Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 24th, 2017, 8:19pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44957 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #75 on: Jul 13th, 2010, 3:43pm »

Phantoms and Monsters

NOTE: I ran across this unusual capture of a supposed 'shadow person' or dark entity on a gas station surveillance camera. The form suddenly manifests and walks towards a doorway. It then appears, towards the end of the clip, that the entity attempts to climb something. There's a possibility that a set of stairs may have existed in that location at one time. I'm not going to say much on the validity of the video but it is very interesting nonetheless...Lon



http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/07/video-climbing-entity.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #76 on: Jul 13th, 2010, 4:08pm »

Everyone was talking about the UFO that shut down the chinese airport. At the bottom of this post is an article link about it, but they had an interesting comment left in the comment section:

begin quote -

Yes, I believe in "ufo's". My dad was in the air force during the korean war, & his plane was surrounded by UFO's. He could barely talk about it. All their instruments went down, they didn't know what was holding them up with no engine sound, & it was very frightening! He was told never to say anything to anyone by the 'powers that be', & even when talking to his immediate family, he became extremely uncomfortable and agitated. & My dad wasn't afraid of anything! He was 6'4", 200 pounds of strength & intelligence... Yes. They are definitely out there, & no, they are not going to do us in as a planet or a species.
By Diane on Jul 13th 2010 at 1:57PM

- end quote

http://hot.aol.com/2010/07/13/paging-mulder-and-scully-to-china/?sms_ss=email

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #77 on: Jul 13th, 2010, 5:46pm »



User Image
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #78 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 07:33am »

Morning, Crystal!

Yes, an interesting comment. More serious people should come forward so that others will finally start to think about this subject.
on Jul 13th, 2010, 5:46pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
User Image

Awww! smiley
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #79 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 07:56am »

Good morning Phil! cheesy

More and more people are talking publically about UFO's without the giggle factor.

That photo was taken in New Zealand. Another National Geographic photo. They have some beautiful photos. Glad you liked it.

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #80 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 07:59am »

Seattle Times

Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - Page updated at 11:46 PM

'Barefoot bandit' back in U.S.; hearing Wednesday in Miami court
By Erik Lacitis

Seattle Times staff reporter

NASSAU, Bahamas
By all appearances, Bahamian authorities decided it was just best to deport Colton Harris-Moore as quickly as possible to the United States.

So Tuesday evening — after pleading guilty to a minor charge in the Bahamas and paying a $300 fine — the teen fugitive known as the "Barefoot Bandit" landed in Miami and was taken into custody by FBI agents.

He was escorted from the commercial plane — with shoes on this time — and into a waiting sport-utility vehicle, which took him to jail.

He is to make a first appearance in U.S. District Court in Miami on Wednesday. A judge there must determine that the person before him is the same person charged with the theft of an airplane in Idaho that crashed near Granite Falls last year. If so, Harris-Moore will be sent back to Western Washington for arraignment in that case.

It will be up to the U.S. Marshal's Office and its transportation system — known as "Con Air" — to determine when Harris-Moore will return to the Northwest. Depending on flight schedules, "that could be anywhere from a few days to a few weeks," said Emily Langlie, the spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney in Seattle. "Harris-Moore will be treated like any other federal inmate."

Eventually, a long list of jurisdictions from Western Washington to Indiana will have to decide whether and how to charge Harris-Moore for some 70 crimes allegedly committed in at least six states during a two-year spree after he escaped from a Renton halfway house. Most of the allegations stem from crimes on Camano and Orcas islands.

Tuesday morning in Nassau, Harris-Moore put his first court case to rest.

He arrived in the courtroom in handcuffs and shackles from a holding cell, where an escort officer in a white, starched jacket, had chatted him up.

The escort officer later told how he asked Harris-Moore about airplanes. He said the youth appeared quite at ease.

"He told me he had always been fascinated by them, ever since kindergarten," said the guard.

The guard asked about how hard it was to take a 40-some-foot boat.

He said the teenager told him, "Well, I grew up around boats."

Harris-Moore was arrested Sunday morning by Bahamian police as he tried to flee on a stolen boat.

He told police he came to the country, located southeast of Florida, because it has so many islands, airports and docks, according to an officer who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case.

The teenager claimed that he told islanders he was trying to get to Cuba so he could throw police off his trail, but that he intended to make his way to the Turks and Caicos Islands southeast of the Bahamas, the officer said.

Monique Gomez, the Bahamas attorney hired Sunday by Seattle-area parties interested in helping the 19-year-old, did pretty well for the "Barefoot Bandit."

On Monday, Bahamian police had said Harris-Moore would face a gun-possession charge and possibly numerous theft-related charges stemming from his alleged weeklong crime spree there.

He ended up pleading guilty to "having landed from a destination outside of the Bahamas, without leave of an immigration officer."

The penalty was $300 or three months in jail.

His mother, Pam Kohler, wired the money to pay the fine after the U. S. Embassy in Nassau called, said Seattle attorney John Henry Browne, who has been retained by the Camano Island woman to represent her son.

Harris-Moore has yet to call Browne. It's not clear if he has spoken with his mother; she declined to comment Tuesday.

The court hearing was over in 15 minutes.

Afterward, Gomez smiled at compliments from others in the courthouse.

It's a small world in the legal profession in the Bahamas. Things that might raise an eyebrow in the U.S. are part of that small world.

For example, the arraignment was held in a small, second-story courtroom presided over by Magistrate Roger Gomez — Monique Gomez's uncle.

There were no wooden benches like one might see in a U.S. courtroom, just three dozen or so metal-frame chairs with vinyl seats. The room did have an air conditioner blasting away the 90-degree heat and 79 percent humidity. The hallway, on the other hand, had only a floor fan.

Gomez was selected by Jim Johanson, an Edmonds lawyer, who in June said he had been asked by a couple who wanted to remain anonymous to offer $50,000 to Harris-Moore to surrender by 3 p.m. June 8.

Johanson said he would represent Harris-Moore free of charge as part of the arrangement.

But of course, Harris-Moore never took that offer.

When the teen was arrested in the Bahamas, Johanson said, the couple asked that Johanson find representation for him.

Johanson used Google and contacts in Florida, and found Gomez. He said the couple paid Gomez less than $5,000.

"I was very pleased with her hard work. She did a hell of a job plea-bargaining the thing to a $300 fine and getting him out of jail time," Johansen said.

When Gomez met with Harris-Moore on Monday, she said, "He was relaxed. He wanted everything to go away."

She tried a bit of humor with him, asking if he had been bitten by sand flies. He said no.

more after the jump
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2012349248_colton14m.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #81 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:02am »

Washington Post

Iranian nuclear scientist heads homeward in anger

By Greg Miller and Thomas Erdbrink
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, July 14, 2010; 5:06 AM

An Iranian nuclear scientist who had disappeared in Saudi Arabia last summer stepped out of a cab in front of Iran's diplomatic mission in Washington on Monday, asking for a ticket back to his homeland. Shahram Amiri told officials that he had been abducted by U.S. intelligence operatives and had spent much of the past year in Tucson being questioned about Iran's nuclear ambitions.

Amiri's reappearance was as mysterious as his disappearance and came just weeks after a series of Internet videos added to the intrigue surrounding the case. In the videos, Amiri claimed alternately to have been kidnapped by the CIA and to have come to this country on his own accord to pursue a PhD.

Early Wednesday, an Iranian news agency reported that Amiri left the U.S. for Iran.

The case has emerged as a source of embarrassment for both governments. The Obama administration faced the departure of someone whose defection had been considered an intelligence coup. Iran described Amiri's desire to the leave the United States as a setback for American efforts, but Amiri may have compromised the secrecy of Iran's nuclear endeavors.

According to an official familiar with the account Amiri gave at the mission, his pleas to be released were finally granted when he was brought to Washington and sent to a nondescript storefront on Wisconsin Avenue, where Iranian representatives work in a space officially operated by Pakistan's embassy.

Within hours of arriving at the mission, Amiri told state-run Iranian television that "my kidnapping was a disgraceful act for America. . . . I was under enormous psychological pressure and supervision of armed agents in the past 14 months."

U.S. officials disputed Amiri's account, insisting that he defected voluntarily and provided valuable intelligence about Iran's nuclear program before increased worries over the safety of his family in Iran prompted him to seek a return. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told reporters Tuesday that Amiri was and always had been free to go. "These are decisions that are his alone to make," Clinton said, noting that Iran has refused to release three American backpackers detained in the country for nearly a year.

Amiri's case has provided a rare public glimpse into the espionage sparring between the United States and Iran, much as the capture and swap of Russian undercover operatives this month exposed the extent to which such cloak-and-dagger endeavors have outlasted the Cold War. The United States and other nations contend that Iran is secretly developing the means to build a nuclear weapon, but the Iranian government says its program is entirely peaceful.

Amiri, 32, has said he worked at Iran's Malek-e-Ashtar Industrial University, which U.S. intelligence agencies believe is connected to the country's Revolutionary Guards Corps. Amiri is not believed to have been directly involved in the most secretive aspects of Iran's nuclear efforts, but intelligence officials said he provided significant insights during lengthy debriefings with the CIA.

"I don't think the U.S. government goes to great lengths to help people come over here unless there is significant intelligence value to be gained," said a U.S. official briefed on the case, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss it.

Amiri disappeared under mysterious circumstances in June 2009, about the same time that U.S. officials spoke of an "intelligence coup" involving a high-profile defector.

He appears to have been resettled in Tucson, where his presence was a carefully guarded secret until the scientist appeared in videos this spring. In the first, which aired on Iranian television, Amiri stares into what appears to be an amateur Web camera, claiming to have been tortured and pleading for human rights organizations to intervene.

But in a subsequent and more polished video that U.S. officials said was crafted with help from the CIA, Amiri is dressed in a suit coat before a backdrop that includes a chessboard and a globe turned to the Western Hemisphere. Amiri says he has never betrayed his homeland and asks "everyone to stop presenting information that distorts the reality about me."

Amiri also says he knows that the Iranian government "will take care of and protect my family." U.S. officials said fears for their safety appear to have been behind his decisions to release the videos portraying himself as a kidnapping victim, as well as his effort to return.

"The Iranians aren't beyond using family to influence people," said a second U.S. official, who added that Amiri's ability to appear in the videos, as well as reach the Iranian mission, "gives the lie to the idea he was tortured or imprisoned. He can tell any story he wants -- but that won't make it true."

Defectors who return to their native countries risk severe reprisals. In one of the most notorious cases, Saddam Hussein's son-in-law defected to Jordan in the mid-1990s and began providing information on Iraq's banned weapons programs. He returned after being promised that he would not be punished, but within days he was killed.

Amiri arrived at the Iranian mission at 6:30 p.m. Monday, officials said. Only a security guard was present, and the two spoke in Farsi. In meetings with Pakistani diplomats, Amiri said he had been drugged after stepping into a cab in Medina, Saudi Arabia, last summer and woke up in the United States. He said he wasn't physically abused but claimed to have endured severe "mental torture."

It was not clear whether Iranian officials had allowed Amiri to speak to his family. Iran has insisted that he would return on a Turkish Airlines flight because of Iran's close ties with Turkey. The next Turkish flight to Tehran via Istanbul was scheduled to leave Wednesday afternoon from New York's Kennedy Airport.

more after the jump
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/14/AR2010071400529.html?hpid=topnews

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #82 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:08am »

Stars and Stripes

Jul 14, 8:24 AM EDT
Afghan attacks kill 8 US soldiers in 24 hours

By MIRWAIS KHAN
Associated Press Writer

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (AP) -- Eight American troops died in attacks in southern Afghanistan, including a car bombing and gunfight outside a police compound in Kandahar, officials said Wednesday as the Taliban push back against a coalition effort to secure the volatile region.

A suicide attacker slammed a car bomb into the gate of the headquarters of the elite Afghan National Civil Order Police late Tuesday in Kandahar, a NATO statement said. Minutes later, insurgents opened fire with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades.

Three U.S. troops, an Afghan policeman and five civilians died in the attack, but NATO said the insurgents failed to enter the compound.

The special police unit, known as ANCOP, had only recently been dispatched to Kandahar to set up checkpoints along with international forces to try to secure the south's largest city, the spiritual birthplace of the Taliban.

The dead civilians included three Afghan translators and two security guards, Kandahar provincial police chief Sardar Mohammad Zazai said.

Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi telephoned reporters Wednesday to claim responsibility for the attack. The insurgents, which are prone to exaggerate death tolls inflicted on Afghan and international security forces, claimed 13 international troops and eight Afghan security forces died in the raid.

NATO and Afghan troops are fanning out elsewhere in Kandahar province to pressure insurgents in rural areas. The strategy is to improve security with more and better-trained police and troops so that capable governance can take root and development projects can move forward and win the loyalty of ordinary Afghans.

The Taliban have responded by ratcheting suicide attacks and bombings, making last month the deadliest of the nearly 9-year-old war for international forces.

On Wednesday, four more American troops were killed by a roadside bomb in the south, while one more U.S. service member died the same day of wounds from a gunbattle.

So far in July, 45 international troops have died in Afghanistan, 33 of them Americans.

In other attacks around the country, nine Afghan civilians died in the south when their vehicle hit a roadside bomb in the volatile district of Marjah in Helmand province, the Ministry of Interior said. Another homemade bomb killed two security guards traveling on a road in eastern Paktika province.

Two suspected Taliban also died in Helmand's Lashkar Gar district when the roadside bomb they were trying to plant exploded prematurely, the ministry said.

more after the jump
http://ap.stripes.com/dynamic/stories/A/AS_AFGHANISTAN?SITE=DCSAS&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2010-07-14-06-34-15

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #83 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:12am »

Phantoms and Monsters

NOTE: I have been informed that the David Eckhart's alien encounters / abductions will be covered on SyFy's 'Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files' on Thursday, July 15th at 10 PM ET. As well, there is a very good possibility that NBC Universal will produce a 1 hour presentation of David's experiences sometime in the future. I can't go into this any further until details are worked out. For those not familiar with the case, I have posted the links to the case information and investigation by our team. BTW, we are still working on this case and expect more to evidence to surface as time goes on...Lon

A link to the trailer: http://www.cinemablend.com/television/Fact-Or-Faked-Promo-For-Syfy-s-New-Series-25071.html

several videos after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/07/eckhart-encounters-syfy-fact-or-faked.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #84 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:16am »

Science Daily

Juno Spacecraft Armored Up to Go to Jupiter
ScienceDaily (July 13, 2010)

NASA's Juno spacecraft will be forging ahead into a treacherous environment at Jupiter with more radiation than any other place NASA has ever sent a spacecraft, except the sun. In a specially filtered cleanroom in Denver, where Juno is being assembled, engineers recently added a unique protective shield around its sensitive electronics. New pictures of the assembly were recently released.

"Juno is basically an armored tank going to Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, Juno's principal investigator, based at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "Without its protective shield, or radiation vault, Juno's brain would get fried on the very first pass near Jupiter."

An invisible force field filled with high-energy particles coming off from Jupiter and its moons surrounds the largest planet in our solar system. This magnetic force field, similar to a less powerful one around Earth, shields Jupiter from charged particles flying off the sun. The electrons, protons and ions around Jupiter are energized by the planet's super-fast rotation, sped up to nearly the speed of light.

Jupiter's radiation belts are shaped like a huge doughnut around the planet's equatorial region and extend out past the moon Europa, about 650,000 kilometers (400,000 miles) out from the top of Jupiter's clouds.

"For the 15 months Juno orbits Jupiter, the spacecraft will have to withstand the equivalent of more than 100 million dental X-rays," said Bill McAlpine, Juno's radiation control manager, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "In the same way human beings need to protect their organs during an X-ray exam, we have to protect Juno's brain and heart."

The strategy? Give Juno a kind of six-sided lead apron on steroids.

With guidance from JPL and the principal investigator, engineers at Lockheed Martin Space Systems designed and built a special radiation vault made of titanium for a centralized electronics hub. While other materials exist that make good radiation blockers, engineers chose titanium because lead is too soft to withstand the vibrations of launch, and some other materials were too difficult to work with.

Each titanium wall measures nearly a square meter (nearly 9 square feet) in area, about 1 centimeter (a third of an inch) in thickness, and 18 kilograms (40 pounds) in mass. This titanium box -- about the size of an SUV's trunk -- encloses Juno's command and data handling box (the spacecraft's brain), power and data distribution unit (its heart) and about 20 other electronic assemblies. The whole vault weighs about 200 kilograms (500 pounds).

The vault is not designed to completely prevent every Jovian electron, ion or proton from hitting the system, but it will dramatically slow down the aging effect radiation has on electronics for the duration of the mission.

"The centralized radiation vault is the first of its kind," Bolton said. "We basically designed it from the ground up."

When NASA's Galileo spacecraft visited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003, its electronics were shielded by special components designed to be resistant to radiation. Galileo also didn't need to survive the harshest radiation regions, where Juno will operate.

But Juno isn't relying solely on the radiation vault. Scientists designed a path that takes Juno around Jupiter's poles, spending as little time as possible in the sizzling radiation belts around Jupiter's equator. Engineers also used designs for electronics already approved for the Martian radiation environment, which is harsher than Earth's, though not as harsh as Jupiter's. Parts of the electronics were made from tantalum, or tungsten, another radiation-resistant metal. Some assemblies also have their own mini-vaults for protection.

Packing the assemblies next to each other allows them to shield their neighbors. In addition, engineers wrapped copper and stainless steel braids like chain mail around wires connecting the electronics to other parts of the spacecraft.

JPL tested pieces of the vault in a radiation environment similar to Jupiter's to make sure the design will be able to handle the stress of space flight and the Jupiter environment, McAlpine said. In a special lead-lined testing tub there, they battered pieces of the spacecraft with gamma rays from radioactive cobalt pellets and analyzed the results for Juno's expedition.

The vault was lifted onto Juno's propulsion module on May 19 at Lockheed Martin's high-bay cleanroom. It will undergo further testing once the whole spacecraft is put together. The assembly and testing process, which also includes installing solar panels for the first-ever solar-powered mission to Jupiter, is expected to last through next spring. Juno is expected to launch in August 2011.

"The Juno assembly is proceeding well," said Tim Gasparrini, Lockheed Martin program manager. "We have a number of the flight and test unit spacecraft avionics components installed into the radiation vault for system testing and we have also just installed the first instrument, the microwave radiometer."

http://www.nasa.gov/juno

more after the jump
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100713122456.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #85 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:24am »

Telegraph

Daniel Houghton, a former MI6 worker accused of disclosing top secret material has pleaded guilty to two charges against him.

Published: 9:58AM BST 14 Jul 2010

Daniel Houghton, 25, who worked for the secret intelligence service between September 2007 and May last year, denied a count of theft, but admitted two offences under the Official Secrets Act.

He was accused of stealing the material and of breaching the Official Secrets Act by disclosing the files.

Houghton, of Hoxton, east London, who holds British and Dutch nationality, was arrested in a Scotland Yard sting at a London hotel in March.

He appeared before Mr Justice Bean at the Royal Courts of Justice in London for a plea and case management hearing on Wednesday morning.

Houghton, wearing an open-necked pale shirt and dark suit was present in the dock of the court for the proceedings.

Piers Arnold, prosecuting, told the judge that the pleas entered were acceptable to the prosecution.

He asked for the theft matter to be adjourned until after Houghton has been sentenced ''with the prosecution's intention to offer no evidence in respect of that charge''.

Houghton pleaded guilty to the following offences.

Houghton will be sentenced on Friday September 3 at the Old Bailey.

more after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/7889420/Former-MI6-worker-pleads-guilty-to-disclosing-secret-material.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #86 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:31am »

Wired

Wikileaks Cash Flows In, Drips Out
By Kim Zetter July 13, 2010 | 8:07 pm | Categories: Sunshine and Secrecy, Wikileaks

The secret-spilling website Wikileaks appears to be a frugal spender, tapping less than 10 percent of the funds received through two of its three donation methods, according to the third-party foundation that manages those contributions.

Wikileaks has received 400,000 euros (U.S. $500,000) through PayPal or bank money transfers since late December, and spent only 30,000 euros (U.S. $38,000) from that funding, says Hendrik Fulda, vice president of the Berlin-based Wau Holland Foundation.

The money has gone to pay the travel expenses of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and spokesman Daniel Schmitt, as well as to cover the costs of computer hardware, such as servers, and leasing data lines, says Fulda. Wikileaks does not currently pay a salary to Assange or other volunteers from this funding, though there have been discussions about doing so in the future, Fulda adds. The details have not yet been worked out.

If you are drawing from volunteers who are basically doing stuff for free and if you start paying money, the question is to whom, and to whom not, do you pay, and how much? Fulda said. Its almost a moral question: How much money do you pay?

The spending figures were first reported by the German paper Der Freitag, after a series of anonymous posts circulated online accusing Wikileaks of misusing donor funds. The posts were authored by an anonymous person who claimed to be a Wikileaks insider, and appeared on Cryptome.org, a competing transparency site.

The limited financial disclosure by the Wau Holland Foundation this week offers the first look at how Wikileaks spends some of its money. Wikileaks does not publish such figures itself, but has claimed to have $200,000 a year in operating costs, and to have raised about $1 million in total.

Fulda said Assange and Schmitt travel coach when they fly on behalf of Wikileaks, and that they have focused expenses on building and maintaining the sites infrastructure, submitting original receipts to the foundation whenever Wikileaks needs expenses reimbursed. Fulda would not provide a more detailed breakdown of all the money paid out so far, but says his foundation is producing a report that will be available in August that should provide more transparency.

The foundation manages donations sent to Wikileaks from people around the world through PayPal and wire transfers directed to a bank account controlled by the foundation. It does not handle donations submitted through Moneybookers, a PayPal-like service, that Wikileaks also lists on its website as a method for donating.

Fulda says Wikileaks may have other sources of funding perhaps from private donors and other foundations but he has no knowledge of them.

But I believe we are taking in the majority of the donations that are coming in through Europe and elsewhere, he said.

Wikileaks Assange declined to discuss the organizations budget with Threat Level.

The Wau Holland Foundation is named after Herwart Holland-Moritz, also known as Wau Holland. He founded the Chaos Computer Club, a hacker club in Germany that has been at the forefront of the hacking community since its establishment in 1981.

Wikileaks approached the foundation last year to manage its donations because of its reputation in supporting the concept of freedom of information. Although the foundation is run by unpaid volunteers, Fulda said its advantage is that it has a more formal structure to manage funds than does Wikileaks.

Wau Holland began handling donations for the site beginning last October. The foundation adheres to Germanys rules for accountability.

We have certain responsibilities for this money, and we are taking this seriously, Fulda says.

Wikileaks went offline last December after running out of money, and pleaded for donations. Fulda said the foundation had received only about 5,000 euros (U.S. $6,000) in donations on behalf of the whistleblowing site at the time. Wikileaks tweeted on December 24 that it would be down until at least January 6, but that period stretched to five months, during most of which the sites archive was unavailable.

The site didnt come back online until May, and even then, its support for encrypted downloading was absent, as was its Tor Hidden Service previously the most secure way to leak documents to the website. Its secure submission webpage stopped working in mid-June. Though theres been no announcement on the website explaining the limited functionality, Assange has since said that the sites infrastructure is being re-tooled to handle the increased load that media attention has brought it.

Donations began pouring in once people saw in January that the site needed help, Hulda said. Wikileaks plea for donations indicated the site needed to raise at least $200,000 to cover a years worth of operating expenses, increased to at least $600,000 if its volunteers were to be paid.

Just asking for money [before this] didnt really work, Fulda said. There was nothing coming in. But when the website had to go down because of lack of funds, then money was coming in.

The site got another boost in donations in April after it published the controversial video showing a 2007 U.S. Army helicopter attack in Baghdad. Wikileaks claimed it raised more than $150,000 in less than a week after the release of the video. A U.S. Army intelligence analyst named Bradley Manning was since arrested and charged with being Wikileaks source for the video. Assange and other Wikileaks volunteers have claimed that the organization commissioned lawyers to defend Manning, and the group has campaigned for more donations from the public to cover the legal expenses.

Fulda said that no money handled by the foundation has gone to pay expenses for Mannings defense. He didnt know if Wikileaks obtained money from other sources for the purpose. He said, however, that his foundation would have no problem in principle paying such legal expenses.

Defending whistleblowers is one of the objectives of Wikileaks, he said. So I dont see an issue with that in theory. How this would work in practice would need to be sorted out.

Donations channeled through the foundation did not pay for Wikileaks editing and production costs behind the Iraq video, he said. A recent New Yorker profile of Wikileaks indicated that Dutch hacker and businessman Rop Gonggrijp stepped in to cover those expenses, advancing about 10,000 euros to finance it.

The 400,000 euros that Wikileaks raised this year is enough to sustain it through the first quarter of next year, Fulda said, covering the costs of a more robust infrastructure that Assange and others are currently working to build.

But the surge of donations has since slowed to a trickle about 2,000 euros a month, Fulda said.

The volume of money coming in is way, way down since the website went back up, he said. I think people get the message that if the website is down there is not enough money. As long as the website is up, [people think] there seems to be enough money.

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/07/wikileaks-funding/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #87 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:34am »

Wired: This day in Tech

July 14, 1965: Mariner 4 Brings Mars Up Close and Cardinal

By Brandon Keim July 13, 2010 | 8:00 pm | Categories: 20th century, Astronomy, Space Exploration

1965: After a few million years of watching Mars from afar, humanity meets the red planet not quite in person, but through the eyes of NASAs Mariner 4 satellite.

User Image

The half-ton space camera flew past Mars eight months after being shot from Earth on an Atlas rocket, having traveled 325 million miles. It flew within 6,000 miles of the planets surface, snapping 22 digital photographs before continuing into space. They were the first close-ups ever taken of another planet, and it was only appropriate that the subject was Mars, a source of fascination since the beginning of recorded history.

There were, alas, none of the canals seen by astronomers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, nor evidence of senders of messages heard by Nikola Tesla or Gugliemo Marconi. Indeed, the hazy images of a barren, crater-strewn landscape ended speculation that Mars might plausibly be inhabited by higher life forms. But those low-resolution 0.04 megapixel images stirred the soul in different ways, and they paved the way for future photo shoots that would reveal a planet every bit as fantastic as imagined.

After leaving Mars, Mariner 4 journeyed to the far side of the sun, and finally returned to Earths vicinity in 1967. Long after it was expected to break down, the satellite continued to send information about cosmic dust, celestial dynamics and solar plasma. After being put through a series of operations tests, Mariner 4 was shut down Dec. 20, 1967.

Images: NASA

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/07/0714first-mars-closeup-photo/

Crystal

edit to add photos
« Last Edit: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:37am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #88 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 08:56am »

Wired

In a First, Full-Sized Robo-Copter Flies With No Human Help

Read More http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/07/in-a-first-full-sized-robo-copter-flies-with-no-human-help/#ixzz0tfHEaE78

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #89 on: Jul 14th, 2010, 11:25am »

on Jul 14th, 2010, 07:56am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
That photo was taken in New Zealand. Another National Geographic photo. They have some beautiful photos. Glad you liked it.

Crystal

Yes, it's beautiful! smiley

on Jul 14th, 2010, 08:02am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Washington Post

Iranian nuclear scientist heads homeward in anger

By Greg Miller and Thomas Erdbrink
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, July 14, 2010; 5:06 AM

An Iranian nuclear scientist who had disappeared in Saudi Arabia last summer stepped out of a cab in front of Iran's diplomatic mission in Washington on Monday, asking for a ticket back to his homeland. Shahram Amiri told officials that he had been abducted by U.S. intelligence operatives and had spent much of the past year in Tucson being questioned about Iran's nuclear ambitions.

Amiri's reappearance was as mysterious as his disappearance and came just weeks after a series of Internet videos added to the intrigue surrounding the case. In the videos, Amiri claimed alternately to have been kidnapped by the CIA and to have come to this country on his own accord to pursue a PhD.

Early Wednesday, an Iranian news agency reported that Amiri left the U.S. for Iran.

The case has emerged as a source of embarrassment for both governments. The Obama administration faced the departure of someone whose defection had been considered an intelligence coup. Iran described Amiri's desire to the leave the United States as a setback for American efforts, but Amiri may have compromised the secrecy of Iran's nuclear endeavors.

According to an official familiar with the account Amiri gave at the mission, his pleas to be released were finally granted when he was brought to Washington and sent to a nondescript storefront on Wisconsin Avenue, where Iranian representatives work in a space officially operated by Pakistan's embassy.

Within hours of arriving at the mission, Amiri told state-run Iranian television that "my kidnapping was a disgraceful act for America. . . . I was under enormous psychological pressure and supervision of armed agents in the past 14 months."

U.S. officials disputed Amiri's account, insisting that he defected voluntarily and provided valuable intelligence about Iran's nuclear program before increased worries over the safety of his family in Iran prompted him to seek a return. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told reporters Tuesday that Amiri was and always had been free to go. "These are decisions that are his alone to make," Clinton said, noting that Iran has refused to release three American backpackers detained in the country for nearly a year.

...

Odd. So we are left to speculate about who's lying here. rolleyes
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls