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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 79735 times)
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« Reply #8640 on: Jun 12th, 2013, 09:31am »

Seattle Times

Originally published June 11, 2013 at 8:22 PM
Page modified June 11, 2013 at 11:40 PM

Heroin use spikes in young adults, UW report says

By Carol M. Ostrom
Seattle Times health reporter

Prescription-drug abuse has fallen in Washington, but heroin use particularly among those under age 30 has increased dramatically, according to a University of Washington report released Tuesday.

In King County, overdose deaths involving the drug increased from 49 in 2009 to 84 last year, with all of the increase coming in the under-30 age group, according to researcher Caleb Banta-Green, author of the report from the UW Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute.

Because direct measurement of heroin use is difficult, Banta-Green compiled results from treatment programs, evidence tested by the state crime lab, overdose-death investigation records and information from law-enforcement sources.

We are hearing about heroin as a major and increasing problem from law enforcement across Washington, Dave Rodriguez, director of the Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area group, a coordinating center for federal and local law enforcement, said in a statement.

Banta-Green said he saw no evidence that legitimate pain patients were turning to heroin as tightened state regulations in recent years have reduced the supply of prescription pain medications.

I think when we reined in opiate prescribing, it dried up the market for diverted prescription pharmaceuticals, and the people who were abusing prescription pharmaceuticals switched over to heroin, he said.

Overall, police have seen a decline in the number of pieces of evidence of drugs sent to the Washington State Patrols Crime Laboratory for testing over the past decade, the report said.

Prescription opiate evidence has dropped dramatically since 2009. But heroin evidence has soared. According to the report, from 2007 to last year the number of samples collected by police testing positive for heroin nearly tripled, to 2,251.

The numbers are really dramatic, Banta-Green said.

In general, regions with the highest rates of heroin evidence collected per 100,000 population now are not urban areas, but those in less populated parts of the state, including the westernmost counties from Clallam to Clark and the northern region from Whatcom to Snohomish counties, which includes San Juan and Island counties.

Across the state, first-time admissions to publicly funded addiction-treatment programs where heroin was the primary drug leapt from 590 in 2003 to 1,397 in 2012.

Last year, heroin users from age 18 to 29, the majority from outside the Seattle metro area, made up two-thirds of those entering publicly funded treatment programs for the first time.

The increase among young adults is very concerning, Banta-Green said.

Rodriguez said many young people began their drug use through pharmaceutical-type opioids, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, often raided from a medicine cabinet.

But once that free supply dries up, and theyve developed an addiction, they have to go out on the black market, he said, where Mexican black-tar heroin costs considerably less than prescription opiates. Im sure it was the last thing on their minds that they would end up getting addicted and using heroin.

There isnt enough treatment capacity now, Rodriguez said. We are severely underfunded for public beds for treatment, with capacity for only about 20 percent of the need. The federal health-care law may change that, he said, with coverage for drug treatment.

Deaths in King County from any type of drug have been dropping from a high of 286 in 2006, but last year saw a swing back upward, to 274. The largest increases were for deaths involving heroin or methamphetamines.

And the increase overall was driven primarily by deaths of those under 30.

Usually people die in their 40s, not in their 20s, Banta-Green said. We dont know if (the increase in young peoples deaths) is something about the drug, about how they use, combining it with other drugs, or that they havent developed tolerance yet. We just dont know why. But it is unusual.

Dr. Daniel Lessler, chief medical officer for Washington states Health Care Authority, said many opioid overdoses can be prevented. In a statement, he urged those who might overdose or who could witness an overdose to obtain a prescription for naloxone, an antidote.

Under state law, users, family members and concerned friends can all carry naloxone.

In addition, said Banta-Green, the 911 Overdose Good Samaritan law provides legal immunity from prosecution to an overdose victim or anyone helping a victim seek medical care. More information on naloxone and the law is available at www.stopoverdose.org.

Banta-Green noted a bright spot in the report: Surveys of 10th-graders in 2012 showed the first statistically significant decline in use of prescription-type opiates to get high. Now we just have to figure out what to do with those who are already addicted.

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2021167682_heroinfloodxml.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8641 on: Jun 12th, 2013, 3:47pm »

Humans in 100,000 years: What will we look like?

By Michael Roppolo
Published June 12, 2013

Are we going to turn into ET?

NOW:
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Homo sapiens have slowly evolved over thousands of millennia, but what happens when modern technology comes into play?

Visual artist, Nickolay Lamm of Pittsburgh, Pa., tried to answer that question. Interested in illustrating how humans would look like in 100,000 years, he asked science for the answers.

Because I'm not expert in evolution, I got in touch with Dr. Alan Kwan who gave me his educated guess at what we may look like, Lamm told FoxNews.com in an email.

Working with Dr. Kwan, who has a PhD in computational genomics from Washington University, they established one possible timeline to future human evolution of sorts. It's not science -- just a "thought experiment," Kwan has clarified -- but it's fascinating to think about.

Published on MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, these changes to modern-day humans were based on the assumption that by the 210th century, scientists will be able to modify human appearances before birth through zygotic genome engineering technology.

Kwan based his theories on the accepted idea that between 800,000 and 200,000 years ago, the Earth underwent a period of fluctuation in its climate, which resulted in a tripling of the human brain, as well as skull size. Scientists agree that the rapid changes in climate may have created a favorable environment for those with the ability to adapt to new challenges and situations.

This trend has noticeably continued, for British scientists have found that modern humans have less prominent features and higher foreheads than people during medieval times.

"This is more of a speculative look than a scientific look into one possible future where human engineering replaces natural evolution in determining human physiology, but we have been very happy that our humble project has garnered so much attention and provided a platform for others share their own vision of the future," Kwan said, according to Lamm.

In 20,000 years, in a world where genetic engineering is commonplace and humans have established colonies in space, human knowledge of the universe will increase and as such, the size of the brain will increase, Dr. Alan Kwan theorizes. As a result, the human head will have to become larger to accommodate the larger brain size

In 60,000 years, Dr. Alan Kwan states that after millennia of traveling through space, zygotic genome engineering will be used to create humans with larger eyes, more pigmented skin and a thicker eyelids. This will be done in order to see better in the dimmer environment of space, to shield humans from the UV rays and alleviate the effects of low to no gravity like todays astronauts on the International Space Station.

100,000 years from now, Dr. Alan Kwan believes that future humans will have much larger eyes and eye-shine due to the tapetum lucidum, a layer of tissue behind the retina of the eye. This would be done to help protect our eyes from cosmic rays.

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Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/06/12/humans-in-100000-years-what-will-look-like/?intcmp=features#ixzz2W2BdhF7f
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« Reply #8642 on: Jun 12th, 2013, 3:53pm »

WOW...IN 300,000 YEARS.WE SHOULD HAVE ORBITAL SOCKETS TAKING.UP 65% OF THE CRANIUM...
I GUESS THAT WILL MAKE IT EASY IN CONFLICTS WHEN ORDERS ARE GIVEN...DON'T SHOOT TILL YA SEE THE WHITES OF THEIR EYES...YUK YUK YUK....

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« Reply #8643 on: Jun 12th, 2013, 8:15pm »

Gadzooks! You mean we'll all look like a Walter Keane painting?
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« Reply #8644 on: Jun 12th, 2013, 9:23pm »

HEY BACKLIT,

UNCANNY...KEANE INDEED...

SHALOM...ZETAR
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« Reply #8645 on: Jun 13th, 2013, 09:01am »

Okay! Ya'll have been in here partying without me! grin

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« Reply #8646 on: Jun 13th, 2013, 09:05am »

Daily Mail

Was it a bird? A Plane? Or a UFO?? Chinese passenger jet hits mysterious object at 26,000ft and lands with severely dented nose cone

Pilot heard a large bang and then the plane 'struggled to perform'

By Becky Evans

PUBLISHED: 16:05 EST, 10 June 2013
UPDATED: 20:06 EST, 10 June 2013

A passenger jet was forced to make an emergency landing after a mysterious mid-air collision with a 'foreign object' at 26,000ft severely dented its nose cone.

The front of the Air China Boeing 757 had been pushed in and scratches and scraped paintwork were clearly visible when it landed.

The plane was climbing over China when a large bang was heard from the front of aircraft.

The pilot said the aircraft was struggling to perform and he immediately called air traffic controllers, according to reports.

He was then allowed him to return to the airport.

Experts said investigations into the suspected crash have raised suspicions that the aircraft was hit by a 'foreign object'.

However, they do not believe it was caused by a bird strike as no blood or feathers were visible on the dented nose cone.

The damage was only spotted when the plane, which was travelling from Chengdu to Guangzhou, safely landed.

photos and more after the jump:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2339139/Was-bird-A-Plane-Or-UFO--Chinese-passenger-jet-hits-mysterious-object-26-000ft-lands-severely-dented-nose-cone.html

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« Reply #8647 on: Jun 13th, 2013, 09:08am »

I'm taking a mental health day. No news for me today. I'm having a MacGyver marathon, that will do the trick.


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« Reply #8648 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 09:30am »




Please be an angel



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« Reply #8649 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 09:32am »

Telegraph

A row has broken out among tourist centre bosses in Scotland over the existence of the Loch Ness Monster, with one accusing another of selling fake photographs of the creature.

By Telegraph reporter, and agencies
11:24AM BST 14 Jun 2013

The argument started when George Edwards, who runs Loch Ness Cruises in Drumnadrochit, Scotland, criticised fellow members of the local Chamber of Commerce for treating the monster as "a myth".

Tony Harmsworth, the former boss of the Loch Ness Centre, responded by accused him of "palming his customers off with fake photographs".

The row is now threatening to split the local business community, 80 years after the first modern-day sighting of the monster put the loch on the map as a tourist destination.

In a letter to the chamber, Mr Edwards, criticised the overly scientific approach taken by the Loch Ness Centre. He says visitors come out of the exhibition feeling disappointed after being told that Nessie is "a myth".

"Just about every time that Mr Shine appears in the media he talks about big fish and big waves," Mr Edwards said. "I believe they are doing more harm than good in promoting Loch Ness tourism with their negative theories.

"How many people come here to see the Loch Ness Big Fish or the Loch Ness Big Wave?"

"In recent years we have seen a decline in tourism across Scotland and maybe it is time for Mr Shine to put up or shut up.

"Mr Shine and his cronies have been making a nice living out of Loch Ness for the past 20 odd years and if they cannot see the logic in promoting Nessie then maybe it's time they moved on, as they seem intent on destroying our industry.

Mr Edwards said: "At the end of the day there's no such thing as an expert on Loch Ness, just people with an opinion.

"Most of the people I talk to on my boat know that it's just a bit of fun. What brings more people to Loch Ness - my little stories about Nessie, or the so-called experts going on about big waves and big fish. They should stop taking themselves so seriously."

His letter, circulated to all 70-plus members of the chamber, drew a strong response from former chairman Mr Harmsworth, who accused Mr Edwards of palming his customers off with fake photographs and sending them away "with their heads full of garbage".

Mr Harmsworth said: "Today's tourists are more discerning. They want to understand the culture, legend and natural history of the places they visit."

He told Mr Edwards: "Entertain your passengers by all means, but do you really need to fake pictures and discredit the whole legend in the process? Surely not. You are a sufficiently accomplished raconteur to keep people's attention, educate, inform and keep it fun for them without resorting to fakery."

Mr Harmsworth has now resigned as editor of the chamber's website after being ordered by the committee to remove a piece he wrote criticising Mr Edwards.

"They said it was attacking a member business," Mr Harmsworth said. "I was expecting to hear that I had their full support, but they would not back me."

He has also cancelled his business membership of the chamber.

Chamber of Commerce chairman Robert Cockburn, who runs Drumnadrochit post office and stores, defended the decision, saying the website was there to promote the businesses of Drumnadrochit.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/scotland/10120313/Row-over-existence-of-Loch-Ness-breaks-out-among-tourist-bosses.html

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« Reply #8650 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 09:36am »

Examiner


Mysterious monster-like creature spotted in Oklahoma

June 13, 2013
By: John Albrecht

A post on Reddit is getting a lot of attention today. Someone from New Jersey posted a photo of a strange monster-like looking creature climbing along a fence. A few readers are wondering what the unidentified animal is and some even think that it might be a Jersey Devil.

Reddit user Diabolicism posted the image Wednesday evening under the headline "what the hell is this animal!? (Spotted in NJ)". Within hours there were over 600 comments on the post with other Reddit users also wondering what the creature was. No one seemed to know.

Some people suggested that the creature could be a gargoyle, an El Chupacabra, or a relative of the Montauk Monster.

According to reporter Jessica Beyms, of the South Jersey Times, the photo doesn't originate from New Jersey. The image was taken in Oklahoma and first posted on May 6 on WildCareOklahoma's Facebook page, and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

Questions were answered when the ODWC supplied another clear image of the creature that showed a view of the animal from the front. Evidently the creature is nothing more than a hairless squirrel.

"She's a squirrel, she lives in a ball of mulch in my garden shed (or at least she did this winter). Now all she seems to be interested in is burying pecans in my garden!" Ed Brookshire posted WildCareOklahoma's Facebook page.

"Years ago we didn't see much wildlife with this genetic deficiency for no hair but it is more common now. We have seen it in squirrels, opossums, and rabbits. It is interesting that this adult is alive in the wild." A representative of WCO said.

photo after the jump:
http://www.examiner.com/article/mysterious-monster-like-creature-spotted-oklahoma

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« Reply #8651 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 09:40am »

Reuters

Special Report: Lack of a prenup imperils oil billionaire's fortune

By Joshua Schneyer, Brian Grow and Jeanine Prezioso

OKLAHOMA CITY
Fri Jun 14, 2013 8:52am EDT

(Reuters) - The divorce of oil baron Harold Hamm has had its dramatic moments. Among them: allegations that Harold was unfaithful - and a heated debate over whether the court should order his wife, Sue Ann, to turn over secret video and audio recordings she made of him at home.

But the split of the Continental Resources chief executive's fortune, worth at least $11 billion, could turn on the absence of a single document - and result in the largest divorce settlement in history.

Despite efforts by the Hamms to keep their divorce proceedings secret, Reuters has learned that the couple never signed a prenuptial agreement when they were married 25 years ago.

Such an agreement, common when one or both spouses bring substantial wealth into a marriage, would have spelled out how to divide marital assets in the event of a divorce.

In its absence, the Hamm divorce has taken on dizzying financial complexity. Court documents indicate Harold Hamm, who owns more oil in the ground than any other American, already has turned over 50,000 pages of corporate information to his wife, a former attorney at Continental.

The documents lay out the financial minutiae of Harold Hamm's sprawling energy empire. To divide it, the parties are expected to select a "business valuation" referee, an independent expert tasked with determining the worth of Harold Hamm's stake in Continental and other companies, according to two people familiar with the matter.

The Hamms have settled one big issue: A lawyer for Harold said they have agreed to a "no-fault" divorce. That means the couple probably won't litigate Sue Ann's accusations of infidelity.

Other sources say the Hamms also have reached another agreement: They have decided on a date of separation around May 18, 2012, the date that Sue Ann Hamm filed for divorce. The date of separation could prove key to how assets will be divided, family law experts say. If the couple had separated in 2003, as Harold Hamm argued in previous court filings, any wealth accrued after that date by Hamm, through Continental and other businesses, might not be considered part of the marital pool.

The agreement on the 2012 separation date could be worth billions for Sue Ann Hamm, legal experts say. That's because Continental's value has nearly quintupled since 2007, and under Oklahoma family law, wealth gained through the efforts of either spouse during a marriage would typically be subject to "equitable distribution" between the parties. The phrase means the court will seek a fair, though not necessarily equal, distribution of assets.

Why Harold Hamm,67, agreed to the 2012 date is unclear. Oklahoma attorneys familiar with the case say a settlement could cost him about $3 billion or more.

That's 60 percent higher than the largest reported divorce settlement - News Corp chairman Rupert Murdoch's $1.7 billion pay-out to ex-wife Anna in 1999. Murdoch has filed for divorce from his current wife, Wendi Deng, a spokesman said Thursday, confirming a report by Deadline Hollywood. The media mogul has a prenup, said a person familiar with the matter, but its terms aren't disclosed.

A multi-billion-dollar settlement would vault Sue Ann Hamm, 56, into the ranks of the 20 wealthiest women in America - worth more than Oprah Winfrey, the entertainment mogul whose fortune was estimated by Forbes at $2.8 billion this year.

To finance such a sum, Harold Hamm could be forced to sell a portion of his 68 percent stake in Continental on the open market to raise cash, or sell his interests in a network of firms that do business with Continental. Hamm hasn't commented on how he would finance any settlement.

Raising cash for a $3 billion settlement by selling Continental shares would cut Hamm's stake to less than 50 percent of the company, according to a Reuters analysis.

Hamm would remain the company's single largest shareholder. But a settlement could diminish his control by attracting new and powerful investors to the stock.

Continental spokeswoman Kristin Miskovsky said the company would not comment on the divorce but that "this private matter has not and is not anticipated to have any impact or effect on the company's business or operations."

Even so, Wall Street is watching. RBC Capital upgraded Continental shares in May to "outperform," but it also has warned that the divorce is a wild card. A sale of a large block of Continental shares would probably send the share price down, at least temporarily, said RBC analyst Leo Mariani. But if Hamm put more shares onto the market - increasing the portion of Continental equity available to outsiders - investors might eagerly snap them up.

"If a settlement makes more shares available to investors, and increases liquidity with a secondary share offering, big investors might well want to buy more," Mariani said.

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE

The Hamm case is playing out in the small, wood-paneled Oklahoma City courtroom run by Magistrate Judge Howard Haralson, a 52-year-old jurist who speaks sparingly from the bench.

At the outset, the Hamms sought to keep the proceedings quiet. Most divorce cases are matters of public record, say family law attorneys. But the Hamm case was filed anonymously in May 2012 under the names "Jane Doe v. John Doe." A strict protective order and confidentiality agreement keep the vast majority of the more than 200 filings under seal.

Five months after the case was filed, Judge Haralson ordered the Hamms to attach their names to the divorce. It is unclear if Harold Hamm agreed to the anonymous filing or sought to maintain it, and when Continental directors were notified.

After receiving inquiries from Reuters on March 21, 10 months after the case was filed, Continental released a statement acknowledging the divorce. That day, after Reuters first reported on the case, Continental's stock price tumbled 3 percent.

Until shortly before the divorce filing, the Hamms kept a high profile as a couple. Considered oil royalty in Oklahoma, with a growing role in national politics and charitable giving, they continued to travel together with their two daughters to vacation spots in recent years, sending holiday cards that featured family photos, friends say.

They appeared in public, smiling for cameras arm-in-arm. In April 2012, they were feted together at a black-tie dinner during which Time Magazine named Harold Hamm one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

The following month, on a warm, clear Oklahoma City evening, the Hamms hosted Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and 700 Republican donors in the mansion they bought together in 2009 in the enclave of Nichols Hills. Romney had appointed Harold Hamm his senior energy adviser. The fundraiser brought in $2 million for Romney, who lauded Hamm for his rags-to-riches path as a wildcatting oilman.

Nine days later, Sue Ann, Harold's second wife and a former executive at Continental, filed for divorce.

Documents reviewed by Reuters show that the relationship had been stormy for years. Most documents in the case are sealed. But a March 7, 2013 filing shows Sue Ann Hamm alleged that Harold "was having an affair" that she discovered in 2010.

Neither Sue Ann nor Harold Hamm would comment on the case. It isn't clear how Harold responded to the affair allegation in court.

At a court hearing in March, a Reuters reporter asked the oil tycoon how he was doing. Hamm replied simply: "Not very good."

LEGAL QUAGMIRE

The absence of a prenuptial agreement has led to at least seven subpoenas filed by attorneys for Sue Ann seeking documents from Continental and six other companies controlled or partially owned by Harold. The goal: to parse internal records in an effort to value Harold's oil and gas empire.

Publicly traded Continental Resources has been pulled into the case as a result. The company and the six Hamm-affiliated firms have filed a flurry of objections to demands for corporate records, creating a stand-off that led to the appointment in May of a "special master" to mediate discovery disputes.

Former Continental executives have been subpoenaed and scheduled for depositions. And the company's current general counsel, Eric S. Eissenstat, is overseeing demands for corporate records in the case, according to court filings.

Now, the case is moving into the critical "valuation" phase, which could last for months and lead to the sale of billions of dollars worth of Harold Hamm's assets to fund a settlement. In a May 10 statement sent to Reuters, Craig Box, an attorney for Harold Hamm, said, "The Hamms have agreed to a no-fault divorce based on irreconcilable incompatibility."

According to family law experts, "no-fault" under Oklahoma law means Sue Ann's allegations of adultery will no longer be a factor litigated in the case, and the Hamms will move to the division of assets.

They have also agreed to appoint L. Vance Brown, a veteran Oklahoma City oil and gas attorney, to act as the special master overseeing discovery disputes in the case. Brown confirmed his appointment in a phone interview on May 30 but said he hasn't been asked to mediate any disagreement yet.

SECOND MARRIAGE

The 13th child of Oklahoma sharecroppers, Hamm started his career at age 20, scrubbing scum from oil barrels. A few years later, he drilled a 75-barrel-a-day gusher in his home state, and the profits helped him pay for university classes in geology.


more after the jump:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/14/us-hamm-divorce-specialreport-idUSBRE95D08220130614

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8652 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 09:45am »







UFO Sighting Has Amherst Residents Talking 2013

published June 13 2013

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« Reply #8653 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 1:49pm »

I remember that thing very early this year, like in the evening or some such, and people wondering what they saw, but I had thought the case had come and gone.

I backtracked and found this article in March.

Just what was that mysterious flying object over Amherst? UFO or C-5
By MICHAEL C. CAROLAN, March 18, 2013 at 4:14 PM, updated March 18, 2013 at 4:21 PM

http://www.masslive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2013/03/just_what_was_that_mysterious.html

I was driving my daughter to swim team practice one recent night when we saw something curious fly right over the road near the Amherst landfill on the outskirts of town.

That is one weird plane, I said, referring to the cargo planes that we see all the time flying down to the Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee. This was much smaller though, and flew much lower, with most unsual lights. It made not a sound.

Its a UFO, Hattie said to me. Shes 11.

Wow, I said, and I thought little about it until my neighbor rang me up a few days later.

Ive got some exciting news, she exclaimed. Belchertown Road was visited by aliens the other night. Perhaps you should prepare the backyard so they can land.

Theres two-and-a-half acres back there, some of which is clear of trees.

She is Russian.

No kidding? I said, and recalled reading about a factory town east of Moscow where panicked citizens stripped shelves of matches, sugar and candles anticipating the Mayan apocalypse in December.

Sure enough, turning on the news, the UFO was all over: the television, the newspaper, on the Internet. Residents reported strange lights and objects. Officials said there was no plane in the sky over town that night.

I called my mother. Shes actually seen a UFO or two. Millions of people have seen them, she said. The government always denies it.

We saw something, I said.

My son overheard us and said he saw it, too. Turns out he was a mile south of my daughter and I, driving with my wife that night.

Triangular in shape, much smaller than the C-5s, flying low, making no sound, he agreed.

I watched it for like five minutes, he said.

Do you think it was a UFO, I asked.

Definitely not a plane, he said. Probably a drone.

We didnt have unmanned aircraft when I was a kid. I called my father, an engineer. He offered an idea: The military might have buried some radioactive material in the landfill there and were testing their drone to see if it could detect it.

Huh? Even dad is coming up with something. I thought about how we terrestrials explain the unexplainable.

Three years ago, one of those enormous C-5s lost two of its 28 wheels, both of which landed in the woods not but a mile away from our home. The plane is the largest aircraft on the planet. The airbase eventually came by to claim the wheels and apologized, but my children and I began looking more closely when those planes flew overhead.

Then, I remembered one Easter eve back when my daughter Hattie was 3 years old.

She looked at her mother and I, her eyes wide, and asked, Will the Easter bunny come into my room?

We grinned. Our daughters imagination had taken over and the mythical bunny had suddenly become real, even menacing, with ears and a hat perhaps, creeping through the house at night, even into her room while she was fast asleep.

She believed. In much the same way the media told us that what we collectively saw had foundation in reality: we believed.

A few weeks later, the Federal Aviation Administration retracted its earlier statement. There was a C-5 in the area after all. But, we know that what we saw was not a C-5.

The night after my Russian neighbor called, I showed Hattie the news report on the Internet. A reporter interviewed people in a caf that we frequent.

The following day, Hattie announced to her class that she, her father and brother had definitely seen the UFO over our town.


My observation - note how the powers that be said "no plane in the air at that time", but then they changed their story later on to "we had a C5 up at that time". This seems to be very familiar territory. UFO sighting, government says they don't know anything about it, then story changes to some "plausible" event.

It is almost as if they know that the question will be asked, they field the expected denial, and not only are ready with a different answer, but WANTING to give a different answer. You could almost say... they WANT to make us paranoid that UFOs are real. Psy-op?
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8654 on: Jun 14th, 2013, 2:22pm »

here's another one, this is after the FAA changed their story and said C5. note comments about a pyramid. i hadn't heard that, so i'm not sure how dubious this account is. still, they mention the whole C5 sound component
http://digitaljournal.com/article/342125

possibly the only video?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ns3EQSE9ozc

being that this is a college town, and the height of lights, and that this was at night, i'm not ruling out that this could have been a coordination of personal drones... someone having fun at the rest of our expense. but it would have to fool a lot of witnesses - the illusion of a triangle or diamond shape the result of our brains filling in the gaps with the placement of lights?

THIS blogspot cements time and date:
http://headinthecloudsamherst.blogspot.com/2013/01/ufo-sighting-early-evening-its-true.html

it's mentioned in the comments that there were previous sightings of lights in the night sky in the two months previous (which there are youtube clips for). i looked at the clips but saw nothing compelling.
« Last Edit: Jun 14th, 2013, 2:23pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
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