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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 114221 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #840 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:41am »

Telegraph

No one likes a 'do-gooder', psychological study shows
Their selfless acts should probably put us all to shame. But new research has demonstrated that no one really likes “do-gooders”.

By John Bingham
Published: 7:30AM BST 25 Aug 2010

A study by psychologists at Washington State University in the US demonstrated that apparent acts of altruism often serve only to alienate others.

Those who volunteer to take on unwanted tasks or who hand out gifts without being prompted are resented for “raising the bar” for others or treated with outright suspicion, the study, found.

Volunteers were put into groups and asked to take part in a series of tasks involving exchanging tokens for meal vouchers.

They were also told that giving up vouchers would improve the group's chance of receiving a cash reward to be shared between them.

Some were told to make deliberately lopsided exchanges – either appearing greedy by hoarding the vouchers or making a show of altruism by not taking their fair share.

At the end the volunteers were asked about the dynamic in their own group.

Unsurprisingly, most said that they would not want to work with the “greedy” person again.

But a majority also expressed the same sentiments about the apparently unselfish member of their group.

"They frequently said 'the person is making me look bad' or is breaking the rules,” said Professor Craig Parks, a social psychologist who led the study.

"Occasionally, they would suspect the person had ulterior motives.

“The do-gooders are also seen as deviant rule breakers. It's as if they're giving away Monopoly money so someone can stay in the game, irking other players no end.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/7962707/No-one-likes-a-do-gooder-psychological-study-shows.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #841 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:44am »

Wired

Aug. 25, 1989: Voyager 2, Meet Neptune
By Doug Cornelius August 25, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: 20th century, Astronomy, Space Exploration

1989: Voyager 2 makes its closest encounter with Neptune, passing just 3,000 miles above the cloud tops of the most distant planet in our solar system.

The Voyager 2 space probe has been our most productive unmanned space voyage. It visited all four of the outer planets and their systems of moons and rings, including the first visits to previously unexplored Uranus and Neptune.

What did the space probe discover about Neptune?

Originally it was thought that Neptune was too cold to support atmospheric disturbances, but Voyager 2 discovered large-scale storms, most notably the Great Dark Spot. It turned out to have a much shorter duration than Jupiter’s persistent Great Red Spot. Neptune not only has storms, it happens to have the fastest winds in the solar system.

The space probe was plotted to perform a close encounter with Triton, the larger of Neptune’s originally known moons. Along the way, Voyager 2 found six new moons (.pdf) orbiting the planet.

Voyager 2 found four rings and evidence for ring arcs, or incomplete rings, above Neptune. That means all four of the gas giants in our solar system have rings. Neptune’s, however, are very meager compared to the magnificent rings around Saturn.

In the late 19th century, astronomers thought that an unseen Planet X was influencing the orbits of Uranus and Neptune. The observed positions of the two planets and their calculated positions differed. Among those astronomers convinced of the existence of Planet X was Clyde Tombaugh. In 1930 while scanning areas of the sky for Planet X, he found Pluto.

When Voyager 2 flew by Neptune, it took very precise measurements of Neptune’s mass and found it to be about 0.5 percent less massive than previous estimates. When the orbits of Uranus and Neptune were recalculated using the more accurate mass figure, it became clear that the imprecise number for Neptune — and not the gravity of an unseen planet — had caused the observed orbital discrepancies.

After the International Astronomical Union demoted Pluto from planetary status in 2006, Voyager 2’s 1989 Neptune flyby became the point when every planet in our solar system had been visited by a space probe.

(All you Pluto-is-a-planet advocates can still argue for reinstatement, but you will have to bring a few more celestial objects into the planet category along with Pluto.)

The twin Voyager space probes were launched in 1977. Voyager 2 was actually launched first, on Aug. 20. Voyager 1 left two weeks later on Sept. 5. (Voyager 6 was never launched, much to the chagrin of Star Trek fans.) Voyager 1’s trajectory was a faster path, getting it to Jupiter in March 1979. Voyager 2 arrived about four months later in July 1979. Both then sped on to Saturn.

Neptune was Voyager 2’s final planetary destination after passing Jupiter (closest approach July 9, 1979), Saturn (closest approach Aug. 26, 1981) and Uranus (closest approach Jan. 24, 1986).

After its encounter with Neptune, the spacecraft was rechristened the Voyager Interstellar Mission by NASA to take measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma and charged-particle environment. But mostly it’s searching for the heliopause, the distance at which the solar wind becomes subsumed by the more general interstellar wind. Voyager 2 is headed out of the solar system, diving below the ecliptic plane at an angle of about 48 degrees and a rate of about 300 million miles a year.

We may be able to communicate with Voyager 2 for another 10 years, when its radioactive power sources are predicted to become too weak to supply electricity to run the craft’s critical systems. Then it will be out of our solar system and out of touch, racing to parts unknown and untold.

Doug Cornelius is a contributor to Wired.com’s GeekDad.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/08/0825voyager2-neptune

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #842 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:49am »

Wired Danger Room


Pain Ray, Rejected by the Military, Ready to Blast L.A. Prisoners
By Noah Shachtman August 24, 2010 | 3:02 pm | Categories: Lasers and Ray Guns

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Inmates of the Pitchess Detention Center, watch your step. If you get out of line, you may get blasted with an invisible heat ray.

The jail’s energy weapon is a small-scale version of the Active Denial System, the experimental crowd control device that the U.S. military brought to Afghanistan — and then quickly shipped back home, after questions mounted about the wisdom of blasting locals with a beam that momentarily puts them in agony. The pain weapon seemed at odds with the military’s efforts to appear more humane and measured in the eyes of the Afghan populace.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department not only found those concerns overblown; they used the military’s long-standing reluctance to zap Afghans as fodder for the plan to zap Pitchess’ prisoners. “I already had contacts at [Active Denial maker] Raytheon who were reeling from the short-sided, self-serving cowardice of people who were more interested in saving face than saving lives, and leveraged it right into getting it into our jails,” former LASD Cmdr. Charles “Sid” Heal tells Danger Room.

The LASD has long been a hotbed of advocates for exotic weaponry — everything from sonic blasters to spy drones. But the Active Denial System has long been of particular interest. Heal calls it the “Holy Grail of crowd control.” He’s been trying for years to get the technology deployed in Los Angeles.

The LASD unveiled the 7½-foot-tall millimeter wave weapon late last week, partially as answer to the 257 inmate-on-inmate assaults at Pitchess so far this year, and the 19 additional assaults on deputies. Sheriff Lee Baca believes the modified pain ray can break up these incidents before they get out of hand. With a range of 80 to 100 feet, the heat beam can blast prisoners that a Taser couldn’t hit. “This device will allow us to quickly intervene without having to enter the area and without incapacitating or injuring either combatant,” Baca says in a statement.

The National Institute of Justice — the research arm of the U.S. Justice Department — is paying for the six-month trial at Pitchess, part of a larger effort to test technologies that might cut down on inmate violence. “If we try and fail we’ve sent a message that we care, because even the effort becomes noble!” Heal e-mails. ”If we try and succeed we’ve become heroes in that we accepted a risk the Department of Defense refused — even after they spent $40 million of the taxpayers money and even while they’re killing people, because [they] are unwilling to use it.”

Photo: LASD

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/pain-ray-rejected-by-the-military-ready-to-blast-l-a-prisoners/#ixzz0xcpCdRUY

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #843 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 08:56am »

Mt. Baker with Birch Bay in the foreground. This is about as good as my photography gets. Mt. Baker is the origination point of Kenneth Arnold's saucers.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #844 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 09:06am »

ATV Today

Brannon Braga wanted to kill off Seven of Nine
Written by James Ryder
Tuesday, 24 August 2010 17:10

Former Star Trek producer Brannon Braga has revealed that he wanted to kill off the character of Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan) in Star Trek: Voyager. Braga was one of the main producers on Star Trek: Voyager and the prequel series Star Trek: Enterprise and is a somewhat controversial figure within the Trek world. Not all Trek fans like his take on the Trek universe and some are quite critical of his work on Star Trek - blaming him for the failure of Enterprise to take off. Braga even received death threats after the character of Captain Kirk (William Shatner) was killed off in the movie Generations.

Now Braga has revealed, in a recent interview with SFX, that while working on Voyager he wanted to kill off the hugely popular character of Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan). The character was introduced in the season three finale of Voyager and became a permanent cast member in the following season as the character was rescued from the Borg by the crew of Voyager. The addition of Ryan's character to the spin-off added some much needed sex appeal for the series but also a new dynamic on the series with Seven often being paired up with Captain Janeway (Kate Melgrew) creating somewhat fraught teacher/pupil relationship. Despite the characters popularity it seems Braga felt the character should have been killed!

"It was my feeling that Seven Of Nine should have died. If you watch the episode 'Human Error' written by Andre Bormanis, it was not only a heart breaking episode in that Seven Of Nine learns, as she begins to explore her human emotions, that she can't experience them. There's a Borg chip inside her that will kill her if she tries to do so. First of all, that's kind of an interesting 'rape victim' analogy or whatever you want to call it, about a damaged woman who can't get past what happened to her, but I also always saw it as a crucial episode that would set up the finale. This was a woman who knew she was neither here nor there. She couldn't go back to the Borg, nor would she want to, but she could never be fully human, so she was doomed. And I wanted to have her sacrifice herself to get her shipmates home." - Braga in SFX

While we do understand where Braga is coming from with his ideas surrounding Seven's possible death we think he was picking on the wrong character in Voyager. If any character should have been killed off - permanently and not resurrected/replaced/retconned at the end of the episode - it should have been the pointless Harry Kim closely followed by dull Chakotay.

http://www.atvnewsnetwork.co.uk/today/index.php/atv-today/3688-star-trek-producer-wanted-to-kill-off-seven-of-nine

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #845 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 09:35am »

UFO's Northwest

Man Sees Spherical Metallic Object Moving Slowly in Morning Sky

Map Showing the Witness Location
and the Approximate Position of the Object.

Date of Sighting: August 23, 2010
Time of Sighting: 9:30 to 9:45 AM PDT
Location of Sighting: Just North of Monmouth, Oregon On Highway 99 (See Map)

Description: Listen to Interview With Witness (MP3)
The witness called shortly after his sighting. He was driving north on highway 99 and saw a metallic silver object moving slowly to the north (northeast) of him. He could see the sun reflecting off of the object. He didn't know what the object was and was convinced that it wasn't an airplane or helicopter. He drove past some trees and lost sight of the object. He then picked up the object again, but it was quite small (dot) and had moved eastward.

Note: This sighting was not a weather balloon, but could have been another type of balloon. Anyone who knows the identity of this object or saw the object is urged to file a report.

map and audio interview after the jump
http://www.ufosnw.com/sighting_reports/2010/salemor08232010/salemor08232010.htm

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #846 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 10:47am »

Looking south at Puget Sound.

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Haley, our rescue girl, she's just turned four
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Haley and Tess when Tess was about three months old
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Bitsie the baby at 10 weeks. She's three years now
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The Berger bunch
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #847 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 11:37am »

Phantoms and Monsters

Wednesday, August 25, 2010
What Will the 2011 Model of UFO Look Like?

Chris Holly's Paranormal World - Over the years the descriptions of unidentified flying objects has become as diverse as our automobile models. I am of course being silly . I have noticed that as we become more aware of what is happening in our sky we also have been seeing more than one type of unknown object.

The shapes of the unexplained crafts spotted across the world make me think the intelligence piloting them may also be as diverse as the crafts they use to visit us.

We are all familiar with the saucer style UFO. I believe it may be the first type of craft that we reported seeing . Sort of the model T Ford of UFO crafts. There are paintings and assorted artifacts that are thousands of years old that show saucer shape crafts. They also reference crafts that look like short rockets. Bright light glowing from or surrounding crafts also seems to be shown in ancient art.

Saucers are still seen around the world. Cigar shapes, triangles , cross shaped crafts, orbs, rings, diamond and rectangle shaped crafts all have been spotted in our skies. I have received reports of crafts of pure light as well as one that seemed to be a large living creature. There are many unknowns being seen by many. The idea that they are all ridiculous is ridiculous. By the numbers of sightings alone we must admit and realize something is going on out there and many of us are seeing it.

The size of the UFO's being spotted is interesting as they too are diverse and range from car size to huge mother ships the size of a building or as long as a football field. I recall reading years ago about a sighting of a mother ship seen by hundreds over long Island in the 1960's . The newspaper article at the time claimed the craft was at least a mile long and wide. That is a very large craft.

There is no doubt that we are being visited. There is no doubt that the crafts used to transport our visitors come in many shapes and forms. I think the only question that really remains is who is responsible for these crafts and who is visiting us.

Judging from the diversity of the UFO's spotted we are being visited by not one but an assortment of beings. I am sure the intelligent life forms building and piloting the crafts that we are seeing are as different from each other as are the crafts we are seeing.

drawing and more after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/08/what-will-2011-model-of-ufo-look-like.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #848 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 11:56am »

BBC News

23 August 2010 Last updated at 14:49 ET
Pont-Saint-Esprit poisoning: Did the CIA spread LSD?
By Mike Thomson

BBC News

Nearly 60 years ago, a French town was hit by a sudden outbreak of hallucinations, which left five people dead and many seriously ill. For years it was blamed on bread contaminated with a psychedelic fungus - but that theory is now being challenged.

Leon says he would prefer to die than endure the 1951 events again On 16 August 1951, postman Leon Armunier was doing his rounds in the southern French town of Pont-Saint-Esprit when he was suddenly overwhelmed by nausea and wild hallucinations.

"It was terrible. I had the sensation of shrinking and shrinking, and the fire and the serpents coiling around my arms," he remembers.

Leon, now 87, fell off his bike and was taken to the hospital in Avignon.

He was put in a straitjacket but he shared a room with three teenagers who had been chained to their beds to keep them under control.

"Some of my friends tried to get out of the window. They were thrashing wildly... screaming, and the sound of the metal beds and the jumping up and down... the noise was terrible.

"I'd prefer to die rather than go through that again."

Over the coming days, dozens of other people in the town fell prey to similar symptoms.

Doctors at the time concluded that bread at one of the town's bakeries had become contaminated by ergot, a poisonous fungus that occurs naturally on rye.

Biological warfare

That view remained largely unchallenged until 2009, when an American investigative journalist, Hank Albarelli, revealed a CIA document labelled: "Re: Pont-Saint-Esprit and F.Olson Files. SO Span/France Operation file, inclusive Olson. Intel files. Hand carry to Belin - tell him to see to it that these are buried."

F. Olson is Frank Olson, a CIA scientist who, at the time of the Pont St Esprit incident, led research for the agency into the drug LSD.

David Belin, meanwhile, was executive director of the Rockefeller Commission created by the White House in 1975 to investigate abuses carried out worldwide by the CIA.

Albarelli believes the Pont-Saint-Esprit and F. Olson Files, mentioned in the document, would show - if they had not been "buried" - that the CIA was experimenting on the townspeople, by dosing them with LSD.

The conclusion drawn at the time was that one of the town's bakeries, the Roch Briand, was the source of the poisoning. It's possible, Albarelli says, that LSD was put in the bread.

It is well known that biological warfare scientists around the world, including some in Britain, were experimenting with LSD in the early 1950s - a time of conflict in Korea and an escalation of Cold War tensions.

Albarelli says he has found a top secret report issued in 1949 by the research director of the Edgewood Arsenal, where many US government LSD experiments were carried out, which states that the army should do everything possible to launch "field experiments" using the drug.

The local hospital where some of the victims were taken in 1951 has been closed Using Freedom of Information legislation, he also got hold of another CIA report from 1954.

In it an agent reported his conversation with a representative of the Sandoz Chemical company in Switzerland.

Sandoz's base, which is just a few hundred kilometres from Pont-Saint-Esprit, was the only place where LSD was being produced at that time.

The agent reports that after several drinks, the Sandoz representative abruptly stated: "The Pont-Saint-Esprit 'secret' is that it was not the bread at all... It was not grain ergot."

'Wrong symptoms'

But American academic Professor Steven Kaplan, who published a book in 2008 on the Pont-Saint-Esprit incident, insists that neither ergot nor LSD could have been responsible.

more after the jump
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-10996838

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #849 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 12:12pm »

on Aug 25th, 2010, 08:56am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Mt. Baker with Birch Bay in the foreground. This is about as good as my photography gets. Mt. Baker is the origination point of Kenneth Arnold's saucers.

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That is such a beautiful scene.... grin Nothing wrong with that photography.... looks great!

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #850 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 12:20pm »

Hi Crys

Quote:
BBC News

23 August 2010 Last updated at 14:49 ET
Pont-Saint-Esprit poisoning: Did the CIA spread LSD?
By Mike Thomson

BBC News

Nearly 60 years ago, a French town was hit by a sudden outbreak of hallucinations, which left five people dead and many seriously ill. For years it was blamed on bread contaminated with a psychedelic fungus - but that theory is now being challenged.

Leon says he would prefer to die than endure the 1951 events again On 16 August 1951, postman Leon Armunier was doing his rounds in the southern French town of Pont-Saint-Esprit when he was suddenly overwhelmed by nausea and wild hallucinations.

"It was terrible. I had the sensation of shrinking and shrinking, and the fire and the serpents coiling around my arms," he remembers.


I read this article yesterday and thought it sounded like the fungus that grows on grains (Ergot poisoning)… which produces pretty much the same symptoms, and not LSD, not that I know much about LSD.

Excerpt:
“that the "bewitched" accusers of Salem had in fact suffered hallucinations, convulsions, bizarre skin sensations and other unusual symptoms because they'd been poisoned by a crop of fungus-infested rye” —
http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/history/ergot.htm

But it says further down in the article:

Quote:
But American academic Professor Steven Kaplan, who published a book in 2008 on the Pont-Saint-Esprit incident, insists that neither ergot nor LSD could have been responsible.


Well I think he could be wrong, and wonder what other alternative explanation he gave for it.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #851 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 12:44pm »

on Aug 25th, 2010, 12:12pm, Luvey wrote:
That is such a beautiful scene.... grin Nothing wrong with that photography.... looks great!

Pen


Thanks Pen.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #852 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 12:45pm »

on Aug 25th, 2010, 12:20pm, Luvey wrote:
Hi Crys



I read this article yesterday and thought it sounded like the fungus that grows on grains (Ergot poisoning)… which produces pretty much the same symptoms, and not LSD, not that I know much about LSD.

Excerpt:
“that the "bewitched" accusers of Salem had in fact suffered hallucinations, convulsions, bizarre skin sensations and other unusual symptoms because they'd been poisoned by a crop of fungus-infested rye” —
http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/history/ergot.htm

But it says further down in the article:



Well I think he could be wrong, and wonder what other alternative explanation he gave for it.

Pen


Hello again,
I would be interested to know what he thought also. That's the trouble with the CIA, I would expect them to do anything. When something like this happens I automatically think of them. Assuming again..........bad!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #853 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 12:55pm »

on Aug 25th, 2010, 12:44pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Thanks Pen.
Crystal


I forgot to mention the other picture of scenery is lovely too, and it looks similar to where I live here in Australia...

And...... your puppies are gorgeous!!! smiley I am a dog lover and have 2 King Charles Cavalier Spaniels and a very old Bichon Frise. They are our adored babies... and we spend lots of time making them special treats because homemade is better for them. At least when we make their treats we know what is in them.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #854 on: Aug 25th, 2010, 1:07pm »

Thanks for the doggy and the landscape pics. Those are some nice dogs and you do live in a beautiful region. smiley
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