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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 126905 times)
Double Nought Spy
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8295 on: Apr 8th, 2013, 10:09am »

on Apr 8th, 2013, 09:25am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Seattle Times

Originally published Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 6:26 PM

Broadcasters worry about ‘Zero TV’ homes

A growing number of “Zero TV” households have stopped paying for cable and satellite-TV service, shun broadcasting and are watching shows and movies on the Internet.

By RYAN NAKASHIMA
The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Some people have had it with TV. They’ve had enough of the 100-plus channel universe. They don’t like timing their lives around network show schedules. They’re tired of $100-plus monthly bills.



We did this years ago. Our TV is in the guest room, which has a comfy couch, and we watch movies there. We have had an antenna on the roof for many years, in case we want to watch a broadcast, but never do.

Now, when we do encounter TV (usually at a friend's house or an airport or something) it seems insufferable. The loud, idiotic commercials pimping crap we will never buy just seem oppressive. More like an assault on our civilized nature than any kind of valid enterprise. It's just awful, in other words, and we are amazed that we ever had a tolerance for the crap. And the content of the shows. Ugh. No wonder the country is turning into a bunch of zombies.

There have been many excellent shows on TV, of course, and I suspect there are still some being made. I've been catching up on Frasier, a show I liked when it was current but I was very busy then and traveled a lot, so I didn't see it often. That has been great fun. I watch it on the computer, even though I could tune it in via Netflix on our home theater in the guest room. Just more convenient, I guess.
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« Reply #8296 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 09:28am »

on Apr 8th, 2013, 10:09am, Double Knit Spy wrote:
We did this years ago. Our TV is in the guest room, which has a comfy couch, and we watch movies there. We have had an antenna on the roof for many years, in case we want to watch a broadcast, but never do.

Now, when we do encounter TV (usually at a friend's house or an airport or something) it seems insufferable. The loud, idiotic commercials pimping crap we will never buy just seem oppressive. More like an assault on our civilized nature than any kind of valid enterprise. It's just awful, in other words, and we are amazed that we ever had a tolerance for the crap. And the content of the shows. Ugh. No wonder the country is turning into a bunch of zombies.

There have been many excellent shows on TV, of course, and I suspect there are still some being made. I've been catching up on Frasier, a show I liked when it was current but I was very busy then and traveled a lot, so I didn't see it often. That has been great fun. I watch it on the computer, even though I could tune it in via Netflix on our home theater in the guest room. Just more convenient, I guess.


Good morning Double Knit Spy,

We watch "Leverage" on dvd, "Big Bang Theory" and a couple of other shows. For a one hour show now you get 20 minutes of commercials. It's paced so fast to shove the storyline in between commercials. We are going to do more dvd watching in the future I suspect.

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« Reply #8297 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 09:29am »

The Star Wars The Old Republic expansion is up this morning. I'll be back later to post. grin

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8298 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 09:41am »

on Apr 9th, 2013, 09:28am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning Double Knit Spy,

We watch "Leverage" on dvd, "Big Bang Theory" and a couple of other shows. For a one hour show now you get 20 minutes of commercials. It's paced so fast to shove the storyline in between commercials. We are going to do more dvd watching in the future I suspect.

Crystal


I have decided to dump Cable and go with a ROKU and get Huluplus and maybe one other streaming source. Initial cost is 100 bucks or so and 15 bucks a month for the streamers.
I'm sick of six commercials every 4 minutes on networks!

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« Reply #8299 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:34am »

on Apr 9th, 2013, 09:41am, LoneGunMan wrote:
I have decided to dump Cable and go with a ROKU and get Huluplus and maybe one other streaming source. Initial cost is 100 bucks or so and 15 bucks a month for the streamers.
I'm sick of six commercials every 4 minutes on networks!

Lone


Amen Lone! Amen!

Good morning cheesy

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« Reply #8300 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:36am »

Wired

Secrets of FBI Smartphone Surveillance Tool Revealed in Court Fight

By Kim Zetter
04.09.13

A legal fight over the government’s use of a secret surveillance tool has provided new insight into how the controversial tool works and the extent to which Verizon Wireless aided federal agents in using it to track a suspect.

Court documents in a case involving accused identity thief Daniel David Rigmaiden describe how the wireless provider reached out remotely to reprogram an air card the suspect was using in order to make it communicate with the government’s surveillance tool so that he could be located.

Rigmaiden, who is accused of being the ringleader of a $4 million tax fraud operation, asserts in court documents that in July 2008 Verizon surreptitiously reprogrammed his air card to make it respond to incoming voice calls from the FBI and also reconfigured it so that it would connect to a fake cell site, or stingray, that the FBI was using to track his location.

Air cards are devices that plug into a computer and use the wireless cellular networks of phone providers to connect the computer to the internet. The devices are not phones and therefore don’t have the ability to receive incoming calls, but in this case Rigmaiden asserts that Verizon reconfigured his air card to respond to surreptitious voice calls from a landline controlled by the FBI.

The FBI calls, which contacted the air card silently in the background, operated as pings to force the air card into revealing its location.

In order to do this, Verizon reprogrammed the device so that when an incoming voice call arrived, the card would disconnect from any legitimate cell tower to which it was already connected, and send real-time cell-site location data to Verizon, which forwarded the data to the FBI. This allowed the FBI to position its stingray in the neighborhood where Rigmaiden resided. The stingray then “broadcast a very strong signal” to force the air card into connecting to it, instead of reconnecting to a legitimate cell tower, so that agents could then triangulate signals coming from the air card and zoom-in on Rigmaiden’s location.

To make sure the air card connected to the FBI’s simulator, Rigmaiden says that Verizon altered his air card’s Preferred Roaming List so that it would accept the FBI’s stingray as a legitimate cell site and not a rogue site, and also changed a data table on the air card designating the priority of cell sites so that the FBI’s fake site was at the top of the list.

Rigmaiden makes the assertions in a 369-page document he filed in support of a motion to suppress evidence gathered through the stingray. Rigmaiden collected information about how the stingray worked from documents obtained from the government, as well as from records obtained through FOIA requests filed by civil liberties groups and from open-source literature.

During a hearing in a U.S. District Court in Arizona on March 28 to discuss the motion, the government did not dispute Rigmaiden’s assertions about Verizon’s activities.

The actions described by Rigmaiden are much more intrusive than previously known information about how the government uses stingrays, which are generally employed for tracking cell phones and are widely used in drug and other criminal investigations.

The government has long asserted that it doesn’t need to obtain a probable-cause warrant to use the devices because they don’t collect the content of phone calls and text messages and operate like pen-registers and trap-and-traces, collecting the equivalent of header information.

The government has conceded, however, that it needed a warrant in his case alone — because the stingray reached into his apartment remotely to locate the air card — and that the activities performed by Verizon and the FBI to locate Rigmaiden were all authorized by a court order signed by a magistrate.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, who have filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden’s motion, maintain that the order does not qualify as a warrant and that the government withheld crucial information from the magistrate — such as identifying that the tracking device they planned to use was a stingray and that its use involved intrusive measures — thus preventing the court from properly fulfilling its oversight function.

“It shows you just how crazy the technology is, and [supports] all the more the need to explain to the court what they are doing,” says EFF Staff Attorney Hanni Fakhoury. “This is more than just [saying to Verizon] give us some records that you have sitting on your server. This is reconfiguring and changing the characteristics of the [suspect's] property, without informing the judge what’s going on.”

The secretive technology, generically known as a stingray or IMSI catcher, allows law enforcement agents to spoof a legitimate cell tower in order to trick nearby mobile phones and other wireless communication devices like air cards into connecting to the stingray instead of a phone carrier’s legitimate tower.

When devices connect, stingrays can see and record their unique ID numbers and traffic data, as well as information that points to the device’s location.

By moving the stingray around and gathering the wireless device’s signal strength from various locations in a neighborhood, authorities can pinpoint where the device is being used with much more precision than they can get through data obtained from a mobile network provider’s fixed tower location.

Use of the spy technology goes back at least 20 years. In a 2009 Utah case, an FBI agent described using a cell site emulator more than 300 times over a decade and indicated that they were used on a daily basis by U.S, Marshals, the Secret Service and other federal agencies.

The FBI used a similar device to track former hacker Kevin Mitnick in 1994, though the version used in that case was much more primitive and passive.

A 1996 Wired story about the Mitnick case called the device a Triggerfish and described it as “a technician’s device normally used for testing cell phones.” According to the story, the Triggerfish was “a rectangular box of electronics about a half a meter high controlled by a PowerBook” that was essentially “a five-channel receiver, able to monitor both sides of a conversation simultaneously.” The crude technology was hauled around in a station wagon and van. A black coaxial cable was strung out of the vehicle’s window to connect the Triggerfish to a direction-finding antenna on the vehicle’s roof, which had four antenna prongs that reached 30 centimeters into the sky.

The technology has become much sleeker and less obtrusive since then, but still operates under the same principles.

In Rigmaiden’s case, agents apparently used two devices made by a Florida-based company called Harris. One was the company’s StingRay system, which is designed to work from a vehicle driven around a neighborhood to narrow a suspect’s location to a building. Once agents tracked the signals from Rigmaiden’s air card to the Domicilio Apartments complex in Santa Clara, California, they apparently used another device made by Harris called the KingFish — a handheld system that allowed them to walk through the complex and zero-in on Rigmaiden’s air card in apartment 1122.

Although a number of companies make stingrays, including Verint, View Systems, Altron, NeoSoft, MMI, Ability, and Meganet, the Harris line of cell site emulators are the only ones that are compatible with CDMA2000-based devices. Others can track GSM/UMTS-based communications, but the Harris emulators can track CDMA2000, GSM and iDEN devices, as well as UMTS. The Harris StingRay and KingFish devices can also support three different communication standards simultaneously, without having to be reconfigured.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/04/verizon-rigmaiden-aircard/all/

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« Reply #8301 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:38am »

Reuters

North Korea warns foreigners to leave South amid new threats of war

By Christine Kim and Joyce Lee

SEOUL | Tue Apr 9, 2013 9:07am EDT

(Reuters) - North Korea intensified threats of an imminent conflict against the United States and the South on Tuesday, warning foreigners to evacuate South Korea to avoid being dragged into "thermonuclear war".

The North's latest message belied an atmosphere free of anxiety in the South Korean capital, where the city center was bustling with traffic and offices operated normally.

Pyongyang has shown no sign of preparing its 1.2 million-strong army for war, indicating the threat could be aimed partly at bolstering Kim Jong-un, 30, the third in his family to lead the country.

The North, which threatens the United States and its "puppet", South Korea, on a daily basis, is marking anniversaries this week that could be accompanied by strong statements or military displays.

The warning to foreigners in the South, reported by the KCNA news agency, said once war broke out "it will be an all-out war, a merciless, sacred, retaliatory war to be waged by (North Korea).

"It does not want to see foreigners in South Korea fall victim to the war," the agency quoted the Korea Asia-Pacific Peace Committee as saying.

"The committee informs all foreign institutions and enterprises and foreigners, including tourists...that they are requested to take measures for shelter and evacuation in advance for their safety."

None of the embassies in Seoul appeared to have issued any directives to their nationals and airlines reported no changes in their schedules. Schools catering to foreign pupils worked without interruption.

The warning, read out on North Korea's state television in a bulletin that interrupted normal programming, was the latest threat in weeks of high tension following U.N. sanctions slapped on Pyongyang for its latest nuclear arms test.

It followed the North's suspension of activity at the Kaesong joint industrial park just inside North Korea, all but closing down the last remnant of cooperation between the neighbors. North Korean workers failed to turn up on Tuesday.

North Korea had said South Korea was trying to turn the Kaesong complex into a "hotbed of war".

Speculation remained high that the North may launch some provocative action this week - perhaps a missile launch or a nuclear arms test.

In a previous appeal, its authorities urged diplomats in Pyongyang to leave on grounds their safety could not be assured beyond Wednesday. None appeared to have taken any such action.

"VERY DANGEROUS" SITUATION

Also featured in broadcasts were country-wide reports of celebrations marking Saturday's 20th anniversary of the current leader's father, Kim Jong-il, taking over North Korea's leadership and next Monday's birth date of his grandfather, post-World War Two state founder Kim Il-Sung.

A spokeswoman for South Korea's presidential Blue House dismissed the warning, saying no one felt under threat.

"We understand that not only South Koreans, but also foreigners residing here remain unfazed as they have great trust and confidence in our military and the Republic of Korea," Yonhap news agency quoted Kim Haing as saying. She was referring to South Korea by its official name.

A government source in Seoul said a North Korean medium-range missile, reported to have been shunted to the east coast, had been tracked and was believed to be ready for launch.

"Technically, they can launch it as early as tomorrow," the source said.

But a U.S. embassy official in Seoul said a directive issued last week saying there was no imminent threat to Americans in South Korea remained valid. "Our workers are in all our offices today," he said. "We have not evacuated anyone."

Stocks, which had fallen 4 percent over the past four days, edged higher on Tuesday despite the warning. The won currency moved little, dipping slightly after the North Korean statement.

World leaders have expressed alarm at the crisis and the prospect of a conflict involving a country claiming to be developing nuclear weapons.

China, the North's sole diplomatic and financial ally, issued a new call for calm and restraint, though Beijing's leaders have shown increasing impatience with Pyongyang.

A Russian foreign ministry spokesman, in a statement on the ministry's website, said Moscow was in solidarity with all G8 industrialized countries "as regards the rejection of Pyongyang's current provocative and bellicose line of conduct".

An official from the 27-nation European Union said Pyongyang "looks calm", but acknowledged there was a "limited risk...of an armed conflict".

U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, speaking in Rome, described the situation as "very dangerous. A small incident caused by miscalculation or misjudgment may create an uncontrollable situation".

The North is also angry at weeks of joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises off the coast of the peninsula, with B-2 stealth bombers dispatched from their U.S. bases.

But the United States announced the postponement last weekend of a long-planned missile launch, a move officials said was aimed at easing tensions on the peninsula. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry visits Seoul this week.

Employers at the Kaesong complex faced uncertainty as the 53,000-strong North Korean workforce stayed away. A spokesman for textile company Taekwang Industrial and at least two other firms said production had stopped.

South Korean figures said 406 South Koreans remained in Kaesong on Tuesday after 69 left the complex, which generates $2 billion in trade for the impoverished North.

Addressing a cabinet meeting, South Korean President Park Geun-hye described the suspension of Kaesong as "very disappointing" and said investors would now shun the North.

South Korean companies are estimated to have invested around $500 million in the park since 2004.

North Korean workers at the park have appeared increasingly agitated in recent days, refusing to talk to their colleagues.

Many Southerners connected with the park bedded down at budget hotels in a nearby South Korean town in the hope that an order would come from the North to re-open.

(Additional reporting by Ju-min Park in PAJU, Jack Kim in Seoul, Ben Blanchard in Beijing; Manuel Mogato in Manila and Steve Gutterman in Moscow; Writing by Ron Popeski; Editing by Nick Macfie)


http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/09/us-korea-north-idUSBRE93408020130409

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« Reply #8302 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:41am »

Science Daily

Hot and Cold Senses Interact: Cold Perception Is Enhanced When Nerve Circuitry for Heat Is Inactivated


Apr. 8, 2013 — A study from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine offers new insights into how the nervous system processes hot and cold temperatures. The research led by neuroscientist Mark J. Zylka, PhD, associate professor of cell biology and physiology, found an interaction between the neural circuits that detect hot and cold stimuli: cold perception is enhanced when nerve circuitry for heat is inactivated.

"This discovery has implications for how we perceive hot and cold temperatures and for why people with certain forms of chronic pain, such as neuropathic pain, or pain arising as direct consequence of a nervous system injury or disease, experience heightened responses to cold temperatures," says Zylka, a member of the UNC Neuroscience Center.

The study also has implications for why a promising new class of pain relief drugs known as TRPV1 antagonists (they block a neuron receptor protein) cause many patients to shiver and "feel cold" prior to the onset of hyperthermia, an abnormally elevated body temperature. Enhanced cold followed by hyperthermia is a major side effect that has limited the use of these drugs in patients with chronic pain associated with multiple sclerosis, cancer, and osteoarthritis.

Zylka's research sheds new light on how the neural circuits that regulate temperature sensation bring about these responses, and could suggest ways of reducing such side-effects associated with TRPV1 antagonists and related drugs.

The research was selected by the journal Neuron as cover story for the April 10, 2013 print edition and was available in the April 4, 2013 advanced online edition.

This new study used cutting edge cell ablation technology to delete the nerve circuit that encodes heat and some forms of itch while preserving the circuitry that sense cold temperatures. This manipulation results in animals that were practically "blind" to heat, meaning they could no longer detect hot temperatures, Zylka explains. "Just like removing heat from a room makes us feel cold (such as with an air conditioner), removing the circuit that animals use to sense heat made them hypersensitive to cold. Physiological studies indicated that these distinct circuits regulate one another in the spinal cord."

TRPV1 is a receptor for heat and is found in the primary sensory nerve circuit that Zylka studied. TRPV1 antagonists make patients temporarily blind to heat, which Zylka speculates is analogous to what happened when his lab deleted the animals' circuit that detects heat: cold hypersensitivity.

Zylka emphasizes that future studies will be needed to confirm that TRPV1 antagonists affect cold responses in a manner similar to what his lab found with nerve circuit deletion.

The study was conducted in the Zylka lab by postdoctoral scientists Eric S. McCoy, Sarah E. Street, and Jihong Zheng and by research associates Bonnie Taylor-Blake and Alaine Pribisco. Funding for the research came from the Searle Scholars Program, The Klingenstein Foundation, The Rita Allen Foundation, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130408172243.htm

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« Reply #8303 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:45am »

Seattle Times

Originally published Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 4:45 AM

Iraqi al-Qaida and Syria militants announce merger

By BASSEM MROUE and MAAMOUN YOUSSEF
Associated Press

Al-Qaida's branch in Iraq said it has merged with Syria's extremist Jabhat al-Nusra, a move that shows the rising confidence of radicals within the Syrian rebel movement and is likely to trigger renewed fears among its international backers.

A website linked to Jabhat al-Nusra confirmed on Tuesday the merger with the Islamic State of Iraq, whose leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, first made the announcement in a 21-minute audio message posted on militant websites late Monday.

Jabhat al-Nusra has taken an ever-bigger role in Syria's conflict over the last year, fighting in key battles and staging several large suicide bombings. The U.S. has designated it a terrorist organization.

The Syrian group has made little secret of its ideological ties to the global jihadist movement and its links across the Iraqi border, but until now it has not officially declared itself to be part of al-Qaida.

Al-Baghdadi said that his group - the Islamic State of Iraq - and Syria's Jabhat al-Nusra will now be known as the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.

"It is time to announce to the Levantine people and the whole world that Jabhat al-Nusra is merely an extension and part of the Islamic State of Iraq," he said.

He said that the Iraqi group was providing half of its budget to the conflict in Syria. Al-Baghdadi said that the Syrian group would have no separate leader but instead be led by the "people of Syria themselves" - implying that he would be in charge in both countries.

The formal merger of such a high-profile Syrian rebel group to al-Qaida is likely to spark concerns among backers of the opposition who are enemies of the global terror network, including both Western countries and Gulf Arab states.

It may increase resentment of Jabhat al-Nusra among other rebel factions. Rebels have until now respected the radical group's fighters for their prowess on the battlefield, but a merger with al-Qaida will complicate any effort to send arms to rebels from abroad.

A website linked to Jabhat al-Nusra known as al-Muhajir al-Islami - the Islamic emigrant - confirmed the merger.

The authenticity of neither message could be independently confirmed, but statements posted on major militant websites are rarely disputed by extremist groups afterward.

Jabhat al-Nusra emerged as an offshoot of Iraq's al-Qaida branch in early 2012, as one of a patchwork of disparate rebel groups in Syria.

One of the most dramatic attacks by the group came on March 4, when 48 Syrian soldiers were killed in a well-coordinated ambush after seeking refuge across the frontier in Iraq following clashes with rebels on the Syrian side of the border. The attack occurred in Iraq's restive western province of Anbar, where al-Qaida is known to be active.

A top Iraqi intelligence official told The Associated Press in Baghdad that they have always known that "al-Qaida in Iraq is directing Jabhat al-Nusra."

He said they announced their unity because of "political, logistical and geographical circumstance." The official said Iraqi authorities will take "strict security measures to strike them."

In an editorial published Tuesday in the Washington Post, Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki warned that a "Syria controlled in whole or part by al-Qaeda and its affiliates - an outcome that grows more likely by the day - would be more dangerous to both our countries than anything we've seen up to now."

Iraqi officials say the jihadi groups are sharing three military training compounds, logistics, intelligence and weapons as they grow in strength around the Syria-Iraq border, particularly in a sprawling region called al-Jazeera, which they are trying to turn into a border sanctuary they can both exploit. It could serve as a base of operations to strike either side of the border.

Baghdad officials said last week they have requested U.S. drone strikes against the fighters in Iraqi territory. A U.S. official confirmed that elements within the Iraqi government had inquired about drone strikes. But the official said the U.S. was waiting to respond until the top level of Iraqi leadership makes a formal request, which has not happened yet.

All officials spoke anonymously as they were not authorized to give official statements to the media.

Eastern Syria and western Iraq have a predominantly Sunni Muslim population like most of the rebels fighting President Bashar Assad, who belongs to the minority Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiite Islam. The Baghdad government is dominated by Shiites, who are a majority in Iraq.

The announcement came hours after a suicide car bomber struck Monday in the financial heart of Syria's capital, killing at least 15 people, damaging the nearby central bank.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack but such operations were claimed by Jabhat al-Nusra in the past.

State-run Al-Ikhbariyeh TV station quoted Central Bank Governor Adib Mayaleh as saying the bank returned to work as usual at 1 p.m. Tuesday (1000 GMT) "despite the destruction" caused by the bombing.

The Syrian Foreign Ministry sent two letters to the United Nations and the U.N. Security Council protesting the Damascus explosion, blaming "terrorists" who "receive financial and logistic support from regional states and other foreign nations."

The Syrian National Coalition, the country's main opposition group, blamed Assad's regime for the bombing, saying "the intent is clearly to terrorize the people." It said the area where the explosion occurred is heavily-guarded.

Elsewhere on Tuesday, activists reported violence in different parts of Syria.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported air raids on suburbs of the capital Damascus as well as the northern province of Raqqa and Idlib.

The Observatory said that Ali Matar, a local rebel commander in the eastern province of Deir el-Zour, was shot dead in the eastern city of Mayadeen. It did not say who was behind the attack but added that some of his guards were wounded in the shooting.

Syria's crisis, which began in March 2011 with protests calling for Assad's ouster, then evolved into a civil war. The U.N. says more than 70,000 have been killed in the conflict.


Youssef reported from Cairo. Associated Press writer Qassim Abdul-Zahra contributed to this report from Baghdad.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2020738464_apmlsyria.html

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« Reply #8304 on: Apr 9th, 2013, 10:46am »







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« Reply #8305 on: Apr 10th, 2013, 07:49am »

Seattle Times

Originally published Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 4:58 AM

Ex-US Rep. Weiner weighing run for NYC mayor
The Associated Press

Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner (WEE'-nur), who resigned over a sexting scandal in 2011, says he's weighing a run for New York City mayor this year.

The Democrat tells New York Times Magazine ( http://nyti.ms/10Jnf1d) "it's now or maybe never for me." But he acknowledges that it's a long shot because some people "just don't have room for a second narrative about me."

He says he doesn't know when he'll decide on entering the race, and concedes he'd be an underdog.

Weiner represented Queens and Brooklyn for more than a decade before resigning amid the scandal over his lewd online behavior.

The interview was posted online Wednesday and is scheduled to be published on Sunday.

His wife is Huma Abedin (HOO'-muh AB'-uh-deen), a longtime aide to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2020744377_apusanthonyweinermayoralrun.html

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« Reply #8306 on: Apr 10th, 2013, 07:51am »

Japan Times


Anticipating launch, South raises alert

Apr 10, 2013

SEOUL – South Korean and U.S. forces raised their alert status to “vital threat” Wednesday ahead of an expected North Korean missile test, with tensions wound tight during a five-day buildup to a key anniversary.

The North last week told foreign diplomats in Pyongyang they had until April 10 to consider evacuation, fueling speculation of a launch between Wednesday and April 15 birthday celebrations for late founder Kim Il Sung. It could also coincide with high-profile visits by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen, who will both be in Seoul on Friday.

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung Se told Parliament the launch could take place “anytime” and warned Pyongyang it risked triggering a fresh round of U.N. sanctions.

South Korean intelligence says the North has prepared two midrange missiles for imminent launch from its east coast, despite warnings from ally China to avoid provocative moves at a time of soaring military tensions.

On Tuesday, the North reiterated a warning that the peninsula was headed for “thermonuclear” war and advised foreigners to consider leaving South Korea.

The South Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command raised its “Watchcon” status from 3 to 2 to reflect indications of a “vital threat,” the Yonhap news agency said, citing a top military official.

Watchcon 4 is in effect during normal peacetime, while Watchcon 3 reflects indications of an important threat. Watchcon 1 is used in wartime.

In a separate report, Yonhap quoted a government source as saying Pyongyang might be preparing “multiple” launches, after other launch vehicles were reportedly detected carrying shorter-range Scud and Rodong missiles.

The Watchcon system solely relates to surveillance levels and is separate from the Defcon system of military preparedness.

The midrange missiles mobilized by the North are reported to be untested Musudan models with an estimated range of up to 4,000 km. That would cover any target in South Korea and Japan, and possibly even U.S. military bases on the Pacific island of Guam.

Separately, Seoul Science Ministry official Lee Seung Won said in a televised briefing Wednesday that North Korea was the most likely culprit for a March 20 cyber-attack on South Korean banks and TV stations.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/04/10/asia-pacific/anticipating-launch-south-raises-alert/#.UWVf3CPn-1s

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Blastr.com

Apple bans popular sci-fi comic Saga because of gay sex scene

Dan Roth

Tue, 04/09/2013 - 6:30pm

Looks like if you were hoping to read this week's Saga through Apple, you'll have to find another way.

Apple doesn't exactly play it fast and loose with the content that appears through their apps. When it comes to pornography, they have a strict 'no means no' policy. But what slips through the cracks is, in this case, just as important as how we define what qualifies as pornographic.

To wit -- In the twelfth issue of Saga, the comic opens with the graphic portrayal of fully naked men engaged in homosexual acts. This is not the first time sex has appeared in the comic nor the first time male genitals have been shown, but it is the first time Apple has completely banned the comic from appearing within iOS apps.

This comes hot on the heels of Apple banning 1500 French comics which varied in degrees of sexual content. So is this simply a recent crack down on the part of Apple? Best-selling author, William Gibson doesn't think so.

more after the jump:
http://www.blastr.com/2013-4-9/apple-bans-popular-sci-fi-comic-saga-because-gay-sex-scene

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Science Daily

Advancing Secure Communications: A Better Single-Photon Emitter for Quantum Cryptography

Apr. 9, 2013

— In a development that could make the advanced form of secure communications known as quantum cryptography more practical, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated a simpler, more efficient single-photon emitter that can be made using traditional semiconductor processing techniques.

Single-photon emitters release one particle of light, or photon, at a time, as opposed to devices like lasers that release a stream of them. Single-photon emitters are essential for quantum cryptography, which keeps secrets safe by taking advantage of the so-called observer effect: The very act of an eavesdropper listening in jumbles the message. This is because in the quantum realm, observing a system always changes it.

For quantum cryptography to work, it's necessary to encode the message -- which could be a bank password or a piece of military intelligence, for example -- just one photon at a time. That way, the sender and the recipient will know whether anyone has tampered with the message.

While the U-M researchers didn't make the first single-photon emitter, they say their new device improves upon the current technology and is much easier to make.

"This thing is very, very simple. It is all based on silicon," said Pallab Bhattacharya, the Charles M. Vest Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the James R. Mellor Professor of Engineering.

Bhattacharya, who leads this project, is a co-author of a paper on the work published in Nature Communications on April 9.

Bhattacharya's emitter is a single nanowire made of gallium nitride with a very small region of indium gallium nitride that behaves as a quantum dot. A quantum dot is a nanostructure that can generate a bit of information. In the binary code of conventional computers, a bit is a 0 or a 1. A quantum bit can be either or both at the same time.

The semiconducting materials the new emitter is made of are commonly used in LEDs and solar cells. The researchers grew the nanowires on a wafer of silicon. Because their technique is silicon-based, the infrastructure to manufacture the emitters on a larger scale already exists. Silicon is the basis of modern electronics.

"This is a big step in that it produces the pathway to realizing a practical electrically injected single-photon emitter," Bhattacharya said.

Key enablers of the new technology are size and compactness.

"By making the diameter of the nanowire very small and by altering the composition over a very small section of it, a quantum dot is realized," Bhattacharya said. "The quantum dot emits single-photons upon electrical excitation."

The U-M emitter is fueled by electricity, rather than light -- another aspect that makes it more practical. And each photon it emits possesses the same degree of linear polarization. Polarization refers to the orientation of the electric field of a beam of light. Most other single-photon emitters release light particles with a random polarization.

"So half might have one polarization and the other half might have the other," Bhattacharya said. "So in cryptic message, if you want to code them, you would only be able to use 50 percent of the photons. With our device, you could use almost all of them."

This device operates at cold temperatures, but the researchers are working on one that operates closer to room temperature.

The paper is titled "Electrically-driven polarized single-photon emission from an InGaN quantum dot in a GaN nanowire." The first author is Saniya Deshpande, a graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science. The work is supported by the National Science Foundation. The device was fabricated at the U-M Lurie Nanofabrication Facility.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130409145056.htm

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Syfy developing 7 new series: Aliens, magic, angels and more!

Trent Moore

Wed, 04/10/2013 - 4:33pm

Spaceships are coming back in a big way. Syfy has cranked up development on seven new series—several of which look to be space-set, hard sci-fi epics.

The network has tapped a slew of experienced genre writers and producers to launch these new series, including Gale Anne Hurd (The Walking Dead), Jason Blum (Paranormal Activity), Ron Milbauer and Terri Hughes Burton (Alphas), and Phil Levens (Smallville).

From derelict spaceships to a war between supernatural forces, here’s a rundown of all the new projects in development:

Clandestine

This series follows a group of left-for-dead outlaws who hide out in an abandoned Coalition ship. Before long they use the ship to pose as Coalition officers, until they discover a huge conspiracy surrounding the real agenda of the Coalition. This one is definitely intriguing, and sounds like it has a solid Farscape and Firefly vibe. Gale Anne Hurd (The Walking Dead) will executive-produce this one, making it one to watch.

Dominion

This one picks up 20 years after rogue, evil angels take their vengeance on humans, following a freedom fighter who rises up to protect humanity. It promises a solid amount of religious-tinged intrigue, perhaps wrapped up in a Supernatural vibe. Writer Vaun Wilmott (Sons of Anarchy) and director Scott Stewart (Defiance) are putting this one together.

Orion

This “space opera” is a combination of elements ranging from Tomb Raider to Farscape, and follows a female relic hunter tracking down artifacts from her past in deep space. To keep it interesting, the story is set in the middle of a huge intergalactic war, and those artifacts could potentially turn the tide of the campaign. Ron Milbauer and Terri Hughes Burton (Alphas) will write and executive-produce this series, and their experience with a grounded series like Alphas should help Orion strike the right balance.

Sojourn

Just because we can travel into space doesn’t mean humanity’s bad habits won’t come with us. This series would follow the first detective in space and the ensuing investigation to solve a murder on a starship. The investigation takes the detective deeper down the rabbit hole, digging up a conspiracy to cover up a crime that occurred half a century earlier. Sci-fi vet Phil Levens (Smallville) will write, with Jason Blum (Paranormal Activity) producing.

Shelter

This one takes the classic meteorite headed for Earth trope and tosses in a big mystery, as hand-picked survivors are sent underground into a utopian-esque bunker to keep society moving. But all is not as it seems, and everyone from the bunker survivors to those left on the surface have to figure out why and how this is happening. Plus, toss in a healthy dose of political intrigue, and this one sounds like it could be fun. In case you’re worried it won’t have enough asteroid street cred, Bruce Joel Rubin (Deep Impact) is writing and producing, so this will be one to keep an eye on.

Infinity

It’s been a long time since we had a good old-fashioned Lost In Space story, and Infinity looks to fill that void with a twist. This series would follow the crew of the only interstellar ship in existence, which is sent to meet an alien armada as they enter our solar system. But during the ensuing firefight, the ship is sent through a wormhole and winds up lost on the other side of the universe. The crew would then encounter different alien worlds as they search for a way home. This one is being written by Javier Grillo-Marxuach (Lost).

Silver Shields

This series would follow country boy Caymer as he journeys to the big city after his father is killed. Caymer then decides to follow in his father’s footsteps and join up with the local police force to solve the mystery surrounding his dad’s death. But once he digs a little deeper into the mystery, he comes face to face with all kinds of magical creatures. Alphas alum Robert Hewitt Wolfe is attached to write and produce this series if it makes it to air.

http://www.blastr.com/2013-4-10/syfy-developing-7-new-series-aliens-magic-angels-and-more

Crystal
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