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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1698 times)
philliman
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #645 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 07:35am »

That's a nice kitten, Crystal. smiley

Oh, well, yesterday was friday the 13th. rolleyes

Boy, 13, struck by lightning -- on Friday the 13th

LONDON (AFP) – Friday the 13th proved suitably unlucky for one 13 year-old boy who was struck by lightning before being taken to hospital -- at 13:13 on the dreaded date.

The boy, who has not been named, was treated for a minor burn after being hit along with two others at an air show in Suffolk, eastern England, a spokeswoman said.

Staff at the St Johns Ambulance service said there had been heavy rain all day before they witnessed a big flash of lightning and a loud clap of thunder over the sea off the Suffolk coast.

"We got a call that someone had been struck by lightning so we immediately sent our paramedics to the scene, followed by an ambulance," said Rex Clarke, head of the team of St John Ambulance volunteers at the event.

"Lightning strikes can cause cardiac arrest, but when our volunteers arrived the boy was conscious and breathing."

...


Read the rest here:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100814/od_afp/britainlightningoffbeat

Luckily the boy is still alive.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #646 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:23am »

on Aug 14th, 2010, 07:35am, philliman wrote:
That's a nice kitten, Crystal. smiley

Oh, well, yesterday was friday the 13th. rolleyes

Boy, 13, struck by lightning -- on Friday the 13th

LONDON (AFP) – Friday the 13th proved suitably unlucky for one 13 year-old boy who was struck by lightning before being taken to hospital -- at 13:13 on the dreaded date.

The boy, who has not been named, was treated for a minor burn after being hit along with two others at an air show in Suffolk, eastern England, a spokeswoman said.

Staff at the St Johns Ambulance service said there had been heavy rain all day before they witnessed a big flash of lightning and a loud clap of thunder over the sea off the Suffolk coast.

"We got a call that someone had been struck by lightning so we immediately sent our paramedics to the scene, followed by an ambulance," said Rex Clarke, head of the team of St John Ambulance volunteers at the event.

"Lightning strikes can cause cardiac arrest, but when our volunteers arrived the boy was conscious and breathing."

...


Read the rest here:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100814/od_afp/britainlightningoffbeat

Luckily the boy is still alive.


Good morning Phil!
Thank goodness the boy is okay. I had a neighbor in Maryland that thought Tuesday the 13th was an unlucky day. We spent more time teasing her over that! Now years later when it's Tuesday the 13th I still laugh and think about her. Funny what different things people think are unlucky.
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« Reply #647 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:27am »

New York Times

Sunny Scenes, Direct From Pyongyang

By MICHAEL Z. WISE
VIENNA

“WHY?” is the question Peter Noever, the director of the Museum of Applied Arts here, says he is constantly asked about a sprawling exhibition of propagandistic North Korean artworks now on view. The show has garnered condemnation and suspicion since it opened in May, just as international tensions flared over North Korea’s alleged sinking of a South Korean naval ship.

The exhibition encompasses more than 100 oil paintings and watercolors from North Korea’s national museum, known as the Korean Art Gallery Pyongyang, as well as architectural drawings and models. This is the first time that secretive totalitarian state has sent a large number of its artworks outside its sealed borders.

Until now the country’s cultural proclivities have been known to the outside world primarily through television broadcasts of bizarrely choreographed dancing and gymnastics extravaganzas performed by up to 100,000 adults and children. The Vienna show gives another, somewhat more intimately scaled perspective on the controlled aesthetics of a dystopia where many citizens must scavenge for food and are subject to forced labor, torture and other repressive measures.

A cotton-candy palette predominates in the eerily upbeat paintings, whose high technical proficiency is matched by a severely limited range of subjects. Dutiful farmers, steelworkers, street sweepers and seamstresses all beam with joy; well-nourished children laugh in dazzling sunlight. “We Are the Happiest Children in the World” is one surreal title. An image from 2000 — just after the peak years of a famine estimated to have cost three million lives — depicts the portly dictator Kim Jong-il lifting the lid off a steaming pot in a kitchen laden with succulent meats and fruits as two white-toqued chefs and an army officer stand by. “The Supreme Commander Kim Jong-il Deeply Concerned Over the Soldiers’ Diet,” reads the caption.

The bulk of the exhibition comprises art created in the last 10 years. These blissful landscapes, street and domestic scenes are hung in open galleries, but monumental depictions of Kim Jong-il and his father — the “Great Leader” Kim Il-sung — are tucked away in roped-off alcoves where guards prevent visitors from getting close. “We’re here to make sure the pictures won’t be damaged,” a guard said.

Along with protecting what are considered North Korean national treasures, the museum is doing everything possible to avoid offending the lending nation. The exhibition and 229-page catalog are devoid of any critical text referring to the content of the pictures or the political context in which they arose. A symposium involving specialists in North Korean art and politics has been scheduled, but only on the eve of the exhibition’s closing on Sept. 5.

“It’s totally clear that if we were to have contextualized this exhibition, as some wanted us to, the exhibition would not have taken place,” Mr. Noever conceded in an interview. While North Korea’s minister of culture wrote in the catalog that he hopes the show will contribute to “deepening mutual understanding” and exchange, the museum in Vienna said North Korea refused to allow any of the featured artists to travel to Austria .

“Is it ethical to show the propaganda works of a dictatorial regime?” a correspondent from the former East bloc asked the exhibition’s curator, Bettina M. Busse, at a press preview on May 18. Under the glare of camera lights, Ms. Busse told Czech Television: “There seems to be a misunderstanding of the topic. We’re concerned with culture.” The German newspaper Die Welt disagreed, condemning the exhibition, “Flowers for Kim Il-sung,” as “obscene.” The paper said that in a “terror regime” like North Korea there is “no perceptible visual art according to an acceptable understanding of any sort.”

The North Koreans themselves had trouble grasping the appeal of their artwork to the Viennese. “They didn’t understand it for a long time,” Mr. Noever said. “What interests me are artists who are apart and little-known cultures to which one has little access and about which one has little information.” Arranging the exhibition involved four visits to Pyongyang starting in 2003 and protracted negotiations, he said. No money was paid for borrowing the works.

Just three days before the exhibition opening, North Korea’s ambassador to Austria came to Mr. Noever’s office to ask once again why he was putting on the show. “There were anxieties,” Mr. Noever said. “The North Koreans feared it was propaganda against North Korea.”

Many Austrians, meanwhile, have accused Mr. Noever of burnishing the image of the regime in Pyongyang. The Austrian finance ministry, which usually provides insurance protection on art loans from abroad to government-supported museums like Mr. Noever’s, refused to do so for this show. “This exhibition shows a covert sympathy,” said a ministry spokesman, Daniel Kapp, “and the finance minister decided we will not contribute.”

Mr. Noever provoked further furor with his catalog essay lamenting that “our Western ideological lenses cloud, if not entirely distort, the view of other realities” and urging museumgoers to “bid farewell once and for all to Eurocentric and culturally imperialistic attitudes.” The show, he argued, “proves that cultural differences can be bridged with mutual respect.”

As museum director for the past 24 years, Mr. Noever has demonstrated a flair for attention-getting projects. He brought in Jenny Holzer and Donald Judd to energize the displays of Biedermeier furniture, Mamluk carpets and assorted applied arts in what had become a fusty storehouse founded as an imperial entity in 1864; organized surveys of Soviet art; opened an art center in Los Angeles; and is seeking to transform one of Vienna’s Nazi-era antiaircraft towers into a contemporary art space. “Noever is no fool,” the Viennese daily Die Presse said of the North Korean spectacle, “but rather the leading Austrian exemplar of leftist radical chic.”

The show is unlikely to win North Korea any new adherents abroad, but many Korea experts concur it may help promote dialogue, albeit limited. “It is important to engage in cultural projects with different countries, even if the regime is one we might not like,” said Jane Portal, who heads the Asian department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and is the author of a book on North Korean art. “Engagement is better than total lack of communication.”

slideshow after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/15/arts/design/15noko.html?_r=1&ref=world

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« Reply #648 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:31am »

Wired


Cyberwar Against Wikileaks? Good Luck With That
By Kevin Poulsen August 13, 2010 | 7:25 pm | Categories: Bradley Manning, Wikileaks

Should the U.S. government declare a cyberwar against WikiLeaks?

On Thursday, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange told a gathering in London that the secret-spilling website is moving ahead with plans to publish the remaining 15,000 records from the Afghan war logs, despite a demand from the Pentagon that WikiLeaks “return” it’s entire cache of published and unpublished classified U.S. documents.

Last month, WikiLeaks released 77,000 documents out of 92,000, temporarily holding back 15,000 records at the urging of newspapers that had been provided an advance copy of the entire database. On Thursday, Assange said his organization has now gone through about half of the remaining records, redacting the names of Afghan informants. That suggests the final release could still be weeks away.

Pundits, though, are clamoring for preemptive action. “The United States has the cyber capabilities to prevent WikiLeaks from disseminating those materials,” wrote Washington Post columnist Marc Thiessen on Friday. “Will President Obama order the military to deploy those capabilities? … If Assange remains free and the documents he possesses are released, Obama will have no one to blame but himself.”

But a previous U.S.-based effort to wipe WikiLeaks off the internet did not go well. In 2008, federal judge Jeffrey White in San Francisco ordered the WikiLeaks.org domain name seized as part of a lawsuit filed by Julius Baer Bank and Trust, a Swiss bank that suffered a leak of some of its internal documents. Two weeks later the judge admitted he’d acted hastily, and he had the site restored. “There are serious questions of prior restraint, possible violations of the First Amendment,” he said.

Even while the order was in effect, WikiLeaks lived on: supporters and free speech advocates distributed the internet IP address of the site, so it could be reached directly. Mirrors of the site were unaffected by the court order, and a copy of the entire WikiLeaks archive of leaked documents circulated freely on the Pirate Bay.

The U.S. government has other, less legal, options, of course — the “cyber” capabilities Thiessen alludes to. The Pentagon probably has the ability to launch distributed denial-of-service attacks against WikiLeaks’ public-facing servers. If it doesn’t, the Army could rent a formidable botnet from Russian hackers for less than the cost of a Humvee.

But that wouldn’t do much good either. WikiLeaks wrote its own insurance policy two weeks ago, when it posted a 1.4 GB file called insurance.aes256.

The file’s contents are encrypted, so there’s no way to know what’s in it. But, as we’ve previously reported, it’s more than 19 times the size of the Afghan war log — large enough to contain the entire Afghan database, as well as the other, larger classified databases said to be in WikiLeaks’ possession. Accused Army leaker Bradley Manning claimed to have provided WikiLeaks with a log of events in the Iraq war containing 500,000 entries from 2004 through 2009, as well as a database of 260,000 State Department cables to and from diplomatic posts around the globe.

Whatever the insurance file contains, Assange — appearing via Skype on a panel at the Frontline Club — reminded everyone Thursday that he could make it public at any time. “All we have to do is release the password to that material and it’s instantly available,” he said.

WikiLeaks is encouraging supporters to download the insurance file through the BitTorrent site The Pirate Bay. “Keep it safe,” reads a message greeting visitors to the WikiLeaks chat room. After two weeks, the insurance file is doubtless in the hands of thousands, if not tens of thousands, of netizens already.

We dipped into the torrent Friday to get a sense of WikiLeaks’ support in that effort. In a few minutes of downloading, we pulled bits and piece of insurance.aes256 from 61 seeders around the world. We ran the IP addresses through a geolocation service and turned it into a KML file to produce the Google Map at the top of this page. The seeders are everywhere, from the U.S., to Iceland, Australia, Canada and Europe. They had all already grabbed the entire file, and are now just donating bandwidth to help WikiLeaks survive.*

Since the Afghan war logs were posted, it’s emerged the 77,000 records already published contain the names of hundreds of Afghan informants, who now face potentially deadly reprisal from the Taliban. WikiLeaks’ publication of those records has drawn criticism from human rights organizations and the international free press group Reporters Without Borders.

Those organizations are just urging WikiLeaks to be more careful with its releases. But the Pentagon has hinted it actually has some recourse against the site. “If doing the right thing isn’t good enough for them, we will figure out what alternatives we have to compel them to do the right thing,” Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell said last week. It’s hard to see what that recourse might be, when Julian Assange, or someone in his inner circle, can spill 1.4 gigabytes of material with a single well-crafted tweet.

(*No, Wired.com has not posted a targeting map for Pentagon cruise missiles. IP geolocation is not precise.)

Read More http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/08/cyberwar-wikileaks/#ixzz0waRZ1Ec0

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« Reply #649 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:41am »

Wired Danger Room

Soldiers Try To Trade Tech Support For Afghan Intel
By Spencer Ackerman August 13, 2010 | 7:49 am | Categories: Af/Pak

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TOKCHI, Afghanistan – Captain Cristian Balan shows up to the computer lab holding a spool of Cat-5 cable, eager to play tech support. If he can get the computers running in this relatively-prosperous town of 4000 people, he figures, it’ll pay dividends in goodwill. Maybe the platoon will get some tips about local insurgent activity.

His fellow soldiers are skeptical. You go to talk to the Afghans and you help them if you can, but all you typically get back is a laundry list of complaints and a Stop Snitching posture of silence when it comes to giving up the bad guys.

So there’s some tension within this small unit, the 3rd Platoon of Alpha Company Sappers, 1-172 Cavalry, with whom Balan, the overall squadron’s communications chief, is riding along today to assist. The soldiers’ ultimate goal is to take down insurgents and stabilize the two districts of Parwan Province in which they operate. They understand that in a counterinsurgency campaign, that means listening to villagers’ gripes, shelling out for the odd development project and even sending out a makeshift geek squad every now and then. But here in Parwan, just outside Bagram Air Base, they’re not seeing enough return on their investment.

But then there’s Balan, a sunny Vermont National Guardsman who teaches digital forensics at Burlington’s Champlain College in civilian life. Since Tokchi requested computer help, he’s psyched that his techie skills may come in handy for 3rd platoon: “We finally get to do what we like to do!” If he wasn’t in Afghanistan, he tells me, he’d have gone to Def Con. Would’ve grown a beard and everything.

Now, Balan (pictured, above and left) is out in the baking heat, waving to kids who don’t wave back. He steps into the computer lab, a small cement box maintained by a social organization called the Bagram People Sultania Foundation. The room has nine black Dell desktops, looking maybe five years old. They’re running Windows XP Home Edition, got USB drives, optical mice – matter of fact, they wouldn’t be out of place in an American public school. Balan thought he’d be working on total dinosaurs. “I could teach off these!” he beams.

He takes off his helmet and armor and talks to an elderly man in the hope of finding out what’s wrong. His fellow geek, Specialist Steve Torrey, squats down and starts taking one of the towers apart to inspect. More good news: clean motherboards. As it turns out, the computers run fine; they just need power. The nearby generator that feeds the lab – something the U.S. helped provide — is out of juice. Balan and Torrey go back to the platoon’s trucks to get 10 gallons of fuel.

Next door, Staff Sergeant Jon Bruce and Lieutenant Willie Spears are having more difficulty unlocking their problems. They’re parleying with the local leader, known as a malik, a leathery-faced guy in a white dishdasha named Abdul Habib. And it’s not going so well; the soldiers and the malik seem to be talking past each other. Bruce and Spears want information about insurgents in the area. Abdul Habib asks the troops to patrol more often, to keep the village safe. They remind him that they came by to fix the computers. Abdul Habib tells the soldiers that they promised to give him a second generator for the lab. “We didn’t promise that,” Bruce answers.


Bruce, a gruff 55-year-old National Guardsman from Rutland, Vermont, who re-enlisted in 2007 after first serving in the Army in the late ’70s and early ’80s, knows these meetings are important. “You can’t just kick in doors and shoot people,” he says. And Bruce considers Abdul Habib one of his more trustworthy maliks. But in general, he doesn’t like these so-called “key leader engagements.” After serving in 2008 up north and in Helmand Province, he’s come to learn these chats are often frustrating wastes of time.

“You ask for intel,” Bruce says on the drive down, and what you typically hear back is, “’There are no bad guys here. We do our own security.’ They clam right up. It’s like a broken record.’”

Recently, gunmen boarded a bus in the village shuttling locals to their jobs a few miles away at Bagram. The militants beat a bunch of them up and stole their gear. Bruce and Spears want to know what the malik knows. “We’re investigating,” is all Abdul Habib says at first. He’d rather discuss the wells that he wants dug.

Bruce’s team turns the subject back to the bus attack. “The issue is not actually there now. It’s for the elections,” the malik replies. Huh? They press further, even as Abdul Habib looks apprehensive. Finally, speaking in a code that the interpreter understands, the malik gives Bruce and Spears two names. One of the people he singles out is a candidate for parliament in next month’s elections. According to the malik, the would-be parliamentarian has 200 untrustworthy armed individuals under his command. “That’s a decent intel piece right there,” Bruce says, vowing to follow up. Abdul Habib adds another: Last night, another guy loyal to the same candidate threw a hand grenade near the police station. “I’m concerned that this is escalating,” the malik says.

It could be what the platoon is after. But it’s also possible that Abdul Habib is trying to get the United States to rid him of a political rival. (I was asked not to name the candidate.) Bruce considers the malik trustworthy. Apparently it’s not the first time they’ve heard that this particular politician has been doing dirt. They’re ready to ride out.

A few miles down the road, in the smaller village of Dasht Opian, the next key leader engagement goes worse.

The platoon doesn’t just need tips about insurgents from the village – it needs remedial information, too. Its repository of data on Dasht Opian, Lieutenant Austin Barber, broke his hand in a gym accident a few weeks ago and had to be sent home. Spears is Barber’s replacement. Given his inexperience, the 42-year-old Illinois National Guardsman takes his cues from Sergeant Kenneth Whittington about what to ask the malik, a gold-toothed, even-tempered man named Abdul Raqeeb.

They ask Abdul Raqeeb apologetically to reiterate some basic information now that Barber is gone. Solicitously, Abdul Raqeeb replies that he’s the malik of five villages, one of three who represent a total of 13 Parwan localities in the area. He gets up to excuse himself, heeding the platoon’s request to introduce a few of its female soldiers to his wife, the leader of a women’s shura.

Whittington considers it a positive sign, since the platoon hasn’t had the opportunity to speak with her before. But it leaves him and Spears in a room with random villagers who’ve streamed in to talk with and gawk at the soldiers. Out comes a Christmas list of demands. There’s no school in Dasht Opian, so local children go to nearby Charikar for their education. There aren’t any hospitals or clinics, either. One guy pipes up that the “biggest need is electricity,” pointing to the energy-efficient spiral light bulb on the malik’s ceiling. The village has two wells and one of them is nearly dry.

But if Whittington’s going to talk community development, he needs something in return. “Up the road, not long ago, we had a truck get rocketed,” he says. He’s referring to an ugly incident on July 24, when insurgents sent a rocket-propelled grenade through 2nd Platoon’s lead armored truck and sprayed the platoon with AK fire about two miles from the town, badly injuring six soldiers. Does anyone know anything about the attack?

A keyed-up farmer named Abdul Gafoor begins pawing at his brown shirt collar, trying to show off his neck. “I was shot a long time ago by the Taliban,” he says. “If I see anyone suspicious in my area, I will handle it. I’ll kick his ass before you know. But I’m not responsible for other villages.”

That’s not really what Spears and Whittington want to hear. They’d rather get information about the insurgents, not villagers vowing to take matters into their own hands. (Ironically, General David Petraeus might consider Abdul Gafoor a candidate for a new effort to get villagers to provide their own security.) The team tries again, telling the men that if they give up intel on the Taliban, they can make some money.

“We will kill them with shotguns!” Abdul Gafoor proudly vows. And speaking of: Could the Americans give him any guns?

Spears gestures to the interpreter. “Tell him his mouth and his phone are the biggest, best weapons he has.”

The malik returns, and the team goes back and forth with him about maybe getting a job fair going in the area, followed by a long exchange in which Spears can’t quite get clear answers about which villages are under Abdul Raqeeb’s control. As everyone says their goodbyes, the unit’s interpreter – who’s been ribbed by the Tajik villagers for being half-Pashtun – concludes, “They’re not being honest. It’s pissing me off.”

As the team rides out, without much solid information about the insurgency, Bruce reflects that such treatment is pretty much par for the course. “We have some trustworthy maliks, but most are not. This is a land of illusions,” Bruce says. “I’ve got almost two years of my life invested in Afghanistan. The cultural ways, the moods out here are not comparable to the U.S. Most of the time, they’re not giving us the straight story.” Separating rumor from fact, he reflects, is “up to us.”

Balan, true to form, thinks it was a good day. He’s got big plans for the computer lab. He wants to network the computers so they can print to a single printer –

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/soldiers-try-to-trade-tech-support-for-afghan-intel/
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« Reply #650 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:46am »

Spaceflight Now

Some nice photos of the launch.
Atlas soars into space for U.S. military

An Atlas 5 rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral at 7:07 a.m. EDT (1107 GMT) Saturday with the first Advanced Extremely High Frequency communications satellite for the U.S. Air Force. These photos were taken at a press viewing site approximately four miles from the launch pad.

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av019/press/

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« Reply #651 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:52am »

LA Times

Genetically engineered salmon under FDA consideration
AquaBounty is seeking FDA approval for a genetically engineered fish that reaches market weight in half the usual time. Some in the industry are leery.

By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau

August 14, 2010

Reporting from Washington —

With a global population pressing against food supplies and vast areas of the ocean swept clean of fish, tiny AquaBounty Technologies Inc. of Waltham, Mass., says it can help feed the world.

The firm has developed genetically engineered salmon that reach market weight in half the usual time. What's more, it hopes to avoid the pollution, disease and other problems associated with saltwater fish farms by having its salmon raised in inland facilities.

The Food and Drug Administration has yet to approve what would be the nation's first commercial genetically modified food animal.

"This is the threshold case. If it's approved, there will be others," said Eric Hallerman, head of the fisheries and wildlife sciences department at Virginia Tech University. "If it's not, it'll have a chilling effect for years."

Some in the fish farming industry are leery of the move toward engineered fish.

"No! It is not even up for discussion," Jorgen Christiansen, director of communications for Oslo-based Marine Harvest, one of the world's largest salmon producers, wrote in an e-mail.

Christiansen said his company worries "that consumers would be reluctant to buy genetically modified fish, regardless of good food quality and food safety."

Some critics call AquaBounty's salmon "Frankenfish." Others say the effort is pointless.

"I don't see the necessity of it," said Casson Trenor of Greenpeace USA — which opposes all genetically modified organisms, including plants. "We don't need to build a new fish."

The FDA has completed its review of key portions of AquaBounty's application, according to Chief Executive Ronald Stotish. Within weeks, the company expects the agency to convene an advisory committee of outside experts to weigh evidence, collect public testimony and issue a recommendation about the fish's fitness for human consumption.

The process could take months or more — which still sounds like progress to the company after its 14-year, $50-million investment.

Manipulating natural processes is a fact of life in most of the world's food supplies. Cattle, hogs, poultry and most grain and vegetable crops have been extensively altered through selective breeding and hybridization — including turkeys with so much white meat they can barely stand, drought- and disease-resistant wheat, and fruits and vegetables that resist bruising or spoiling.

more after the jump
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-super-salmon-20100814,0,1584315.story

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« Reply #652 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 08:55am »

Hollywood Reporter

Animated 'Terminator' sets off rights fight
Hannover House, Pacificor at odds over proposed feature
Staff report
Aug 13, 2010, 09:44 PM ET

Plans for an animated "Terminator" feature film hit a roadblock Friday with franchise rights holder Pacificor sending a cease and desist letter to Hannover House, the firm that announced the project on Thursday.

As TheWrap reported, Pacificor says it did not "license or authorize" the film, called "Terminator 3000," and wants co-producers Hannover and Red Bear Entertainment to stop sending press releases with any references to "Terminator" or the proposed film, among other things.

Hannover House CEO Eric Parkinson maintains that he gained animation rights to the franchise as part of his compensation package when exiting as CEO of Hemdale Home Video and Hemdale Communications. Hemdale produced the first "Terminator" film and in 1990, released sequel rights that, after repeatedly changing hands, recently became the property of Pacificor at auction. Parkinson says animation rights were never included in Hemdale's "Terminator" transactions.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/news/e3id4800d851700dee90215d49da673c9e5

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« Reply #653 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 09:10am »

Swamprat has a new thread about the just released Leslie Kean book "UFO's Generals, Pilots, Gov. Officials go on the record".

http://ufocasebook.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=books&action=display&num=1281474217&start=0#1281794785

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« Reply #654 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 11:28am »

Reality Uncovered

August 14, 2010
The Malmstrom AFB Missile/UFO Incident, March 1967

According to Ufology researcher/writer Robert Hastings, on March 16, 1967, the appearance of UFOs at Echo-Flight nuclear missile facility allegedly shut down the missile silo. Robert Hasting’s information comes from a man named Robert Salas who claimed he witnessed the event.

Background of the Malmstrom AFB Missile/UFO Case
The son of one of the officers who was involved in the Echo flight incident, named James Carlson, took Hastings and Salas to task for those claims. Carlson contends that both his father and retired Col. Walt Figel, the other officer involved in the incident, both reported that there were no UFOs.

See Tim Printy’s March-April 2010 edition of SUNlite for more background.

Hastings has denied that James was ever in touch with the second witness, Col. Walt Figel. James Carlson provided RU investigators with records of his correspondence with Figel, which revealed that Figel confirmed James Carlson’s interpretation of how the event actually occurred.

more after the jump
http://www.realityuncovered.net/blog/2010/08/the-malmstrom-afb-missileufo-incident-march-1967/

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #655 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 11:47am »

This is the kind of story you need when it seems like the world is spiraling out of control..


Not many people get a picture of this proud bird
snuggled up next to them.....

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Freedom
and Jeff


Freedom and I have been together 10 years this summer.
She came in as a baby in 1998 with two broken
wings. Her left wing doesn't open all the way
even after surgery, it was broken in 4
places. She's my baby.

When Freedom came in she could not stand
and both wings were broken. She was
emaciated and covered in lice. We made the
decision to give her a chance at life, so I took
her to the vets office. From then
on, I was always around her. We had her in a
huge dog carrier with the top off, and it
was loaded up with shredded newspaper for her to
lay in. I used to sit and talk to her,
urging her to live, to fight; and she would lay
there looking at me with those big brown eyes.
We also had to tube feed her for weeks.

This went on for 4-6 weeks, and by then she still
couldn't stand. It got to the point where the
decision was made to euthanize her if she
couldn't stand in a week. You know you don't
want to cross that line between torture and
rehab, and it looked like death was
winning. She was going to be put
down that Friday, and I was supposed to come in
on that Thursday afternoon. I didn't want to go
to the center that Thursday, because I couldn't
bear the thought of her being euthanized;
but I went anyway, and when I walked in everyone
was grinning from ear to ear. I went
immediately back to her cage; and there she was,
standing on her own, a big beautiful
eagle. She was ready to live. I was
just about in tears by then. That
was a very good day.

We knew she could never fly, so the director
asked me to glove train her. I got her used to
the glove, and we started doing education programs for schools in western Washington. We wound up in the newspapers, radio (believe it or not) and some TV. Miracle Pets even did a show about us.

In the spring of 2000, I was diagnosed with
non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. I had stage 3,
which is not good (one major organ plus
everywhere), so I wound up doing 8 months of
chemo. Lost the hair - the whole bit.

I missed a lot of work. When I
felt good enough, I would go to Sarvey
and take Freedom out for walks. Freedom would
also come to me in my dreams and help me fight
the cancer. This happened time and time again.

Fast forward to November 2000, the day after
Thanksgiving. I went in for my last
checkup. I was told that if the cancer was not
all gone after 8 rounds of chemo, then my last
option was a stem cell transplant. Anyway, they
did the tests; and I had to come back Monday for
the results. I went in Monday, and I was
told that all the cancer was gone.

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So the first thing I did was get up to Sarvey and
take the big girl out for a walk. It was misty
and cold. I went to her flight and jessed her
up, and we went out front to the top of the
hill. I hadn't said a word to Freedom, but somehow she knew. She looked at me and wrapped both her wings around me to where I could feel them pressing in on my back
(I was engulfed in eagle wings), and she touched my nose with her beak and stared into my eyes, and we just stood there like that for I don't know how long. That was a
magic moment. We have been soul mates ever since she came in. This is a very special bird.

On a side note: I have had people who
were sick come up to us when we are out, and
Freedom has some kind of hold on
them. I once had a guy who was
terminal come up to us and I let him hold
her. His knees just about buckled and he
swore he could feel her power coarse through his
body. I have so many stories like that.

I never forget the honor I have of being so close
to such a magnificent spirit as Freedom.

Hope you enjoy this.

Jeff

This story is almost too sweet to be true, but true it is ....Click below to check it out.

http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/freedom.asp
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #656 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 12:05pm »

Thank you Swamprat. What a beautiful article. Freedom and Jeff are an amazing pair. It makes you feel joyful reading about them, it must be something to see them in person/eagle.
Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #657 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 12:08pm »

Originally published in The Anthropology
of Consciousness, Vol. 2, Nos. 3-4,
September-December 1991, pp. 32-35.

D. SCOTT ROGO AND HIS CONTRIBUTIONS
TO PARAPSYCHOLOGY1
George P. Hansen
Cranbury, NJ

D. Scott Rogo was one of the most widely respected writer-journalists covering the field of parapsychology. I am greatly saddened to report that on August 18, 1990 Scott was found stabbed to death in his home (Connelly 1990). He was born February 1, 1950, and began publishing articles on psychical research while still a teenager, including some in scientific journals. His first book appeared when he was only 20.
Scott held a unique position in parapsychology, and he made many contributions that deserve recognition. Because he died so young, there is not much published biographical information on him, although Berger (1988), May and Lesniak( 1990), and Shepard (1985), all carry brief entries. Some of the recent tributes have provided a bit more personal information on Scott (e.g., Clark 1990; Coleman 1990; Harary 1990; Paul 1990; Siegel 1991; Smith 1990). Scott attended the University of Cincinnati and then San Fernando Valley State College from which he graduated in 1972 summa cum laude with a B.A. in music.2 He played the English horn for two seasons with the San Diego Symphony and also played occasionally for the Honolulu Symphony. He played the oboe as well.
I can make no claim to have known Scott well, but he did spend about a week visiting the Institute for Parapsychology in Durham, North Carolina while I was working there. We also saw each other at conventions during the last 10 years. As I became acquainted with him, I found him to have a terrific sense of humor. He was also good partner for intellectual sparring because he didn’t take arguments personally.
Scott was best known as a writer and journalist of the paranormal, but in reality he was far more than that. Unlike many authors, Scott was an active scientific investigator. He served as a visiting researcher at both the Psychical Research Foundation (then in Durham, North Carolina) and the (former) Division of Parapsychology and Psychophysics of Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. He published three papers reporting experimental research on the ganzfeld3 (Rogo 1976, 1977; Rogo, Smith, and Terry 1976) and conducted a study on personality factors of successful ganzfeld subjects (Rogo and Sargent 1982). Scott was also active in field investigations of hauntings and poltergeists (e.g., Rogo 1974, 1982, 1987). Not only did he produce many books and popular articles, but in addition he published full papers in all of the professional, English-language, refereed parapsychology journals. I know of no other popular author who can claim that distinction.
Scott was also a leading authority on the history of psychical research. In this I would estimate that there are only three or four people in the world who might be considered to be in his league. The breadth of his historical knowledge of the field was unsurpassed.
Scott’s interests included parapsychology, Forteana4 and popular occultism. He knew this wide range of literature of the paranormal probably better than anyone else. His articles appeared in numerous periodicals (see Table 1) and covered near death experiences, autism and ESP, multiple personality research, critiques of James Randi’s debunking, and miracles of saints. Much of Scott’s writing was related to issues of survival of bodily death. He took the affirmative position on the question, but he did not disregard the evidence challenging his view. His The Search for Yesterday is probably the single best book critiquing the research on reincarnation. Ronald Siegel (1991), a noted skeptic and friend of Scott, commented that Scott’s position on the question of life after death had shifted over the years as new evidence became available.
Although anthropology was not his main interest, his writings were sometimes enriched by examples from anthropological sources and discussions of psi in non-western cultures; for instance, his book The Poltergeist Experience included coverage of a stone-throwing case in Sumatra and a fire-igniting poltergeist in India. His Expoloring Psychic Phenomena briefly discussed Amazon natives’ use of psychoactive drugs to elicit ESP. Scott wrote at least two articles on anthropology for parapsychologists (Rogo 1983, 1984), and he also presented parapsychological ideas to anthropologists at an AAA convention (Rogo 1979).

more after the jump
http://www.tricksterbook.com/ArticlesOnline/RogoObit.htm

I have his book "A Casebook of Otherworldly Music vol.I"
Interesting aspect of the paranormal that is often ignored.

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #658 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 1:35pm »

Brilliant story and I can fully understand where Jeff is coming from. I find great comfort in raptors and find it heart breaking when you have to put one to sleep .its a case of being cruel to be kind. I take in injured birds of all species but do prefer raptors as I find them highly intelligent and affectionate. In the photos is yeti who was a rescued snowy owl who had cancer, we tried everything to cure it but it returned a year later. Although after surgery he could not fly he still had great happy year terrorizing the dog’s lol. The other two is molly and oly, European eagle owls. They where the most scheming creatures you could ever meet Loaded with character lol loved them to bits. They where released as a breeding pair in central England and are doing fantastic.
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/12-09-04_1530.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/12-10-04_1708.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/12-10-04_1926.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/24-09-04_1148.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/24-09-04_1150.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/24-09-04_1149.jpg
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/09-11-04_1713.jpg

I hope Jeff and Freedom continue to have a long life together free of illness
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #659 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 2:07pm »

Great pics, Hyundi! That has to be rewarding work!
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