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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 15735 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #825 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 09:02am »

Wired

Court: Death Threats Addressed to Corporations Aren’t Illegal
By David Kravets August 23, 2010 | 3:34 pm | Categories: Crime, Threats

An Arizona man who plotted a massacre outside the 2008 Super Bowl had his conviction overturned Monday by a federal appeals court because his snailmailed death threats went to no specific targets.

The case concerned Kurt William Havelock, who drove to the Super Bowl in Glendale, Arizona, with a newly purchased assault rifle and dozens of rounds of ammunition with the intent to kill. “It will be swift and bloody,” he wrote media outlets in packages mailed a half hour before he got cold feet and abandoned his plan. “I will sacrifice your children upon the altar of your excess.”

With the prodding of his father, he turned himself in to local police. Federal authorities charged him with six counts of mailing threatening letters. The defendant was convicted on all charges and sentenced to a year in prison.

During the trial and on appeal, the 40-year-old, who was disgruntled that he was denied a liquor permit to open a bar, argued that he committed no crime at all. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed in a 2-1 decision.

Under the threatening-letters statute, “the ‘person’ to whom the mail is addressed must be an individual person, not an institution or corporation,” wrote Judge William Canby, who was joined by Judge Betty Fletcher. Havelock’s communications were mailed to media outlets, not named individuals, the majority noted.

In dissent, Judge Susan Graber wrote, “The result of the majority’s interpretation is that the statute prohibits sending a threatening communication only if the outside of the envelope or package explicitly directs delivery to a natural person.”

Havelock sent the threatening letters addressed to the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Phoenix New Times, The Associated Press and the websites theshizz.org and azpunk.com. “I will slay your children. I will shed the blood of the innocent,” he wrote.

The law, the San Francisco-based appeals court wrote, “does indeed require that the mailed item containing the threat is addressed to an individual person, as reflected in the address on the mailed item. Because Havelock’s communications were not so addressed to individual persons, we reverse his convictions.”

Havelock was not immediately reachable. Neither his attorney nor federal prosecutors responded for comment.

Here is the federal statute in question:

Whoever knowingly so deposits or causes to be delivered [by the Postal Service according to the direction thereon], any communication with or without a name or designating mark subscribed thereto, addressed to any other person and containing any threat to kidnap any person or any threat to injure the person of the addressee or of another, shallNo- be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both.

Judge Graber argued that the conviction should stand. Congress, she wrote, adopted the law “to protect individuals from mailed threats of kidnapping, ransom demands, threats of bodily injury or death, and certain other serious threats.”

Graber said the appeals court “should interpret the word ‘person’ in a statute as including corporations and several other types of entities unless the context shows otherwise.”


http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/08/threatening-mail/#ixzz0xX2bnZLj

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #826 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 09:05am »





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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #827 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 09:10am »

Morning Crys

I saw this on the news this morning.... I can't believe the boy lived through that horrific smash..... unbelievable shocked He is one hell of a lucky young man.

Car launches into concrete pillar

Incredible video of the moment a car launched off a US highway divide and slammed into a concrete pillar has been released.

Brendan Eden, a 19-year-old from Ohio, was travelling at least 160km/h when he lost control of his car and crashed into the pillar of a bridge.

The impact of the crash caused his car to split into three pieces, WDTN2 TV reports.

Video of the crash was caught on the dashboard camera of a police car that was also on the highway.

The driver was airlifted to hospital where he is in a critical condition.

"He is very lucky to still be alive at this point," Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt Marty Fellure told WDTN2.

"You can see … the impact he took and where he got ejected and landed, he's a very fortunate man right now."

Police are still investigating why Eden was speeding and what caused him to veer off the road.

See video at source: http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/7950221/car-launches-into-concrete-pillar
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #828 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 2:12pm »

Hi Pen,
I just saw this on the news! Holy Cow! Last I heard he is in critical condition but he survived! shocked
And thank goodness he didn't hit anyone else.
Crystal
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« Reply #829 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 2:19pm »

Lewis-McChord soldier from MO killed in Iraq
The Army says a soldier from Joint Base Lewis-McChord was killed Sunday in combat in Iraq.


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r.i.p. Brandon


JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. —
The Army says a soldier from Joint Base Lewis-McChord was killed Sunday in combat in Iraq.

The Pentagon said Tuesday that 24-year-old Sgt. Brandon E. Maggart of Kirksville, Mo., was fatally wounded by insurgents who attacked his unit.

He was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment. The battalion deployed in January. Maggart previously deployed to Iraq from March 2007 to May 2008.


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #830 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 4:31pm »

Just 24! Oh, my...! R.I.P.! sad

on Aug 24th, 2010, 08:38am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hey Phil,
I don't know why Seeker hasn't been by. Hope it wasn't something I said. tongue

Crystal

Nah. I don't believe that. wink
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Stellar Thoughts
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #831 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 4:49pm »

on Aug 24th, 2010, 4:31pm, philliman wrote:
Just 24! Oh, my...! R.I.P.! sad


Nah. I don't believe that. wink


Whew!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #832 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 8:36pm »


User Image
by Anthony Ayiomamitis

« Last Edit: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:20am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #833 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 10:24pm »

Very nice!
What kind of kit do you have?
What focal length were you using?
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #834 on: Aug 24th, 2010, 11:58pm »

on Aug 24th, 2010, 10:24pm, Belizeman wrote:
Very nice!
What kind of kit do you have?
What focal length were you using?


Great photo Wings!
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« Reply #835 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:19am »

It isn't my photo. I was being lazy as I was in a hurry yesterday and didn't give the man credit. Sorry.

Full moon rising, by Anthony Ayiomamitis

http://pixdaus.com/single.php?id=258968

Pixdaus has amazing photos.

Crystal
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« Reply #836 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:29am »

New York Times

August 25, 2010
Dozens Killed in Wave of Attacks Across Iraq
By ANTHONY SHADID

BAGHDAD — In one of the broadest assaults on Iraq’s security forces, insurgents unleashed a wave of roadside mines and a more than a dozen car bombs across Iraq on Wednesday, killing dozens, toppling a police station in the capital and sowing confusion among the soldiers and police who responded.

The withering two-hour assault in 12 towns and cities, from southernmost Basra to restive Mosul in the north, was as symbolic as it was deadly, coming a week before the United States declares the end of combat operations here. Wednesday was seemingly the insurgents’ reply: Despite suggestions otherwise, insurgents proved their ability to launch coordinated attacks virtually anywhere in Iraq, capitalizing on the government’s dysfunction and perceptions of American vulnerability.

For weeks, there had been sense of inevitability to the assaults, which killed at least 46 people, many of them police. From the American military to residents here, virtually everyone seemed to expect insurgents to seek to demonstrate their prowess as the United States brings its number of troops below 50,000 here.

But the anticipation did little to prepare security forces for the breadth of the assault. Iraqi soldiers and police brawled at the site of the biggest bombing in Baghdad, and residents heckled them for their impotence in stopping a blast that cut like a scythe through the neighborhood.

“A bloody day,” Khalil Ahmed, a 30-year-old engineer, said simply, as he stared at the cranes and bulldozers trying to rescue victims buried under the police station.

“From the day of the fall of Saddam until now, this is what we have — explosions, killing and looting,” he said. “This is our destiny. It’s already written for us.”

The assaults began at 8:20 a.m. when a pickup packed with explosives detonated in a parking lot behind the police station in the northern Baghdad neighborhood of Qahira. The police station collapsed, and the blast sheared off the top floors of nearby homes. Windows were shattered a half-mile away. One family was pulled out alive. Hours later, cranes and bulldozers tried to remove others trapped beneath the rubble.

Police kept angry residents from entering the scene.

“You get millions of dinars in salaries and you won’t let us help our families?” one youth shouted. “You just take money and don’t care about us!” cried another.

An Iraqi investigator walked by the scene.

“This is the state?” he muttered. “This is the government?”

Twice, soldiers and police brawled at the scene, and shots were fired in the air.

For weeks, insurgents have carried out a daily campaign of bombings, hit-and-run attacks and assassinations against the security forces and officials, seeking to undermine confidence in their ability to secure the country. They remained the target Wednesday in attacks in Fallujah, Rammadi, Kirkuk, Basra, Karbala, Mosul and elsewhere.

In one of the worst assaults, in the southern city of Kut, Iraqi officials said a car bomb detonated by its driver killed 14 people and wounded 70, most of them police, in an attack on a police station near the provincial headquarters.

In Diyala Province, five roadside bombs detonated in the morning in Buhriz, the first against a police patrol, a second against reinforcements who were heading to the scene and three others targeting houses belonging to policemen, officials said. They were followed by a car bomb that struck the provincial headquarters in Baquba, northeast of Baghdad, killing three people. Another car bomb struck a hospital in nearby Muqdadiya.

“The beginning of the storm,” said Saleh Khamis, a 38-year-old teacher in Buhriz.

In Ramadi, a car bomb tore through a bus station, killing eight people.

Under a deadline set by the Obama administration, the United States has brought its number of troops here to a little below 50,000, a presence it intends to maintain through next summer. The administration and the American military have sought to portray the partial withdrawal as a turning point in the American presence here, insisting that Iraq’s army and police are ready to inherit sole control over security here.

Military officials have said they believe that insurgents only number in the hundreds, and the military has issued a daily drumbeat of announcements that leaders and cadres in the insurgency have been arrested in American-Iraqi operations.

“The message the insurgents want to deliver to the Iraqi people and the politicians is that we exist and we choose the time and the place,” said Wael Abdel-Latif, a judge and former lawmaker. “They are carrying out such attacks when the Americans are still here, so just imagine what they can do after the Americans leave.”

The attacks come amid deep popular frustration with the country’s politicians, who have failed to form a government more than five months after elections in March. Shoddy public services, namely electricity, have only sharpened the resentment.

At the scene of the bombing in Baghdad, residents grimly swept up glass from storefronts. Others milled among the dozens of police and army vehicles. No one seemed to express optimism; most said they were bracing for more of the same.

“The situation doesn’t let us live our lives here,” said Mahmoud Hussein, a 26-year-old mechanic. “No water, no electricity no security. Every day it gets worse.”

Stephen Farrell, Moises Saman and Khalid D. Ali contributed reporting from Baghdad, and Iraqi employees of The New York Times from Baghdad, Baquba, Hilla, Kirkuk and Basra.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/world/middleeast/26iraq.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal

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« Reply #837 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:32am »

New York Times

August 23, 2010
Hacker’s Arrest Offers Peek Into Crime in RussiaBy ANDREW E. KRAMER

MOSCOW — On the Internet, he was known as BadB, a disembodied criminal flitting from one server to another selling stolen credit card numbers despite being pursued by the United States Secret Service.

And in real life, he was nearly as untouchable — because he lived in Russia.

BadB’s real name is Vladislav A. Horohorin, according to a statement released last week by the United States Justice Department, and he was a resident of Moscow before his arrest by the police in France during a trip to that country earlier this month.

He is expected to appear soon before a French court that will decide on his potential extradition to the United States, where Mr. Horohorin could face up to 12 years in prison and a fine of $500,000 if he is convicted on charges of fraud and identity theft. For at least nine months, however, he lived openly in Moscow as one of the world’s most wanted computer criminals.

The seizing of BadB provides a lens onto the shadowy world of Russian hackers, the often well-educated and sometimes darkly ingenious programmers who pose a recognized security threat to online commerce — besides being global spam nuisances — who often seem to operate with relative impunity.

Law enforcement groups in Russia have been reluctant to pursue these talented authors of Internet fraud, for reasons, security experts say, of incompetence, corruption or national pride. In this environment, BadB’s network arose as “one of the most sophisticated organizations of online financial criminals in the world,” according to a statement issued by Michael P. Merritt, the assistant director of investigations for the Secret Service, which pursues counterfeiting and some electronic financial fraud.

As long ago as November 2009, the United States attorney’s office in Washington, in a sealed indictment, identified BadB as Mr. Horohorin, a 27-year-old residing in Moscow with dual Ukrainian and Israeli citizenship.

But it was not until Aug. 7 this year that Mr. Horohorin, who was traveling from Russia to France, was detained on a warrant from the United States as he boarded a plane to return to Russia at an airport in Nice, in southern France.

The Secret Service released a statement on Aug. 11, when the indictment was unsealed. Max Milien, a Secret Service spokesman in Washington, said the agency could not comment about the decision to arrest Mr. Horohorin in France.

Olga K. Shklyarova, spokeswoman for the Russian bureau of Interpol, said no American law enforcement agency had requested Mr. Horohorin’s arrest in her country. “We never received such a request,” she said by telephone.

According to the Secret Service statement, Mr. Horohorin managed Web sites for hackers who were able to steal large numbers of credit card numbers that were sold online anonymously around the globe. Those buyers would do the more dangerous work of running up fraudulent bills.

The numbers were exchanged on Web sites called CarderPlanet carder.su and badb.biz — according to the Secret Service, and payment was made indirectly through accounts at a Russian online settlement system known as Webmoney, an analogue to PayPal.

Underscoring the nationalistic tone of much of Russian computer crime, one site featured a cartoon of the Russian prime minister, Vladimir V. Putin, awarding medals to Russian hackers. “We awaiting you to fight the imperialism of the U.S.A.” the site said, in approximate English.

Mr. Horohorin lived openly in Moscow. As a foreign citizen, he registered with the police, according to Dmitri Zakharov, a spokesman for the Russian Association of Electronic Communication, an industry lobby for legitimate Russian Internet businesses, who cited a database of such registries.

A phone number for Mr. Horohorin was out of service Thursday.

Arrests in Russia for computer crimes are rare, even when hackers living in Russia have been publicly identified by outside groups, like Spamhaus, a nonprofit group in Geneva and in London that tracks sources of spam.

The F.B.I. in 2002 resorted to luring a Russian suspect, Vasily Gorshkov, to the United States with a fake offer of a job interview (with a fictitious Internet company called Invita), rather than ask the Russian police for help. To obtain evidence in the case, F.B.I. computer experts had hacked into Mr. Gorshkov’s computer in Russia. When this was revealed, Russian authorities expressed anger that the F.B.I. had resorted to a cross-border tactic.

Online fraud is not a high priority for the Russian police, Mr. Zakharov said, because most of it is aimed at computer users in Europe or the United States. “This is a main reason why spammers are not arrested,” he said.

Politics may also play a role. Vladimir Sokolov, deputy director of the Institute of Information Security, a Russian research organization, said the United States and Russia were still at odds on basic issues of computer security, although the differences were narrowing.

The United States tends to view computer security as a law enforcement matter. Russia has pushed for an international treaty that would regulate the use of online weapons by military or espionage agencies. Last year the United States opened talks on a treaty, but it has continued to press for closer law enforcement cooperation, Mr. Sokolov said.

Computer security researchers have raised a more sinister prospect: that criminal spamming gangs have been co-opted by the intelligence agencies in Russia, which provide cover for their activities in exchange for the criminals’ expertise or for allowing their networks of virus-infected computers to be used for political purposes — to crash dissident Web sites, perhaps.

Sometimes, the collateral damage for online business is immediate. A year ago, for example, hackers used a network of infected computers to direct huge amounts of junk traffic at the social networking accounts of a 34-year-old political blogger in Georgia, a country that fought a war with Russia in 2008. The attack, though, spun out of control and briefly crashed the global service of Twitter and slowed Facebook and LiveJournal, affecting tens of millions of computer users worldwide.

The Russian authorities have repeatedly denied that the state has any connection to such attacks.

Spamhaus says 7 of the top 10 spammers in the world are based in the former Soviet Union, in Ukraine, Russia and Estonia.

More ominously, Western law enforcement agencies have traced a code intended for breaking into banking sites to Russian programming.

In 2007, Swedish experts identified a Russian hacker known only by his colorful sobriquet — the Corpse — as the author of a virus that logged keystrokes on personal computers to capture passwords for Nordea, a Swedish bank, and the accounts were drained of about $1 million.

For a time, these rogue programs were openly for sale on a Russian Web site. The home page displayed an illustration of Lenin making a rude gesture.

Since Mr. Horohorin’s arrest, the badb.biz Web site has gone dark. But through Monday, at least, its CarderPlanet counterpart, the Russian site carder.su, was still open for business.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/business/global/24cyber.html?ref=europe

Crystal
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« Reply #838 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:36am »

Telegraph

Murdered British spy found stuffed into sports bag in bath of London flat
A British spy who was found dead in the bath of a flat in London was stabbed several times before his body was stuffed into a sports bag where it lay decomposing for up to two weeks.

By Heidi Blake and Duncan Gardham
Published: 11:29AM BST 25 Aug 2010

The man, named locally as Gareth Williams, is understood to have been employed as a communications worker at GCHQ, the Government’s “listening post” in Cheltenham, Glos.

It is believed Mr Williams, who was in his thirties, was on secondment at the headquarters of MI6, the Secret Intelligence Service, in Vauxhall, just across the Thames from where his body was found.

He had apparently been due to return home to Gloucestershire before he was murdered.

The grim discovery was made after police were called to the top floor flat in Pimlico, Central London, following reports that the occupant had not been seen for some time.

Mr Williams' mobile telephone and sim cards had been carefully laid out elsewhere in the flat.

The street of multimillion-pound Georgian terraced homes remained cordoned off this morning and police officers stood outside No 36, which is divided into three flats.

Michael Howard, the former Conservative Party leader, is among a host of politicians and bankers who live on the street.

Mr Williams rented a flat in Cheltenham from retired office worker Jenny Elliott, 71, for ten years until just over a year ago when he moved to London.

He phoned Mrs Elliott in April to ask for his old room back after getting a transfer back to the town.

"Gareth was a very likeable person who didn't really have any friends as such," Mrs Elliott said.

"He was an extremely intelligent person but would not talk about his job as it was a secret, on account of working for GCHQ. All he told me was it was something to do with codes," she added.

Neighbours in Pimlico also spoke of their shock.

Jason Hollands, 41, a City worker, who also lives nearby, said: "It's truly gruesome - this is a very mixed area of bankers and politicians. I've spoken to the next-door neighbour, who knew nothing."

Rob Mills, 35, who lives two doors away, said: "It's shocking. I'm told the man lived at the top-floor flat but we haven't ever seen him. It's not like you'd tell your neighbours if you were a spy."

A Met police spokesman said: “Officers were called to reports of a suspicious death at around 4.40pm today.

“They attended a top floor flat in Alderney Street and gained entry and found the body of a man in his 30s. He has yet to be identified.”

Counter-terrorist and security service officers are helping detectives in the inquiry.

The last spy to have been killed on British soil was Alexander Litvinenko, the former Russian Federal Security Service officer, who died of polonium poisoning in November 2006.

Video after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/7963441/Murdered-British-spy-found-stuffed-into-sports-bag-in-bath-of-London-flat.html

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« Reply #839 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:39am »

Telegraph

Cat put in wheelie bin: 'Death to Mary Bale' Facebook page taken down
A Facebook group calling for the death of a woman who dumped a cat in a wheelie bin has been removed by moderators as police say they are ''closely monitoring'' online threats towards Mary Bale.

Published: 1:14PM BST 25 Aug 2010

A spokeswoman for the social networking site said the group, entitled ''Death to Mary Bale'', contravened Facebook's terms of use.

Hundreds of people posted angry messages online after a clip showing four-year-old tabby Lola being thrown into a bin was uploaded by her owners.

Mrs. Bale, a bank worker from the Stoke area of Coventry, said she binned the feline as ''a joke'', adding: ''It's only a cat.''

But animal lovers have expressed their rage online, with some calling for Mrs Bale to be violently punished.

One Facebook user said the 45 year-old should be ''repeatedly head butted'', whilst another wrote: ''She should be flogged to within an inch of her life, the evil b----.''

A Facebook spokeswoman said: ''We can't comment on individual cases for privacy reasons but I can tell you that one group, entitled Death to Mary Bale, has been removed today.''

The spokeswoman said Facebook users were encouraged to report any offensive comments posted on the site, adding that moderators would remove anything deemed to be a ''credible threat''.

West Midlands Police described the some of the group's content as ''inflammatory and offensive''.

A spokeswoman said: ''We have monitored Facebook to assess any threat of harm to Mary Bale as part of this investigation.

"The investigation is being led by the RSPCA but obviously the other strand of this now is Mary Bale's safety and we are looking at the potential impact of these messages.

''I would not go so far as to say we are investigating death threats, that is not the situation, but we are closely monitoring these groups and messages.''

She added: ''There are no plans to give any kind of formal police protection but we are talking to Mary Bale about her personal safety, we are having that conversation with her, and we do want to make sure she is ok.''

Lola's owners, Stephanie and Darryl Mann, of Bray's Lane, Coventry, said they were "stunned" by the reaction to the footage, taken from security cameras outside their home.

The couple urged people to let the RSPCA and the police deal with Ms Bale and "not take matters into their own hands".

In the clip, Ms Bale is seen stroking the cat before picking it up by the scruff of the neck and dumping it in the container.

Lola, who was trapped for 15 hours, emerged unscathed and is said to be fully recovered from the ordeal.

Speaking to The Sun newspaper, Mrs Bale said people were "overreacting".

She said: "I really don't see what everyone is getting so excited about - it's just a cat."

Mrs Bale said she noticed the cat as she was walking home from work and began stroking it.

"I don't know what came over me, but I suddenly thought it would be funny to put it in the wheelie bin which was right beside me.

"I did it as a joke because I thought it would be funny. I never thought it would be trapped. I expected it to wriggle free."

Mrs Bale admitted she "shouldn't have done it" but added that she did not deserve the hatred of people around the world.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/7963804/Cat-put-in-wheelie-bin-Death-to-Mary-Bale-Facebook-page-taken-down.html

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