Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jul 21st, 2017, 01:46am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 524 525 526 527 528  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 90944 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7875 on: Jan 11th, 2013, 09:06am »

Reuters

Russia alarmed by lack of deal with Iran on nuclear talks

Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:15am EST

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Moscow is alarmed that no date or venue has been agreed for a new round of talks between global powers and Iran over Tehran's nuclear programme, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said on Friday.

Iran, which denies Western accusations it is seeking to develop a capability to make nuclear weapons, said last week it had agreed to resume talks in January with six powers. But Ryabkov said there was no final agreement on a date or venue.

"This alarms us, because the pause has dragged on," the Interfax news agency quoted Ryabkov, the Russian negotiator, as saying. "As a nation and a member of the 'group of six' we are working actively to find a solution."

There was no breakthrough in three rounds of talks since April 2012 and Israel has stepped up talk of pre-emptive attacks on Iranian nuclear sites, lending urgency to diplomacy.

Western diplomatic sources said on Friday that Iran has yet to respond to a proposal to hold a new round of talks next week with the six nations - the United States, France, Britain, China, Russia and Germany.

Global powers, particularly in the West, want to rein in Iran's uranium enrichment work. Tehran says it is refining uranium for peaceful ends only but enrichment yields material that can be used to make nuclear bombs if processed further.

(Writing by Steve Gutterman; Editing by Mark Heinrich)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/11/us-nuclear-iran-talks-idUSBRE90A0LV20130111

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7876 on: Jan 11th, 2013, 09:11am »

Wired

CES Day 5: Mind-Controlled Copters, 4K TVs, and Touchscreens Made of Mist

By Gadget Lab Staff

01.11.13, 6:30 AM

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA -- We're getting close to the end of this year's Consumer Electronics Show, which wraps up Friday afternoon. The most interesting items we've seen here haven't been the traditional, bread-and-butter stuff you'd expect, like TVs, headphones, laptops and home entertainment systems.

Instead, we've been more fascinated by the left-field entries like brainwave-controlled toys, lightbulbs that communicate with your iPhone, $1000 tablets built for gaming, and laser-powered heads-up displays for your car.

Sure, there are plenty of cool TVs we want to take home (we've got one in this very round-up) but the real fun of CES is dipping into the non-stop stream of inventive, conceptual, crazy -- and crazy-expensive -- products on the showroom floor. Here's today's greatest hits.

gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/01/ces-2013-day-5-gallery/?pid=4314&viewall=true

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7877 on: Jan 11th, 2013, 09:14am »

Washington Post

Banks seek NSA help amid attacks on their computer systems

By Ellen Nakashima, Updated: Friday, January 11, 3:06 AM

Major U.S. banks have turned to the National Security Agency for help protecting their computer systems after a barrage of assaults that have disrupted their Web sites, according to industry officials.

The attacks on the sites, which started about a year ago but intensified this past September, have grown increasingly sophisticated, officials said. The NSA has been asked to provide technical assistance to help banks further assess their systems and to better understand the attackers’ tactics.

The cooperation between the NSA and banks, industry officials say, underscores the government’s fears about the unprecedented assault against the financial sector, and is part of a broader effort by the government to work with U.S. firms on cybersecurity. Nonetheless, the assistance is likely to dismay privacy advocates, who say that the world’s largest electronic spying agency has no business peering inside private companies’ systems, even if for the strict purpose of improving computer security.

U.S. intelligence officials said last year they believe the attacks against the banks and other companies have been carried out by Iran, although some experts have cautioned that it is difficult to accurately determine who is behind them.

“If you look at their actions, they’re taking this very seriously. The government is stepping up to the plate,” said one bank official, who like most interviewed for this article declined to be named because he was not authorized to speak for the record.

NSA declined to comment for this article beyond a statement saying that the agency provides assistance “in full compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.”

DDoS attacks

The cyber assaults against the banks are known as distributed denial-of-service, or DDoS, attacks, in which Web servers are overwhelmed with traffic, thus slowing their responsiveness or crashing them altogether. The disruptions — which typically last up to an hour or two at most — do not involve the theft of data, but have interrupted online banking services and diverted security teams at a large number of financial institutions.

The banks whose Web sites have been disrupted include Bank of America, PNC Bank, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, HSBC and Sun Trust. In recent weeks, attackers have targeted up to seven banks a day, but only on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

For security experts at banks — already considered to be among the best at cybersecurity in the private sector — the attacks have been far more challenging than most DDoS incidents because the assailants have commandeered vastly more traffic to carry out the attacks.

The government’s willingness to engage “is emblematic of how these cyber-related risks are evolving,” the bank official said. “Agencies like the NSA have tremendous expertise for very sophisticated types of information-security programs.”

Although the NSA is known mostly for its collection of intelligence, its mission includes “information assurance” to secure both the military’s computer networks and other “national security systems.” The NSA has for more than 20 years helped companies that provide software to the Defense Department improve their security.

In general, it can provide assistance to private sector companies when their systems are seen as being critical to national security, said Richard George, a former computer security official at NSA. The request must come from a government agency, such as Treasury or the Department of Homeland Security, that has authority to work with the company.

“We can certainly help them analyze the situation,” said George, who is now at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory. “One thing we can do is ‘red team’ their solution. If their tech guys say, ‘This is what we plan to do,’ we can look at that and say, ‘Is it effective?’ ”

Google obtained NSA help in 2010 after the tech giant found its computer networks compromised by hackers believed to be based in China. The request, made through DHS, was justified on the grounds that Google’s search engine is widely used on Defense Department computers, a former defense official said.

George said the agency’s assistance usually entails a small team — say, six people — inspecting a company’s system to help the firm understand how an intrusion happened, what if anything was stolen, and whether similar events have happened at other firms.

The team can advise a company on how to repair its system and strengthen and test its defenses to prevent repeat occurrences. Some company data may be shared in order help derive a “signature” of the attack, former officials said.

The access to information is among the issues that concern critics.

“The dual mission of the NSA, to promote security and to pursue surveillance, creates an intractable privacy problem,” said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

Former NSA officials say privacy concerns are overblown and note that requests for NSA assistance are denied when there is no national security interest at stake. George said that, over the past decade, the agency has aided about 10 companies a year after their networks were compromised.

“If NSA is involved [with the banks], it’s because they would love to see what’s happening on the victim’s side,” a second former defense official said. “There’s probably more for the government to learn than to give.”

A silver lining

For the government, the recent DDoS incidents, while disturbing, have had a silver lining: They have given impetus to further collaboration with the private sector.

The Obama administration has sought to improve such cooperation, in the hopes of improving the nation’s cybersecurity. Last fall, the White House was calling Internet providers and asking them, “What are you seeing?” one Internet company official said. “Gradually, that evolved to ‘How can we help?’ ”

The NSA is far from the only agency working to improve cybersecurity in the private sector.

The FBI has a joint cyber task force in Northern Virginia and a 24/7 hotline for industry to call for help, and the Treasury Department has a cyber unit closely monitoring threats. The Homeland Security department, which runs a round-the-clock cybersecurity watch center in Arlington, is sharing alerts with industry, and has banking and Internet company representatives on the premises. The Justice Department has set up a nationwide network of national security cyber specialists, which officials said would do more outreach to industry and serve as a forum to exchange information.

The FBI is concerned about recent cyber events, said Richard McFeely, the bureau’s executive assistant director of the Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch. “We need to make sure that we’re responsive around the clock on it.”

In the case of banks, the government has begun providing officials with advance warning of a DDoS attack sometimes five or 10 minutes ahead of time.

The ability to share information between the FBI and the banks has been eased by the granting of more than 250 classified-level security clearances to bank officials in the past five years, industry officials said.

“What we’ve seen is a much more refined ability to receive information from the NSA and other agencies,” the bank official said.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/banks-seek-nsa-help-amid-attacks-on-their-computer-systems/2013/01/10/4aebc1e2-5b31-11e2-beee-6e38f5215402_story.html?hpid=z1

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7878 on: Jan 11th, 2013, 09:18am »








UFO Breaking News!! Alien Life Discovered in Mars UFO 2013. by Ofuhunter

Published on Jan 10, 2013

This video has to be seen in HD and full screen for real results. Please note this Nasa curiosity picture hasn't been edited in any way just zoom in and out. This ufo Mars pictures were taken by Curosity and send to planet earth on the 4th Jenuary 2013.
UFO related, sheilaaliens, Nasa, CIA, Classified.

left Picture Nasa Link

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0147MR0834003000E1_DXXX&am...

Center picture Nasa Link

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0147MR0834004000E1_DXXX&am...

Category
Science & Technology

~

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7879 on: Jan 12th, 2013, 09:38am »








Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3934
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7880 on: Jan 12th, 2013, 11:12am »

This illustrates the ease by which hoaxers can deceive the UFO community. It also illustrates how we often mis-understand what it is we see in the "real" world.....

Surrealist photographer recreates his dreams in real life

CNN iReport
By Daphne Sashin, CNN
Sat January 12, 2013

User Image
User Image

(CNN) -- A couple with fish bowls instead of heads. A magician who can make cards fly in a perfect spiral.

These images have to be real, our brains tell us.

That's the amazing thing about photography, says Ronen Goldman: If the light falls on the object just the right way, if the shadows line up naturally, our brains allow us to believe the unbelievable.

It's the guiding concept that drives 32-year-old Goldman, a conceptual photographer in Tel Aviv, Israel, who has been recreating his dream fragments in a six-year series called The "Surrealistic Pillow" Project. The project has appeared in the Affordable Art Fair in several cities.

Goldman considers himself more of a photographer than a manipulator. He shoots all the elements of his photos on location at the same time under the same lighting to achieve the best optic effects. He then uses Adobe's Photoshop editing program to layer the images together and mask objects as needed to create the illusions.

"Surrealism in my view is not simply Photoshop or photographic technique," he says. "The most important in my mind is the intention, or the concept you want to convey. It's not about levitation or multiplication of objects -- those are just tools I happen to use to convey deeper concepts I find to be interesting."

Art photography: When 'reality isn't good enough'


"Most of what I know today I learned from Internet resources, starting from shutter speeds and apertures, basic functions of the camera, to composition and Photoshop techniques.

What the brain draws from: Art and neuroscience

Some photos, like his depiction of a woman lying upside down on a staircase, and a man repelling down the wall, require little editing -- just creative angles and a discretely positioned step-stool, he explained.

Read more, see photos: http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/11/living/irpt-surreal-dream-photographer/index.html?hpt=hp_c1
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7881 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 09:13am »

Good morning Swamprat.

Thank you for that article.

Crystal



User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7882 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 09:16am »

Reuters

U.S. states flirt with major tax changes
13 January 2013, 10:06am EST
By Nanette Byrnes

CHAPEL HILL, North Carolina (Reuters) - Hopes for overhauling the federal tax system are fading in Washington, but in some state capitals, tax reform experiments - some far-reaching - are fast taking shape.

Across the South and Midwest, Republicans have consolidated control of state legislatures and governorships, giving them the power to test long-debated tax ideas.

Louisiana Republican Governor Bobby Jindal, for instance, called on Thursday for ending the state's income tax and corporate taxes, with sales taxes compensating for lost revenue.

A similar plan is being pushed by Republicans in North Carolina. Kansas, which cut its income tax significantly last year, may trim further. Oklahoma, which tried to cut income taxes last year, is expected to try again.

"When it comes to getting pro-growth tax reform done this year, the only real opportunities are at the state level," said Patrick Gleason, director of state affairs for Americans for Tax Reform, the Washington-based anti-tax lobbying group headed by small-government conservative activist Grover Norquist.

His group and other conservative pressure organizations, such as Americans for Prosperity, have targeted state capitals for tax reform campaigns.

Cutting income taxes and shifting the overall tax burden to consumption through higher sales taxes is a long-standing goal of some tax theorists. Critics argue that approach is regressive and unfairly burdens the middle class and the poor, who spend more of their earnings on items subject to sales tax.

Nicholas Johnson, a state tax expert with the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, gave the chances of sweeping tax changes taking hold a low probability.

Still, he said he worried the efforts in the states could move the tax discussion in a direction harmful to middle- and low-income taxpayers and make balancing state budgets harder.

"Even if this is too radical, if it makes other radical schemes seem more reasonable, that's worrisome," he said.

SINGLE-PARTY CONTROL

But the political moment may have arrived for a test.

Thirty-seven of the 50 states now have single-party control of legislatures and governorships: 25 Republican, 12 Democratic. In those states, unlike Capitol Hill, partisan gridlock is not a big issue, making difficult projects such as tax reform easier.

In addition, new ideas look attractive in states that have suffered for years from high unemployment and tight revenue

"We have no choice but to make change," said Bob Rucho, a Republican state senator in solidly Republican North Carolina, who is leading a push in that state for major tax changes.

Rucho and other like-minded lawmakers have a plan to do away with all state individual and corporate income taxes. The plan would replace lost revenue with a new business license fee and a higher sales tax on goods and services not now taxed by the state, such as legal, accounting and spa services, and food.

In his inaugural address on Saturday, Republican North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory promised to work with business "as partners" to eliminate taxes and regulation that stifle growth.

Rucho's plan would remake the North Carolina budget, which now derives 65 percent of its $18.5 billion in total tax revenues from individual income and corporate taxes.

To make up for that much lost revenue, the state sales tax rate would have to rise to 6.53 percent from 4.75 percent, according to a supportive study done by a consulting firm run by Arthur Laffer, a former adviser to Republican President Ronald Reagan and one of the fathers of "trickle-down" economics.

SPURRING GROWTH?

U.S. states often test reforms too controversial for Washington to tackle. Although several states, including Texas and Florida, have no individual income tax, Alaska stands out in modern times for having repealed its personal income tax. It was able to replace the lost revenue with its huge state oil income.

The kind of basic shift to sales tax from income tax being eyed by Republicans is informed partly by "trickle-down" or supply-side economics - embraced by Republicans 30 years ago and still a powerful force in the party. Laffer has advised some of the states' activists.

North Carolina's Rucho acknowledged the argument that the poor would be hit disproportionately by higher sales taxes. But he said new sales taxes on services would also hit higher-income taxpayers.

He said low-income people got more government assistance that could help offset higher tax costs. Also, he added, cutting income taxes would spur economic growth, a key supply-side tenet, helping everyone.

In an interview with Reuters, Laffer said states with lower income tax burdens outperformed those with higher taxes.

Some studies, from liberal and non-partisan think tanks, say just the opposite and cite the relative economic strength of high-tax states such as New York.

(Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh, Kim Dixon and Peter Cooney)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/13/us-usa-tax-states-idUSBRE90C08C20130113

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7883 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 09:24am »

Seattle Times

Originally published Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 5:42 PM

$1 trillion coin flips off table as solution to Congress' debt-limit fracas

By The Washington Post and The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Forget about the government minting a $1 trillion coin to solve its debt-limit crisis.

Treasury Department spokesman Anthony Coley said Saturday that neither his department nor the Federal Reserve believes the law can or should be used to produce such a coin to avoid a coming battle with Congress over government borrowing.

The government has reached its $16.4 trillion borrowing limit. By late February or early March, Treasury will run out of ways to cover debts and could begin defaulting on government loans.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says Congress has two options: Pay the tab for its spending or send the nation into default, which would have serious economic consequences.

The idea of minting a platinum coin to invalidate the debt ceiling comes from a few key sentences tacked onto the 1997 Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act. "Notwithstanding any other provision of law," it reads, "the Secretary of the Treasury may mint and issue platinum coins in such quantity and of such variety as the Secretary determines to be appropriate."

The author of those sentences was Mike Castle, a Republican congressman from Delaware. The intent was to help coin collectors who wanted the Treasury Department to mint cheaper platinum coins.

But in giving the Treasury Department the flexibility to mint platinum coins of little value, Castle accidentally gave it the flexibility to mint platinum coins of unlimited value. "That was never the intent of anything that I drafted," he said.

The idea of minting a trillion-dollar platinum coin was first floated in May 2010, in the comment section of "The Center of the Universe," a blog devoted to Modern Monetary Theory.

The idea gained some adherents during the debt-ceiling crisis of 2011, but it really developed traction after the 2012 fiscal-cliff deal.

A Twitter campaign by Joe Weisenthal, of Business Insider, and Josh Barro, of Bloomberg View, forced it into the conversation, and subsequent endorsements by Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman and former U.S. Mint director Philip Diehl gave it further legitimacy.

Others worried the coin would be seen as a power grab by the president, leading to a far more bitter standoff over the debt ceiling and a showdown in the courts.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2020121151_nocoin13.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7884 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 09:26am »

Science Daily

NASA Rules out Earth Impact in 2036 for Asteroid Apophis

Jan. 11, 2013

— NASA scientists at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., effectively have ruled out the possibility the asteroid Apophis will impact Earth during a close flyby in 2036. The scientists used updated information obtained by NASA-supported telescopes in 2011 and 2012, as well as new data from the time leading up to Apophis' distant Earth flyby Jan. 9, 2013.

Discovered in 2004, the asteroid, which is the size of three-and-a-half football fields, gathered the immediate attention of space scientists and the media when initial calculations of its orbit indicated a 2.7 percent possibility of an Earth impact during a close flyby in 2029. Data discovered during a search of old astronomical images provided the additional information required to rule out the 2029 impact scenario, but a remote possibility of one in 2036 remained -- until Wednesday.

"With the new data provided by the Magdalena Ridge [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] and the Pan-STARRS [Univ. of Hawaii] optical observatories, along with very recent data provided by the Goldstone Solar System Radar, we have effectively ruled out the possibility of an Earth impact by Apophis in 2036," said Don Yeomans, manager of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at JPL. "The impact odds as they stand now are less than one in a million, which makes us comfortable saying we can effectively rule out an Earth impact in 2036. Our interest in asteroid Apophis will essentially be for its scientific interest for the foreseeable future."

The April 13, 2029, flyby of asteroid Apophis will be one for the record books. On that date, Apophis will become the closest flyby of an asteroid of its size when it comes no closer than 19, 400 miles (31,300 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

"But much sooner, a closer approach by a lesser-known asteroid is going to occur in the middle of next month when a 40-meter-sized asteroid, 2012 DA14, flies safely past Earth's surface at about 17,200 miles," said Yeomans. "With new telescopes coming online, the upgrade of existing telescopes and the continued refinement of our orbital determination process, there's never a dull moment working on near-Earth objects."

NASA detects and tracks asteroids and comets passing close to Earth using both ground and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them and plots their orbits to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet.

The Near-Earth Object Program Office at JPL manages the technical and scientific activities for NASA's Near-Earth Object Program of the Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130111133502.htm

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3934
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7885 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 2:12pm »

DARPA wants to dot ocean floor with network of robotic pods that can spy, explore

DARPA’s Upward Falling robots launch from ocean floor now or in future


By Layer 8 on Fri, 01/11/13

This plan sounds a bit like a science fiction scenario where alien devices were planted in the ground thousands of years ago only to be awoken at some predetermined date to destroy the world. Only in this case it's the scientists at Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency who want to develop a system of submersible pods that could reside in the world's oceans (presumably not in anyone's territorial waters) and be activated for any number of applications days, months or even years later.

The Upward Falling Payload (UFP) project, as DARPA calls it, centers on pre-deploying deep-ocean nodes years in advance in forward areas which can be remotely commanded to launch to the surface. "The objective of the UFP program is to realize a new approach for enabling forward deployed unmanned distributed systems that can provide non-lethal effects or situation awareness over large maritime areas," DARPA stated.

Depending on the specific application, DARPA said UFP systems would provide "a range of non-lethal but useful capabilities such as situational awareness, disruption, deception, networking, rescue, or any other mission that benefits from being pre-distributed and hidden. An example class of systems might be small unmanned aerial vehicles that launch to the surface in capsules, take off and provide aerial situational awareness, networking or decoy functions."

"Almost half of the world's oceans are more than four kilometers deep. This provides considerable opportunity for cheap stealth. The vastness and depth make retrieval costs prohibitive. Despite this, the UFP program is specifically not a weapons program, and the risks to losing any single node will be minimal," DARPA said

The UFP system is envisioned to consist of three key subsystems, DARPA says:
• The 'payload' which executes waterborne or airborne applications after being deployed to the surface
• The UFP 'riser' which provides pressure tolerant encapsulation and launch (ascent) of the payload
• The UFP communications which triggers the UFP riser to launch. A multi-phase effort is envisioned to design, develop, and demonstrate UFP systems.

DARPA said it is looking for proposals in three key areas for developing the program: Communications, deep ocean 'risers' to contain the payloads, and the actual payloads. DARPA envisions technical communities that conduct deep-ocean engineering from the telecom and oil-exploration industry to the scientific community with insights into signal propagation in the water and on the seafloor would be interested in the project.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/darpa-wants-dot-ocean-floor-network-robotic-pods-can-spy-explore
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7886 on: Jan 13th, 2013, 3:26pm »

Is that the explanation?

User Image
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7887 on: Jan 14th, 2013, 09:36am »

Good morning Swamprat and Phill cheesy

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7888 on: Jan 14th, 2013, 09:38am »

Reuters

Mali Islamists counter attack, promise France long war

By Bate Felix and Alexandria Sage
Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:24am EST

BAMAKO/PARIS (Reuters) - Al Qaeda-linked Islamist rebels launched a counter-offensive on Monday in central Mali after four days of air strikes by French warplanes on their strongholds in the desert north, promising to drag France into a long and brutal Afghanistan-style ground war.

France intensified its air raids on Sunday using Rafale aircraft and Gazelle attack helicopters to pummel training camps at the heart of the vast area seized by rebels in April, while pouring hundreds of troops into the capital Bamako.

French planes were in action again on Monday.

Paris is determined to end Islamist domination of northern Mali, which many fear could act as a launchpad for attacks on the West and a base for coordination with al Qaeda in Yemen, Somalia and North Africa.

Launching a counter-attack far to the southwest of recent fighting, Islamists clashed with government forces on Monday inside the town of Diabaly, just 350 km (220 miles) northeast of the capital Bamako.

Residents said the rebels had entered the town from the north overnight, approaching from the porous border region with Mauritania where al Qaeda's North African wing AQIM has camps.

"They have taken Diabaly ... after fierce fighting and resistance from the Malian army," French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told BFM television, adding that French and Malian forces were fighting to dislodge the rebels.

Residents said Islamists, shouting 'Allahu akbar', were battling the army inside the town.

A spokesman for the MUJWA Islamist group, one of the main factions in the rebel alliance, promised French citizens would pay for Sunday's air strikes in their stronghold of Gao. Dozens of Islamist fighters were killed when rockets struck a fuel depot and a customs house being used as their headquarters.

"They should attack on the ground if they are men. We'll welcome them with open arms," Oumar Ould Hamaha told Europe 1 radio. "France has opened the gates of hell for all the French. She has fallen into a trap which is much more dangerous than Iraq, Afghanistan or Somalia."

France has said its sudden intervention on Friday, after Mali's president appealed for urgent aid in the face of a rebel advance, stopped the Islamists from seizing the capital Bamako. It has pledged to press on with air strikes in the coming days.

President Francois Hollande says France's aim is simply to support a mission by the 15-nation West African bloc ECOWAS to retake the north, as mandated by a U.N. Security Council resolution in December.

Under pressure from Paris, several regional states have said they hope to have soldiers on the ground this week. Military chiefs from ECOWAS nations will meet in Bamako on Tuesday but regional powerhouse Nigeria, which is due to lead the mission, has cautioned that training and deploying troops will take time.

DOUBTS OVER ECOWAS DEPLOYMENT

More than two decades of peaceful elections had earned Mali a reputation as a bulwark of democracy, but that image unraveled in a matter of weeks after a military coup in March which left a power vacuum for the Islamist rebellion.

France, which has repeatedly said it has abandoned its role as the policeman of its former African colonies, convened a U.N. Security Council meeting for Monday to discuss Mali.

Hollande's intervention has won plaudits from Western leaders but raises the threat level for eight French hostages held by al Qaeda allies in the Sahara and for the 30,000 French expatriates living in neighboring, mostly Muslim states.

Concerned about reprisals at home, France has tightened security at public buildings and on public transport.

In its first casualty of the campaign, Paris said a French pilot was killed on Friday when rebels shot at his helicopter.

Hours earlier, a French intelligence officer held hostage in Somalia by al Shabaab militants linked to al Qaeda was killed in a failed commando raid to free him.

Military analysts warn that if French action was not followed up by a robust deployment of ECOWAS forces, with logistical and financial support from NATO, then the whole U.N.-mandated Mali mission was unlikely to succeed.

"The French action was an ad-hoc measure. It's going to be a mess for a while, it depends on how quickly everyone can come on board," said Hussein Solomon, a professor in the Department of Political Studies and Governance at the University of the Free State, South Africa.

He voiced grave doubts about the prospects of a properly equipped and trained ECOWAS force deploying effectively in a ground operation to follow up French air strikes.

"This is just playing for time ... It's imperative that other NATO countries get involved," he said. "Everybody talks about the threat of global terrorism, but then where is the global response?"

Officials in Washington has said the United States would share intelligence with France and was considering sending a small number of unarmed surveillance drones. Britain and Canada have also promised logistical support.

(Additional reporting by Adama Diarra, Tiemoko Diallo and Rainer Schwenzfeier in Bamako, Catherine Bremer and John Irish in Paris, Pascal Fletcher in Johannesburg; Writing by Daniel Flynn; Editing by Richard Valdmanis)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/14/us-mali-rebels-idUSBRE90D0FX20130114

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11797
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #7889 on: Jan 14th, 2013, 09:42am »

Washington Post

Sour U.S.-Russia relations threaten Obama’s foreign policy agenda

By Anne Gearan, Published: January 13

A poisonous unraveling of U.S. relations with Russia in recent months represents more than the failure of President Obama’s first-term attempt to “reset” badly frayed bilateral relations. It threatens pillars of Obama’s second-term foreign policy agenda as well.

From Syria and Iran to North Korea and Afghanistan, Russian President Vladimir Putin holds cards that he can use to help or hurt Obama administration objectives.

Obama badly needs Russian help to get U.S. troops and gear out of landlocked Afghanistan. He also wants Russian cooperation — or at least a quiet agreement not to interfere — on other international fronts.

Putin, however, appears to see little reason to help. Since his election last year to a third term as president, his political stock has risen among many Russians as he has confronted the West, and the United States in particular. The pro-democracy street demonstrations of a year ago have evaporated, leaving the former KGB officer in clear control.

In December, both countries passed punitive laws that capped a year of deteriorating relations. A U.S. law targeting Russia’s human rights record and a tit-for-tat law banning American adoption of Russian children reflected domestic politics and national chauvinism, and they reinforced many of the worst suspicions that each nation holds about the other.

The low point puts Obama in the uncomfortable position of deciding how far to bend to appease Putin, who began his tenure last spring by snubbing Obama’s invitation for an Oval Office visit.

Obama has long been expected to visit Russia this year, although no summit has been scheduled.

“The real question for Putin and Obama is, putting aside the issues on which they are just bound to disagree — like democracy and Syria — what are the issues that matter to them on which they can cooperate?” said Stephen Sestanovich, a Russia expert at the Council on Foreign Relations.

“The likelihood is that over the next term, for both of them, that is likely to be a shorter list than it was in the past four years.”

Limited leverage

Like the United States, Russia holds a veto in the U.N. Security Council, and its membership in other diplomatic clubs confers outsize international clout to the former superpower.

By saying no, Putin can stymie U.S. goals in matters far beyond his own shores — and far removed from Russia’s long-standing beef with the United States over the latter’s plans to erect a missile defense shield in Europe.

U.S. leverage is limited. Obama is unlikely to either drop the missile defense plan or revisit steps that have eased commercial trade between both nations. Russia appears less swayed by the prospect of arms-control concessions than in the past.

From Russia’s perspective, Obama has ignored or overridden its concerns on two major issues — missile defense and the military intervention in Libya. Both instances contributed to the Russian perception that the United States’ main leverage is its ability to roll over friends and foes alike.

No U.S. president since Ronald Reagan has had a better relationship with Russia in his second term than in the first, Sestanovich said. But none has started the second with as deep and recent a setback as the harsh exchanges of December.

Congress issued a broad denunciation of Russian human rights practices, applying new travel and financial restrictions on Russians accused of rights abuses. The law is named for a Russian lawyer who died in prison in 2009. Obama signed off on the measure, dropping objections he had voiced earlier.

Moscow called the legislation “odious.”

“We certainly understand the hidden agenda of this political game started by those who are against the improvement of Russian-American relations,” Russia’s Foreign Ministry said. “They are eager to use any pretext to punish Russia for its independent and principled position in international affairs.”

Russia retaliated by enacting the law banning American adoptions of Russian children, leaving hundreds of waiting families in limbo. The Dima Yakovlev law is named for a Russian-born toddler who died in 2008 after being left alone in a hot car by his adoptive American father. The Kremlin eased its position slightly Thursday, saying the law would not go into effect until next year.

Downward spiral

The Obama administration knew Putin would not be easy to deal with, but the rapid decline in relations was a surprise, according to officials and analysts.

The United States says that a new Russian law requiring organizations and journalists receiving international funding to register as foreign agents is intended to quash criticism of Putin’s government.

Putin expelled the U.S. Agency for International Development without notice in September, ending two decades of work that provided medical and other services alongside what he sees as subversive support for democracy.

Moscow next stunned Washington by announcing the end of an arms control agreement that has been a foundation of U.S.-
Russian cooperation since the fall of the Soviet Union.

The 1991 pact had been renewed twice and, by U.S. figures, had allowed deactivation of more than 7,650 strategic warheads.

“Our overall approach remains to try to cooperate with Russia as much as we can on as many issues as we can,” including Iran, Afghanistan and Syria, said State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.

“But we’re also going to be very clear and very frank when we disagree, as we do with regard to human rights practices, quality of democracy in Russia and as we have in the past on Syria and other things,” she said.

In some instances, the U.S. response has been tough. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said last month that Russia is trying to reassert political and economic influence across nations that were once part of the Soviet Union.

“There is a move to re-Sovietize the region” in the guise of regional integration, Clinton told a group of lawyers and rights advocates in Ireland.

“Let’s make no mistake about it,” she said. “We know what the goal is, and we are trying to figure out effective ways to slow down or prevent it.”

Clinton’s unguarded remarks reflected U.S. dismay at the backsliding of political and press freedoms in Russia and neighboring states, and wider frustration with Moscow. Her warning, coming hours before she met Russia’s foreign minister for difficult talks about the civil war in Syria, also illustrated the paradox for Washington in condemning perceived Russian excesses while asking for Russian help.

Russia is a key ally of Syria and maintains a naval base on its Mediterranean coast. For a variety of reasons, Russia has refused to back international moves to challenge the rule of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The standoff effectively freezes any meaningful action against Assad nearly two years into a war that the United Nations estimates has killed more than 60,000 Syrians.

The U.S. relationship with Russia is uneasy under the best of circumstances and has succeeded chiefly in areas of mutual security interest, such as arms control. Obama has been unable to expand those areas of cooperation, despite genial relations with Putin’s predecessor, Dmitry Medvedev.

Obama told Medvedev last year that he would have more leeway to negotiate on missile defense after the U.S presidential election. Russians ridiculed Medvedev as naive for believing any of Obama’s pledges, said Mark Katz, a Russia specialist at George Mason University.

“A lot of Russians feel this way, but Putin feels it very deeply — that no matter what he does, the Americans will take advantage of them,” Katz said.

“Our attitude is that we’re only asking them to do things that they should do anyway and that we don’t have to make concessions to them for going along with us. There’s just a basic difference there.”


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/sour-us-russia-relations-threaten-obamas-foreign-policy-agenda/2013/01/13/acf3856a-5b62-11e2-88d0-c4cf65c3ad15_story.html?hpid=z2

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 524 525 526 527 528  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls