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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 113089 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #8805 on: Jul 11th, 2013, 11:06am »

I am so angry over this I could spit!

Military.com

Pentagon Eyes Cuts in Danger Pay

Jul 10, 2013
Associated Press
by Lolita C. Baldo

WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon is eyeing plans to eliminate danger pay for service members in as many as 18 countries and five waterways around the world, saving about $120 million each year while taking a bite out of troops' salaries, The Associated Press has learned.

Senior defense and military leaders are expected to meet later this week to review the matter and are poised to approve a new plan. Pentagon press secretary George Little declined to discuss details but said no final decisions have been made.

Senior military leaders came up with the proposed list of locations in their regions that no longer were perilous enough to warrant danger pay, including several countries in the heart of the tumultuous Middle East, such as Jordan, where hundreds of troops have recently deployed because of the bloody Syrian civil war on its border.

Defense officials said the proposal would strip the stipend -- which can be up to $225 per month -- from as many as 56,000 service members, including thousands stationed in Kuwait, which was a key hub during the Iraq war. It also would affect thousands of sailors who routinely travel through the Persian Gulf region on ships or airmen who fly over the Gulf.

The $225 monthly cut in pay would come regardless of the service member's base salary, which can range from a low of roughly $18,000 a year for a brand new recruit to a high of nearly $235,000 a year for a four-star general with more than 40 years in the military. Troops also can receive a variety of other allowances for housing, clothing or job specialties.

Defense officials described the proposal on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about it.

Under the plans being discussed, troops would still receive the extra money if they serve in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Pakistan, Syria, Yemen and in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. The U.S. does not have any military members now serving in Iran.

Some of the countries that could likely be dropped from the list include Bahrain, where the Navy's 5th Fleet is located; Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Liberia, Haiti and several former Soviet republics.

Officials have argued that if service members are allowed to bring their families with them for assignments in places like Bahrain, then it is difficult to argue that they should receive danger pay.

The list has routinely evolved over many years, with countries added as they became more dangerous hotspots. And military leaders do periodic reviews of the list.

While the changes are based solely on the security review, the cuts also come as the Pentagon is under growing pressure to slash its budget, and as more than 650,000 civilians began taking the first of their 11 required days off without pay through the end of this fiscal year on Sept. 30.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said earlier this week that the fiscal pressures and congressional gridlock have led to far more abrupt and steeper cuts than expected. He noted that if Congress does not find a way to avoid the automatic budget cuts known as sequestration, the department will have to find $52 billion in additional savings next year.

So far, the danger pay decision does not affect the tax-free status of service members' pay when serving in those countries or on ships in the Gulf region.

Under existing Defense Department rules, military troops serving in as many as two dozen different nations as well as the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden have been able to receive the imminent danger pay. Until early 2012, they received the full monthly amount -- $225 at the time -- for any complete or partial month they served in any of the qualifying areas.

Beginning Feb. 1, 2012, troops received pro-rated payments of $7.50 for each day they were on official duty in one of the areas.

The total cost has been about $500 million per year.

Officials also said the proposed changes do not affect hostile fire pay. Service members who are exposed to a hostile fire or hostile mine explosion event are eligible to receive a full monthly payment of $225. But they can't receive both danger pay and hostile fire pay for the same month.

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2013/07/10/pentagon-eyes-cuts-in-danger-pay.html?comp=7000023317843&rank=6

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« Reply #8806 on: Jul 12th, 2013, 10:50am »




Please be an angel



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« Reply #8807 on: Jul 12th, 2013, 10:52am »







"Stagecoach" 1939


~

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« Reply #8808 on: Jul 12th, 2013, 6:39pm »

Guardian

Free Syrian Army threatens blood feud after senior officer killed by jihadists

Death of Kamal Hamami likely to inflame rising tensions between mainstream Syrian opposition and foreign anti-Assad fighters

by Martin Chulov in Beirut
Friday 12 July 2013 13.29 EDT

Commanders of the Free Syrian Army (FSA) have reacted with fury to the assassination of a senior FSA officer by a jihadist group, warning that the killing would lead to further violence between the disparate factions battling to oust the president, Bashar al-Assad.

Kamal Hamami, a member of the opposition's supreme military command, was killed and his body mutilated after he was lured to a planning meeting on Thursday with fighters believed to be foreign jihadists in the Jebel al-Krud region, north of Latakia.

The killing – the first internecine targeting of a ranking member of the mainstream Syrian opposition group – follows rising tensions between the exclusively Syrian militia and jihadi fighters, including increasing numbers of foreigners who see the civil war in Syria as part of a global jihad.

Rebel leaders in northern Syria said on Friday that the assassination had shattered trust between the two sides and set off a blood feud.

"This will not go unpunished," said a former officer of the Syrian army who now commands a mainstream opposition militia near Idlib province. "They are trying to assert themselves, to make us bow to them. They need to be taught a lesson."

Since they entered northern Syria in mid-July last year, jihadist groups have become the most effective fighting force in the land, renowned for their prowess on the battlefield and skill in obtaining weapons.

Blighted by ill-discipline and infighting, the FSA has meanwhile struggled to assert itself as its fight against the Assad regime stagnated and more battle-ready militants seized the initiative during raids on military bases that yielded crucial hauls of guns and ammunition.

Recently, however, the jihadists have been accused of the same shortcomings as discipline gives way to power grabs and growing tensions between Syrian and regional al-Qaida leaders.

The main homegrown group, Jabhat al-Nusra, has been undermined by a power struggle between its nominal leader, Abu Muhammad al-Golani, and the leader of the Islamic State of Iraq, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who has led the terror group in its revitalised insurgency against Iraq's Shia-led government.

Baghdadi has attempted to combine his group with Jabhat al-Nusra but was rebuffed in May by Golani, who was reported to have instead pledged loyalty to the al-Qaida leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri. Since then, Jabhat al-Nusra's ranks have split in the same way that the FSA has splintered in the past year.

While it remains a formidable fighting force, it cannot boast the same rigid control over its members and especially over foreign fighters who are increasingly creating their own leadership structures and setting their own rules.

"I've always said that this would become like Anbar," where al-Qaida was driven out in 2006 after earning the ire of local hosts, said a rebel leader in Aleppo. "And I was right. This is now a land of warlords and clans, of foreigners with a perverse form of Islam that share neither our views or goals.

"This is what becomes of a civil war in a place like Syria when help doesn't come the way of the people who need and deserve it."

The spectre of a war within a civil war – mainstream fighters battling foreign fighters – has long been predicted by senior members of established FSA brigades, such as Liwaa al-Tawheed in Aleppo and the Farouk brigades near Idlib and Homs.

For the most part, though, the groups had co-existed, often collaborating on raids and working to the maxim of first winning the battle, then thrashing out how to deal with what remains of the country.

Jabhat al-Nusra members interviewed by the Guardian this year said their leaders, many of whom had fought in Iraq, both against the US army and Sunni tribes, had learned from past mistakes – especially in Anbar, where overplaying attempts to impose and enforce a strict interpretation of sharia law meant they lost the trust of the tribes.

Now, with foreign fighters again taking prominence and employing the same ruthless, uncompromising ways, al-Nusra is losing its bid for containment.

"The war is metastasising in ways that draw in regional and other international actors, erase boundaries and give rise to a single, transnational arc of crisis," says a new report on the Syrian crisis from the International Crisis Group.

"The opposition increasingly resembles a Sunni coalition in which a radicalised Sunni street, Islamist networks, the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood, Gulf states and Turkey take leading roles. The pro-regime camp, encompassing Iran, Hezbollah, Iraq and Iraqi Shi'ite militants, likewise appears to be a quasi-confessional alliance."

The opposition, "not unlike the regime, has acquired a critical and resilient mass of support at least partially immune to the ups and downs of its performance. The large underclass that is its core constituency has suffered such extreme regime violence that it can be expected to fight till the end."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/12/free-syrian-army-officer-killed?CMP=twt_fd

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8809 on: Jul 12th, 2013, 8:57pm »

on Jul 10th, 2013, 9:36pm, Swamprat wrote:
Navy lands unmanned drone on aircraft carrier

Published July 10, 2013

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July 10, 2013: An X-47B autonomous aircraft lands on an aircraft carrier. (AP)


That was indeed an interesting development. Here's another one, in my opinion:

Move Over Terminator, Make Room for ATLAS

The UFO Trail

July 12, 2013

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DARPA's most advanced humanoid yet, ATLAS

Defense contractors rolled out ATLAS, one of the most advanced humanoids ever built, at the DARPA Robotics Challenge conducted Thursday. The robot has two arms, two legs and stands over six-feet tall. It weighs in at 330 lbs. and has 28 hydraulically activated joints that assist in natural movement and what is termed “user-programmed behavior”.

ATLAS can walk up stairs, climb over objects and maneuver its way around obstacles. The advanced robot can withstand hits from heavy objects and is equipped with a variety of sensors that alert its human operator to environmental factors.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency reported ATLAS may increase abilities of first responders during disaster scenarios. They also reported that ATLAS is but one of the robots in its increasing arsenal.

“We have dramatically raised the expectations for robotic capabilities,” said Gill Pratt, program manager for the DARPA Robotics Challenge.

See video of ATLAS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=zkBnFPBV3f0
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« Reply #8810 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 09:34am »

Good morning Jjflash cheesy

That will give you nightmares! Some Tin Man! shocked

We're not in Kansas anymore.

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« Reply #8811 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 09:42am »

Someone posted this on Facebook.

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« Reply #8812 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 09:46am »

Associated Press

Napolitano departure bares gaps in DHS leadership

By EILEEN SULLIVAN and ALICIA A. CALDWELL
July 13 10:10 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — The leadership vacancy created by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano's resignation is the latest and greatest blow to a department where one-third of the heads of key agencies and divisions have been filled with acting officials or remained vacant for months.

Napolitano's departure, slated for September, will create the 15th hole in the department's 45 leadership positions. Napolitano's chief of staff and the director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement are leaving this month. The deputy secretary, general counsel, heads of Customs and Border Protection, privacy, legislative affairs, intelligence and analysis and more are filled with acting officials. Other key positions, like the executive secretariat, inspector general and deputy undersecretary for cybersecurity remain vacant.

The pattern of putting acting officials in leadership positions at the Homeland Security Department— sometimes replacing acting officials with other acting officials — has been going on for months. This swath of vacancies raises questions about how a department depleted of permanent leadership could implement changes, particularly as Congress considers overhauling the nation's immigration system.

"Her departure is a substantial addition to the growing list of unfilled key leadership positions within the department," Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, who chairs the House Homeland Security Committee, said of Napolitano's resignation. "The administration should move swiftly to fill the gaping holes in its management."

The White House referred a request for comment to the Homeland Security Department, which did not respond.

The Homeland Security Department is comprised of agencies that protect the president, respond to disasters, enforce immigration laws and secure air travel. Many of the unfilled leadership positions don't require Senate confirmation.

Napolitano on Friday announced she would be leaving her post in early September to become the president of the University of California school systems. It was not immediately clear who the president wants to replace her. The acting undersecretary at the department is poised to take over as acting secretary unless the Senate confirms the president's nominee for Homeland Security undersecretary before Napolitano leaves. If that happens, the new undersecretary would assume the role of acting secretary until the president names a replacement.

"Sometimes, when major changes occur, there is a tendency to focus on the uncertainty of the future, perhaps at the expense of the urgency of the now," the assistant secretary of policy at the Homeland Security Department, David Heyman, said Friday in an email to his staff following Napolitano's announcement. "This department has seamlessly and professionally negotiated a number of similar changes in the past, and I know a number of you all are veterans of such transitions."

While some of these vacancies have little impact on daily operations around the country, the lack of permanent leadership at the top can have long term effects over policy, said Richard Skinner, the department's former inspector general. There has been no permanent replacement for Skinner since he left two years ago.

Acting officials are always reluctant to make long-term policy calls, said James Ziglar, the last commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, which was absorbed into the Homeland Security Department in 2003.

"On the administration side, management side, everyone is looking at the person, saying, 'You aren't going to be around very long, so we're going to just hold off doing stuff,'" Ziglar said.

Customs and Border Protection, which oversees the securing of the nation's borders, has not had a Senate-confirmed leader since the George W. Bush administration. President Barack Obama in 2010 exercised his ability to bypass Congress and appoint Alan Bersin as head of CBP. But that appointment was up at the end of 2011. The acting commissioner who replaced Bersin recently retired from government, only to be replaced by another acting commissioner.

Without a Senate-confirmed commissioner of CBP, it will be difficult to put in place and actual border strategy, said Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum.

The Democratic-controlled Senate has passed an ambitious and broad immigration bill, which includes doubling the size of the Border Patrol to more than 40,000 agents, offering a path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally and increasing the number of people who come to the United States as temporary workers. House Republicans have vowed to fight the bill, arguing that the border isn't secure and that must come first.

"Whoever is in the position is always looking over their shoulder, wondering if they are going to have a job," Noorani said.

The position of the department's chief privacy officer is also filled by an acting official at a time when evaluating and protecting privacy will be critical for any new immigration laws likely to include deciding who among the millions of immigrants living the country illegally gets to stay.

The department's second most senior position has been without a confirmed leader since Jane Holl Lute left in April. Rand Beers, who has been the acting deputy secretary, is poised to take over the department while the Senate considers Alejandro Mayorkas to fill the second top job permanently.

But Mayorkas' confirmation would also create another vacancy, this time at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. That agency is responsible for policing who gets immigration benefits, including green cards, and is likely to have a significant role in implementing any immigration reform that addresses the millions of immigrants already living in the United States illegally.

And not having a permanent inspector general to serve as the department's watchdog is a significant problem, said Skinner, who once served in an acting capacity in that role.

"The longer that position stays vacant, the more vulnerable the department becomes," he said.

Career government employees need leaders who have the backing of the president, said Prakash Khatri, the former ombudsman at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

"When they know there's an acting head of the office, generally the careerist will not make any major moves," Khatri said. "At a time when we have major reform pending, that is the last thing we want."

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/napolitano-departure-widens-dhs-leadership-gap

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« Reply #8813 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 09:48am »

Reuters

Russia says no asylum request yet from fugitive Snowden

By Steve Gutterman

MOSCOW
Sat July 13, 2013 6:33am EDT

(Reuters) - Russia kept former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden at arm's length on Saturday, saying it had not been in touch with the fugitive American and had not yet received a formal request for political asylum.

Remarks by Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov signaled Russia is weighing its options after Snowden, who is stranded at a Moscow airport, broke three weeks of silence and asked for refuge in Russia until he can secure safe passage to Latin America.

Washington urged Moscow to return Snowden to the United States, where he is wanted on espionage charges after revealing details of secret surveillance programs, and President Barack Obama spoke by phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Snowden's leaks about U.S. spy methods, including eavesdropping on global email traffic, have upset Washington's friends and foes alike. Stuck at Sheremetyevo airport with his passport revoked, he has become an irritant in relations between the United States and Russia.

"We are not in contact with Snowden," Russian news agencies quoted Lavrov as saying in Kyrgyzstan, where he attended a foreign ministers' meeting.

He said he had learned of Snowden's meeting with Russian human rights activists and public figures at the airport on Friday from the media, "just like everyone else."

Snowden, who had previously kept out of sight since arriving in the airport's transit zone on June 23, told the activists that he would submit his asylum request the same day.

Lavrov said that under Russian law, asylum seekers must first make an official appeal to the Federal Migration Service. But its director, Konstantin Romodanovsky, said on Saturday the agency had not yet received such a request from Snowden.

DOUBLE-EDGED SWORD

Snowden, who worked at a National Security Agency facility, in Hawaii, revealed that the NSA has access to vast amounts of data such as emails and chat rooms from companies including Facebook and Google, under a government program called Prism.

He fled to Hong Kong and then flew to Moscow, where he and Russian officials say he has remained in the airport transit zone. He has no visa to enter Russia.

Snowden is useful as a propaganda tool for Putin, who accuses the U.S. government of preaching to the world about rights and freedoms it does not uphold at home. But his presence on Russia's doorstep is a double-edged sword.

Putin has invited Obama for a bilateral summit in Moscow in September, and asylum for Snowden could jeopardize that, even though both countries have signaled they want to improve ties that have been strained in Putin's third presidential term.

And while pro-Kremlin politicians have been avidly casting Snowden, 30, as a rights defender, former KGB officer Putin said last month that the surveillance methods he revealed were largely justified if applied lawfully.

Putin has said twice that Snowden should choose a final destination and go there, and on July 2 he said Russia could only take Snowden in if he stopped activities "aimed at harming our American partners".

Putin's spokesman said on Friday that the condition, which prompted Snowden to withdraw an earlier asylum request, still stood.

Snowden has asked some 20 countries for asylum and received offers from Venezuela, Nicaragua and Bolivia, but he said on Friday that Western states had made it "impossible for me to travel to Latin America and enjoy the asylum granted there".

The United States has urged nations not to give him passage, and a plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales home from Russia last week was denied access to the airspace of several European countries on suspicion Snowden might be on board.

(Editing by Alessandra Prentice and Mark Trevelyan)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/13/us-usa-security-snowden-russia-idUSBRE96C04O20130713

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« Reply #8814 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 09:56am »

New York Daily News

Roswell UFO website allows visitors to upload pictures, video of other-worldly sightings

The people behind the New York-based site www.roswellsightings.com plan to launch a smartphone app, too.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Friday, July 12, 2013, 12:35 PM

ROSWELL, N.M. — A new website supported by a Roswell museum gives people a chance to prove that we are not alone in the universe.

The Roswell Daily Record reports that the recently launched roswellsightings.com allows anyone on Earth to upload photos or videos of sightings or encounters with what they believe are UFOs.

The website is based in New York and is from a partnership with the Roswell-based International UFO Museum And Research Center.

The user-friendly website allows people to share recordings on social network sites or watch the latest scientific news or other videos.

Program designers say they hope to complete a smartphone app to upload videos and photos to the site.

So far, witnesses have posted sightings from Argentina, Brazil, and South Africa.


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/roswell-ufo-website-visitors-upload-pictures-video-other-worldly-sightings-article-1.1397204#ixzz2YwC8lR7G

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« Reply #8815 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 4:34pm »

Terrorism may be the least of our worries.....


U.S. Military Prepares for Global Unrest Amid Climate Fears

Marlene Cimons, Climate Nexus
Date: 12 July 2013

Marlene Cimons of Climate Nexus contributed this article to LiveScience's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

Though Earth's shifting climate evokes many images, civil unrest usually isn't one of them. Yet, a warming planet could have a profound impact on national security, both in the United States and abroad. This time, the threat isn't from terrorism or a single enemy, but from natural disasters occurring on an unprecedented scale.

Acts of nature fueled by a warming climate — for example, floods and prolonged drought — may lead to disrupted migration, food and water shortages, and other public health crises — which, in turn, could prompt civil and political instability. Those impacts would pose a particularly profound threat for people in countries with fragile governments, including key U.S. strategic interests.

This threat has Pentagon officials worried enough to speak out and to invest in research to better understand the relationships among conflict, socioeconomic conditions and climate. The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) plans to use the data to predict future threats and develop ways to cope with them.

Under its highly selective Minerva social-science program, the DOD has awarded researchers at the University of Maryland a three-year, $1.9 million grant to develop models that will help policymakers anticipate what could happen to societies under a range of potential climate-change scenarios.

"It's likely that physical and economic disruptions resulting from climate change could heighten tensions in sensitive areas of the world," said Elisabeth Gilmore, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland's school of public policy and the study's lead researcher. "The environmental changes from climate change can have important effects on our well-being and security. We need to better understand these interactions."

Her team plans to use statistical models and case studies to identify the best predictors of climate-related conflict, and then use the data and a novel simulation method to generate forecasts of conflict over a range of socioeconomic and climate-change scenarios. Finally, the project will identify a range of military and policy interventions that could reduce the occurrence of climate-related civil conflict.
The Pentagon has been concerned about the national security implications of climate change for quite some time, and military officials have continued to speak out about them.

For example, Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, who leads the U.S. Pacific Command, repeatedly has warned of the national security dangers of climate change. In fact, earlier this year, he said global warming was "the most likely thing ... [to] cripple the security environment, probably more likely than the other scenarios we all often talk about."

In 2007, CNA, a Pentagon-funded think tank that conducts in-depth research and analysis, released a report from a panel of retired senior military officers and national security experts who predicted that extreme weather events prompted by climate shifts could disrupt the U.S. way of life and cause already weak governments to fall, particularly in many Asian, African and Middle Eastern nations where marginal living standards already exist.

Moreover, the report warned that the United States may find itself drawn into these situations to help provide stability before conditions worsen, before they are exploited by extremists or after a conflict has begun. Even stable governments, like the United States' and those of nations in Europe, could be pressured to take in large numbers of immigrants and refugees as drought increases and food production dwindles in Latin America and Africa, the report added.

Some researchers have suggested that framing climate change as a threat to national security and public health, rather than to the environment, might make the issue more relevant and meaningful to many conservative Americans and others who tend to deny or dismiss it. But, surprisingly, recent research published in Climatic Change by Teresa Myers of George Mason University and her colleagues indicated that such seems to make those individuals angry.

The researchers weren't sure why this approach elicited an angry response, but they wonder whether the climate-change deniers resented an attempt to connect national security — an issue they care about — with climate change, an issue they tend to dismiss. Or, they may have been upset with the researchers for presenting claims about global warming and national security they did not think were authentic or credible.

Instead, perhaps the doubters should read the words of retired U.S. Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan, chairman of CNA's military advisory board and the U.S. Army's former chief of staff. He seems to believe that enough scientific evidence of climate change's impact exists to be sobering — and that it deserves the U.S. government's attention.

"We seem to be standing by —and, frankly, asking — for perfectness in science,"' Sullivan wrote in the 2007 CNA report. "People are saying they want to be convinced, perfectly. They want to know the climate-science projections with 100 percent certainty. Well, we know a great deal, and even with that, there is still uncertainty. But the trend line is very clear. We never have 100 percent certainty. We never have it. If you wait until you have 100 percent certainty, something bad is going to happen on the battlefield. That's something we know. You have to act with incomplete information. You have to act based on the trend line. You have to act on your intuition sometimes."

http://www.livescience.com/38167-national-security-impact-of-warming-climate.html
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« Reply #8816 on: Jul 13th, 2013, 9:55pm »

Cancer Cure Closer Thanx to Brits!!!
I took immunology as part of a pre med regime and this stuff is dynomite!
They are throwing mega bucks at them the Pharms smell a winner..


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/exclusive-cancer--a-cure-just-got-closer-thanks-to-a-tiny-british-company--and-the-result-could-change-lives-of-millions-8707590.html
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« Reply #8817 on: Jul 14th, 2013, 01:58am »

Swamprat the IPCC went down that road years back and all the necessary information is on their computer in Japan, natural disasters in the southern hemisphere are well planed for and some of the security plans although nasty I agree with. Mass migration into the northern hemisphere just cannot be allowed to happen , you can only allow so many into your home before you your self end up starving and as cruel as it may seem the future will be survival of the fittest and those that have planed for such disasters.

SYS they won’t cure cancer or heart disease or aids as apart from being one excellent money maker it is population control, cure these disease’s and the only option left would be world war three or mass exodus to other planets. Lots of ways to beat cancer already exist but your fooled into going down the pharma route even your local GP falls for their crap, second theory of cancer had brilliant results until the governments shut it down on the orders of the pharma boys, then you have such as colloidal silver or Jim Humbles MMS and it does work hence why the pharmas want it done away with, I have had cancer several times and beat it mainly by telling the hospital to shove their treatment where the sun don’t shine, help your self people start building up your immune system with safe natural products then add a few unorthodox safe remedies its easy.
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« Reply #8818 on: Jul 14th, 2013, 09:50am »

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #8819 on: Jul 14th, 2013, 09:52am »

Associated Press

Woman gored during final bull run in Spain

By CARLOTA CORTES
July 14 8:41 AM EDT

PAMPLONA, Spain (AP) — A bull gored an Australian woman and left her seriously injured during the final bull run of this year's annual San Fermin festival in Spain on Sunday. Four other runners were hospitalized with cuts and bruises.

The 23-year-old woman, identified only as J.E., was gored in the back and suffered multiple rib fractures and damage to her right lung that left her in "very grave" condition after an operation at Navarra Hospital, said the regional government that organizes the festival.

The Australian was struck by a massive Miura bull as she clung to wooden barriers outside the bullring entrance, said regional health authority spokesman Javier Sesma.

It is very rare for women to be gored during the annual festival since most of the runners are men. Javier Solano, a San Fermin expert working for national broadcaster TVE, said records showed only two other women had been injured by gorings in the recent history of the fiesta.

The four injured runners who were tossed by bulls or fell as they ran were identified as a 39-year-old man from California, a 23-year-old man from Madrid and two men from Navarra, said the regional government organizers. None of those injuries were serious.

Dramatic confrontations between runners and bulls had occurred during the previous two days of the festival.

A 19-year-old Spaniard who had stopped breathing after being crushed by large pileup of fallen runners on Saturday has recovered consciousness and begun to breathe without mechanical assistance, Sesma said Sunday.

A 35-year-old American man from Cleveland, Ohio, who was gored by a bull Saturday was recovering "favorably" from a "rectal perforation" that affected his abdomen and a kidney, said a Navarra Hospital statement.

Patrick Eccles, a 20-year-old University of Utah student who was gored Friday, was in a stable condition and improving after having had his spleen removed, the statement said.

Miura bulls, which can weigh 695 kilograms (1,530 pounds), are renowned as Spain's largest and fastest fighting bulls, and Sunday's bull run was quick, taking 2 minutes, 16 seconds to cover 928 yards (850 meters) from stables just outside Pamplona's medieval stone wall to the central bullring.

Despite the animals' size and strength, experts admire Miuras for their explosive acceleration, stamina and grace, characteristics that inspired legendary Italian car maker, the late Ferruccio Lamborghini, to name one of his iconic sports cars after the breed.

The San Fermin festival, which honors the patron saint of this northern city, dates back to the late 16th century and is also known for its all-night street parties, where copious quantities of red wine from Navarra and Rioja are consumed and sprinkled around.

The festivities were made famous by Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel "The Sun Also Rises."

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/woman-gored-during-final-bull-run-spain

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