Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Oct 23rd, 2017, 10:23am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 569 570 571 572 573  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 153448 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8550 on: May 27th, 2013, 08:12am »

Wired

Mad Genius Buys Volcano, Transforms It Into Naked-Eye Observatory

By Adam Elder
05.27.13
6:30 AM

Way out on the edge of the Painted Desert in Arizona, 70-year-old Californian artist James Turrell has spent the past three decades excavating a 389,000-year-old extinct volcano. Roden Crater, as it’s known, is Turrell’s magnum opus. Whenever it’s finally complete, this black and red cinder caldera will be a monumental naked-eye observatory to surpass any throughout history.

Inside, the crater’s naturally lit viewing rooms are precision-engineered to observe specific celestial events. While outside, Turrell has reformed the rim of the crater to create a beautiful “vaulting effect” of the sky in a way that we almost never see it.

“I’m very interested in how we perceive, because that’s how we construct the reality in which we live,” Turrell says, “and I like to tweak that a little bit. I make structures that arrest and apprehend light for our perception.”

His work is the subject of three major retrospectives this summer, opening at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art this past weekend, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston on June 9, and the Guggenheim in New York City June 21.

Even without Roden Crater, Turrell’s reputation in the art world is enormous—he’s one of the first visual artists awarded a MacArthur “genius” fellowship. But what sets him apart is his multidimensional approach. He’s a true polymath, fluent in engineering, mathematics, astronomy, history, literature, aviation (Turrell is an avid pilot; it’s how he went looking for Roden Crater) and ranching (a necessary requirement of his bank loan on the crater’s land).

Witness him describing his favorite subject.

“We take light through the skin and create vitamin D,” Turrell says. “So we are literally light eaters. But then it also has a strong emotional quality, which is pretty much what I work with—the kind of situation that’s actually a theta state, which is thinking, but it’s not thinking in words. So this is an art that can be a bit difficult describing. And that’s also where people have always had that challenge with: [describing] the spiritual side of light.”

As an undergrad Turrell studied perceptual psychology, then pursued his master’s degree in fine art at UC Irvine. His revelation came in his first semester, when he found himself more interested in the projector’s light dancing in the darkness than the slides it was showing. He’s said that all painting, from Rembrandt to Rothko, is the study of light. But Turrell doesn’t make art that’s about light; he’s literally gotten rid of the object and made it the subject. His art is light.

Turrell’s gallery work—brilliantly colored walls, cubes, holograms, tunnels, seamless spaces of light known as Ganzfelds, mysterious voids of glowing geometric perfection—all force viewers to question how they are seeing what they’re seeing. Turrell wants us to recognize what he calls “the thingness of light.” In his hands, it can appear to occupy space in our world through shapes. Or it can conjure the colors of sunrise and twilight. Taking it away can evoke our primal senses, as if we’re back in our ancestors’ caves.

He can also change the color of the sky entirely. Turrell has built 82 Skypaces worldwide—including at a Quaker meetinghouse in Houston. (Turrell grew up in the faith; his grandmother used to tell him to “go inside and greet the light.”) When the sky that’s seen through a small cutout in the roof contrasts with varying colors projected inside, it appears to come down into the room imbibed with a beautifully foreign, inky black tint.

“We all know that the sky is blue, but many of us don’t realize that we give the sky its blueness,” Turrell says. “And it’s only because we do that that I can change it.”

And after 48 years of this perceptual study, what’s it feel like for him to look back on a life’s work so far?

“There are things that I enjoy seeing that I haven’t seen for a while, and others that I wonder what I was doing—what I was thinking,” he says.

Each of the upcoming exhibitions illuminates different aspects of Turrell’s work. LACMA spans his entire career, and features a new Ganzfeld and one of his epic Perceptual Cells, where viewers lay prone in an enclosed chamber and get bombarded with a furious medley of colors. MFA Houston displays seven of Turrell’s popular installations, while the Guggenheim will feature a giant original work inside the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed rotunda.

As for Roden Crater, like many grandiose works of art, its completion date is continually pushed back. In fact, it no longer has one—it may be the Sagrada Familia of the New World. But though funding the crater has always been stop-start since its beginning, Turrell remains upbeat.

“I committed to the fact that I was going to open it in the year 2000, and I stick with that,” he says, satirically.

Even art’s luminary of perception chooses to see things his own way sometimes.

All images: Courtesy James Turrell except where noted.

gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/design/2013/05/james-turrell/?viewall=true

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8551 on: May 27th, 2013, 08:16am »






Published on May 26, 2013

May 26, 2013 - UNITED STATES - It's a mystery that hung over the Fresno sky Wednesday afternoon.

Several Fresno residents reported seeing a bright, spherical-shaped object in the sky. The low-hovering object remained visible for hours.

KMPH reached out to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Fresno Air Terminal and the Army National Guard Wednesday afternoon. The agencies could not provide an explanation for the object.


~

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4154
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8552 on: May 27th, 2013, 09:10am »

User Image


Thank you Ron. You are missed!


Semper fi
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
purr
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

..you talkin' to me...YOU TALKIN' TO ME..??!


PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 4826
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8553 on: May 27th, 2013, 2:35pm »

on May 27th, 2013, 08:16am, WingsofCrystal wrote:



Published on May 26, 2013

May 26, 2013 - UNITED STATES - It's a mystery that hung over the Fresno sky Wednesday afternoon.

Several Fresno residents reported seeing a bright, spherical-shaped object in the sky. The low-hovering object remained visible for hours.

KMPH reached out to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Fresno Air Terminal and the Army National Guard Wednesday afternoon. The agencies could not provide an explanation for the object.


~

Crystal



Thanks for adding, Crystal. Since the object was place holding against strong winds, it does seem to be a UFO. Can't think of a parachute, balloon (unless invisibly tethered) or ultralight capable of doing this.


purr
User IP Logged

Let us be sure that those who come after will say of us in our time, that in our time we did everything that could be done. We finished the race; we kept them free; we kept the faith.

-RONALD REAGAN
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8554 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:37am »

on May 27th, 2013, 09:10am, Swamprat wrote:
User Image


Thank you Ron. You are missed!


Semper fi


God bless him. r.i.p.

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8555 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:37am »

on May 27th, 2013, 2:35pm, purr wrote:
Thanks for adding, Crystal. Since the object was place holding against strong winds, it does seem to be a UFO. Can't think of a parachute, balloon (unless invisibly tethered) or ultralight capable of doing this.


purr


Good morning Purr cheesy

It is an interesting one.

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8556 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:40am »

Telegraph

Cambridge University students were left baffled after spending time on a physics question only to find it was unanswerable.

By Josie Ensor
2:22PM BST 28 May 2013

The Cambridge candidates sitting a second year natural sciences paper had been asked to solve two problems in an exam paper.

But when they looked at the information they were given to work with they spotted the vital 'i' symbol needed to calculate the answers was missing.

The omission meant it was impossible to answer the equation that involved a "commutation relation and a factor of sqrt(-1) in a spin-operator matrix".

Baffled students spent an hour scratching their heads before one spotted the mistake and brought it to the attention of examiners.

The invigilators granted them an extra 15 minutes to complete the paper on Saturday.

Around 300 students are thought to have sat the exam and an estimated three quarters of them will have attempted at least one of the faulty questions.

One who asked not to be named said: "Some people would have just skipped those questions without attempting them – but they still got extra time.

"The time I wasted on that question plus the extra panicking was way more than 15 minutes.

"The mistakes themselves weren't huge but it also made me question whether there were other mistakes."

Another student added: "All I can say is thank you to the genius who had enough brains and courage to realise the mistake and point it out to the examiner.

"I could have spent all afternoon on it."

A spokesman for the university said yesterday: "We regret that there were two typographical errors in the Part IB physics examination sat on Saturday 25th May.

"The examiners will ensure that no candidate is disadvantaged."

Mistakes in exam papers were found in a number of AS and A-Level papers two years ago.

Ofqual, the exams watchdog, was asked to investigate after a geography AS-level paper and a business studies GCSE were found to have questions which were impossible to answer.

The AQA exam body apologised and all students were awarded full marks for the question.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/10084335/Cambridge-University-students-stumped-by-unanswerable-question.html

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
dove
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 12
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8557 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:40am »

on May 25th, 2013, 12:41pm, philliman wrote:
Dove! Nice to see you around and also thanks for sharing. Yes, it's very important to know what we eat.


Hi Phil. Thanks. smiley

Unfortunately, too many people don't have much of an idea what's in their food or where it comes from. That's too bad considering that good (and safe) nutrition is our protection from many illnesses. If our food makes us ill either by supplying toxins to our bodies or making us deficient in nutrients, we need to know that it's the cause so we can correct the diet (eating non-GMO organic food, f.e.).

This is a really good review of what Roundup can do to your body. It could cause several diseases, from autism to Alzheimer's to heart disease. This doesn't count the damage being done by the GMOs themselves. They can cause their own set of problems within animals (including humans)--with infertility, gut diseases, and organ damage being the main ones.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_AHLDXF5aw



on May 26th, 2013, 10:44am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Lovely Dove!!!!!! cheesy


So good to see you! Please give the link again. I had to get a new computer and lost your link. That's why I haven't been by.

love ya

Crystal



I see you found your way there. smiley A new computer? Yay! cheesy


I hope everyone had a nice holiday weekend. smiley

xoxo
Dove
User IP Logged

WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8558 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:42am »

Wired

This Pentagon Project Makes Cyberwar as Easy as Angry Birds

By Noah Shachtman
05.28.13
6:30 AM

The target computer is picked. The order to strike has been given. All it takes is a finger swipe and a few taps of the touchscreen, and the cyberattack is prepped to begin.

For the last year, the Pentagon’s top technologists have been working on a program that will make cyberwarfare relatively easy. It’s called Plan X. And if this demo looks like a videogame or sci-fi movie or a sleek Silicon Valley production, that’s no accident. It was built by the designers behind some of Apple’s most famous computers — with assistance from the illustrators who helped bring Transformers to the silver screen.

Today, destructive cyberattacks — ones that cause servers to fry, radars to go dark, or centrifuges to spin out of control — have been assembled by relatively small teams of hackers. They’re ordered at the highest levels of government. They take months to plan. Their effects can be uncertain, despite all the preparation. (Insiders believe, for example, that the biggest network intrusion in the Pentagon’s history may have been an accidental infection, not a deliberate hack.)

With Plan X, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking to change all that. It wants munitions made of 1s and 0s to be as simple to launch as ones made of metal and explosives. It wants cyberattack stratagems to be as predictable as any war plan can be. It wants to move past the artisanal era of hacking, and turn cyberwarfare into an industrial effort. Across the U.S. government, there are all kinds of projects to develop America’s network offense. None are quite like this.

“Plan X is a program that is specifically working towards building the technology infrastructure that would allow cyber offense to move from the world we’re in today — where it’s a fine, handcrafted capability that requires exquisite authorities to do anything… to a future where cyber is a capability like other weapons,” Darpa director Arati Prabhakar told reporters last month. “A military operator can design and deploy a cyber effect, know what it’s going to accomplish… and take an appropriate level of action.”

But you can’t expect the average officer to be able to understand the logical topology of a global network-of-networks. You can’t expect him to know whether its better to hook a rootkit into a machine’s kernel or its firmware. If cyberwar is going to be routine, Darpa believes, the digital battlefield has to be as easy to navigate as an iPhone. The attacks have to be as easy to launch as an Angry Bird.

“Say you’re playing World of Warcraft, and you’ve got this type of sword, +5 or whatever. You don’t necessarily know what spells were used to create that sword, right? You just know it has these attributes and it helps you in this way. It’s the same type of concept. You don’t need the technical details,” says Dan Roelker, the cybersecurity specialist who helped develop some of the world’s most widely-used intrusion detection software, came up with the idea for Plan X, and joined Darpa to make it happen.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/05/pentagon-cyberwar-angry-birds/all/

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8559 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:45am »

on May 28th, 2013, 10:40am, dove wrote:
Hi Phil. Thanks. smiley

Unfortunately, too many people don't have much of an idea what's in their food or where it comes from. That's too bad considering that good (and safe) nutrition is our protection from many illnesses. If our food makes us ill either by supplying toxins to our bodies or making us deficient in nutrients, we need to know that it's the cause so we can correct the diet (eating non-GMO organic food, f.e.).

This is a really good review of what Roundup can do to your body. It could cause several diseases, from autism to Alzheimer's to heart disease. This doesn't count the damage being done by the GMOs themselves. They can cause their own set of problems within animals (including humans)--with infertility, gut diseases, and organ damage being the main ones.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_AHLDXF5aw





I see you found your way there. smiley A new computer? Yay! cheesy


I hope everyone had a nice holiday weekend. smiley

xoxo
Dove


Good morning lovely Dove,

Phil gave me the link. Good to see you here cheesy

We had a nice weekend. Played with the pups and played Star Wars with the Husband. Called Mom and she is doing well. She's 87 now. My aunt is 83 and living with Mom. They are going out in their RV this June to spend a month in Colorado. They are something! So all is well in our neck of the woods. Hope you are doing well.

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8560 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:47am »

Science Daily

How Do Plants Grow Toward the Light? Scientists Explain Mechanism Behind Phototropism

May 28, 2013 — Plants have developed a number of strategies to capture the maximum amount of sunlight through their leaves. As we know from looking at plants on a windowsill, they grow toward the sunlight to be able to generate energy by photosynthesis. Now an international team of scientists has provided definitive insights into the driving force behind this movement -- the plant hormone auxin.

The growth of plants toward light is particularly important at the beginning of their lifecycle. Many seeds germinate in the soil and get their nutrition in the dark from their limited reserves of starch and lipids. Reaching for the surface, the seedlings rapidly grow upwards against the gravitational pull, which provides an initial clue for orientation. With the help of highly sensitive light-sensing proteins, they find the shortest route to the sunlight -- and are even able to bend in the direction of the light source.

"Even mature plants bend toward the strongest light. They do this by elongating the cells of the stem on the side that is farthest from the light. This type of light-oriented growth is called phototropism," explains Prof. Claus Schwechheimer from the Chair of Plant Systems Biology at the Technische Universität München (TUM).

Transporters move plant hormone to target site

The substance responsible for cell elongation is auxin. This phytohormone is formed in cells at the tip of the shoot and is then passed from cell to cell. As such, the hormone is shuttled through many cells of the plant before it reaches its final destination. "Export and import proteins push the auxin out of one cell into the intercellular space and then into the next cell and so on until the auxin eventually reaches its target site," outlines Schwechheimer.

The most important proteins in this process are the export proteins known as "PINs," which regulate the direction of the auxin flow. As Schwechheimer's team was able to demonstrate, these PINs do not function on their own: "They require the signal of the D6PK protein kinase," Schwechheimer continues. "The kinase enzyme modifies the PINs through the transfer of phosphate groups -- thus activating them as auxin transporters."

What is the role of auxin?

The movements of plants were first described comprehensively by Charles Darwin in 1880 in his seminal work "The power of movement in plants." The theory that the plant hormone auxin could play a role in plants bending toward a light source was first proposed in 1937 by the Dutch researcher Frits Went in the Cholodny-Went model.

Even though many subsequent observations have supported this model, up to now there has been no definite proof that auxin is in fact involved in this process. Prof. Christian Fankhauser from UNIL (Université de Lausanne) in Switzerland explains why: "Up to now, all plants with a known defect in auxin transport showed a normal phototropism. How then could auxin transport be essential for this process?"

Auxin regulation model confirmed

The TUM team, in cooperation with their colleagues at UNIL, have found the answer to this question. The Swiss researchers were able to inactivate several PIN transporters in a plant simultaneously. And for their part, the TUM scientists managed to demonstrate the function of the D6PK protein kinase.

It was found that when several of the PIN and kinase components were missing, plant growth was completely unresponsive to the light signals that trigger phototropism. The auxin transport mechanism in these mutant plants was severely impaired: The plants grew upwards, away from the gravitational pull, irrespective of the light source. This helped the scientists prove for the first time that the hormone auxin definitely is the substance that drives phototropism.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130528105946.htm

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8561 on: May 28th, 2013, 10:51am »

If it's security camera footage how did it zoom in on the object? Must have been someone there on site?




UFO Sightings Michigan 5-27-2013 Security Camera Footage


~

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4154
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8562 on: May 28th, 2013, 2:54pm »

Woman to have ‘dolphin-assisted’ birth

Published May 28, 2013

A pregnant woman and her husband have traveled to Hawaii where they plan on having a “dolphin-assisted birth,” a water delivery among dolphins, according to Medical Daily.

Heather Barrington, 27, and her husband Adam, 29, of South Carolina, are preparing for the July arrival of their first child through a series of prenatal and postnatal swims with a pod of dolphins at The Sirius Institute in Pohoa, Hawaii.

The Sirius Institute describes itself as a "a research consortium with the purpose of 'dolphinizing' the planet." They recently set up the Dolphin Attended, Water, Natural and Gentle Birth Center (DAWN), due to what they claim is an increasing demand on their web site for people looking to give birth near dolphins. The Sirius Institute claims that giving birth with dolphins is part of an ancient native Hawaiian practice.

While dolphin-assisted births are rare, dolphin assisted therapy (DAT) has been used for more than 25 years in patients with mental and physical disabilities and autism, according to Medical Daily. During DAT, patients swim and play with dolphins living in captivity while completing tasks meant to improve skills like hand-eye coordination. However, scientists claim there is little scientific evidence indicating that DAT is therapeutically effective.

Water births – without the presence of dolphins –have proven benefits, including more efficient contractions, improved blood circulation for the mother, less pain and more oxygen for the baby, according to the American Pregnancy Association (APA). However, the APA noted that few studies have been done examining the risks associated with water births.

In the event that a “dolphin-assisted” birth cannot occur, the couple has made plans to deliver with a midwife. Experts point out that dolphins are predators and can become aggressive, though dolphin-related injuries among people are relatively rare, Medical Daily reported.

“Having that connection with the pod of dolphins anytime – even if the birth doesn’t happen in the water – still brings peace, comfort and strength to the mother and baby during labor,” Heather told the South Charlotte News.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/05/28/woman-to-have-dolphin-assisted-birth/?test=latestnews#ixzz2UcPdcafm
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8563 on: May 29th, 2013, 11:28am »

"Woman to have ‘dolphin-assisted’ birth

Published May 28, 2013

A pregnant woman and her husband have traveled to Hawaii where they plan on having a “dolphin-assisted birth,” a water delivery among dolphins, according to Medical Daily.

Heather Barrington, 27, and her husband Adam, 29, of South Carolina, are preparing for the July arrival of their first child through a series of prenatal and postnatal swims with a pod of dolphins at The Sirius Institute in Pohoa, Hawaii."



EWWWWWWWWWW!!!!!!!!!!!


Good morning Swamprat cheesy

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8564 on: May 29th, 2013, 11:32am »

Reuters

Afghan insurgents attack International Red Cross in Jalalabad

JALALABAD, Afghanistan
Wed May 29, 2013 12:09pm EDT

(Reuters) - A suicide bomber blew himself up at the gate of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) office in the Afghan city of Jalalabad on Wednesday and two more insurgents entered the building, local officials said.

Afghan security forces were fighting the attackers inside the ICRC building, according to Ahmad Zia Abdulzai, spokesman for the governor of Nangarhar province.

Black smoke billowed out of the building after the blast at 5:30 p.m. (1300 GMT), and heavy gunfire could be heard.

A spokesman at the Geneva-based ICRC headquarters said it was in touch with the Jalalabad office, where there are six foreign members of staff and dozens of local employees.

The attack came less than a week after a band of insurgents assaulted the office of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Kabul, killing three civilians and injuring four foreign aid workers.

The ICRC's $90 million-a-year operations in Afghanistan are the group's biggest in the world. Some 1,800 ICRC staff work on projects ranging from providing orthopedic limbs to the war wounded to visiting militants in Afghan jails.

(Reporting by Rafiq Sherzad, Hamid Shalizi and Amie Ferris-Rotman, additional reporting by Tom Miles in Geneva; Editing by Mark Heinrich)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/05/29/us-afghanistan-icrc-idUSBRE94S0QA20130529

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 569 570 571 572 573  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls