

“If the new leadership can crack down or curtail these companies, they will score well with the public. But those interest groups are very powerful,” Cheng Li, a scholar of elite Chinese politics at the Brookings Institution in Washington, said in an interview. “The political risk is overwhelming.”

So, say some, is the risk of doing nothing. Concern has mounted in some quarters of the party — and anger among citizens — over the emergence of a powerful and privileged elite. Cynics have coined the phrase “black collar” to describe the big-city titans and government elites who wear expensive black suits and invariably drive black luxury automobiles, often flouting traffic and speed laws.

There was a notable lack of discussion of new economic reforms at the party’s annual economic work conference in December, where Mr. Hu focused only on talk of stability, according to an editor at a party newspaper.

But in at least five private forums organized by the children of Communist revolution elites last year in Beijing, the need for reforms was discussed, say people briefed on the meetings. Those so-called princelings in attendance wield power through personal connections that could in the long run influence the next group of leaders, even though their calls for change have no immediate effect.

Much about Mr. Xi points to a person who, by the standards of current leaders, will be comparatively progressive. Unlike the parochial Mr. Hu, Mr. Xi, 58, is well-traveled and intimately familiar with the West. His daughter attends Harvard, and he is said to enjoy Hollywood films about World War II. (Mr. Hu is said to be a Russophile.)

Mr. Hu, a onetime hydroelectric power technician, worked his way up through jobs in China’s hardscrabble interior. Mr. Xi is the son of a Communist Party aristocrat, Xi Zhongxun, who was present at the birth of China’s turn to capitalism and helped develop the special economic zone of Shenzhen. Mr. Xi rose through party jobs in China’s entrepreneurial coastal centers.

Some experts say that the background and the histories of China’s other new leaders bode well for an economic overhaul.

“These people got their college education in the honeymoon years of reform and opening up, in 1977 and 1978 when the country was just beginning to be transformed,” said Li Daokui, an economist and adviser to China’s central bank. “Those who were most excited were college students. These people are intrinsically believers in reform and opening up.”

But Mr. Xi’s voice, while influential, will be just one of many in China’s collective leadership. Managing the economy probably will fall to two other standing committee members: Li Keqiang, the apparent choice to succeed Wen Jiabao as prime minister, and Mr. Wang, the onetime head of a state-owned bank who is regarded as a top candidate for first vice prime minister.

Mr. Wang has deep ties with China’s finance and industrial sectors, and he has played a central role in economic talks with Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner. His history — he was a protégé of Zhu Rongji, an economic reformer who served as prime minister from 1998 to 2003 — bolsters a general belief that he supports market-oriented economic policies.

Mr. Li’s views are unclear, but he served earlier as governor of the central province of Henan, one of the nation’s poorest. And his current portfolio, which includes making changes in China’s housing and health care sectors, suggests a bent toward improving average citizens’ lot.

But some party elites have criticized Mr. Li as ineffectual and reluctant to challenge vested interests in those sections.

Whatever their views, major policy changes will have to run a gantlet of scrutiny — and potential opposition — by a new Politburo and other Communist Party powers, including Mr. Hu, who, like his predecessors, is expected to still play a signature role.

And the changes are unlikely to be swift. Many near-term economic policies have already been laid out in the party’s latest five-year plan, unveiled last year. Until Mr. Xi manages to fill important jobs with his own allies, a process that will take years, Mr. Hu’s economic blueprint will be the guide.

For some years to come, Mr. Hu is going to be “an overlord,” one economist who has advised party leaders said in an interview late last year. “If Xi has any hope, it’s in his second term” — that is, the last five years of his expected decade-long stint as president.


Michael Wines reported from Beijing, and Edward Wong from Washington. Jonathan Ansfield contributed reporting from Beijing, and Li Bibo contributed research from Beijing.


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/world/asia/xi-jinping-chinas-presumptive-next-leader-to-visit-us.html?_r=1&ref=world#

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6164 on: Feb 12th, 2012, 08:22am »

on Feb 12th, 2012, 04:26am, Smersh wrote:


Thanks Smersh,
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