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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 91836 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #8715 on: Jun 25th, 2013, 11:59am »

Good morning Bewildered cheesy

Crystal


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« Reply #8716 on: Jun 25th, 2013, 12:01pm »

Christian Science Monitor

Indiana leopard: Since when did leopards live in Indiana?

Indiana leopard: An Indiana woman and her boyfriend shot and killed a leopard that they spotted prowling in their backyard. Wait, they have leopards in Indiana?

By Eoin O'Carroll, Staff / June 24, 2013

No, that headline isn't a typo. It really says "Indiana leopard," and not "Indian leopard."

Your double-take is completely understandable, though, as leopards are not native to the Hoosier State. The nine known subspecies of leopard make their homes in Africa and across Asia, the largest habitat of any species of big cat. But definitely not Indiana.

Or so we thought. According to news reports, a Charlestown, Ind., woman and her boyfriend spotted a large cat in the woods at the edge of her property. Fearing for the safety of the woman's housecats after several pets in her neighborhood had been attacked, the boyfriend shot and killed the animal Thursday, thinking it was a bobcat.

It wasn't. It was a much bigger cat.

"The cat in these photographs has been identified tentatively as a leopard," said an official with the state's Department of Natural Resources told a local news station. "Perhaps an immature cat about 9 months old. DNR is attempting to determine who it belonged to, or where it came from. In any case, it would be someone's pet, since leopards are not native to Indiana, or for that matter, to North America," the official added.

DNR officials are now investigating where the animal came from. The owner of a nearby wildlife refuge center said that all of his animals were accounted for.

Owning a leopard in Indiana is legal, but you need to have a permit.

Would the leopard have eaten the woman's cats if given the chance? Leopards are opportunistic hunters, dining on everything from insects to antelopes, as well as rodents, birds, reptiles, and some primates.

Domestic cats and leopards are part of the same taxonomic family. So would that make a leopard eating a cat the equivalent of a human eating a gorilla? Perhaps, but such semi-cannibalism is common in nature. Dogs sometimes eat foxes. Wolves sometimes eat dogs. And, indeed, humans sometimes eat gorillas. Perhaps the woman was right to be concerned.

In general, it's a good idea to be circumspect in the presence of large felines, especially in Indiana. On Friday, a worker cleaning a cage at a wildlife refuge in Center Point, Ind., was mauled by a tiger after forgetting to close a gate. Her co-workers managed to free her from the tiger's jaws, and she is now recovering.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Wildlife/2013/0624/Indiana-leopard-Since-when-did-leopards-live-in-Indiana?nav=92-csm_category-leadStory

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« Reply #8717 on: Jun 25th, 2013, 12:04pm »

Associated Press

Putin says no to US request to extradite Snowden

By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV and MATTI HUUHTANEN
— Jun. 25 12:42 PM EDT

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin bluntly rejected U.S. pleas to extradite National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on Tuesday, saying Snowden is free to travel wherever he wants and insisting that Russian security agencies haven't contacted him.

Snowden is in the transit zone of a Moscow airport and has not passed through Russian immigration, Putin said, meaning he is not technically in Russia.

After arriving Sunday on a flight from Hong Kong, Snowden booked a seat on a Havana-bound flight from Moscow on Monday en route to Venezuela and then possible asylum in Ecuador, but he didn't board the plane.

Snowden's whereabouts since then have been a mystery, and Putin's comments were the first time Russia has made clear it knows where he is.

Speculation has been rife that Russian security agencies might want to keep Snowden in Russia for a more thorough debriefing, but Putin denied that.

"Our special services never worked with Mr. Snowden and aren't working with him today," Putin said at a news conference during a visit to Finland.

Putin said that because there is no extradition agreement with the U.S., it couldn't meet the U.S. request.

"Mr. Snowden is a free man, and the sooner he chooses his final destination the better it is for us and for him," Putin said. "I hope it will not affect the business-like character of our relations with the U.S. and I hope that our partners will understand that."

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Tuesday that though the United States does not have an extradition treaty with Russia, it wants Moscow to comply with common law practices between countries where fugitives are concerned.

Putin's staunch refusal to consider Snowden's extradition reflects the Russian president's readiness to further challenge Washington at a time when U.S.-Russian relations are already strained over Syria and a Russian ban on adoptions by Americans.

A Kremlin decision to provide even temporary shelter and safe transit to Snowden would embarrass Washington. And despite Putin's denial, analysts believe Russian special services wouldn't miss the chance to question the man who is believed to hold reams of classified U.S. documents.

Russia also relished using Snowden's revelations to try to turn the tables on U.S. criticism of Russia's rights record.

Putin compared Snowden to WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, who has been provided asylum in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, saying that both men were labeled criminals but consider themselves rights activists and champions of freedom of information.

"Ask yourself a question: should people like that be extradited so that they put them in prison or not?" he said. "In any case, I would prefer not to deal with such issues. It's like shearing a piglet: a lot of squealing and little wool."

In an apparent reference to claims that Moscow could have played a role in Snowden's exit from Hong Kong, he said that his arrival was a "complete surprise" and dismissed accusations against Russia as "ravings and sheer nonsense."

"He doesn't need a visa or any other documents, and as a transit passenger he has the right to buy a ticket and fly wherever he wants," Putin said.

Russian news media had reported Snowden remained in a transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, but journalists there haven't seen him.

Legally, an arriving air passenger "crosses the border" after clearing immigration checks.

Russia's Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov rejected the U.S. push for Snowden's extradition earlier Tuesday, but wouldn't specify his whereabouts, saying only that he hasn't crossed the Russian border.

"We consider the attempts to accuse Russia of violating U.S. laws and even some sort of conspiracy, which on top of all that are accompanied by threats, as absolutely ungrounded and unacceptable," Lavrov said. "There are no legal grounds for such conduct by U.S. officials."

U.S. and Ecuadorean officials had said they believed Snowden was still in Russia.

Kerry called for "calm and reasonableness."

"We would hope that Russia would not side with someone who is 'a fugitive' from justice,' " Kerry said at a news conference in Saudi Arabia.

The U.S. has revoked Snowden's passport.

A representative of WikiLeaks has been traveling with Snowden, and the organization is believed to be assisting him in arranging asylum. Assange, the group's founder, said Monday that Snowden was only passing through Russia and had applied for asylum in Ecuador, Iceland and possibly other countries.

A high-ranking Ecuadorean official told The Associated Press that Russia and Ecuador were discussing where Snowden could go, saying the process could take days. He also said Ecuador's ambassador to Moscow had not seen or spoken to Snowden. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case publicly.

Ecuador's foreign minister, Ricardo Patino, hailed Snowden on Monday as "a man attempting to bring light and transparency to facts that affect everyone's fundamental liberties."

"We're following all the appropriate legal channels and working with various other countries to make sure that the rule of law is observed," President Barack Obama told reporters.

The Kremlin has previously said Russia would be ready to consider Snowden's request for asylum.

Snowden is a former CIA employee who later was hired as a contractor for the NSA. In that job, he gained access to documents that he gave to newspapers the Guardian and The Washington Post to expose what he contends are privacy violations by an authoritarian government.

Snowden also told the South China Morning Post newspaper in Hong Kong that "the NSA does all kinds of things like hack Chinese cellphone companies to steal all of your SMS data." He is believed to have more than 200 additional sensitive documents in laptops he is carrying.

Some observers said in addition to the sensitive data, Snowden's revelations have provided the Kremlin with propaganda arguments to counter the U.S. criticism of Russia's crackdown on opposition and civil activists under Putin.

"They would use Snowden to demonstrate that the U.S. government doesn't sympathize with the ideals of freedom of information, conceals key information from the public and stands ready to open criminal proceedings against those who oppose it," Konstantin Remchukov, the editor of independent daily Nezavisimaya Gazeta, said on Ekho Moskvy radio.

Putin has accused the U.S. State Department of instigating protests in Moscow against his re-election for a third term in March and has taken an anti-American posture that plays well with his core support base of industrial workers and state employees.


Huuhtanen reported from from Naantali, Finland. Michael Weissenstein and Gonzalo Solano contributed to this story from Quito, Ecuador.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/nsa-leakers-global-flight-appears-stalled-now

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« Reply #8718 on: Jun 25th, 2013, 12:06pm »

Science Daily

Addiction Relapse Might Be Thwarted by Turning Off Brain Trigger

June 24, 2013 — Researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at UC San Francisco have been able to identify and deactivate a brain pathway linked to memories that cause alcohol cravings in rats, a finding that may one day lead to a treatment option for people who suffer from alcohol abuse disorders and other addictions.

In the study, researchers were able to prevent the addicted animals from seeking alcohol and drinking it, the equivalent of relapse.

"One of the main causes of relapse is craving, triggered by the memory by certain cues -- like going into a bar, or the smell or taste of alcohol," said lead author Segev Barak, PhD, at the time a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of co-senior author Dorit Ron, PhD, a Gallo Center investigator and UCSF professor of neurology.

"We learned that when rats were exposed to the smell or taste of alcohol, there was a small window of opportunity to target the area of the brain that reconsolidates the memory of the craving for alcohol and to weaken or even erase the memory, and thus the craving" he said.

The study, also supervised by co-senior author Patricia H. Janak, PhD, a Gallo Center investigator and UCSF professor of neurology, was published online on June 23 in Nature Neuroscience.

Neural Mechanism That Triggers Alcohol Memory

In the first phase of the study, rats had the choice to freely drink water or alcohol over the course of seven weeks, and during this time developed a high preference for alcohol.

In the next phase, they had the opportunity to access alcohol for one hour a day, which they learned to do by pressing a lever. They were then put through a 10-day period of abstinence from alcohol.

Following this period, the animals were exposed for five minutes to just the smell and taste of alcohol, which cued them to remember how much they liked drinking it. The researchers then scanned the animals' brains, and identified the neural mechanism responsible for the reactivation of the memory of the alcohol -- a molecular pathway mediated by an enzyme known as mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1).

They found that just a small drop of alcohol presented to the rats turned on the mTORC1 pathway specifically in a select region of the amygdala, a structure linked to emotional reactions and withdrawal from alcohol, and cortical regions involved in memory processing.

They further showed that once mTORC1 was activated, the alcohol-memory stabilized (reconsolidated) and the rats relapsed on the following days, meaning in this case, that they started again to push the lever to dispense more alcohol.

"The smell and taste of alcohol were such strong cues that we could target the memory specifically without impacting other memories, such as a craving for sugar," said Barak, who added that the Ron research group has been doing brain studies for many years and has never seen such a robust and specific activation in the brain.

Drug that Erases the Memory of Alcohol

In the next part of the study, the researchers set out to see if they could prevent the reconsolidation of the memory of alcohol by inhibiting mTORC1, thus preventing relapse. When mTORC1 was inactivated using a drug called rapamycin, administered immediately after the exposure to the cue (smell, taste), there was no relapse to alcohol-seeking the next day.

Strikingly, drinking remained suppressed for up to 14 days, the end point of the study. These results suggest that rapamycin erased the memory of alcohol for a long period, said Ron.

The authors said the study is an important first step, but that more research is needed to determine how mTORC1 contributes to alcohol memory reconsolidation and whether turning off mTORC1 with rapamycin would prevent relapse for more than two weeks.

The authors also said it would be interesting to test if rapamycin, an FDA-approved drug currently used to prevent organ rejection after transplantation, or other mTORC1 inhibitors that are currently being developed in pharmaceutical companies, would prevent relapse in human alcoholics.

"One of the main problems in alcohol abuse disorders is relapse, and current treatment options are very limited." Barak said. "Even after detoxification and a period of rehabilitation, 70 to 80 percent of patients will relapse in the first several years. It is really thrilling that we were able to completely erase the memory of alcohol and prevent relapse in these animals. This could be a revolution in treatment approaches for addiction, in terms of erasing unwanted memories and thereby manipulating the brain triggers that are so problematic for people with addictions."

The other co-authors of the paper are Feng Liu, PhD, Sami Ben Hamida, PhD, Quinn V. Yowell, BS, Jeremie Neasta, PhD, and Viktor Kharazia, PhD, all of the Gallo Center and UCSF Department of Neurology.

The study was supported by funds from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and funds from the State of California for Medical Research on Alcohol and Substance Abuse administered through UCSF.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130624173852.htm

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« Reply #8719 on: Jun 25th, 2013, 3:14pm »

on Jun 25th, 2013, 11:58am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning Jjflash,

"But perhaps the most concerning aspect of such goings ons, at least as they relate to such points as made in recent posts in this thread, was a point eventually released by the Church Committee. Senator Frank Church headed a group which, circa 1970s, delved into just what in the hell had been going on within the Central Intelligence Agency since its 1947 advent. Among the abuse of military personnel, drugging citizens and conducting what were termed "terminal" experiments, or research resulting in the loss of human life, all in the name of supposed national security, Frank Church demonstrated that the CIA sought proper approval for the activities from the Executive Office once in 25 years. Once. In 25 years.

That is not a covert operation. It is an effing coup."


Excuse my language but that is some scary sh*t!

Crystal



Hi, Crystal,

Thanks for your comments. The more I learned about the history of the Agency, the more I noticed how people commonly know very little about what are now declassified circumstances completely available to the public. I also noticed how the UFO community collectively averts from its discussion, frequently calling it all unfounded conspiracy theory - in spite of the fact it is all documented and available in such transcripts as Congressional hearings on MKULTRA and Church Committee proceedings.

Those interested might choose to take a look through a series of posts I called The MC Files: Manchurian Candidate and Mind Control:

John Marks and 'The Search for the Manchurian Candidate'

The CIA and the Search for the Manchurian Candidate, Part One of Two

The CIA and the Search for the Manchurian Candidate, Part Two of Two

The posts contain links to authenticated documents released through the Freedom of Information Act, transcripts from hearings and similar such references specifically related to CIA abuses as previously mentioned. I also pointed out a few potential correlations with events in UFO Land. In my opinion, the lack of attention the intel community receives within ufology as compared to the ETH for possible explanations to various reported events is among the most relevant and ignored topics in the field.
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« Reply #8720 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:12am »

Good morning Jjflash cheesy,

Thank you for your posts.


Crystal



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« Reply #8721 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:14am »

Guardian

Nine die in shoot-out after Rio favela protest

Brazilian riot police and suspected drug traffickers clash after protest in Maré complex

by Jonathan Watts
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 25 June 2013 21.37 EDT

At least nine people were killed on Monday in a shoot-out between Brazilian riot police and suspected drug traffickers after a protest in a favela.

The killings at Rio de Janeiro's Maré complex, which lies between the airport and the city on the Avenida Brasil, are likely to prompt fresh concerns about security before next year's World Cup.

The events are disputed. Police claim a peaceful protest turned violent when crack cocaine-users used the disturbance as a pretext to loot a nearby supermarket and rob people.

Heavily armed BOPE police units were called in and a confrontation ensued. After a sergeant was gunned down, a gun battle followed in which two residents and seven drug traffickers were killed, a military police spokesman said.

Residents have given a different version, saying BOPE officers overreacted after the death of their comrade, killing people inside buildings several hours after the first clash.

This is denied by the police. "This was not a case of revenge, it was a police operation to go into the favela to conduct a forensic investigation into the killing," said a spokesman.

Furious locals held a demonstration about the incident on Tuesday, prompting police to send in a tank and hundreds of officers.

Several NGOs operating in the complex have condemned the police action. "Any police operations that leads to the deaths of eight citizens is wrong," said Luke Dowdney, a Briton who established Fight for Peace, a boxing and martial arts centre in Maré. "This war mentality policing is what the state is supposed to be moving away from. We need police to establish a presence here and to bring justice, not the opposite."

Maré is one of Rio's biggest favela complexes, with an estimated 130,000 residents. It is divided into 17 communities, many controlled by different, often-feuding gangs.

Locals told the Guardian that police harassment has intensified in recent months before a planned "pacification" operation, which was expected after the pope's visit to Rio next month.

For the ongoing Confederations Cup, a reinforcement unit from the National Guard was moved to Maré after an engineer from the International Broadcasting Centre was shot when he mistakenly drove into the area after taking a wrong turn on his way back from the airport.

Underscoring problems of violence, gun use and controversial policing, the latest incident will heighten fears for the millions of foreign visitors expected in Rio for three upcoming mega-events: a papal visit, the World Cup and the Olympics.

It will also add to tensions inside Brazil, where more than a million people took to the streets last week to protest against police brutality, corruption, poor public services and over-spending on the World Cup.

Four people died in earlier demonstrations, including three who were run down after blocking the roads and one who had a heart attack after choking in a cloud of police teargas.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/25/shoot-out-rio-favela-protest

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« Reply #8722 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:17am »

Associated Press

Al-Qaida said to be changing its ways after leaks

By KIMBERLY DOZIER
— Jun. 26 3:27 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. intelligence agencies are scrambling to salvage their surveillance of al-Qaida and other terrorists who are working frantically to change how they communicate after a National Security Agency contractor leaked details of two NSA spying programs. It's an electronic game of cat-and-mouse that could have deadly consequences if a plot is missed or a terrorist operative manages to drop out of sight.

Two U.S. intelligence officials say members of virtually every terrorist group, including core al-Qaida, are attempting to change how they communicate, based on what they are reading in the media, to hide from U.S. surveillance — the first time intelligence officials have described which groups are reacting to the leaks. The officials spoke anonymously because they were not authorized to speak about the intelligence matters publicly.

The officials wouldn't go into details on how they know this, whether it's terrorists switching email accounts or cellphone providers or adopting new encryption techniques, but a lawmaker briefed on the matter said al-Qaida's Yemeni offshoot, al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, has been among the first to alter how it reaches out to its operatives.

The lawmaker spoke anonymously because he would not discuss the confidential briefing by name.

Shortly after Edward Snowden leaked documents about the secret NSA surveillance programs, chat rooms and websites used by like-minded extremists and would-be recruits advised users how to avoid NSA detection, from telling them not to use their real phone numbers to recommending specific online software programs to keep spies from tracking their computers' physical locations.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., said there are "changes we can already see being made by the folks who wish to do us harm, and our allies harm."

Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, said Tuesday that Snowden "has basically alerted people who are enemies of this country ... (like) al-Qaida, about what techniques we have been using to monitor their activities and foil plots, and compromised those efforts, and it's very conceivable that people will die as a result."

At the same time, NSA and other counterterrorist analysts have been focusing their attention on the terrorists, watching their electronic communications and logging all changes, including following which Internet sites the terrorist suspects visit, trying to determine what system they might choose to avoid future detection, according to a former senior intelligence official speaking anonymously as a condition of discussing the intelligence operations.

"It's frustrating. You have to start all over again to track the target," said M.E. "Spike" Bowman, a former intelligence officer and deputy general counsel of the FBI, now a fellow at the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law. But the NSA will catch up eventually, he predicted, because there are only so many ways a terrorist can communicate. "I have every confidence in their ability to regain access."

Terror groups switching to encrypted communication may slow the NSA, but encryption also flags the communication as something the U.S. agency considers worth listening to, according to a new batch of secret and top-secret NSA documents published last week by The Guardian, a British newspaper. They show that the NSA considers any encrypted communication between a foreigner they are watching and a U.S.-based person as fair game to gather and keep, for as long as it takes to break the code and examine it.

Documents released last week also show measures the NSA takes to gather foreign intelligence overseas, highlighting the possible fallout of the disclosures on more traditional spying. Many foreign diplomats use email systems like Hotmail for their personal correspondence. Two foreign diplomats reached this week who use U.S. email systems that the NSA monitors overseas say they plan no changes, because both diplomats said they already assumed the U.S. was able to read that type of correspondence. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss their methods of communication publicly.

The changing terrorist behavior is part of the fallout of the release of dozens of top-secret documents to the news media by Snowden, 30, a former systems analyst on contract to the NSA.

The Office of the Director for National Intelligence and the NSA declined to comment on the fallout, but the NSA's director, Gen. Keith Alexander, told lawmakers that the leaks have caused "irreversible and significant damage to this nation."

"I believe it will hurt us and our allies," Alexander said.

The leaks revealed that the NSA was scanning the worldwide use of nine U.S.-based Internet service providers, including Google, Yahoo, Skype and YouTube.

"After the leak, jihadists posted Arabic news articles about it ... and recommended fellow jihadists to be very cautious, not to give their real phone number and other such information when registering for a website," said Adam Raisman of the SITE Intelligence Group, a private analysis firm. They also gave out specific advice, recommending jihadists use privacy-protecting email systems like TOR, also called The Onion Router, to hide their computer's IP address, and to use encrypted links to access jihadi forums, Raisman said. While TOR originally was designed to help dissidents communicate in countries where the Internet is censored, it is facing legal difficulties because criminals allegedly have used it as well.

"Criminals are doing well without things like TOR," said Karen Reilly, a spokeswoman for TOR. "If TOR disappeared tomorrow they would still have secure, anonymous access to the Internet. ... Their victims would not."

Other analysts predicted a two-track evolution away from the now-exposed methods of communication: A terrorist who was using Skype to plan an attack might stop using that immediately so as not to expose the imminent operation, said Ben Venzke of the private analysis firm IntelCenter.

But if the jihadi group uses a now-exposed system like YouTube to disseminate information and recruit more followers, they'll make a gradual switch to something else that wasn't revealed by Snowden's leaks — moving slowly in part because they'll be trying to determine whether new systems they are considering aren't also compromised, and they'll have to reach their followers and signal the change. That will take time.

"Overall, for terrorist organizations and other hostile actors, leaks of this nature serve as a wake-up call to look more closely at how they're operating and improve their security," Venzke said. "If the CIA or the FBI was to learn tomorrow that its communications are being monitored, do you think it would be business as usual or do you think they would implement a series of changes over time?"

The disclosure that intelligence agencies were listening to Osama bin Laden drove him to drop the use of all electronic communications.

"When it leaked that bin Laden was using a Thuraya cellphone, he switched to couriers," said Jane Harman, former member of the House Intelligence Committee and now director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center. "The more they know, the clearer the road map is for them."

It took more than a decade to track bin Laden down to his hiding place in Abbottabad, Pakistan, by following one of those couriers.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/al-qaida-said-be-changing-its-ways-after-leaks

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« Reply #8723 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:21am »

Japan Times

Softbank gets OK in Sprint deal

Kyodo, AFP-JIJI
Jun 26, 2013

OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS – Shareholders of Sprint Nextel Corp. on Tuesday approved Softbank Corp.’s offer to acquire the third-largest U.S. mobile carrier for $21.6 billion, paving the way for the Japanese carrier to enter the American wireless market.

With the acquisition of the No. 3 U.S. mobile carrier, Softbank, the parent of Softbank Mobile Corp., said it would become the world’s third-largest cellphone carrier along with AT&T of the United States in terms of sales, ranking behind China Mobile Ltd. of China and Verizon Wireless, another U.S. carrier.

Softbank issued a statement early Wednesday saying: “We are happy to have received support from many Sprint shareholders. We plan to swiftly complete procedures for this transaction upon receiving approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.”

Softbank anticipates the transaction to be completed early next month.

“The transaction with Softbank should enhance Sprint’s long-term value and competitive position by creating a company with greater financial flexibility,” Sprint CEO Dan Hesse said.

The deal is the largest overseas acquisition ever by a Japanese firm.

After the acquisition, subscribers of Softbank group service units in Japan and the U.S. will total about 97 million. The company aims to slash $2 billion (about ¥195 billion) in annual costs through joint procurement of communication equipment and mobile handsets with Sprint.

The Softbank deal received clearance from U.S. national security officials last month under the condition they appoint an independent member to the Sprint board of directors to serve as security director.

The director, who must be approved by U.S. authorities, would oversee national security matters and serve as a point of contact for Washington.

Last October, Softbank and Sprint agreed that the Japanese firm would pay $20.1 billion to acquire a 70 percent stake in Sprint.

In April, U.S. satellite television provider Dish Network Corp. challenged the buyout plan, making a $25.5 billion bid to acquire Sprint.

To counter Dish, Softbank raised its takeover bid by $1.5 billion, to $21.6 billion, to acquire a roughly 78 percent stake in Sprint.

In its filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on June 21, Dish said it decided to abandon its effort to acquire Sprint.

Dish has also made a bid to acquire a greater stake in Clearwire Corp., a wireless Internet company owned 50 percent by Sprint, countering Sprint’s plan to make Clearwire its wholly owned unit to expand its broadband services with the frequency band owned by Clearwire.

The Clearwire board had earlier supported Dish’s buyout plan, but has reversed its stance and recommended its shareholders approve Sprint’s plan after Sprint raised its buyout offer. Prospects for that buyout battle remain uncertain.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/06/26/business/softbank-gets-ok-in-sprint-deal/#.Ucr4aZDn-1s

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« Reply #8724 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:31am »

Wired

50 Years of the World’s Greatest Sports Car

By Jason Paur
06.25.13
6:30 AM


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In 1963 a small German car company introduced its second street model. It was called the 911, and 50 years later, Porsche's sports car continues to defy the odds as one of the most successful, popular, and adored vehicles of all time.

Everyone and their brothers are singing the praises of the 911 for its 50th birthday, and that includes photographer René Staud. He's released an 8-pound tome appropriately entitled The Porsche 911 Book, and the 320-page slab of everything 911 is a massive coffee table book that encapsulates the artistry and engineering of every 911 for the past five decades.

The 911 is the ultimate case study in evolution over revolution. The design and layout is the same 50 years on, which – if common sense reigned supreme – should have ended its life years ago. With an engine located behind the rear wheels, the original 911s were more than a handful for drivers at the limit. As the years went by, the engineers in Zuffenhausen subtracted weight, added turbos, attached giant wings, and created an icon. The car's reputation for wanting to switch ends was only eclipsed by its success on the track.

Just this past weekend Porsche celebrated its 100th class win at the grueling 24 Hours of LeMans. And for more than half of those wins, it was a 911 at the top of the heap. And that includes Sunday's victory.

But to be fair, the 911 RSR that took the win is a far cry from its ancestor above.

The original six-cylinder offering from Porsche was called the 901. It was a higher-powered model following the company's successful but slightly smaller 356. The French automaker Peugeot objected to the name, claiming rights to all car models with a zero in the middle. Porsche changed the 0 to a 1, and a legend was born.

With its design origins traced back to the original Volkswagen Beetle (also designed by Porsche), the 911 included a few options to make a civil sports car, including a pair of (very small) rear seats and enough room under the hood for golf clubs. The car was praised by the automobile press after its debut in 1963, but few could have imagined that the same basic design would be winning races and hearts a lifetime later.

Eventually Porsche added computers that could help with the workload, and by the mid-1980s the legendary 911 offspring were among the most technologically advanced cars on the planet. In the '90s Porsche modernized the Carrera with the addition of liquid cooling. Purists considered it the end of the icon, but the company went on to build world-beating performance cars that were better than ever. And the 911 continues to be at the front of sports car development despite the same general design unveiled to the public 50 years earlier.

The profile is basically the same and the engine still sits in the back. And in a pinch, you could almost swap the side windows between models that are separated by half a century.

photo gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/06/porsche-911-50th-anniversary/

~

When I was a teenager my Mom drove a Porsche. We were on our way to Crown King, Arizona one weekend. We had a cabin up there. We were on Interstate 17 when the fanbelt broke. My Mom made a fanbelt out of her pantyhose. That got us into a gas station. You should have seen the look on the mechanics face when he asked what that was and she told him about her pantyhose fanbelt. grin

Crystal





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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8725 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 09:42am »

LOVE THE 911...HAD ONE....911S..GOT PULLED OVER IN NEW YORK DOING 36 MPH IN A 35 MPH SPEED LIMIT...WAS TOLD...IF YOU CAN AFFORD THIS CAR...YOU CAN AFFORD THE TICKET...
SOLD IT SOON AFTER....

SHALOM...ZETAR
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« Reply #8726 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 11:09am »

on Jun 26th, 2013, 09:31am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
When I was a teenager my Mom drove a Porsche. We were on our way to Crown King, Arizona one weekend. We had a cabin up there. We were on Interstate 17 when the fanbelt broke. My Mom made a fanbelt out of her pantyhose. That got us into a gas station. You should have seen the look on the mechanics face when he asked what that was and she told him about her pantyhose fanbelt. grin

Crystal




Very creative and resourceful!
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« Reply #8727 on: Jun 26th, 2013, 8:27pm »

My friend had four of them at the same time from different years. They are the best at cornering. Doing 50 on a 25 mph on ramp is breathtaking.
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« Reply #8728 on: Jun 27th, 2013, 08:53am »

on Jun 26th, 2013, 09:42am, ZETAR wrote:
LOVE THE 911...HAD ONE....911S..GOT PULLED OVER IN NEW YORK DOING 36 MPH IN A 35 MPH SPEED LIMIT...WAS TOLD...IF YOU CAN AFFORD THIS CAR...YOU CAN AFFORD THE TICKET...
SOLD IT SOON AFTER....

SHALOM...ZETAR


Good morning Zetar cheesy

He was just jealous!

Crystal

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« Reply #8729 on: Jun 27th, 2013, 08:57am »

on Jun 26th, 2013, 11:09am, jjflash wrote:
Very creative and resourceful!


Good morning Jjflash cheesy

My Mom is spectacular! She has no idea how wonderful she is. She lives with her sister. They are both in their 80's and are going in their RV this next month to Colorado. They go out all summer. Last year they had to come home when the air conditioner broke in the RV. So now they are on pins and needles waiting to go. They don't want to hit the campgrounds on the Fourth of July weekend so aren't quite sure when they will leave.

Crystal

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