Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Dec 14th, 2017, 03:54am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 451 452 453 454 455  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1074 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6780 on: Jun 2nd, 2012, 08:48am »

Wired

Court Wary of Overturning Warrantless Spy Case Victory, But Might Have To
By David Kravets
June 1, 2012 | 3:46 pm
Categories: politics, privacy

PASADENA, California — A federal appeals court appeared troubled Friday by the Obama administration’s arguments that the government could break domestic spying laws without fear of being sued — and that the government’s argument might be correct, due to an oversight by Congress.

A two-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard an hour of oral arguments here by the government and a lawyer for two attorneys whom a federal judge concluded had been wiretapped illegally without warrants by the government.

The American attorneys — who were working with the now-defunct al-Haramain Islamic Foundation, were awarded more than $20,000 each in damages and their lawyers $2.5 million in legal fees. They sued under domestic spying laws adopted in the wake of President Richard M. Nixon’s Watergate scandal. The government appealed.

Justice Department attorney Douglas Letter told Judge Michael Daly Hawkins and M. Margaret McKeown, both President Bill Clinton appointees, that they should dismiss the case outright because the government is immune from being sued for breaching the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act under a concept known as sovereign immunity.

“We think the simplest way here is the sovereign immunity argument,” Letter told the panel. He added that the aggrieved lawyers could sue individual government officials. But under that scenario, the government would declare the issue a state secret and effectively foreclose litigation.

“I’m trying to understand the government’s overall position,” Hawkins said. “The government’s position is you can’t sue the government, you can sue anybody else, but who those people are might be a state secret.”

“Correct, your honor,” Letter said moments later.

A federal judge found in 2010 that two American lawyers’ telephone conversations with their clients in Saudi Arabia in 2004 were siphoned to the National Security Agency without warrants. The allegations were initially based on a classified document the government accidentally mailed to the former al-Haramain Islamic Foundation lawyers Wendell Belew and Asim Ghafoor.

The document was later declared a state secret, removed from the long-running lawsuit and has never been made public. With that document ruled out as evidence, the lawyers instead cited a bevy of circumstantial evidence that a a trial judge concluded showed the government illegally wiretapped the lawyers as they spoke on U.S. soil to Saudi Arabia.

It marked the first and only time anyone had prevailed in a lawsuit challenging President George W. Bush’s so-called Terrorist Surveillance Program. The program was first disclosed by The New York Times in December 2005, and the government subsequently admitted that the National Security Agency was eavesdropping on Americans’ telephone calls without warrants if the government believed the person on the other line was overseas and associated with terrorism. The government had also secretly enlisted the help of major U.S. telecoms, including AT&T, to spy on Americans’ phone and internet communications without getting warrants as required by the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Judge McKeown suggested that, even if the appeals court gutted the case on sovereign immunity grounds, the case could go back to the trial court to target individual government officials allegedly involved, like FBI Director Robert Mueller, who was earlier dismissed from the case.

“Why wouldn’t the case go back to district court?” she asked Letter.

“You shouldn’t allow plaintiffs to play these types of games,” Letter responded, saying there was no direct evidence that the director was personally involved in the alleged spying.

“It’s not a game,” Hawkins said.

“This is just wrong to do this to a federal official,” Letter added.

Jon Eisenberg, the attorney for Belew and Ghafoor, took the podium next and said: “We do not view this litigation as a game, in the slightest.”

He added that “this lawsuit was about official government conduct, not rogue individuals.”

Judge Harry Pregerson, a President Jimmy Carter appointee, did not participate in the hour-long arguments but will review a transcript. The court decides cases with three-judge panels.

Judge Hawkins noted that the FISA law spells out that those who were illegally spied upon may seek monetary damages. But if Congress did not intend for the government to be sued, “it would make the remedy illusory,” Hawkins said.

Still, both judges seemed troubled that they might, indeed, have to dismiss the case on sovereign immunity grounds, because they suggested that the FISA law does not expressly waive sovereign immunity, or authorize the right to sue the government.

The two al-Haramain lawyers alleged they were the victim of the Bush administration’s secret, warrantless domestic spying program adopted in the aftermath of the September 2001 terror attacks.

Congress, with the vote of President Barack Obama — who was an Illinois senator at the time — subsequently legalized much of the warrantless spying in the summer of 2008. The legislation also provided the nation’s telecommunication companies immunity from lawsuits accusing them of being complicit with the government’s warrantless wiretapping. That legislation expires at year’s end, and Obama has asked Congress to reauthorize it.

The court did not indicate when it would rule.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/06/warrantless-wiretap-appeals/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6781 on: Jun 3rd, 2012, 07:57am »

New York Times

June 2, 2012
U.S.-Pakistan Freeze Chokes Fallback Route in Afghanistan
By ROD NORDLAND

SALANG PASS, Afghanistan — Nowhere is the impact of Pakistan’s ban on NATO truck traffic more visible than here at the top of the Hindu Kush, on one of the only alternative overland routes for supply convoys to reach Kabul and the rest of the country.

For 20 miles north and south of the old Soviet-built tunnel at Salang Pass, thousands of trucks are idled beside the road, waiting for a turn to get through its perilous, one-and-a-half-mile length.

This is the only passable route for heavy truck traffic bringing NATO supplies in from the Central Asian republics to the north, as they now must come.

There are other roads, but they are often single-lane dirt tracks through even higher mountain passes, or they are frequently subject to ambushes by insurgents and bandits. So a tunnel built to handle 1,000 vehicles a day, and until the Pakistani boycott against NATO in November handling 2,000, now tries — and often fails — to let 10,000 vehicles through, alternating northbound and southbound truck traffic every other day.

“It’s only a matter of time until there’s a catastrophe,” said Lt. Gen. Mohammad Rajab, the head of maintenance for the Salang Pass. “One hundred percent certain, there will be a disaster, and when there is, it’s not a disaster for Afghanistan alone, but for the whole international community that uses this road.” He said 90 percent of the traffic now was trailer and tanker trucks carrying NATO supplies.

The tunnel near the top of this 12,000-foot pass is so narrow — no more than 20 feet across at the base, and less toward the top — that the heavily laden trucks often jam as they try to pass one another, lodging in tightly against the sloping, rough-hewn walls. The trucks have to be winched apart and dragged out by heavy equipment.

Other trucks get stuck when their drivers deliberately underestimate their overhead clearance — the tunnel is 16 feet high, but only in the very center.

“It’s a nightmare,” one tank truck driver said.

The tunnel lighting does not work, nor do closed-circuit television cameras installed to warn of problems. The tunnel’s roof leaks water, rendering the savagely potholed road surface a mixture of mud, chopped-up asphalt and broken concrete. Ventilator fans in most of the tunnel are out of order, leading to such high levels of carbon monoxide that officials are talking about a system to pump emergency oxygen in, General Rajab said.

The roadway, with only patches of paving, has ruts so deep that trucks sometimes just tip over on their sides, as happened last week with a tanker truck carrying fuel for NATO. It flipped over just south of the main tunnel, cracking the tank and spawning a small stream flowing down the steep switchbacks, which enterprising Afghans quickly diverted into makeshift canals and impoundments so they could carry out the dangerous work of filling containers from the flow.

That was the second day in a row that a truck tipped over near the top of the pass, blocking all daytime traffic for most of those two days. In between, the road opened at night, but then a NATO military convoy came along, forcing all civilian truck traffic to cease for 12 hours, General Rajab said.

With the increased traffic and the deterioration of the roads it has caused, a journey that used to take a day, from Kabul to Hairatan, a fuel and freight depot town on the northern border with Uzbekistan, now requires 8 to 10 days for trucks, according to interviews with many drivers. For cars it takes two days.

“Yesterday I slept over there,” said Sayid Ali, a tractor-trailer driver who was hauling cement, pointing at the next switchback down, less than a mile away. “Tonight I’ll probably sleep here.” He had so far spent five days just in a 25-mile-long climb to the tunnel, and was still two miles away, stuck by the fuel spill.

A tanker driver named Mohammadullah, hauling fuel for a NATO contractor, was eight days out of Kabul and still climbing. He said the drivers often ran out of food and were forced to pay exorbitant prices to vendors who drove up with supplies. He expected the round trip would take him most of a month.

“I’d rather be driving to Kandahar,” he said. Trucks need to have armed guards because of insurgents on that route, he said, “but I’d rather do that than all this waiting.”

The much-shorter Pakistani routes, from seaports like Karachi on better roads, were closed to protest the deaths of 24 Pakistani soldiers in an American airstrike. But Pakistan has expressed willingness to reopen the frontier: for a fee of thousands of dollars per truck, compared with $250 previously. “We’re not about to get gouged in the price,” Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said on ABC’s “This Week.”

The Salang Pass tunnel, built in 1964 by the Soviets and never completely finished (it lacks amenities like interior surfacing of the walls and an escape tunnel), has a tragic history. Nine hundred Russians and Afghans reportedly died of asphyxiation in the tunnel in 1982 when a military convoy was trapped inside by an accident or an explosion.

Two years ago, huge avalanches at the southern mouth of the tunnel killed at least 64 people, buried alive in cars and buses.

General Rajab says he worries that the tunnel could even collapse — no thorough overhaul has ever been done, he said, because the route is too vital to close long enough for major repairs.

“It’s crazy to use this road; there are just too many problems,” he said. “They should open an alternative or we will never solve this.”

A spokesman for the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, Lt. Col. Jimmie Cummings, said the military had no comment. “We do not discuss the particular road routes that we use for movements of logistics,” he said.

The only remotely viable alternative route, General Rajab said, is over the Shibar Pass, farther west. It involves a three-day detour, which could be an improvement over Salang these days. However, the military would have to work at improving security on that route, he said — when he recently detoured trucks that way, they were looted before reaching the pass.


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/03/world/asia/us-pakistan-dispute-chokes-an-afghan-supply-route.html?_r=1&hp#

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6782 on: Jun 3rd, 2012, 08:07am »

Reuters

Access to Pacific harbors key to U.S. strategy: Panetta

By David Alexander
CAM RANH BAY, Vietnam
Sun Jun 3, 2012 7:34am EDT

(Reuters) - Defense Secretary Leon Panetta visited a deep-water Vietnamese port near the contested South China Sea on Sunday, calling access to such harbors critical as the U.S. shifts 60 percent of its warships to the Asia-Pacific by 2020.

Panetta flew to Cam Ranh Bay, one of Asia's finest deep-water harbors located about 450 miles south of China, just a day after he spelled out details of a new U.S. military strategy that calls for a shift in focus to the Pacific after a decade of conflict in Afghanistan and Iraq.

While U.S. officials insisted the visit had nothing to do with China, Panetta's appearance was likely to heighten concerns among some Chinese officials who see the shift as an attempt to fence in the country and frustrate Beijing's territorial claims, especially in the South China Sea.

Chinese Lieutenant General Ren Haiquan noted the U.S. decision to increase the number of warships in the Pacific during remarks at the Shangri-La Dialogue security forum in Singapore on Sunday.

"First, we should not treat this as a disaster," Ren said.

"I believe that this is the United States' response to its own national interests, its fiscal difficulties and global security developments," he said in comments reported by Hong Kong's Phoenix Television.

Panetta, who toured a Navy supply ship undergoing repairs, was the most senior U.S. official to visit Cam Ranh Bay since the Vietnam War, when it served as a key U.S. logistic hub.

Currently, the port only does maintenance on U.S. cargo vessels but not warships. No U.S. warships have visited it since the war, but have called at other Vietnamese ports, U.S. officials said.

Speaking from the deck of the USNS Richard E. Byrd, Panetta said his visit was symbolic of how far the two countries have come since they normalized relations 17 years ago and that partnerships with countries like Vietnam were critical to the new U.S. military strategy.

"We are rebalancing our forces to the Asia-Pacific ... so that in the future, 60 percent of our forces will be located in this region," he said.

"For that reason, it will be particularly important to be able to ... work with partners like Vietnam to be able to use harbors like this as we move our ships from our ports on the West Coast towards our stations here in the Pacific."

Under the strategy announced in January, the U.S. military aims to be smaller, more flexible and agile. Rather than seeking permanent bases as it has in the past, it is focusing on rotational deployments.

"We are stressing our effort to try to develop partnerships with countries in this region, to develop their capabilities so that they can better defend and secure themselves," he said.

As part of that, he underscored the importance of moving ahead with ASEAN - the Association of South East Asian Nations - to develop a code of conduct that the countries of the region could abide by in settling disputes and ensuring maritime and navigational rights.

Some ASEAN countries have claims over parts of the South China Sea which has put them at odds with Beijing -- notably Vietnam and the Philippines.

Panetta cited a range of areas in which he was looking to expand cooperation with Vietnam, including high-level exchanges, humanitarian aid and disaster relief, and peacekeeping operations.

"In particular we want to work with Vietnam on critical maritime issues, including a code of conduct focusing on the South China Sea and also working to improve freedom of navigation in our oceans," he said.

His Vietnam visit was part of a week-long trip to Asia to explain the new U.S. military strategy. He led a high-level delegation on Saturday to the Shangri-La Dialogue, an annual security conference that draws senior civilian and military leaders from some 30 Pacific nations.

At one session, Singapore announced it had agreed in principle to a U.S. request to forward deploy up to four Littoral Combat Ships to the island state on a rotational basis.

A senior member of Panetta's delegation, General Martin Dempsey, travelled on Sunday to the Philippines which is in talks about a rotational U.S. deployment there.


(Reporting By David Alexander, Editing by Jonathan Thatcher)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/03/us-asia-security-panetta-idUSBRE85205I20120603

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6783 on: Jun 3rd, 2012, 08:16am »

PRBlog.com

Real Cowboys Meet Real Aliens in New Book by UFO Researchers

Yes, there were UFO sightings by cowboys, ranchers, and others in the "Old West." Perhaps not as dramatic as Hollywood's version, these true-life UFO cases of the 1800s are nonetheless every bit as interesting, according to a newly-released book.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Real Cowboys and Aliens
PRLog (Press Release)
Jun 02, 2012 -

Imagine John Wayne riding his trusty steed over a rocky ridge and finding, littered across the desert in front of him, a crashed extraterrestrial spacecraft and the bodies of its non-human occupants. This scenario of the Wild West meeting the far future may not be as far-fetched as some people think, according to Noe Torres and John LeMay, authors of the newly-released The Real Cowboys & Aliens: UFO Encounters of the Old West, 2nd Edition. The book features over 30 illustrations by award-winning artists Neil Riebe, Shane Olive, and Jared Olive, and is now available at RoswellBooks.com and all major online book retailers.


User Image


“After the Steven Spielberg movie Cowboys & Aliens was announced in 2010, we thought it would be interesting to look at actual UFO cases from the 1800s,” Torres said. “While the movie is an enjoyable work of fiction, clearly it has little or no basis in reality, and we wanted our book to present actual, documented cases of UFOs in the Old West.”

Writing with middle school and high school students in mind, the authors emphasized that people in the Old West really did see strange flying ships streaking across the sky. Hundreds of UFO sightings were reported throughout North America in the 19th century, as documented in numerous newspaper articles and books of that time period. Farmers, cowboys, ranchers, and others reported seeing strange signs and wonders in the sky, and occasionally, they also claimed to meet beings that were clearly not human.

The first edition of their book was praised by critics and was wildly successful among both school-age children and adults. A review in New Mexico’s major daily newspaper, the Albuquerque Journal, proclaimed, “Hey, Hollywood. If you’re going to make a big-budget movie about extraterrestrial contact with Wild West cowpunchers, can’t you at least try to get it right? … Of course spacemen explored our planet in the days of saddle-sore lawmen and swinging saloon doors. But it wasn’t the cartoonish picture of evil planetary invaders, complete with hideous teeth and slimy hands emanating from their reptilian bellies that is portrayed in this Hollywood blockbuster…. The Real Cowboys & Aliens: UFO Encounters of the Old West, sets the record straight, using information gathered from yellowed newspaper clippings from the 1800s to tell of numerous close encounters between farmers and cowboys on the range and mysterious visitors in flight.” (Albuquerque Journal, Aug. 18, 2011, Page A1).

“We were, of course, extremely gratified at the praise we received for our first edition,” Torres said, “So a year later, we decided to go back in and improve a few things about the first edition and essentially create a ‘director’s cut’ of the book with some additional content and illustrations. We also got one of the most talented artists we’ve ever worked with, Joe Calkins, to create a new artistic concept for our front cover. The result is dramatic, depicting a Wild West showdown between an Old West gunslinger and an extraterrestrial. Looking at the cover, you get the overwhelming feeling that something is about to happen and that it won’t be pleasant for the humans.”

Calkins also did the cover art for several of Torres’ previous books, including Ultimate Guide to the Roswell UFO Crash, Aliens in the Forest, and Russia’s Roswell Incident. Calkins, who resides in Woodburn, Oregon, displays samples of his art on his Web site CerberusArt.com.

“After the Spielberg movie was announced, we thought it important for people to know that these types of UFO encounters really did happen in the 1800s,” co-author LeMay said, “In reality, there exist many newspaper and magazine accounts from the 1800s telling of strange sightings from America’s cowboy era.” A native of Roswell, New Mexico, LeMay has authored several books about the history of New Mexico and is vice-president of the board of directors for the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico (HSSNM).

“It seems likely that UFOs were quite common in the 1800s,” Torres added, “We have found hundreds of newspaper and magazine accounts about people seeing strange objects and lights in the sky. We have also found articles that mention face-to-face encounters with creatures that seemed human but were clearly not.”

Torres, a state section director in Texas for the Mutual UFO network (MUFON), said, “What is especially interesting about these historic UFO sightings is that they took place before airplanes were invented and before flight of any kind was common. Although hot air balloons had been around since the 1700s, it was closer to 1900 before balloon airships became widely known.” Torres has written several books about historic UFO cases.

Torres and LeMay said that after researching many UFO sightings from 1800s, they picked the most interesting cases to include in the book. Torres said, “We’ve included many bizarre stories, such as the one about a being from outer space whose spaceship crashed in North Texas and whose body was buried in a lonely Texas cemetery where it may still remain today. You will also read about a flying monster shot by two cowboys outside of Tombstone, Arizona. There is also a tale about an underwater UFO that came up to the surface and nearly electrocuted two men. Another story tells of a mysterious ‘airship’ that lassoed a calf and then flew off into the sky with it. You will also hear the tale of a strange flying beast that terrorized a small Midwest town. Did these strange encounters really happen as recorded, or were they the products of overworked imaginations? We’ll the readers decide for themselves.”

The second edition is not a radical departure from the first, according to Torres. “We didn’t stray far from the original. We added some new content, tweaked some of the narrative to make it flow more smoothly, and added some new illustrations by our very talented artists. And, we definitely improved the front cover. But, we wanted to keep the overall presentation very similar to the first edition.”

Torres and LeMay have spoken at many schools about their book since the first edition was released early in 2011. “Originally we targeted this book at middle school and high school students,” LeMay said. “We had no idea it would be so popular among adults. We’ve received some really good reviews, although people sometimes comment about the reading level of the book, not realizing that it was primarily intended for a younger audience. We wanted kids who saw the Spielberg movie to know that there really were UFO sightings back in the Old West.”

The artist whose illustrations appear at the start of each chapter, Neil Riebe, is an author and illustrator living in Madison, Wisconsin. Shane Olive is a retired firefighter living in Roswell, New Mexico. He has worked in illustrating for over 30 years. He had done artwork for book covers, VHS box art, and for various magazines, including TV Guide. His son, Jared, who also contributed several illustrations for this book, is a firefighter in Roswell. He has previously designed t-shirts and logos for products sold in Roswell gift shops.

The 126-page paperback book is now available for $12.95 at http://www.RoswellBooks.com and at all major online book sellers.

http://www.prlog.org/11890643-real-cowboys-meet-real-aliens-in-new-book-by-ufo-researchers.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6784 on: Jun 3rd, 2012, 08:20am »

Telegraph

Plane diverted after man's hair set on fire

A guest on a stag party caused a plane to be diverted yesterday after attempting to set his friend’s hair on fire at 30,000ft.

10:28AM BST 01 Jun 2012

The 24-year-old from Widnes was arrested on suspicion of endangering an aircraft after the incident, which took place on a Monarch flight from Manchester to Majorca.

The plane, which had 212 passengers on board, was flying over France around 90 minutes after takeoff when the cabin crew smelled smoke and the captain decided to land at Gatwick.

Officers from Sussex Police boarded the aircraft and took the man into custody for questioning. It is understood that both men were part of a stag party heading to Palma, and other passengers told police they believed the incident had been a “prank”. Nobody was hurt, police confirmed.

“Monarch confirms that flight ZB532, flying from Manchester to Majorca on Thursday May 31, diverted into London Gatwick where one passenger was off-loaded from the aircraft due to an incident onboard,” said a spokesman for the airline. “Monarch has a zero tolerance approach to disruptive passengers on board.”

A spokesman for Sussex Police added: "The aircraft was diverted to Gatwick and landed shortly after 9am when smoke was detected on board. The smoke came from a passenger whose hair had been singed by another passenger that he was travelling with."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/9305030/Plane-diverted-after-mans-hair-set-on-fire.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6785 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 08:39am »

The Hill

Obama's ambassador pick brings fight over Iraq policy back to Capitol Hill
By Julian Pecquet
06/04/12 05:00 AM ET

President Obama's decision to pull all troops out of Iraq will come under renewed scrutiny this week as the Senate considers his choice for ambassador to the country.

Obama's pick, Brett McGurk, led the failed negotiations to extend the U.S. troop presence past the end of 2011. The political situation in Iraq has deteriorated since then, prompting hawkish senators such as John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) to lambast the White House.

“I will have very significant questions about his qualifications and his positions on the issues,” McCain told Foreign Policy's blog The Cable when the nomination was announced in March. “He's not my choice.”

McGurk has testified that the United States would only have agreed to keep U.S. forces in Iraq past the end of last year if they remained immune from prosecution by Iraqi courts, something Iraq would not agree to.

The current ambassador, Jim Jeffrey, has told the State Department he wants to step down from his posting at the largest U.S. embassy in the world.

It’s unclear how many Republican senators will have the stomach to oppose the White House on such a sensitive posting. Many of them were traveling abroad during the recess week and weren’t available for comment.

While the GOP’s stance is unknown, opposition to McGurk from some Iraqi quarters appears to be weakening.
 When his nomination was first announced, the main opposition coalition declared that it would have nothing to do with him because of his alleged close ties to Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. The self-described nonsectarian Iraqiya List has accused Maliki of a power grab and has hired a U.S. public-relations shop to draw attention to the deteriorating political situation since U.S troops left the country in December.

“I would like to inform you that al-Iraqiya bloc and the liberal trend will not deal with new assigned ambassador to Iraq Mr. Brett McGurk for his loyalty and bounds with the Islamic party,” the Washington representative of former Prime Minister Ayed Allawi, a leader of the coalition, wrote to lawmakers in March.

The vow to ignore an official White House envoy appears to have stirred controversy, however, and on Thursday a senior adviser to the Iraqiya List shared a much different message with The Hill.

“We consider the nomination of Mr. McGurk to be a U.S. government internal affair and if Mr. McGurk is confirmed then our relationship with him will be based on the mutual interests of Iraq and the U.S.,” said Mark Alsalih, who is also the U.S. representative for Iraqi Vice President Tareq al-Hashimi, another Iraqiya List leader.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee is scheduled to bring up McGurk's nomination on Wednesday, along with Obama's picks for ambassador to Sri Lanka and Tajikistan.

http://thehill.com/blogs/global-affairs/middle-east-north-africa/230621-obama-ambassador-pick-brings-iraq-fight-back-to-capitol-hill

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6786 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 08:43am »

Wired

Alt Text: In Space, No One Can Hear You Haul
By Lore Sjöberg
June 4, 2012 | 6:30 am
Categories: Current Affairs

Last week was a big deal for fans of both space travel and capitalism, as the spacecraft Dragon visited the International Space Station and, like its fantastical namesake, delivered food and computers to astronauts.

The reason the SpaceX Dragon is big news is not because the unmanned spacecraft is huge or advanced or armed with photon torpedoes. It’s news because it’s a privately built and privately funded vehicle, ushering us into a shining new era in which space travel becomes banal and tedious.

If you read the account of the mission and substitute “Peterbilt” for “Dragon,” “loading dock” for “International Space Station” and “Bakersfield” for “orbit,” you’ll see that once you get over the whole “vacuum of space” thing, it’s the story of a slightly awkward delivery of dry goods to a government warehouse.

This, I should explain, is a good thing. Humanity never advances without reaching for the stars, pulling them from the spheres, looking at them and saying, “Man, these stars suck. Why don’t we get better stars? Pfft.”

So I will be extremely satisfied if, within my lifetime, I can see space travel become completely, irritatingly common. I look forward to hackneyed stand-up comedians making predictable jokes about G-forces and anti-space-sickness pills. I await the formation of a corrupt and inefficient Space Docker’s Union. I anticipate being annoyed by yet another maudlin country-western song about the lonely but honest life of a geosynchronous cargo handler.

But that’s not the only space news. Buoyed by the temporarily newfound interest in the transport of cargo from Earth to pretty close to Earth and back, news outlets are covering more, shall we say, “minor” aspects of the race to make space into the finally profitable frontier.

One bit of news is that the FAA has given Virgin Galactic permission to fly its latest craft, the prosaically yet annoyingly named SpaceShipTwo, into space.

This troubles me. Not the permission, the fact that the private space company had to get permission. You need the FAA’s say-so to leave the planet?

I never really thought about it before, mostly because I’ve never been in a position to achieve escape velocity. I’ve generally been happy with the whole gravity well thing, give or take some lower back pain. But now that I’m aware that I can’t just leave the planet at will, it’s all I want to do.

I feel trapped, kept on Earth by the oppressive forces of government bureaucracy. Who are they to tell me whether I should be surrounded by breathable atmosphere? What are they going to do, post a guard at the Kármán line and demand to see my papers as I zoom by at a dozen or so kilometers per second?

So along with the inevitable youth vogue for “space hauler hats,” I hope that the future brings some degree of restlessness and rebellion when it comes to space travel, a deeply principled rejection of the tyranny of Earth-bound governmental control.

We were born here, but we don’t have to stay here. Don’t let the man literally keep you down. Occupy space.

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/06/alt-text-space-trucking/
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6787 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 08:45am »

Reuters

IAEA sees "demolishing" of buildings at Iran site

Mon Jun 4, 2012 9:33am EDT

VIENNA (Reuters) - Satellite images indicate that buildings are being demolished at an Iranian military site the United Nations nuclear watchdog wants to visit, IAEA chief Yukiya Amano said on Monday, stressing the need for his inspectors to go there.

Amano's comments will likely further reinforce suspicions among Western diplomats that Iran is trying to remove any incriminating evidence from the Parchin facility before possible granting the International Atomic Energy Agency access.

The veteran Japanese diplomat also told a press conference he hoped that an agreement could be reached soon with Iran to resume a long-stalled investigation by the agency into suspected atomic weapons research in the Islamic Republic.

The IAEA and Iran - which denies the charges - will hold a new meeting on June 8 in Vienna and Amano said the two sides had narrowed their differences in previous rounds of talks, suggesting he believed a deal could be close.

He made clear again that the IAEA wanted access as soon as possible to Parchin, a sprawling site southeast of Tehran where the U.N. agency believes Iran may have carried out high explosives tests relevant for nuclear weapons development.

Asked about satellite images of the site which the IAEA showed diplomats at a closed-door briefing last week, Amano said: "The satellite imagery indicates that these activities include the use of water, demolishing of buildings, removing fences and moving soil. These are some of the activities that we have observed through satellite imagery."


(Reporting by Fredrik Dahl; Editing by Jon Hemming)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/04/us-nuclear-iran-amano-idUSBRE8530IL20120604

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6788 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 08:49am »

Yahoo

The 2012 Roswell UFO Festival is On and Going Strong

City of Roswell More Excited Than Ever to Welcome Visitors for Fun Festival Weekend Celebrating 65th Anniversary of 1947 Incident

Press Release: City of Roswell – 1 hour 42 minutes ago
ROSWELL, N.M., June 4, 2012
PRNewswire

In early July, 1947, a mysterious object crashed on a ranch 30 miles north of Roswell. The Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) issued a statement claiming to have recovered a crashed "flying disk." An article ran on the front page of the Roswell Daily Record and the next day, RAAF changed its statement to say that the object was a weather balloon, not a flying disk as they previously reported. This revised statement sparked immediate controversy and has continued to be a topic of debate more than 65 years later. Was it just a weather balloon? Uncover the cover-up and see the mystery and excitement for yourself, June 29-July 1, 2012!

The City of Roswell along with Mainstreet Roswell, Roswell Parks and Recreation, Roswell Museum and Art Center and The Roswell Runners Club are inviting UFO enthusiasts and skeptics alike, to join in the celebration of one of the most debated incidents in history. This year's three-day event sees the return of several fan favorites, such as featured guest speakers, authors, live entertainment, Alien and Pet Costume Contests and parade, plus, a low-rider and funny car show and contest, more family-friendly activities and a section just for kids!

Lodging options are still available, including many hotels within a two mile radius of the event, as well as a shaded Recreational Vehicle Camp Ground. Animal Day Care is available locally for your traveling companions. Roswell also has public bus transportation with Pecos Trails Transit. Transportation from the parking areas will be furnished by the local Lions Club. The majority of the events will be held downtown, with very few exceptions. All events are within walking distance.

For more information about the 2012 Roswell UFO Festival, visit www.ufofestivalroswell.com or call 1-888-ROSFEST (767-3378). You can also follow the festival on Facebook (Amazing Roswell UFO Festival) or on Twitter (www.twitter.com/RosUFOFest).

Was it just a weather balloon? Visit Roswell during the 65th Anniversary and SEE IT FOR YOURSELF! For more information, call the Roswell Convention & Visitors Bureau at 1-888-ROSWELL, (575) 624-7704 or visit us online at www.SeeRoswell.com.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/2012-roswell-ufo-festival-going-120400441.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
HAL9000
Guest
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6789 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 10:26am »

Crystal,



...The reason the SpaceX Dragon is big news is not because the unmanned spacecraft is huge or advanced or armed with photon torpedoes. It’s news because it’s a privately built and privately funded vehicle, ushering us into a shining new era in which space travel becomes banal and tedious....


Er.... maybe Lore Sjöberg should have looked here first.

http://news.yahoo.com/spacex-dragon-success-elicits-praise-calls-renewed-funding-203400395.htm

....The success of the Dragon, which not only delivered a cargo of supplies to the ISS, but returned a cargo back to Earth, earned praise from space advocates and members of Congress, as well as renewed calls for full funding of the government subsidy program that has enabled the development of not only the Dragon, but other commercial space vehicles. ...

...United States Senate to fully fund the Commercial Crew subsidy program. The House has cut funding for that program by $300 million dollars. President Obama's request was for over $800 million for the coming fiscal year....


HAL
User IP Logged

Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4289
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6790 on: Jun 4th, 2012, 10:36pm »

NJ: Buckle up Your Dog & Cat or Face Fines

Jun 4, 2012
By Todd Starnes

Garden State drivers who fail to buckle up their cat or dog could face criminal charges as well as fines totaling up to $1,000, according to the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission.

State officials are teaming up with the NJ Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to enforce laws requiring motorists to “properly restrain their pets.”

The law forbids dogs from hanging out windows – and also from riding in the bed of a pickup truck.

Drivers who fail to do so could face fines from $250 to $1,000 – for each offense. They could also be charged with disorderly conduct under New Jersey’s animal cruelty statutes.

“As your family gets ready to embark on their family vacation, you take the time to buckle up your kids because you love them,” Coffey told Fox News Radio. “It’s also time to take a look at your furry family members.”

She said driving with a distracted animal in the car could be dangerous not only for the family pet, but also for other motorists.
“I hate to sound like we’re picking on dogs, but that’s normally the animal we’re talking about,” she said, noting that the law requires all animals to be buckled up.

A number of New Jersey motorists are calling the law ridiculous and overreaching.

“What nonsense,” one reader told the CBS television affiliate in Philadelphia. “I have an SUV that my dog rides in the back of. Why on Earth would I tie her down?”

Another reader pondered, “Does that mean I have to buckle my puppy/kitten in an infant car seat?

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/nj-buckle-up-your-dog-cat-or-face-fines.html
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6791 on: Jun 5th, 2012, 08:52am »

on Jun 4th, 2012, 10:36pm, Swamprat wrote:
NJ: Buckle up Your Dog & Cat or Face Fines

Jun 4, 2012
By Todd Starnes

Garden State drivers who fail to buckle up their cat or dog could face criminal charges as well as fines totaling up to $1,000, according to the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission.

State officials are teaming up with the NJ Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to enforce laws requiring motorists to “properly restrain their pets.”

The law forbids dogs from hanging out windows – and also from riding in the bed of a pickup truck.

Drivers who fail to do so could face fines from $250 to $1,000 – for each offense. They could also be charged with disorderly conduct under New Jersey’s animal cruelty statutes.

“As your family gets ready to embark on their family vacation, you take the time to buckle up your kids because you love them,” Coffey told Fox News Radio. “It’s also time to take a look at your furry family members.”

She said driving with a distracted animal in the car could be dangerous not only for the family pet, but also for other motorists.
“I hate to sound like we’re picking on dogs, but that’s normally the animal we’re talking about,” she said, noting that the law requires all animals to be buckled up.

A number of New Jersey motorists are calling the law ridiculous and overreaching.

“What nonsense,” one reader told the CBS television affiliate in Philadelphia. “I have an SUV that my dog rides in the back of. Why on Earth would I tie her down?”

Another reader pondered, “Does that mean I have to buckle my puppy/kitten in an infant car seat?

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/nj-buckle-up-your-dog-cat-or-face-fines.html


Dumb dumb dumb!

Hey Swamprat cheesy

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6792 on: Jun 5th, 2012, 08:58am »

My adopted soldier sent me a note asking if I could send a card to his friend

"one of my friends was hit by an incoming rocket and isn't doing very good. I was gonna ask you if you could pass along his address at Walter Reed National Medical Center to maybe the letter writing team at Soldiers Angels. So they can send letters or flowers or anything to him and his family."

ATTENTION INTENSIVE CARE UNIT
WALTER REED NATIONAL MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER
ECHO COMPANY 307TH BSB/ 1-504TH PIR / 82ND ABN DIV

PFC ZARATE, GUSTAVO / RM 310 BLDG 9
8901 WISCONSIN AVENUE
BESTHESDA, MD 20889-0004


I know this is a UFO site but if any of you are so inclined, please send Gustavo a card and keep him in your prayers.

Crystal


edit to add full zip
« Last Edit: Jun 5th, 2012, 12:04pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6793 on: Jun 5th, 2012, 09:15am »

Reuters

Top al Qaeda strategist may have been killed in Pakistan

By Jibran Ahmad and Saud Mehsud
PESHAWAR/DERA ISMAIL KHAN
Tue Jun 5, 2012 10:03am EDT

PESHAWAR/DERA ISMAIL KHAN (Reuters) - Abu Yahya al-Libi, one of al Qaeda's top strategists and seen as the most prominent figure in the network after leader Ayman al Zawahri, may have been killed in a drone strike in Pakistan, Pakistani intelligence officials said on Tuesday.

If his death is confirmed it would be the biggest blow to al Qaeda since U.S. special forces killed Osama bin Laden in a secret raid in Pakistan in May 2011.

The CIA's drone campaign in Pakistan, stepped up under the administration of President Barack Obama, has made the South Asian nation a perilous place for al Qaeda.

If a drone strike did kill Libi, it would bolster the American argument that the unmanned aircraft are a highly effective weapon against militants.

The United States has also escalated drone strikes against al Qaeda figures in Yemen, where militants gained a foothold during a popular uprising against former President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

The pressure may encourage al Qaeda to seek new havens in areas where it has come under less scrutiny. A growing number of experts point to an influx of militants into Mali, for instance.

U.S. sources said Libi, a Libyan cleric with a degree in chemistry who has survived previous attacks by drones, was a target of a strike early on Monday in northwest Pakistan's North Waziristan tribal region, home to some of the world's most notorious militant groups.

Sajjan Gohel, chief executive of the Asia-Pacific Foundation security research consultancy, said Libi was one of the few remaining key figures within al Qaeda's core.

"Libi has also been at the centre of al Qaeda's plans to reconstitute itself and try and remount a trans-national terror campaign. This is one of the reasons he was viewed as a high value target," he told Reuters by email.

Some U.S. officials describe Libi, whose real name is Mohamed Hassan Qaid, as number two to Zawahri, the Egyptian doctor who took over al Qaeda after bin Laden's death.

Diplomats and some Pakistani intelligence officials say funding for al Qaeda in Pakistan dried up after Bin Laden's death, forcing some fighters to return to their home countries, mostly in the Arab world.

Still, some analysts say the death of an al Qaeda leader does not necessarily spell disaster for the group, arguing it is de-centralized and offers inspiration to militants and not just logistical support or financing.

"Even if he's killed it doesn't matter much to the organization as long as Dr Zawahri remains alive," said Imtiaz Gul, author "The Most Dangerous Place", a book about the lawless border area between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Drone strikes have undoubtedly made it more difficult for al Qaeda leaders and fighters to operate along the border.

Pakistan says that while the CIA-run drone campaign has some advantages, it fuels anti-American sentiment and is counterproductive because of collateral damage.

Drones are a sticking point in talks between the United States and Pakistan aimed at repairing ties damaged by a series of issues, including the recent imprisonment of the Pakistani doctor who helped the CIA hunt down bin Laden.

Pakistan on Tuesday summoned the U.S. charge d'affaires to the Foreign Ministry to convey its "serious concerns" over drone strikes, the ministry said in a statement.

Pakistani intelligence officials told Reuters they believe Libi, which means Libyan in Arabic, may have been among seven foreign militants killed in Monday's strike by a drone aircraft.

One of the officials said Pakistani authorities had intercepted telephone chatter about Libi, an al Qaeda theologian and expert on new media whose escape from a U.S.-run prison in Afghanistan in 2005 made him famous in al Qaeda circles.

"We intercepted some conversations between militants. They were talking about the death of a 'sheikh'," one of the Pakistani intelligence officials said, referring to the title given to senior religious leaders.

"They did not name this person but we have checked with our sources in the area and believe they are referring to Libi."

The intelligence official said according to informants, Libi was seriously wounded in the strike and was taken to a private hospital where he died.

MILITANT COMMANDER DENIES LIBI'S DEATH

But a militant commander in North Waziristan closely associated with foreign fighters said Libi ad not been killed.

"This is not the first time claims have been made about his death. The Americans are suffering heavy losses in Afghanistan so they have resorted to making false claims," he said.

It can take months to confirm whether drone strikes have killed an Islamist militant leader because the area of the attack is often sealed off by the Taliban in the lawless northwest of Pakistan.

Residents of the village where Pakistani intelligence officials says Libi may have been killed, Hesokhel, noted an unusually high number of militants gathered there after the drone strike and they kept people away.

"They usually bury the bodies after a drone strike in the nearest graveyard," said one of the villagers, describing the aftermath of previous strikes in the area. "This time they put all the bodies in their cars and took them away."

A senior Taliban commander in North Waziristan said Libi had been living in Pakistan near the Afghan border since 2005 when he escaped along with three cell mates from the Bagram military base north of Kabul, where U.S. forces run what is considered the most secure U.S. prison in Afghanistan.

"MAN OF ACTION"

For the United States, Libi is one of al Qaeda's most dangerous figures. In September last year, the United States Treasury imposed financial sanctions against him. It said Libi, in his late 40s, released 68 public messages on al Qaeda's behalf and was second in visibility only to Zawahri.

Recently released letters written by bin Laden and captured during the U.S. raid in which he was killed last year show Libi to have been one of a handful of al Qaeda officials relied upon by bin Laden to argue al Qaeda's case to a worldwide audience of militants, in particular to the young.

Believed to have received more theological training than either bin Laden or Zawahri, Libi has a reputation as a man of action, a jihadi scholar and a populist propagandist.

He was also a unifying figure in al Qaeda, said Gohel.

"There has often been a terse relationship between the Libyan and Egyptian factions within al-Qaeda and it is believed that Libi had bridged that gap," said Gohel.

"His death 'if confirmed' will be another significant blow to al-Qaeda and another example that the controversial drone strike policy is working."

A Western expert on al-Libi, U.S. scholar Jarret Brachman, wrote on his blog: "If true (Libi's death), (this would be) a cataclysmic blow to the future of al-Qaeda's General Command. For my money, there's no recovering from this one."

Libi, reportedly born in 1963, made repeated appearances on al Qaeda videos and wrote prolifically, becoming one of the group's most prominent media warriors.

Brachman, also a biographer, says Libi was seen as having made al Qaeda "cool" for a younger generation.


(Additional reporting by Mark Hosenball in WASHINGTON and William Maclean in LONDON; Writing by Michael Georgy; Editing by Robert Birsel)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/05/us-pakistan-libi-idUSBRE85407220120605

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #6794 on: Jun 5th, 2012, 09:27am »

Wired

Photographer Joins Battle Against a Record-Breaking Fire
By Jakob Schiller
June 5, 2012 | 6:30 am
Categories: Gear, Miscellaneous, Photo Gallery, Photojournalism, Science


User Image
A member of the Granite Mountain Hotshot crew from Prescott, Arizona, watches as flames take off during a burnout operation meant to contain part of the Whitewater-Baldy fire on May 31.
Photo: Jakob Schiller



The largest fire in New Mexico’s history kicked off this year’s fire season on May 16, with another big fire spreading across Utah and Nevada over the weekend – both ignited by lighting. While there have been earlier, smaller fires, the Whitewater-Baldy fire in the Gila National Forest of Southern New Mexico has received national attention by consuming over 250,000 acres. It’s currently about 20 percent contained.

As a photojournalist, for me wildland fire is a weirdly addictive thing to cover. The act of fighting fires creates a unique and particularly visual moment where natural elements face off with human technology and strategy. Each summer I usually find myself inhaling lungs full of what has now become the familiar smell of tree smoke.

Covering these infernos varies from state to state and there are some things you should know before running off to make your own pictures of crowning trees or planes dropping slurry. It’s very easy to get injured in these situations and the only way to ensure one’s safety is to stay away entirely, but for those who must go for whatever reason, these can be helpful tips. Shoot at your own risk.

1. Go through a safety training. Anyone who wants to be out on a wildfire should know some basic things about fire behavior. You should also know how to use a fire shelter. In some places it’s not a requirement to have any training, but it’s going to make you feel a lot better when you’re standing next to, or in, a forest of blazing trees. It’s also going to make a the firefighters feel a lot better about letting you tag along if they know you can take care of yourself.

2. Don’t get mesmerized by the flames. The first time you’re on a fire it’s an amazing experience to stand next to a wall of flames. But remember, there is a lot more to a forest fire than just the fire. For me, it’s always about the people. I want my photos to tell a story about the firefighter’s work and the potential dangers. Flame pictures can quickly get boring, so find a way to dig a little deeper.

3. Invest in proper fire gear. You will never be allowed anywhere near a fire unless you have the proper wildland fire equipment including fire resistant pants, a fire resistant shirt, fire approved boots, a helmet, gloves and a fire shelter.

4. Show, don’t tell. It’s easy to show a firefighter lighting some grass on fire. It’s harder to capture how fatigued that firefighter might feel after doing that for 12 hours each day.

5. Know your state’s regulations. In California the media are granted much more access and can usually go anywhere they want unless they are endangering the safety of others. In New Mexico where I currently live, to get anywhere near a forest fire you have to be accompanied by some kind of fire official.

6. Pay attention to the light. This is one of the first rules of photography, but in a fire you often have a unique chance to exploit crazy light situations. At the Whitewater-Baldy fire for example, all the smoke acted like a huge, rose-tinted softbox. It muted the highlights and gave me a wonderfully soft light to play with even at noon when the light is usually awful. In the evening the setting sun often turns the smoke all kinds of colors, so if you have the time stick around until the end of the day.

7. When it doesn’t feel safe, turn around and go back. All the firefighters I’ve ever worked with have kept an eye out for me, but sometimes their level of comfort and my level of comfort differ because they are 100 times more experienced. There have been a couple times when I was told I could keep going, but it didn’t feel safe so I called it. The way I see it, if I’m worrying about my safety I’m probably not paying attention to my photography.

8. Always bring more of everything. More batteries. More water and more food. Almost every time I shoot a fire I end up spending double the amount of time than I expected. Sometimes it takes longer to get access to the fire. Sometimes it takes longer to get to the spot where you want to shoot. Sometimes you’re stuck in one spot because it’s not safe to move. Firefighters are always well stocked with water and Gatorade and more than happy to share their provisions. But just to be safe, make sure you have that extra quart of water and couple extra granola bars packed away.

9. The moment oftentimes isn’t at the fire. One of my favorite fire photos of all time happened at base camp. I was with a group of elite firefighters camped 10 miles into the California wilderness. Before heading out for the day one of the women in the crew took a moment to practice yoga under a tree. The picture was unexpected and I think it added a lot of important information to a story about what the life of a firefighter really looks like.

photo gallery and more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2012/06/forest-fire-season/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 451 452 453 454 455  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls