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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44917 times)
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« Reply #8010 on: Feb 11th, 2013, 09:27am »

Reuters

Syrian army, rebels clash in Damascus

AMMAN | Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:31am EST

(Reuters) - Troops loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad fought rebels in Damascus for control of an area just east of the city center on Monday, moving tanks to defend their lines as their opponents also struck targets elsewhere in the capital.

Residents and activists said the army of President Bashar al-Assad sent armored reinforcements to Jobar, a Sunni Muslim district adjacent to the city's landmark Abbasid Square after rebels took over a loyalist position in the area, the third since fighters pushed into Jobar last week, they said.

However, Assad's forces remained well dug in in the center. "The main battle is taking place in Jobar," an opposition activist in Damascus named Amer said. "The rebels appear to be advancing in the eastern sector. But the center of Damascus is crisscrossed with concrete barriers and security is deployed everywhere; we cannot say that they (the rebels) have a real active present in the center."

He said the army appeared to be under so much pressure in Jobar that it had moved tanks there from the southwestern suburb of Daraya, near the highway to the Jordanian border, where it has been battling rebels for two months.

A video posted by a group known as Liwa al-Islam, one of the opposition fighting units around Damascus, showed its members firing a rocket they claimed had a range of 60 km (35 miles), an apparent marked improvement in the arsenal of the opposition.

Sham News Network, an opposition group of media activists, said rebels overran an army barracks in Jobar and had attacked a roadblock in Afif neighborhood overnight. Afif is located near one of Assad's presidential compounds in the foothills of Qasioun Mountain, northwest of the city.

Activists also reported a mortar attack on a police station in the central Damascus neighborhood of Arnous. It was not clear whether the mortars hit the target or if there were casualties.

"The situation is getting very tough. For the first time we have been hearing mortars fall so close," said a woman who lives in the western neighborhood of Mezze.

The Syrian military has been firing heavy artillery and rockets from Qasioun at Jobar and at a series of Sunni Muslim districts that have been at the forefront of the 22-month uprising against Assad.

Assad's core forces, from his minority Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shi'ite Islam, are based on Qasioun. Their main supply line to coastal bases passes near the contested central city of Homs, 140 km (90 miles) north of Damascus.

Activists reported on Monday clashes in the Qalamoun region on the Damascus-Homs highway, near an army base from where Scud missiles have been fired at rebel-

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/11/us-syria-crisis-damascus-idUSBRE91A0DH20130211

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« Reply #8011 on: Feb 11th, 2013, 09:30am »

Telegraph

Fox attack council criticised for calling the animals ‘playful’

The council that owns the home in which a baby boy was mauled by a fox was derided today for suggesting that the animals were "playful" and did not pose a problem.

By Victoria Ward
3:12PM GMT 11 Feb 2013

Lewisham Council was criticised for its attitude after four-week-old Denny Dolan was attacked by a fox that severed his finger and tried to drag him from his cot.

Steve Barron, director of Pest-Go London, said foxes were "bold, opportunistic predators" and said local councils were not doing enough to inform the public about how to treat them.

"There is a lack of education and misinformation from councils," he said.

"People need to know that urban foxes are an issue, that they should be discouraged from feeding them or having an association with them. They are wild animals."

Mr Barron said local authorities were failing to act upon isolated incidents and were leaving the public to take matters into their own hands.

"There is a lot of misinformation in the public domain," he added.

"Foxes are not cute and cuddly, they have wild tendencies, their teeth are designed to pierce."

During the latest attack mother Hayley Banks Cawley, 28, is said to have had to kick the male fox to get it to release her baby as he dragged him toward the door by his left hand.

The baby was soaked in blood and required surgery to reattach a severed finger, as surgeons warned his parents that there remains a 30 per cent chance that he will not regain full use of the finger.

The attack took place in the middle of the afternoon in Bromley, on the outskirts of south-east London, has left the parents.

Lorraine Murphy, 42, who lives nearby, said: “The baby was covered in blood. There was blood everywhere in the house.

“The fox didn’t just get in and hurt the baby. He actually tried to take the baby away. It was Hayley’s actions that saved the child. She was there so quickly. She fought the fox off. I think she kicked it before it released the baby.”

Denny was taken to The Evelina Children’s Hospital, part of the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust Hospital in London following the attack last Wednesday.

The baby is said to be making a "good recovery", and the mother has been re-housed to another council house.

Neighbours said that the number of foxes in the area had risen significantly in recent years with the animals becoming increasingly bold in the presence of humans.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/9862866/Fox-attack-council-criticised-for-calling-the-animals-playful.html

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« Reply #8012 on: Feb 11th, 2013, 09:36am »

Wired

Shapeways’ 3-D Printing Factory Tour Reveals the Handmade Future

By Tim Maly
02.11.13
6:30 AM



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The first thing you notice when you visit the Shapeways Factory of the Future in Long Island City is the dust. It's the white nylon material that is used in laser sintering. It gets everywhere.

The second thing is the sheer number of people involved. When we talk about 3-D printing, we emphasize its seamlessness and ease of use. "Your ideas made real with Shapeways 3-D printing," says Shapeways' front page. It's easy to overlook the number of steps between sending in a CAD file and getting the result delivered to your home. All of those steps involve a human.

We'd like to show you how Shapeways makes ideas real.

gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/design/2013/02/shapeways-factory-tour/?pid=2178

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« Reply #8013 on: Feb 11th, 2013, 09:44am »

Hollywood Reporter

Pope Benedict XVI Resigns, and Hollywood Reacts With Jokes

6:59 AM PST 2/11/2013
by Jordan Zakarin

Pope Benedict XVI's resignation may have shocked the Catholic Church, but the celebrity twiterattti had its jokes all queued up for the early Monday announcement.

In announcing his abdication, the 85-year old pope wrote that his age and failing health made him unable to fully execute the duties required of his ministry. Benedict was named pope in 2005, following the death of Pope John Paul II; his resignation marks the first time since 1415 that the leader of the Catholic Church has stepped down from power.

His time as the religion's number one has been marked by social change, including debates over abortion, as well as the further uncovering of a widespread molestation scandal that has plagued the church -- a sensitive subject that became the fodder for many of Hollywood's early jokes.

"Being 'The Pope' means you are married to God. So, is this like a divorce?" tweeted a delighted Ricky Gervais, who is an outspoken atheist. Comedian Jim Norton chimed in on the molestation allegations, writing, "The Pope is retiring due to 'lack of strength'. This must be in reference to how he handled the pedophilia scandal."

MSNBC host Chris Hayes rang the same bell, tweeting, "Call me crazy, but I think the next Pope should be someone who didn't help cover up child rape.Tho,that may disqualify every single cardinal." Meanwhile, comedian/actor Patton Oswalt went the geek route, adding, "Wait...ex-Pope? X-POPE! Oh shit, I gotta pitch this to Marvel. #eyelasers"

More tweets below:

The tweets after the jump:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/pope-resigns-jokes-hollywood-dominate-420329

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« Reply #8014 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 10:03am »

Washington Post

N. Korea’s nuclear test raises tension, shows progress toward viable weapon

By Chico Harlan, Updated: Tuesday, February 12, 5:49 AM

SEOUL — North Korea on Tuesday detonated a “smaller and light” nuclear device, its state-run news agency said, marking the latest advance in a weapons program that President Obama called “a threat to U.S. national security and to international peace and security.”

The explosion, conducted in a sealed tunnel carved horizontally into a remote North Korean mountain, set off a brief seismic wave and appeared to be slightly more powerful than nuclear tests carried out by Pyongyang in 2006 and 2009.

This latest test — conducted in the face of strong opposition from the United States and its allies, as well as from North Korea’s chief patron, China — allowed the North to home in on its top technological goal: building an atomic device small enough to mount on a long-range missile.

Such a capability, if North Korea achieves it, would turn the secretive police state from a regional menace into a global one and raise stakes for neighboring countries that have so far been unable to influence its behavior.

It was the first test carried out under Kim Jong Eun, the young, third-generation leader who appears to favor the us-against-everybody militancy honed by his father and grandfather, with the United States characterized as the archenemy foil.

In a statement Tuesday, North Korea said it would carry out “second and third measures of greater intensity” if the United States continues with what North Korea described as hostile policies.

“These provocations do not make North Korea more secure,” Obama said in a statement released early Tuesday in Washington, less than 24 hours before he is expected to call for nuclear arms reductions in his State of the Union speech. “Far from achieving its stated goal of becoming a strong and prosperous nation, North Korea has instead increasingly isolated and impoverished its people through its ill-advised pursuit of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery.”

Security analysts said there is no immediate way to verify the North’s claim that it has successfully manufactured a smaller, or miniaturized, warhead. The North, in the past, has sometimes exaggerated its claims. Analysts emphasized that if the North wants full confidence that its nuclear devices work reliably, the nation will likely have to test again — repeatedly.

If North Korea is taken at its word, though, it now has a device — weighing less than 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds — that is “missile-deliverable,” said Jeffrey Lewis, an East Asia nonproliferation expert at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

“This does make them more of a threat,” Lewis said.

Still, said Siegfried Hecker, a scientist who has visited the North’s nuclear facilities several times, “such a weapon can only be used in a suicide attempt,” because any attack by North Korea would draw such a strong counter-attack. “My opinion is, no, it’s not a game-changer,” Hecker said. “In the end, what it does, it makes the North Korean deterrent more credible.”

Republicans lawmakers in Washington have called for more robust action, short of military intervention, to address North Korea’s nuclear activities. In a statement Tuesday, Rep. Edward R. Royce (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, said Obama should focus on “crippling the Kim regime’s military capabilities through stringent sanctions that tackle its illicit activities and cut off its flow of hard currency.”

“Otherwise,” Royce said, “the grave North Korean threat to the region and the United States will only grow.”

The North, for many reasons, is a global outlier in terms of nuclear testing. Among the eight countries to have tested a nuclear device, it is by far the most impoverished. It’s the only country to detonate a nuclear weapon since 1998, amid a moratorium on testing from major states.

The North is also proving itself atypical in its race to build a small nuclear device before perfecting a larger, crude device, like the 12- to 20-kiloton “Little Boy” bomb that the United States dropped on Hiroshima toward the end of World War II. Most nuclear-armed countries have first built big nuclear warheads, then tried to shrink them. Some nuclear experts now say that the North is trying to skip a step, going straight for the smaller device, although it is harder to build.

The detonation Tuesday had a yield of between 6 and 7 kilotons, South Korea’s defense ministry said, compared with a 1-kiloton blast in 2006 and a blast that measured between 2 kilotons and 7 kilotons in 2009.

In its statement about the latest test, North Korea said it had used an “A-bomb . . . with great explosive power.” It also said that its deterrence had become “diversified,” a possible hint, experts said, that the nuclear device used highly enriched uranium, rather than the plutonium used in the first two tests. The North, though, did not go further in specifying its fissile material. Foreign countries could gather clues about what was used by monitoring radioactive emissions around the test site in coming days.

Such information would lend important clues about North Korea’s weapons program, and whether its pile of fissile material is finite or growing. North Korea could still be working from its small pile of plutonium, although it froze its program in 2007. More likely, the country’s engineers are now building bombs with uranium, which can be enriched to weapons-grade levels in facilities tougher to detect by satellite.

North Korea uses its nuclear program in hopes of achieving many different goals. Chief among them, and least likely in the short-term, is recognition from the United States as a fellow nuclear power. In the meantime, the North’s government continues to use its weapons to sustain a tense, though predictable, cycle of rocket launches, international condemnation and nuclear tests in response to that international condemnation.

Tuesday’s test comes just two months after the North sent a long-range rocket into orbit and just three weeks after the U.N. Security Council strengthened already-existing sanctions. North Korea said its test was a “counteraction to defend the country’s security and sovereignty in the face of the ferocious hostile act of the United States,” which it has previously described as the ringleader at the council.

In its domestic media, the North portrays itself as a country under perpetual threat from foreign imperialists, with sporadic weapons tests a reason for underdog pride. The North’s 24 million people have little choice but to go along with the pro-government message: They’re thrown in prison camps for doing otherwise.

“Kim Jong Eun can send a message to the military and people that North Korea will not crumble down,” said Yoo Ho-yeol, a North Korea studies professor at Korea University in Seoul. “This test can create a sense of pride domestically and result in consolidation of the state.”

Following the blast, which had been widely anticipated because of the North’s rhetoric and based on satellite images of the test site, the North faced a familiar round of condemnation. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called the detonation “totally unacceptable.” A spokesman for U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said the North’s test was a “clear and grave violation” of existing international resolutions.

Government officials in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo could search in upcoming days for creative ways to further constrain the North’s weapons program. But the sanctions-and-pressure approach can do little without the cooperation of China, which is responsible for 70-percent of North Korea’s trade and which prefers the Kim family to a united, and democratized, Korean peninsula.


Yoonjung Soo contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/n-koreas-test-of-smaller-device-raises-tension-suggests-progress-toward-creating-a-viable-weapon/2013/02/12/fa166e88-7503-11e2-aa12-e6cf1d31106b_story.html?hpid=z1

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« Reply #8015 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 10:05am »

Scientific American

Life Discovered Under Ice in Antarctic Lake

Lake Whillans, 800 meters down and on the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf in West Antarctica, harbors a host of microbes and a wetland ecosystem

By Quirin Schiermeier and Nature magazine

Having just completed the tortuous 48-hour journey from the South Pole to the US west coast, John Priscu is suffering from more than his fair share of jet lag. But his tiredness can't mask the excitement in his voice. After weeks of intense field work in Antarctica, he and his team have become the first to find life in a lake trapped under the frozen continent's ice sheet.

“Lake Whillans definitely harbors life,” he says. “It appears that there lies a large wetland ecosystem under Antarctica’s ice sheet, with an active microbiology.”

The lake in question is a 60-square-kilometer body of water that sits on the edge of the Ross Ice shelf in West Antarctica. To reach it, Priscu, a glaciologist at Montana State University in Bozeman, and his team had to drill down 800 meters of ice.

They arrived at their goal on 28 January, when their environmentally clean hot-water drill broke through to the lake's surface. What they found was a body of water just 2 meters or so deep — much shallower than the 10–25 meters seismic surveys had suggested, although Priscu notes that the lake may well have deeper spots.

The team put a camera down the borehole to make sure that the borehole was wide enough for sampling instruments to be deployed and returned safely. It was, and over the next few days, the scientists collected some 30 liters of liquid lake water and eight sediment cores from the lake’s bottom, each 60 centimeters long.

What precious stuff they had retrieved soon became clear under the on-site microscope. Both water and sediment contained an array of microbes that did not need sunlight to survive. The scientists counted about 1,000 bacteria per milliliter of lake water — roughly one-tenth the abundance of microbes in the oceans. In Petri dishes, the bacteria show a “really good growth rate”, says Priscu.

“These are wonderful findings, a major discovery indeed,” says Martin Siegert, an Antarctic researcher at the University of Bristol, UK, who led a UK expedition to Lake Ellsworth, another subglacial body of water on the continent, in December. Unfortunately, technical difficulties halted the UK team’s drilling effort.

Cool and collected
The exact nature of the life unearthed by the US team will now be established by DNA sequencing and other tests. It will take at least a month to do the basic work, says Priscu.

“What we are all dying to find out now is, of course, ‘who’s there’ and ‘what’s their life style',” he says.

Researchers hope that the survival strategies of the subglacial microbes might offer clues to what the biology of extraterrestrial life might be like — Jupiter’s moon Europa, for instance, is thought to host a large sub-surface ocean of water where such life might be able to exist.

As photosynthesis is impossible without sunlight, the Lake Whillans bacteria must get their energy from a different source. This could be existing organic material, or, like the ‘chemotrophs’ found in gold mines and near deep-sea hydrothermal vents, the bacteria might run on chemical reactions involving minerals in the Antarctic bedrock and carbon dioxide dissolved in lake water.

“We have been allowed a glimpse into Antarctica’s subglacial world,” Priscu says. “I’m sure our results will change the way we view that continent.”

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=life-discovered-under-ice-in-antarctic-lake

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« Reply #8016 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 10:08am »

Wired

Star Wars Revolutionized Special Effects Twice; Can It Do It Again?

By Jason Michelitch
02.12.13
6:30 AM

Regardless of your feelings about Jedis, George Lucas, or J.J. Abrams, the announcement of new Star Wars films is a big deal. Since the release of the first film in 1977, Star Wars has been an unavoidable part of American film culture, not only directly for millions of fans, but more indirectly through its influence as the undisputed godfather of all big-budget special-effects spectacles in the modern cinema. The two Star Wars trilogies — original and prequel — each redefined special effects for their respective eras, but produced strikingly different critical legacies.

The first trilogy has been considered a standard-bearer for thirty years, its Star Destroyer explosions and Speeder Bike chases still astonishing to behold three decades later. The innovative computer-controlled motion photography of John Dykstra’s effects team allowed for more precise use of miniatures and models than ever before, and put Lucasfilm’s visual effects company Industrial Light and Magic on the map as a trailblazer in the world of cinematic illusion. Its achievements throughout the 1980s and 1990s in integrating practical and digital effects techniques produced such lasting images as melting Nazi faces, time-traveling Deloreans, and vicious, clever velociraptors.

The balance between the practical and the digital was always only changing in one direction, though, and by the end of the new millennium, Lucasfilm’s SFX division was ready to tip the scales so dramatically that big-budget movies would never be the same again. And what more appropriate opportunity than a brand new set of films in the franchise that started it all?

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace introduced audiences to a more fully realized world of digital effects than had ever been seen before. Building on the triumphs in character rendering in such films as Terminator 2 and The Mummy, ILM set about constructing spaceships, aliens, and robots almost entirely out of computer animation. But the new suite of images they created, though just as technically innovative as their predecessors, failed to connect with audiences and critics in the same way.

Despite the dazzling visual detail of the digital effects, there was a weightlessness to them, an insubtantiality that permeated the discussion around the film. Although this wouldn’t stop The Phantom Menace from earning over $1 billion in worldwide box office and garnering plenty of loyal fans, there was — and is — a sense among critics and discerning viewers that there was simply something missing from the visual fabric of the prequel trilogy’s universe.

Worse, the special effect that was meant to be The Phantom Menace‘s crowning glory instead ended up as the biggest albatross around its neck. Do any three words inspire such instinctive vitriol and loathing in a film fan than “Jar Jar Binks”? Intended as the breakout kid-friendly character along the lines of C-3PO or Wicket the Ewok (and indeed, Binks was popular with very young children) Jar Jar became instead emblematic of the film’s flawed CG heart. Touted as “the first walking, talking, CG film star,” Jar Jar was rejected wholesale by audiences that just a few years later would warm immeasurably to another fully CG film star: the celebrated interpretation of Gollum from Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings series.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/02/star-wars-fx/

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« Reply #8017 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 10:11am »

Blastr.com


Hackers take over emergency broadcast system to warns of zombies

Dan Roth

Tue, 02/12/2013 - 9:32am

The dead rising up to devour the living? Yeah, we'd say that qualifies as an emergency.

The people of Montana got quite a surprise Monday when, in the middle of the Steve Wilkos Show, an emergency broadcast began to air, warning people that "dead bodies are rising from their graves."

From the comfort of your computer, it's pretty clear that this was a joke and that festering, undead armageddon is not happening, but we can imagine some people thinking the time had actually come. After all, the zombie market is pretty saturated. If you see enough zombie horror you're bound to start thinking it's possible. Montana also isn't the most densely populated region, so it's not too hard to believe that someone living far away from daily signs of life might buy the zombie apocalypse.

Keeping that in mind, we're actually kind of relieved that KRTV quickly pulled the fake emergency and issued a formal apology.

Someone apparently hacked into the Emergency Alert System and announced on KRTV and the CW that "dead bodies are rising from their graves" in several Montana counties. This message did not originate from KRTV, and there is no emergency. Our engineers are investigating to determine what happened and if it affected other media outlets.

As of yet, the source of the prank is unknown but, we confess, we thought it was pretty funny despite the fact that it probably scared the pants off of a few people. Check out the video and tell us if you would have been fooled.







http://www.blastr.com/2013-2-12/hackers-take-over-emergency-broadcast-system-warns-zombies

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« Reply #8018 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 11:57am »

...The dead rising up to devour the living? Yeah, we'd say that qualifies as an emergency...

Which raises the question posed by Rajesh in Big Bang Theory.

'What happens to zombies if they can't get human flesh ? They can't die, they are already dead.

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« Reply #8019 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 4:50pm »

on Feb 12th, 2013, 11:57am, HAL9000 wrote:
...The dead rising up to devour the living? Yeah, we'd say that qualifies as an emergency...

Which raises the question posed by Rajesh in Big Bang Theory.

'What happens to zombies if they can't get human flesh ? They can't die, they are already dead.

HAL
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« Reply #8020 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 4:57pm »

I love Big Bang Theory cheesy







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« Reply #8021 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 5:00pm »

"I love Big Bang Theory" cheesy

Yep! One of my favorites!
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« Reply #8022 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 5:10pm »

on Feb 12th, 2013, 5:00pm, Swamprat wrote:
"I love Big Bang Theory" cheesy

Yep! One of my favorites!


Hey Swamprat cheesy


You have good taste, grin

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A new movie about shadow people. Trailer below





SHADOW PEOPLE is a psychological-thriller that explores the rare medical phenomenon known as SUNDS (Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome). Millions of people across the globe have had encounters with what they describe as dark, shadowy creatures that visit them at night. Sometimes horrifying, sometimes deadly, these nocturnal intruders have been described as early as man's first recorded writings. But what are they? And what do they want?

Small town radio personality CHARLIE CROWE (Dallas Roberts) is thrust into the mystery when a strange caller relates a terrifying experience during Crowe's late night call-in show. At the same time, CDC Public Health Agent, SOPHIE LANCOMBE (Alison Eastwood), is hot on the trail of the cause of the rare medical condition known as SUNDS. Her investigations entwine her with Charlie's own discoveries and take them both into a dark world and a decades old cover-up about the phenomenon we now call, The Shadow People. Once you open the door to the mystery...you'll never sleep soundly again.

Shadow People release date article:

http://www.shocktillyoudrop.com/news/172017-anchor-bay-sets-release-date-for-shadow-people-starring-walking-deads-dallas-Roberts


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« Reply #8023 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 5:18pm »

.....and they call us "UFO people" weird....... shocked


Florida couple use coffee enemas to cleanse colons 4 times a day

By Marc Lallanilla
Published February 12, 2013

Some people say they're addicted to coffee, but a couple in Florida has taken their coffee habit to a whole new level: coffee enemas.

Mike and Trina, who declined to give their last names (for reasons that may be obvious), are so hooked on coffee enemas that they use them to cleanse their colons at least four times daily, though Trina admitted using them up to 10 times in a single day, according to ABC News.

"I love the way it makes me feel," Trina told ABC News. "It gives me a sense of euphoria."

Both she and Mike work from home — otherwise, their frequent enemas might not be possible.

"I had a lot of stomach problems, digestive problems with my kidney and my liver," Trina told ABC News. "I started research and it led into coffee enemas, and I really started to feel the benefit. I felt like I was living for the first time in years."

No benefits, many risks

Medical research, however, reveals that not only are there no proven benefits to coffee enemas, there are some significant risks to using enemas for "colon cleansing" on a frequent basis.

"No scientifically robust studies in support of this practice" exist, according to an article co-authored by Dr. Ranit Mishori, a physician at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The study was published in the August 2011 issue of The Journal of Family Practice.

Mishori and her colleagues found the most common side effects of colon cleansing are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Depending on the solution used, patients can experience a serious loss of electrolytes — and coffee enemas are linked to potassium depletion.
Medical conditions such as kidney and liver failure, air emboli, rectal perforations, blood infections, colitis (inflammation of the colon) and death from dysentery can also result from colon cleansing.

And after frequent or regular enema use — like that of Mike and Trina — the colon and rectum can eventually lose the ability to generate proper bowel movements, making a person utterly dependent on enemas for their bowel movements.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/02/12/florida-couple-use-coffee-enemas-to-cleanse-colons/#ixzz2KjGv151Z
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8024 on: Feb 12th, 2013, 5:26pm »

People here may think I might be leg pulling, but I had a Shadow Person encounter that nearly made me poop myself.

This around the time my mother died. I had moved back in with the parents as a young adult, staying in the smallest room. Occasionally, I'd be startled from sleep from phantom noises. This is an important point to which I'll elaborate in a bit, but let me get to the point of my own fright.

My bed was high, and pushed against the wall with the window. I would usually sleep with my back toward the window, and my front facing the rest of the room, across from which would be my bedroom door. One night, I was roused from sleep... but not by any sound. Kind of the way your consciousness fades in when you slowly wake in the morning. I opened my eyes, looking into my very dark room that had just the dimmest light from the window. I had the impression of a being, a man, right up next to my bed. He was crouching, and where his face would be was mere inches from my own. I could detect this thing as it was blacker than the rest of the room, but I couldn't see any features, just an outline of a man.

I very suddenly and violently shoved forward while yelling gutterally, "What do you want!?" My hand went through empty air, and there was nothing there. I sat bolt upright, holding my breath, looking through the room. My heart was pounding, and I felt... that's the only way to describe it... I felt the man still there, watching; but I couldn't see him. And I felt cold, but not cold by temperature. Whatever was there (if anything at all) felt malevolent. Simple terms... I felt like an evil spirit was in that room with me.

Knowing about night terrors and the way that stuff works, in time I mostly have chalked the experience up to being such a night terror. During this time, while staying in that room, I would occasionally hear weird noises at night. Like one time it sounded like a sharp deep crack noise from above my closet, as if the house suddenly settled and a deep crack in a board let out a noise. I got up and asked my mother, and she said she heard nothing. Another time, with back to the window, I was woken suddenly by an intense banging on that window (less than half a foot from my back).

But I otherwise have not experienced anything like this... much. I take it back. When I was younger, if I took a nap (and only from a nap), I would rouse from my sleep with the feeling of a cat walking on the bed, creeping slowly toward me. I'd awake with no cat anywhere, and no dimpling of weight on the bed. Since that dark manifestation, I've never again had any experience like this, and it has been over 15 years now.

Perhaps it was all the drinking I was doing as a youth huh

PS: I slept with the light on for the rest of that night.
« Last Edit: Feb 12th, 2013, 5:47pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
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