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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 91572 times)
HAL9000
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6315 on: Mar 7th, 2012, 12:31pm »

RE reply 317 above.

I don't think it is a Compass Rose.

Firstly it has 24 'nodes' . 18 or 36 would be more reasonable for checking the planes compass.

Also it is in the middle of a taxi way. When you swing a planes compass you need some room to maneuver the plane around. Here we have a narrow taxiway with what looks like rough desert on either side. Hardly room to swing a cat.

I have no idea what it is. But based on experience from my light aircraft mechanic days when I used to check compasses, It isn't a Rose.

HAL

P.S It isn't 'on the ramp'. it's on a taxiway.

Note, Modified to correct the number of node. HAL
« Last Edit: Mar 7th, 2012, 1:36pm by HAL9000 » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6316 on: Mar 7th, 2012, 12:38pm »

on Mar 7th, 2012, 12:31pm, HAL9000 wrote:
RE reply 317 above.

I don't think it is a Compass Rose.

Firstly it has 24 'nodes' . 16 or 32 would be more reasonable for checking the planes compass.

Also it is in the middle of a taxi way. When you swing a planes compass you need some room to maneuver the plane around. Here we have a narrow taxiway with what looks like rough desert on either side. Hardly room to swing a cat.

I have no idea what it is. But based on experience from my light aircraft mechanic days when I used to check compasses, It isn't a Rose.

HAL

P.S It isn't 'on the ramp'. it's on a taxiway.


Hey HAL,

Thank you for your imput. I have no experience in this field so am totally in the dark as to their explanation.

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6317 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 08:30am »

The Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Devoid

High strangeness on audio


Wednesday, March 7, 2012
by Billy Cox

“There it is! There it is again! To the right — I’ve got it in sight again!”

In proposing a UFO study for the United Nations' Office of Outer Space Affairs, CEFAA's Ricardo Bermudez said “I believe all possibilities of risk to air operations, no matter how incredible, must be investigated. To ignore it is irresponsible"

The pilot’s voice is clearly excited. But the UFO, which flashes red and green colors, doesn’t show up on anyone’s radar. Even though air traffic controllers can see it for themselves, tracking the thing with binoculars.
“It goes slow or fast?” asks one of the guys in the tower.
“When it came on a collision course it came fast, quite fast,” replies the pilot. “We had to avoid it with a sharp left turn …”

This was what happened on LAN Flight 405 on June 1, 1988, near Puerto Montt, gateway to the fjords in southern Chile. We know about this near-disaster not only because the chatter was recorded and preserved, but because it was introduced to U.S. audiences — and ignored by U.S. media — at the International UFO Congress on Feb. 25 in Arizona.

LAN 405’s close call was just one of three sets of flight recordings released by retired Chilean air force general Ricardo Bermudez, who now directs that nation’s official UFO research program, CEFAA. Maybe the most impressive encounter occurred on June 24, 2010, when two commercial aircraft and a Navy plane reported an object one pilot described as “camouflaged as a cloud but with erratic motion.” You can hear those conversations, with English translations, at the National Aviation Reporting Center on Anomalous Phenomena website.

In the full accounting of Bermudez’ presentation at Open Minds magazine, it appears the general didn’t pull any punches. Try to imagine, say, retired USAF chief of staff Michael Moseley narrating an animated power-point reconstruction of a UFO incident and volunteering, “We have here three airplanes in different frequencies describing the same situation,” and talking about how the object drew close enough for one crew to see “windows like a train.”

With Bermudez also touting Chile’s recently enacted government transparency law, you can bet your 401(k) Uncle Sam wants to stay the hell away from this guy. CEFAA networks with researchers in 14 countries, and Bermudez informed listeners of his agency’s “External Committee of Advisors” that includes “eight top scientists from the Chilean Commission of Nuclear Energy, Aerospace Medicine at Santiago University, astronomers from the Metropolitan and Catholic Universities, a plasma physicist from Santiago University, a geographer and expert in satellite imagery from Chile State University, and two psychologists.” He also mentioned CEFAA’s Internal Committee which includes authorities on operations safety, meteorology, air accidents investigations, aerospace engineering and audiovisual technology.

This was the team — along with NARCAP — that took a look at multiple videos of a military air show over El Bosque on Nov. 4, 2010. At least seven different camera angles captured an apparent metallic disc that slipped in undetected among Chilean jet fighters at speeds calculated to be 18 times faster than the F-16s nearby. Dismissing space junk, birds, meteors and all that from the suspect list, CEFAA came up empty-handed. But it concluded “the object moves east with 25 degrees inclination. This is the same angle spacecraft enter the atmosphere.”

But what’s the angle for American science? We don’t even have a manned spaceflight program anymore.

http://devoid.blogs.heraldtribune.com/12839/high-strangeness-on-audio/
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6318 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 08:32am »

Good morning Swamprat. cheesy

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6319 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 08:35am »

New York Times

March 8, 2012
Miles Under the Pacific, a Director Will Take On His Most Risky Project
By WILLIAM J. BROAD

As a boy, he used to squeeze his body into drainage pipes, snaking along to see how far he could go.

As an adult, he made the two top-grossing movies of all time, “Avatar” and “Titanic.”

And on Wednesday, James Cameron folded his 6-foot-2-inch frame into a 43-inch-wide capsule and plummeted, alone, down five miles in the New Britain Trench off Papua New Guinea. His feat, in a 24-foot-long craft dubbed the Deepsea Challenger, broke by a mile the world depth record for modern vehicles that a Japanese submersible had held.

But he wants to go deeper: This month, Mr. Cameron plans to plunge nearly seven miles to the planet’s most inaccessible spot: the Challenger Deep in the western Pacific, an alien world thought to swarm with bizarre eels and worms, fish and crustaceans. He wants to spend six hours among them, filming the creatures and sucking up samples with a slurp gun.

“It’s a blast,” Mr. Cameron said in an interview during sea trials of his new craft. “There’s nothing more fun than getting bolted into this and seeing things that human beings have never seen before. Forget about red carpets and all that glitzy stuff.”

His attempt is also dangerous. Two people once died in a submersible. Last month, Mr. Cameron lost two members of his team in a fatal helicopter crash.

He built his miniature submarine secretly in Australia, and already it has outdone all other watercraft in its ability to ferry people through the deep’s crushing pressures. As with the birth of the private space rocket industry, where commercial companies are building ships to take astronauts aloft, the debut of Mr. Cameron’s submarine signals the rising importance of entrepreneurs in the global race to advance science and technology.

His goal with his next dive is to tackle a much older record. A half century ago, in a technical feat never equaled, the United States Navy sent two men down nearly seven miles into the Challenger Deep, their vehicle 60 feet long. A window cracked on the way down. The landing stirred up so much ooze that the divers could see little through the portholes, took no pictures and began their ascent after just 20 minutes on the seabed.

Mr. Cameron’s bid is to be unveiled Thursday in Washington by the National Geographic Society, where he holds the title of Explorer-in-Residence. Both the society, which is helping pay for the expedition, and Mr. Cameron took pains to characterize the effort as purely scientific rather than competitive.

It comes as a number of wealthy men — including Richard Branson of the Virgin empire and the Internet guru Eric E. Schmidt — are building or financing miniature submarines meant to transport them, their friends and scientists into the remotest parts of the world’s oceans, including the Challenger Deep.

Mr. Cameron will collect samples for research in biology, microbiology, astrobiology, marine geology and geophysics. “The science is paramount,” Ellen Stanley, a National Geographic spokeswoman, said in an interview. “We’re out to learn what’s down there.”

Mr. Cameron called his venture “very different from going down and planting a flag” — a seeming reference to how Russian explorers in 2007 put a flag on the seabed under the North Pole. Their deed was meant to strengthen Moscow’s claims to nearly half the Arctic seabed.

The Challenger Deep is in the Mariana Trench, the deepest of the many seabed recesses that crisscross the globe. Over the decades, biologists have glimpsed their unfamiliar inhabitants mainly by lowering dredges on long lines. Up have come thousands of strange-looking worms and sea cucumbers. More recently, robot cameras have spied ghostly fish with sinuous tails.

Aboard Mr. Cameron’s expedition is Douglas Bartlett, a professor of marine microbial genetics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, an arm of the University of California at San Diego. Last year, Dr. Bartlett led a team that dropped cameras into the Mariana Trench and observed giant amoebas — a first in the inhospitable zone. Known as xenophyophores, these mysterious life forms consist of a single cell and appear able to grow to the size of a fist. Scientists find them exclusively in the deep sea.

National Geographic said the public would be able to follow Mr. Cameron’s expedition at www.deepseachallenge.com. It described the project’s main science collaborator as Scripps, followed by the University of Hawaii, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Guam. The film director has long exhibited a fascination with the deep sea, making “The Abyss” (1989), “Titanic” (1997) and a number of documentaries about lost ships, including “Bismarck” (2002) and “Ghosts of the Abyss” (2003), a 3-D tour of the Titanic’s interior. National Geographic said that Mr. Cameron had now made a total of 76 submersible dives, including 33 to the famous luxury liner.

The crew capsules of submersibles are made small to better withstand tons of crushing pressure, and thus have no amenities. Mr. Cameron’s solo model is unusually small, its inner diameter less than four feet.

He said the vehicle over all had many cameras but only one thick porthole, its inner diameter three inches. He described the craft as a “vertical torpedo,” meant to fall and rise quickly so as to maximize time for exploring the seabed.

“You’d be an idiot not to be apprehensive, but I trust the design,” Mr. Cameron said as he contemplated his impending dive. “You’re going into one of the most unforgiving places on earth.”

He said the deaths early last month of his two crew members, Mike deGruy and Andrew Wight — both celebrated filmmakers who specialized in carrying viewers into the sea’s depths — initially prompted him to want to scrap the expedition. The two were preparing to film a sea trial of the Deepsea Challenger when their helicopter went down shortly after takeoff from an airstrip south of Sydney, Australia.

“It was a horrible day,” Mr. Cameron recalled. “We felt sick at heart. It caused us to question risk and the meaning of life. I personally did not want to continue at that point, but the team rallied.”

Mr. Cameron said the project, if successful, will result not only in a number of new scientific findings but two documentary films — one a 3-D production for wide-screen theaters, and the other a National Geographic TV special.

He said that he would take some protein bars with him for the historic dive, but that much of his space was taken up with digital recording decks.

“It’s full of electronics,” Mr. Cameron said. “It’s tight, like a Mercury space capsule.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/08/science/earth/james-cameron-prepares-to-dive-into-mariana-trench.html?_r=1&hp

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6320 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 08:42am »

LA Times


Hundreds of banks help finance nuclear weapons, report says
March 7, 2012 | 11:53 am

More than 300 banks, insurance companies and other institutions are helping to finance nuclear weapons around the world, according to a new report from an activist campaign that aims to prod banks to divest from the makers of such weapons.

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons is pushing the banks and other financial institutions to stop financing companies that design, manufacture or maintain nuclear weapons, their parts or the missiles, submarines or bombers to deliver them.

More than half of the companies singled out by the group are based in the United States, including Citi, J.P. Morgan Chase and Bank of America. The banks did not respond to requests for comment on the report.

By lending money to weapons companies and buying their shares and bonds, banks and other companies "are indirectly facilitating the buildup and modernization of nuclear forces," the report said.

"Banks and other financial institutions should be called upon to do the right thing … by divesting from the immoral nuclear arms industry," retired Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote in a foreword to the report. He argued that divestment was crucial to ending the racist system of apartheid in South Africa.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/03/nuclear-weapons-banks-finance.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6321 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 09:02am »

Wired

March 8, 1955: The Mother of All Operating Systems
By Priya Ganapati
March 8, 2010 | 12:00 am
Categories: 20th century, Computers and IT, Inventions


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Photo: Stephen Dodd, Jay Forrester, Robert Everett and Ramona Ferenz test Whirlwind in 1950.
Courtesy Mitre Corp.



1955: Computer pioneer Doug Ross demonstrates the Director tape for MIT’s Whirlwind machine. It’s a new idea: a permanent set of instructions on how the computer should operate.

Six years in the making, MIT’s Whirlwind computer was the first digital computer that could display real-time text and graphics on a video terminal, which was then just a large oscilloscope screen. Whirlwind used 4,500 vacuum tubes to process data.

The Whirlwind occupied 3,300 square feet and was the fastest digital computer of its time. It also pioneered a number of new technologies, including magnetic core memory for RAM.

Another one of its contributions was Director, a set of programming instructions on paper tape that is regarded as the predecessor of operating systems in computers. The Director was designed to issue commands to the four-year-old Whirlwind machine.

The idea was to eliminate the need for manual intervention (.pdf) in reading the tapes for different problems during a computing session.

The Director tape would communicate with the computer through a separate input reader. That means different tapes with various problems to be computed would be recognized and appropriately processed. A Director tape would make a complete run possible by pushing a single button.

Programmers John Frankovich and Frank Helwig wrote the first Director tape program. The software concept was to connect a Flexowriter — a mechanical, heavy-duty tape reader — to a newer, faster photoelectric tape reader.

This allowed the team to feed the spliced-together paper tapes directly to Whirlwind, without having a separate human operator.

Lead programmer Doug Ross finally demonstrated it in 1955.

The Director tape was also probably the first example of a Job Control Language–driven operating system. JCL is a scripting language used on mainframe operating systems to instruct them how to run a batch job or start a subsystem.

The Whirlwind is credited with leading to development of the SAGE, or Semi-Automatic Ground Environment, system used by the U.S. Air Force. It’s also said to have influenced most of the computers of the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/03/0308doug-ross-director-tape/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6322 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 09:17am »

Science Daily

Chimpanzees Have Police Officers, Too
ScienceDaily (Mar. 7, 2012)

— Chimpanzees are interested in social cohesion and have various strategies to guarantee the stability of their group. Anthropologists now reveal that chimpanzees mediate conflicts between other group members, not for their own direct benefit, but rather to preserve the peace within the group. Their impartial intervention in a conflict -- so-called "policing" -- can be regarded as an early evolutionary form of moral behavior.

Conflicts are inevitable wherever there is cohabitation. This is no different with our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. Sound conflict management is crucial for group cohesion. Individuals in chimpanzee communities also ensure that there is peace and order in their group. This form of conflict management is called "policing" -- the impartial intervention of a third party in a conflict. Until now, this morally motivated behavior in chimpanzees was only ever documented anecdotally.

However, primatologists from the University of Zurich can now confirm that chimpanzees intervene impartially in a conflict to guarantee the stability of their group. They therefore exhibit prosocial behavior based on an interest in community concern.

The more parties to a conflict there are, the more policing there is

The willingness of the arbitrators to intervene impartially is greatest if several quarrelers are involved in a dispute as such conflicts particularly jeopardize group peace. The researchers observed and compared the behavior of four different captive chimpanzee groups. At Walter Zoo in Gossau, they encountered special circumstances: "We were lucky enough to be able to observe a group of chimpanzees into which new females had recently been introduced and in which the ranking of the males was also being redefined. The stability of the group began to waver. This also occurs in the wild," explains Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, the lead author of the study.

High-ranking arbitrators

Not every chimpanzee makes a suitable arbitrator. It is primarily high-ranking males or females or animals that are highly respected in the group that intervene in a conflict. Otherwise, the arbitrators are unable to end the conflict successfully. As with humans, there are also authorities among chimpanzees. "The interest in community concern that is highly developed in us humans and forms the basis for our moral behavior is deeply rooted. It can also be observed in our closest relatives," concludes Rudolf von Rohr.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120307185016.htm

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« Reply #6323 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 09:20am »

.



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HAL9000
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6324 on: Mar 8th, 2012, 1:42pm »

re 6321 above.

“When it came on a collision course it came fast, quite fast,” replies the pilot. “We had to avoid it with a sharp left turn …”

This was what happened on LAN Flight 405 on June 1, 1988, near Puerto Montt
,

If this was a normal flight it shouldn't be too hard for someone in the region to find some of the passengers on it. They would probably have remembered the sharp left turn.

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6325 on: Mar 9th, 2012, 09:24am »

on Mar 8th, 2012, 1:42pm, HAL9000 wrote:
re 6321 above.

“When it came on a collision course it came fast, quite fast,” replies the pilot. “We had to avoid it with a sharp left turn …”

This was what happened on LAN Flight 405 on June 1, 1988, near Puerto Montt
,

If this was a normal flight it shouldn't be too hard for someone in the region to find some of the passengers on it. They would probably have remembered the sharp left turn.

HAL


Good morning HAL,

Since I hate to fly I certainly would remember. tongue Guess it depends on how often they travelled?

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« Reply #6326 on: Mar 9th, 2012, 09:27am »

New York Times

March 8, 2012
Hacker, Informant and Party Boy of the Projects
By N. R. KLEINFIELD and SOMINI SENGUPTA

In his Lower East Side apartment, the nights were racket-filled and without end. Neighbors lived with the pounding music and the sound of a pit bull being chased around the living room. The revelry sent scores of calls to the city’s complaint line.

In that same apartment he hatched the online plots, the ones intended to cripple the governments of Algeria and Zimbabwe, to shame some of the biggest brand-name companies in the world.

On the Internet he was Sabu, a notorious celebrity who led a scattered tribe of politically motivated “hacktivists,” revered as the sly mastermind of brash computer attacks. Then, when he was caught, he slipped into the role of federal informant.

But always he was Hector Xavier Monsegur, party boy of the projects.

The multiple worlds of Sabu converged on Tuesday when court papers revealed his real identity.

As an informant, he helped bring down a batch of prominent fellow hackers in Europe and the United States. They were indicted on a charge of computer crimes that the authorities said affected one million victims, along with major companies and government agencies.

Hackers, concealed behind fanciful aliases on the Internet, often appropriate larger-than-life dimensions. In reality, other than in physical proportions, Sabu seemed considerably smaller than life. A defensive-lineman-size man known as Booby, he was raising the two young children of his imprisoned aunt in a public housing project. Court documents showed that Mr. Monsegur, 28, paid bills with stolen credit cards and dabbled in drug sales.

In one neighborly gesture, he offered to use his hacking skills to sweeten other tenants’ credit ratings.

On Twitter, both before and after he was helping the authorities catch his compatriots, he was prone to grand declarations: “Give us liberty or give us death — and there’s billions of us around the world. You can’t stop us. Because without us you won’t exist.”

In the days before his unmasking, he was strangely haunted by the subject of turncoats. “So you’re telling me if you get locked up, and your nosy neighbor who dropped the dime on you runs free — you would simply ignore?” he posted Monday.

Mr. Monsegur’s whereabouts are unknown, and his lawyers declined to comment. His background remains gauzy, but court records and interviews with relatives and neighbors offer an outline.

He was born in 1983. His father, also named Hector Monsegur, was arrested in 1997 along with his sister, Iris, for selling heroin. Both went to prison for seven years.

While his father was locked up, Mr. Monsegur apparently moved in with his grandmother, Irma, who lived in a sixth-floor apartment in the Jacob Riis Houses, a Lower East Side housing project.

School officials said Mr. Monsegur attended Washington Irving High School, but left in 2001 without finishing ninth grade. In the transcript of his guilty plea, Mr. Monsegur said that he went to college, though it is unclear if he actually did.

After his release from prison in early 2003, Mr. Monsegur’s father found work with a sanitation company. The aunt, Iris, ran a credit repair company from her Staten Island home. Her involvement with drugs, however, continued. She was arrested again and returned to prison in 2010. By that point she had had two girls. They were entrusted to the care of the younger Mr. Monsegur, and he gained legal custody of them.

Even after his aunt left prison last August, her children remained with Mr. Monsegur.

He worked sporadically, including for a few months at OpenPlans, a nonprofit group that tries to improve government through technology. His profile on the networking site LinkedIn, which listed him as a senior systems administrator there, disappeared on Thursday. A former co-worker described him as friendly and competent.

But authorities said he had been unemployed in recent years.

Mr. Monsegur was active in computer and hacking circles as far back as the late 1990s, and started a group for local programmers in 2002. “My name is Xavier,” he announced, inviting others to join and “integrate their knowledge into one big mass of hairy information.”

He soon came to embrace strong antigovernment and anticapitalist ideologies that steered him into the hacking world.

In what was identified as a question-and-answer interview with Sabu published in New Scientist magazine last year, he said that he became a hacktivist when he was 16. He said he became disturbed that the Navy was using Vieques Island in Puerto Rico as a bombing range for exercises, and that he helped disrupt communications. In 2010, he said in the interview, he was drawn to Anonymous, a leaderless, antiauthoritarian movement that has taken up a variety of political causes. The catalyst, he said, was his outrage over the arrest of Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, the whistle-blower site.

In particular, he became a leader of a splinter group, Lulz Security, or LulzSec, which claimed to attack computer security companies for laughs, or lulz, rather than for financial gain.

Describing himself, he said in the interview, “I’m not some cape-wearing hero, nor am I some supervillain trying to bring down the good guys. I’m just doing what I know how to do, and that is counter abuse.” For his online handle he chose Sabu, adopted from a former professional wrestler.

In 2010 and 2011, according to court documents, Mr. Monsegur participated in a relentless string of online attacks against companies and governments. Targets included Visa, MasterCard, PayPal and Sony. He also played a role in attacks on computers belonging to the governments of Tunisia, Yemen, Algeria and Zimbabwe, as well as those of the United States Senate.

Though he was self-taught, Mr. Monsegur was probably among the most skilled technologists in the bunch. As the “rooter,” federal authorities say, he was in charge of identifying vulnerabilities of LulzSec targets and creating the attack strategy.

Copies of LulzSec chat logs posted online show that he was sometimes wary of getting caught. In one discussion, he is irate at his fellow hackers for revealing the name of a site used in an attack, because it could expose his computer’s location. Another participant is deferential: “Mm, okay, ill not say anything further without conferring with you.”

In another chat, Sabu is told about a hacker who spots weaknesses of target organizations. He issues an order: “Can you bring them to this network for private chats with me? I want some realtime coordination.”

On Twitter he posted about a variety of political causes: repression in Syria, the American colonization of Puerto Rico, legislation that would restrict the Internet.

Mr. Monsegur’s value as an informant is on display in an online chat with Jeremy Hammond, a Chicago man accused of attacking a company called Stratfor last December, as excerpted in court papers. Mr. Hammond gleefully describes his attack to Mr. Monsegur, who praises him. Then Mr. Monsegur extracts a valuable piece of information. He calls him by one of his other nicknames, Anarchaos, and Mr. Hammond responds — linking the two aliases.

“If I get raided anarchaos your job is to cause havok in my honor,” Mr. Monsegur says.

“It shall be so,” Mr. Hammond replies.

Neighbors and relatives said that offline, Mr. Monsegur became more disruptive after his grandmother died a couple of years ago. “That messed him up,” a family member said.

Most residents of the complex who knew him would speak only on condition of anonymity, out of fear of retribution from him and his friends. These neighbors said that besides the children, he seemed to live with a number of others.

Some found him an irksome presence. “He partied all night,” one neighbor said. “I always made complaints to the police. Nothing was done.”

One neighbor complained twice to Community Board 3 about the chronic noise, as recently as last week. She said it would persist from 7 p.m. to 4 a.m., seven days a week.

Several neighbors said that they smelled marijuana wafting from the parties. One neighbor said that when she left in the morning the hubbub persisted. “The music gives me headaches,” she said. Among his visitors, neighbors said, were a half-sister and several brothers, one of whom brought along a white pit bull named China.

There were those who found Mr. Monsegur gracious. One man who lived in the complex told of losing his wallet a year ago while stepping out of a cab. Mr. Monsegur happened to find it, tracked down the man and returned it.

Neighbors said Mr. Monsegur told them he spent the bulk of his days huddled in front of his computer. “He would brag how he changed bad credit to good credit on his computer,” one neighbor said. She said she had heard another tenant talk about how Mr. Monsegur helped him upgrade his credit.

They were in disbelief that he could be the man authorities unmasked.

In pleading guilty, Mr. Monsegur admitted that he applied his hacking skills not simply for laughs or noble causes but for money. In court documents, he said that he had hacked into an auto parts company and had it ship him four automobile motors worth $3,456.

According to sources briefed on the investigation, the Federal Bureau of Investigation learned in February of last year that Sabu was Mr. Monsegur. He had made elementary mistakes, like logging into an online chat room without using anonymity software and revealing the name of a Web site he controlled in a chat room.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/09/technology/hacker-informant-and-party-boy-of-the-projects.html?hp

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« Reply #6327 on: Mar 9th, 2012, 09:31am »

Reuters

Pakistan Taliban demand release of bin Laden's widows, threaten attacks

By Saud Mehsud
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan
Fri Mar 9, 2012 8:22am EST

The Pakistan Taliban will attack government, police and military officials if three of the late al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden's widows are not released from Pakistani custody, a spokesman for the militant group said on Friday.

Pakistan's government has charged bin Laden's three widows with illegally entering and staying in the country, Interior Minister Rehman Malik said on Thursday.

"If the family of Osama bin Laden is not released as soon as possible, we will attack the judges, the lawyers and the security officials involved in their trial," Ehsanullah Ehsan of the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) told Reuters.

"We will carry out suicide bombings against security forces and the government across the country."

Malik did not specify which court was dealing with the case. The three women will have to stand trial, but it was not clear what punishment they face if convicted.

Bin Laden was killed in a secret U.S. raid in the northern Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad in May last year.

The al Qaeda leader's body was flown out by American special forces, but his three wives and an undisclosed number of children were among the 16 people detained by Pakistani authorities after the raid.

Two of the wives are Saudi nationals, and one is from Yemen, according to the Pakistani foreign ministry.

Pakistan had previously said that it would repatriate the women after a government commission probing the bin Laden raid had completed its questioning.

The commission has interviewed the family members for clues about how the al Qaeda chief managed to stay in the country undetected.

The TTP vowed revenge after bin Laden's death last year, and carried out high-profile attacks across Pakistan. It bombed an American consulate convoy, laid siege to a naval base and killed paramilitary cadets.

Formed in 2007, the TTP is an umbrella group of various Pakistani militant factions operating in Pakistan's unruly northwestern tribal areas along the porous border with Afghanistan.

TTP's spokesman also threatened attacks against Shad Begum, a women's rights activist based in the northwestern city of Peshawar.

The U.S. State Department honored Begum with the 2012 International Women of Courage award at a ceremony in Washington on Thursday.

"She works for a secular and infidel system in Pakistan," Ehsan said. "That is why America has given her this prize."

(Writing by Qasim Nauman; Editing by Chris Allbritton and Daniel Magnowski)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/09/us-pakistan-militants-binladen-idUSBRE8280L120120309

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« Reply #6328 on: Mar 9th, 2012, 09:37am »

Telegraph

Nasa space missions honoured as Lego shuttle is sent into space

A teenager has paid his own tribute to the defunct Nasa shuttle programe by sending a lego version of the craft into space.

10:24AM GMT 09 Mar 2012

Raul Oaida built the tiny replica spaceship from the famous building blocks in just three days, gluing the Lego bricks together and attaching the toy shuttle to a helium balloon which took it 22 miles towards the edge of space.

The 18-year-old Romanian also attached a parachute to the vessel along with a GPS navigation system and an on-board camera to record the flight.

The video footage shows the Lego model climbing through clouds and eventually soaring high above the Earth with ice particles forming across the toy.





Uploaded by vinciverse on Mar 2, 2012

My name is Raul Oaida (from Romania) and this is my LEGO tribute to the end of the space shuttle era. Proving that although retired, this machine can still fly, albeit in toy form.

Support & vote the next launch: http://microblade.blogspot.com/2012/03/space-program-crowdfunding.html

The launch took place from central Germany (easy flight clearance) and reached a max altitude of 35000m. A 1600g meteo balloon filled with helium was used alongside a GoPro Hero, Spot GPS and of course Lego Space Shuttle model 3367.

We launched it on the 31st of December 2011, the equipment was recovered via GPS tracking 240 km S-E from a remote area.

I wish to thank Steve Sammartino for the opportunity to do this project and the german airtraffic control for the understanding.

Full Story: http://microblade.blogspot.com/2012/03/2001-brick-odyssey.html

You can find us on Twitter: @rauloaida @sammartino

~

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/weirdnewsvideo/9132906/Nasa-space-missions-honoured-as-Lego-shuttle-is-sent-into-space.html

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« Reply #6329 on: Mar 9th, 2012, 09:45am »

Hollywood Reporter

Nicolas Cage Comic-Book Heist to Become Movie at Lionsgate (Exclusive)

The studio has picked up "Action No. 1," a comedy from writers and "Reno 911!" creators Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon about the 2000 theft of Cage's prized Superman comic book.

5:58 PM PST 3/8/2012
by Borys Kit

The story of how Nicolas Cage lost his rare comic book featuring the first appearance of Superman may finally be told. At least Hollywood’s version of it.

Lionsgate has picked up Action No. 1, a heist comedy from writers and Reno 911! creators Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon. The duo also is producing along with Peter Principato and Paul Young.

The story revolves around a group of nerds who attempt to steal Cage's copy of Action Comics No. 1, the landmark 1938 comic that introduced the world to the Man of Steel.

The theft of Cage’s comic made real-world headlines in 2000. The issue was missing until 2011, when it was discovered among the contents of an abandoned storage locker. It sold for a record $2.1 million at auction in November. To comic-book fans, the story of the book’s theft and its ultimate recovery is as thrilling as any tale of a stolen Monet or Degat.

The part of Cage was written with the real Cage in mind, but at this stage, it's unlikely that Cage will play himself. Jason Statham's name has surfaced in connection with the project, but sources say he is not involved. (It was not known who Statham would play; the actor already played the leader of a heist in The Bank Job but has yet to tackle the role of a comics fanboy.)

Nerds breaking into fortresses or stealing prized objects is not a new subgenre. Fanboys, the 2009 road comedy directed by Kyle Newman, featured a trio ofStar Wars superfans attempting to sneak into George Lucas’ ranch to see The Phantom Menace. Comic-Con, a spec script by Matthew Sullivan and Michael Diliberti that generated some buzz a few years ago, was about geeks executing a heist during the annual Comic-Con convention to save their favorite comic-book shop.

Cage, Statham, Lennon and Garant are repped by CAA. Lennon and Garant, whose feature credits include Night at the Museum andBalls of Fury, are additionally repped by Principato Young and Jackoway Tyerman.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/nicolas-cage-action-comics-no-1-movie-jason-statham-297787

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