Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 24th, 2017, 8:17pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 43 44 45 46 47  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44902 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #660 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 2:35pm »

Wonderful photos Hyundi. I love this one because I want to put a bubble over the dog's head that says, "Why is he still here?"

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj59/hyundisonata/12-10-04_1926.jpg

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #661 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 3:30pm »

Thanks for that wonderful story, Swampie. And thanks for those nice pics of those beautiful animals, hyundisonata. They've got some beautiful eyes. smiley
« Last Edit: Aug 14th, 2010, 3:34pm by philliman » User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
CA519705950
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 587
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #662 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 5:21pm »

Evening all.
User IP Logged

"Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist."
Epicurus.
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #663 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 7:23pm »

on Aug 14th, 2010, 5:21pm, CA519705950 wrote:
Evening all.


Hi CA519705950,
Hope you are having a good day today. We are around here. Did you get "Alien Agenda" yet?
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #664 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 7:29pm »


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #665 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 7:30pm »



User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #666 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 7:32pm »

I don't know if I posted this or not. If it's a re-run I'm sorry.


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #667 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 7:33pm »




User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #668 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 8:01pm »

Thin MIB's

A Review of MIB (Men in Black): A History
Linda Murphy, From 'Astronet Review' No. 1 February 1992

A much more bizarre story was supposedly told by an unnamed family who had sighted a UFO. Sometime after the sighting they said that they were visited by a very strange individual. Ivan Sanderson, who reported the incident in his book "Uninvited Visitors", described the individual thus: "almost seven feet tall, with a small head, dead white skin, enormous frame, but pipe-stem limbs. " This oddity said he was an insurance investigator and that he was looking for someone who had the same name as the husband of this family. He indicated that the man he was looking for had inherited a great deal of money. Continued Sanderson; "This weird individual just appeared out of the night wearing a strange fur hat with a visor and only a light jacket. He flashed an official-looking card on entry but put it away immediately. Later on when he removed his jacket he disclosed an official-looking gold shield on his shirt which he instantly covered with his hand and removed."

* I added the bold

http://www.ufoevidence.org/documents/doc1692.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #669 on: Aug 14th, 2010, 8:12pm »


User Image
© Eric Gevaert
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Luvey
UFO Casebook Staff

member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 840
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #670 on: Aug 15th, 2010, 07:35am »

Good morning Crys grin

The picture of the yacht on the water looks so peaceful... just gazing at it gives me a feeling of a oneness with everything. Just beautiful. Thank you smiley

Have a lovely day Crys.

Pen
User IP Logged

~ "When you master your mind, you master your life." ~

~ In every action there is an equal and opposite reaction ~
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #671 on: Aug 15th, 2010, 08:17am »

on Aug 15th, 2010, 07:35am, Luvey wrote:
Good morning Crys grin

The picture of the yacht on the water looks so peaceful... just gazing at it gives me a feeling of a oneness with everything. Just beautiful. Thank you smiley

Have a lovely day Crys.

Pen


Good evening Pen,
I'm glad you liked it. It sure made me smile. Hope you have had a good weekend so far.
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #672 on: Aug 15th, 2010, 08:20am »

New York Times

August 14, 2010
Secret Assault on Terrorism Widens on Two Continents
By SCOTT SHANE, MARK MAZZETTI and ROBERT F. WORTH

WASHINGTON — At first, the news from Yemen on May 25 sounded like a modest victory in the campaign against terrorists: an airstrike had hit a group suspected of being operatives for Al Qaeda in the remote desert of Marib Province, birthplace of the legendary queen of Sheba.

But the strike, it turned out, had also killed the province’s deputy governor, a respected local leader who Yemeni officials said had been trying to talk Qaeda members into giving up their fight. Yemen’s president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, accepted responsibility for the death and paid blood money to the offended tribes.

The strike, though, was not the work of Mr. Saleh’s decrepit Soviet-era air force. It was a secret mission by the United States military, according to American officials, at least the fourth such assault on Al Qaeda in the arid mountains and deserts of Yemen since December.

The attack offered a glimpse of the Obama administration’s shadow war against Al Qaeda and its allies. In roughly a dozen countries — from the deserts of North Africa, to the mountains of Pakistan, to former Soviet republics crippled by ethnic and religious strife — the United States has significantly increased military and intelligence operations, pursuing the enemy using robotic drones and commando teams, paying contractors to spy and training local operatives to chase terrorists.

The White House has intensified the Central Intelligence Agency’s drone missile campaign in Pakistan, approved raids against Qaeda operatives in Somalia and launched clandestine operations from Kenya. The administration has worked with European allies to dismantle terrorist groups in North Africa, efforts that include a recent French strike in Algeria. And the Pentagon tapped a network of private contractors to gather intelligence about things like militant hide-outs in Pakistan and the location of an American soldier currently in Taliban hands.

While the stealth war began in the Bush administration, it has expanded under President Obama, who rose to prominence in part for his early opposition to the invasion of Iraq. Virtually none of the newly aggressive steps undertaken by the United States government have been publicly acknowledged. In contrast with the troop buildup in Afghanistan, which came after months of robust debate, for example, the American military campaign in Yemen began without notice in December and has never been officially confirmed.

Obama administration officials point to the benefits of bringing the fight against Al Qaeda and other militants into the shadows. Afghanistan and Iraq, they said, have sobered American politicians and voters about the staggering costs of big wars that topple governments, require years of occupation and can be a catalyst for further radicalization throughout the Muslim world.

Instead of “the hammer,” in the words of John O. Brennan, President Obama’s top counterterrorism adviser, America will rely on the “scalpel.” In a speech in May, Mr. Brennan, an architect of the White House strategy, used this analogy while pledging a “multigenerational” campaign against Al Qaeda and its extremist affiliates.

Yet such wars come with many risks: the potential for botched operations that fuel anti-American rage; a blurring of the lines between soldiers and spies that could put troops at risk of being denied Geneva Convention protections; a weakening of the Congressional oversight system put in place to prevent abuses by America’s secret operatives; and a reliance on authoritarian foreign leaders and surrogates with sometimes murky loyalties.

The May strike in Yemen, for example, provoked a revenge attack on an oil pipeline by local tribesmen and produced a propaganda bonanza for Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. It also left President Saleh privately furious about the death of the provincial official, Jabir al-Shabwani, and scrambling to prevent an anti-American backlash, according to Yemeni officials.

The administration’s demands have accelerated a transformation of the C.I.A. into a paramilitary organization as much as a spying agency, which some critics worry could lower the threshold for future quasi-military operations. In Pakistan’s mountains, the agency had broadened its drone campaign beyond selective strikes against Qaeda leaders and now regularly obliterates suspected enemy compounds and logistics convoys, just as the military would grind down an enemy force.

For its part, the Pentagon is becoming more like the C.I.A. Across the Middle East and elsewhere, Special Operations troops under secret “Execute Orders” have conducted spying missions that were once the preserve of civilian intelligence agencies. With code names like Eager Pawn and Indigo Spade, such programs typically operate with even less transparency and Congressional oversight than traditional covert actions by the C.I.A.

And, as American counterterrorism operations spread beyond war zones into territory hostile to the military, private contractors have taken on a prominent role, raising concerns that the United States has outsourced some of its most important missions to a sometimes unaccountable private army.

A Proving Ground

Yemen is a testing ground for the “scalpel” approach Mr. Brennan endorses. Administration officials warn of the growing strength of Al Qaeda’s affiliate there, citing as evidence its attempt on Dec. 25 to blow up a trans-Atlantic jetliner using a young Nigerian operative. Some American officials believe that militants in Yemen could now pose an even greater threat than Al Qaeda’s leadership in Pakistan.

The officials said that they have benefited from the Yemeni government’s new resolve to fight Al Qaeda and that the American strikes — carried out with cruise missiles and Harrier fighter jets — had been approved by Yemen’s leaders. The strikes, administration officials say, have killed dozens of militants suspected of plotting future attacks. The Pentagon and the C.I.A. have quietly bulked up the number of their operatives at the embassy in Sana, the Yemeni capital, over the past year.

“Where we want to get is to much more small scale, preferably locally driven operations,” said Representative Adam Smith, Democrat of Washington, who serves on the Intelligence and Armed Services Committees.

“For the first time in our history, an entity has declared a covert war against us,” Mr. Smith said, referring to Al Qaeda. “And we are using similar elements of American power to respond to that covert war.”

Some security experts draw parallels to the cold war, when the United States drew heavily on covert operations as it fought a series of proxy battles with the Soviet Union.

And some of the central players of those days have returned to take on supporting roles in the shadow war. Michael G. Vickers, who helped run the C.I.A.’s campaign to funnel guns and money to the Afghanistan mujahedeen in the 1980s and was featured in the book and movie “Charlie Wilson’s War,” is now the top Pentagon official overseeing Special Operations troops around the globe. Duane R. Clarridge, a profane former C.I.A. officer who ran operations in Central America and was indicted in the Iran-contra scandal, turned up this year helping run a Pentagon-financed private spying operation in Pakistan.

In pursuing this strategy, the White House is benefiting from a unique political landscape. Republican lawmakers have been unwilling to take Mr. Obama to task for aggressively hunting terrorists, and many Democrats seem eager to embrace any move away from the long, costly wars begun by the Bush administration.

Still, it has astonished some old hands of the military and intelligence establishment. Jack Devine, a former top C.I.A. clandestine officer who helped run the covert war against the Soviet Army in Afghanistan in the 1980s, said his record showed that he was “not exactly a cream puff” when it came to advocating secret operations.

But he warned that the safeguards introduced after Congressional investigations into clandestine wars of the past — from C.I.A. assassination attempts to the Iran-contra affair, in which money from secret arms dealings with Iran was funneled to right-wing rebels in Nicaragua known as the contras — were beginning to be weakened. “We got the covert action programs under well-defined rules after we had made mistakes and learned from them,” he said. “Now, we’re coming up with a new model, and I’m concerned there are not clear rules.”

Cooperation and Control

The initial American strike in Yemen came on Dec. 17, hitting what was believed to be a Qaeda training camp in Abyan Province, in the southern part of the country. The first report from the Yemeni government said that its air force had killed “around 34” Qaeda fighters there, and that others had been captured elsewhere in coordinated ground operations.

The next day, Mr. Obama called President Saleh to thank him for his cooperation and pledge continuing American support. Mr. Saleh’s approval for the strike — rushed because of intelligence reports that Qaeda suicide bombers might be headed to Sana — was the culmination of administration efforts to win him over, including visits by Mr. Brennan and Gen. David H. Petraeus, then the commander of military operations in the Middle East.

The accounts of the American strikes in Yemen, which include many details that have not previously been reported, are based on interviews with American and Yemeni officials who requested anonymity because the military campaign in Yemen is classified, as well as documents from Yemeni investigators.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/15/world/15shadowwar.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #673 on: Aug 15th, 2010, 08:25am »

New York Times

Notes from the front lines
August 13, 2010, 10:52 am
The Increasing Role and Influence of Military Spouses
By TIM HSIA

I am leaving active duty this month, and the biggest fan of this change is my wife. The decision to leave the military did not come easily. During required counseling sessions with my battalion and brigade commanders, these senior officers sought to persuade me to stay on active duty.

Peers and subordinates also sought to persuade me, many citing the troublesome economy as a good reason to keep a steady job. But the counsel of commanders and soldiers, despite their good intentions, did not equal my wife’s influence and her recommendation that I leave. She no longer wants to deal with the hardships associated with deployments and training missions.

As the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have continued, the military has become more attuned to the concern of the families of service members.

The first lady, Michelle Obama, has sought to provide more support for military families, and the vice president’s wife, Jill Biden, has played a cameo role in the television show “Army Wives.”

There is also a highly readable blog by and for military spouses, SpouseBuzz.

In today’s military, military spouses play an active role not just in their spouses’ decisions but also in decisions that affect their spouses’ military unit. They are involved not only with the local military community, but also within the military command structure.

Family Readiness Groups
Each unit has a Family Readiness Group (F.R.G.), which is composed of the spouses of soldiers. The role of the F.R.G. is to help families adapt to the military lifestyle and to provide spouses with information regarding their loved ones during deployments.

The F.R.G. not only sponsors picnics, coffee hours, weekend trips, and video chats to loved ones overseas but also liaises with commanders in order to keep up the information flow to military families. One of the main responsibilities of F.R.G. leaders is to provide guidance to commanders to ensure their policies take into account not just the soldier, but also the concerns of their families.

Initially F.R.G.s were simply informal wives clubs, but the military has moved to institutionalize these groups in order to better serve military families, and also to ensure these groups encompassed every military family within a unit.

My wife and I found the F.R.G. to be of great assistance when I was assigned to a base in a remote part of Germany. The F.R.G. helped to prepare our move there by providing a slew of information such as what we would need upon arrival, currency exchange rates and travel tips.

When the F.R.G. is inclusive, it thrives. However, there are instances when the F.R.G. can serve as a detriment to a unit, and also hinder the military operations of a deployed unit.

In one F.R.G. there was so much division among the spouses that it threatened the cohesion within the rank and file of the unit. One commander’s wife threatened to have a subordinate fired during a heated phone conversation. Because of this threat and other issues posed by the F.R.G. leader, the commander said, “the need to deal with challenges involving the unit’s family support group nearly every other day” took away time he “could have been using to focus on the war.”

The advice of military spouses is not just limited to the realm of the unit. For example, the military chain of command from the Joint Chiefs of Staff has embraced Greg Mortenson’s educational efforts in Afghanistan partly because “of the popularity of ‘Three Cups of Tea’ among military wives who told their husbands to read it.”

Social Pressure
A supportive spouse has almost become a prerequisite for soldiers who aspire to a high rank. I have yet to serve under any officer or senior noncommissioned officer who is single. The vast majority of career officers and NCOs are married, and being single can actually be detrimental to one’s career because one’s subordinates and their wives can unfairly cast the single service member as being out of touch with the demands and needs of the military family.

For married service personnel, it is often frowned upon when one’s spouse is not closely affiliated and identified with the family readiness group. As a soldier rises in the ranks, the roles and responsibilities s expected of his or her spouse also greatly increase.

There is an expectation that spouses married to someone in a senior leadership position should also be leaders within the F.R.G. and military community. Spouses who hold down demanding nonmilitary career jobs have told my wife and me that they felt they have been pushed outside of a unit’s social circle when they did not devote enough time to their F.R.G.

I have tremendous empathy for military spouses because of the demands placed on them by a military that has been constantly at war.

These spouses must bear not only frequent deployments but also being stationed in remote bases. Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal in his retirement ceremony best summarizes the demands of being in the military, professionally and personally:

“Service in this business is tough and often dangerous,” he said. “It extracts a price for participants, and that price can be high. It is tempting to protect yourself from the personal and professional cost of loss by limiting how much you commit, how much you believe and trust in people, and how deeply you care.”

The military lifestyle is not easy on marital relationships. I can easily recall my wife’s birthdays because they are marked by significant military events: the day before we moved to Germany, the day before a deployment, or during a deployment.

more after the jump
http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/13/the-increasing-role-and-influence-of-military-spouses/?ref=world

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #674 on: Aug 15th, 2010, 08:29am »

Telegraph

Bear saved after 10 days with jar stuck on head
A six-month-old bear dubbed 'Jarhead' has been saved after having its head stuck in a container for at least 10 days.

By Alastair Jamieson
Published: 8:00AM BST 15 Aug 2010

The clear plastic container was removed from the cub's head, where it had become lodged after the animal was digging through rubbish in a neighbourhood in central Florida.

Animal welfare experts say the cub was days away from death because the jar made it impossible to eat or drink. The team had to tranquillise the mother bear and then grab the cub to remove the jar from the bear's head.

The subdued mother was then put in a trap and the cubs followed. After she awoke and nursed the cubs, the bears were moved to a less populated area nearby.

An ABC News report said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) enlisted the help of residents in the operation, which was triggered by a sighting of the cub with the jar.

It said the bears were regular visitors to the unsecured rubbish bins near the Weirsdale community in the Ocala National Forest.

Mike Orlando, biologist with the FWC, said: “It was a lot easier said than done. The residents were really great about calling us when they saw the bears, but it seemed like we were always about 20 minutes behind.”

The group set traps after two days but it was a further eight days before they could finally trap the family and subdue the mother.

photo of the poor thing after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/7946308/Bear-saved-after-10-days-with-jar-stuck-on-head.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 43 44 45 46 47  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls