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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 16196 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9375 on: Oct 31st, 2013, 07:52am »



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9376 on: Nov 1st, 2013, 12:00am »

wow that was funny!! Happy one to you too Wings
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vx1OVLX5Rc

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« Last Edit: Nov 1st, 2013, 02:31am by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9377 on: Nov 1st, 2013, 11:38pm »

Tale of an american checkpoint
Exceeding the Standard

in war and peacetime
Fallujah
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Sacramento
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« Last Edit: Nov 1st, 2013, 11:42pm by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9378 on: Nov 3rd, 2013, 03:18am »

Dude..If it gotta smell...Its A dell!

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-TV/2013/11/01/Dell-Users-Complain-of-Cat-Pee-Smell

grin
curse of the drone probably
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xx Wells Fargo Bank Typo Kills Old Navy Vet
« Reply #9379 on: Nov 3rd, 2013, 11:48am »

http://rt.com/usa/wells-fargo-delassus-foreclosure-168/
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The next court date in the matter of Larry Delassus versus Wachovia Mortgage-Wells Fargo is scheduled for March 18, but don’t expect the plaintiff to be there. Mr. Delassus literally died in court while fighting back against the banking behemoth.

Delassus, 62, died in a California court room in December after suffering from a major heart attack while his attorney Anthony Trujillo argued on the stand. His client, a US Navy veteran, was suing the bank for negligence and discrimination against a disabled person.

Problems began for Delassus back in 2009 when he received a letter from Wells Fargo informing him that he had been delinquent on his taxes for a condo he owned in Hermosa Beach, California. Delassus says he was actually six months ahead on his taxes, but his mortgage holder insisted that he owed the bank over $13,000 for two years of missed payments. Delassus found out over a year later that the problem occurred because Wells Fargo had mistaken Delassus’ condo with a neighboring one due to a typo in the address they had on file, but even then the bank didn’t relent with its attempt to take away his home.

"In September, 2010 Wells Fargo acknowledged its error in paying the taxes on Plaintiff's neighbor's property and corrected it,” the bank’s attorney, Robert Bailey, said in court. At that point, though, they didn’t do much more to correct their error.

In an article this month in LA Weekly, reporter Jessica Ogilvie explains how things only got worse from there for Mr. Delassus, who suffered from the relatively-rare Budd-Chiari syndrome. During the year that Delassus argued with the bank over what he did or didn’t owe, they doubled his mortgage payments to an amount he simply couldn’t stay on top of paying.

“The bank refused to let him resume his $1,237.69 installments,” the paper says, and on top of that Delassus faced a sizable "reinstatement" cost, described as being typically the amount past due plus other fees. But even then, Delassus’ attorney couldn’t get Wells Fargo to explain what he owed.

"So Plaintiff was never provided with the reinstatement amount after the bank discovered its error, correct?" Trujillo asked the bank in Sept 2010.

"That is correct,” responded Wells Fargo litigation-support manager Michael Dolan in a conversation that was videotaped for the court.

When Delassus finally got in touch with the bank in early 2011 to see what he owed, they told him they wanted all that was left on his condo, $337,250.40, to be paid in full one day later. He sued the bank on Jan. 26 of that year, but by May of that year it was already back in the hands of Wells Fargo, on the market and sold for a pretty profit that went straight to the bank.

"I came back from the hospital, and that very day, they sold the son of a bitch," Delassus says in a videotaped court deposition obtained by LA Weekly. "I'm homeless. I did not have a home. My condo — 16 years, gone. Gone."

Without his home and out hundreds of thousands of dollars, Delassus waited to hear how his lawsuit would end up. But during a motion hearing in Dec. 2012, he died in the courtroom while his attorney argued against the judge. One day earlier, the judge in the case announced a tentative ruling in which it appeared that all legal claims against Wells Fargo would be dismissed.

"He really thought he was gonna get his place back," Debbie Popovich, a friend of Delassus’, tells LA Weekly. "He thought if he told the truth, they could do something for him.”

Trujillo was trying to convince the judge in the case exactly that, but Delassus slumped over and died during testimony in December.

"It was the most shocking thing I've been through in a long time," a friend who witnessed it told the paper.

Now the lawsuit against Wells Fargo will continue, but first Trujillo needs to have his client’s estate finalized in probate court. The Hermosa Beach Patch reports that the next hearing has been tentatively set for March 18.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9380 on: Nov 4th, 2013, 12:51pm »

Yes, time travel is possible.



http://www.dump.com/timetravel/

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"Let's see what's over there."
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xx island of garbage size of UK headed to Cali
« Reply #9381 on: Nov 7th, 2013, 01:27am »

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/floating-island-rubbish-three-times-2678207
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Floating island of rubbish three times size of BRITAIN floating towards California
5 Nov 2013 12:50

Five millions tons of debris made up of devastated property is making its way to the US following the 2011 tsunami in Japan
Danger: according to research one million tons of debris is on its way to the US Danger: according to research one million tons of debris is on its way to the US
Reuters

A floating island of debris three times the size of BRITAIN is heading for the California coastline sparking huge environmental concerns.

Five millions tons of rubbish made up of devastated homes, boats, cars and businesses is making its way across the Pacific Ocean following the 2011 tsunami in Japan.

Scientists have already discovered debris on the west coast but their latest findings suggest California is expected to be hit with a deluge all at once.

America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released their latest findings showing a huge island of rubbish floating northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.

Boffins have been unable to say for certain when the debris will wash ashore but they have been closely monitoring its movements which stretches from Alaska to the Philippines.

Seven months ago, the first documented debris from the tsunami reached Crescent City, California.

A 20-foot boat belonging to the marine sciences program at Takata High School in the north east city of Rikuzentakata was discovered washed up.

NOAA spokeswoman Keeley Belva said more than 1,600 reports of debris had been firmly traced back to the tsunami.

They included a small boat found in Hawaii, a motorbike washed ashore on the coast of British Columbia and large pieces of a dock in Washington state and Oregon.

A football was also discovered on an Alsakan island still with its owner’s name it.

The boy was traced to Rikuzentakata.

The tsunami devastated the east coast of Japan in March 2011.

Caused by the massive T?hoku earthquake it sent a colossal undersea “megathrust” creating waves up to 41 metres tall crashing on to the shoreline.

The tsunami was so powerful scientists measured it had moved Honshu - the main island of Japan - eight feet.

The Fukushima nuclear power plant was left destroyed sending three of its reactors in to meltdown.

It led to hundreds of thousands of residents being evacuated up to 50 miles away.

However despite the leaking radioactive reactor water from the plant, none of the floating debris has tested positive for radiation.

Check out our before and after pictures of the areas devastated by the tsunami in our gallery below.
« Last Edit: Nov 7th, 2013, 10:46am by purr » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9382 on: Nov 7th, 2013, 05:51am »

....However despite the leaking radioactive reactor water from the plant, none of the floating debris has tested positive for radiation...


Probably because it was created long before the present problem with leaks.

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9383 on: Nov 7th, 2013, 05:54am »

Can someone reduce that picture size a bit, it is causing the text to run off the page.

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9384 on: Nov 7th, 2013, 7:33pm »

on Nov 7th, 2013, 05:51am, HAL9000 wrote:
....However despite the leaking radioactive reactor water from the plant, none of the floating debris has tested positive for radiation...


Probably because it was created long before the present problem with leaks.

HAL

Thank Gawd Almighty for small miracles. Maybe California Alaska etc can recycle the wood or somethin..ya know.? make boardwalks looks like good junk. They should be greatful..
Maybe build a wooden alien offshore landing platform..The possibilities are staggering..
cool
« Last Edit: Nov 7th, 2013, 7:34pm by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9385 on: Nov 8th, 2013, 07:53am »

Groundbreaking Research! grin



The Tao of Pee: The Science Behind Urination

Nov. 7, 2013 — Although we don't often think about it, fluid dynamics touches almost every aspect of our lives, from a billowing breeze that buffets a flag, to swirling river currents that shape canyons to the surging blood that sustains our lives. One of the basest of bodily functions -- urination -- is governed primarily by the equations of fluid motion.

Later this month, at the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting in Pittsburgh, Pa., two teams of researchers reveal new insight into the physics of peeing.

In the laboratory of Georgia Tech's David Hu, scientists and engineers look to nature for engineering ideas. In work that could help in the design of scalable hydrodynamic systems, researchers from the Hu lab recently filmed the urination habits of 16 animals of varying sizes -- five mice, five rats, one dog, two goats, two cows, and one elephant. The results? Size matters. Although small animals such as mice and rats take about 2 seconds to pee, urination "events" in animals larger than about 5 kilograms consistently clocked in at an average of 21 seconds.

"An elephant has a large bladder and a urethra with dimensions comparable to a household pipe," says graduate student and study leader Patricia Yang. As gravity pulls fluid down to the bottom of the urethra, Yang explains, the flow speed increases, causing urine to be eliminated more quickly than in a medium-sized animal, like a dog, which has a shorter urethra and gets less of a boost from gravity. The dog, however, has a smaller bladder, and "this is why an elephant and a dog empty their bladder in the same time," she says.

When it comes to urination accuracy, however, speed and size are less important than angle, says fluid dynamicist Randy Hurd of Brigham Young University, who will present a study of the dynamics of urinal use. Hurd and his graduate advisor, Tadd Truscott, got the idea for the work during a caffeine- and sugar-fueled midnight road trip from San Diego following last year's DFD meeting. The two were brainstorming about new and creative projects for Truscott's "Splash Lab," which uses high-speed imaging techniques to study fluid behavior.

At the Splash Lab, Hurd and his colleagues created an artificial male urethra on a 3D printer. The urethra -- a cylinder with a 8 mm x 3 mm elliptical channel running down the center -- was attached with tubing to a pressurized container, allowing it to deliver a steady stream of dyed water at 21 milliliters per second, the expected flow rate for a healthy, middle-aged male. High-speed cameras were used to visualize the flow as it struck both a solid surface (representing the porcelain back wall of most urinals) and a "free" surface (representing standing water); white paper was placed below the surfaces to track where splash droplets ended up.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the researchers found that it is indeed possible to use a urinal without splashing onto yourself or your own clothing. The key? Angle.

"For typical male urination, the stream breaks up into droplets before impacting the urinal wall or the water surface," he says. Significant splash-back occurs if that stream is angled perpendicular to the urinal wall, down to angles of about 45 degrees. But when this impact angle becomes very small, "it is much easier for the droplets to only slightly change direction, and slide along the porcelain surface without generating large splashes," says Hurd, who hopes to eventually create an optimization function to find the ideal approach for urinal usage.

"Although reducing the impact angle would also work in traditional toilets, these angles tend to only present themselves around the rim of the bowl, simultaneously increasing the chances of missing the bowl entirely," says Hurd. "I wouldn't recommend this approach to anyone but military snipers."

The presentation, "The Hydrodynamics of Urination: to drip or jet," is on November 24, 2013 in the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

The presentation, "Urinal Dynamics," is on November 24, 2013 in the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131107132622.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fmatter_energy+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Matter+%26+Energy+News%29
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9386 on: Nov 8th, 2013, 07:55am »

Good morning cheesy

Hope everyone had a great Halloween.

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9387 on: Nov 8th, 2013, 07:58am »

Associated Press

US naval convoy crosses Egypt's Suez Canal

By MOSAAD EL-GOHARY
Nov. 8, 2013 8:39 AM EST

PORT SAID, Egypt (AP) — An official at Egypt's Suez Canal says a U.S. aircraft carrier and a destroyer have crossed the waterway from the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea.

The official says the U.S. warships crossed Friday after 14 hours of heightened security along the canal. The official says that included closing all roads along the canal and having Egyptian military helicopters provide air support.

The official said the aircraft carrier was the USS Nimitz, based in Everett, Wash. He did not identify the destroyer.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief reporters.

In September, the U.S. Navy increased its presence in the Middle East to keep watch over Syria amid of threats to strike the country over a chemical weapons attack there.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/us-naval-convoy-crosses-egypts-suez-canal

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9388 on: Nov 8th, 2013, 08:09am »

News.com.au

Student doc spies UFO over Douglas
November 08, 2013

THE truth is out there for a young Townsville doctor-in-training who believes he has photographic evidence of a UFO chasing a large flock of birds.

James Cook University medical student Joshua Thompson, 20, was driving to his home at Riverside Gardens in Douglas on Tuesday about 6pm when he spotted thousands of small black birds flying over the Ross River towards the Palmetum gardens, as he went past the bridge.

"I've never seen anything like that before in Townsville," he said.

"I thought that looked a bit cool."


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He took a photograph on his iPhone 5 and, when later examining the picture, he noticed two strange, small saucer-shaped objects in the sky.

In one of the photos, there is a clear burst of yellow light in the shape of a disc, with six small lights in the sky.

"The six small lights really weirded me out," he said.

"You can see them really clearly in this ring type of thing."

There also appears to be a black shadow behind the unknown object, and another object above it, seemingly flying away.

The lit UFO also has a transparent beam underneath it, suggesting it is zooming away.

"My theory is the birds may have been some sort of cover for it to get away," he said.

Mr Thompson uploaded his sighting to YouTube from his smartphone on Tuesday night, attracting more than 1000 views within 24 hours.

He said he was not a "superstitious" person, but was aware of another recent sighting.

"My mate who is in the same course as me, who did astronomy as an elective this semester, he saw a similar sighting about a month ago in the same area, the same type of disc-orb shape, he said, that just took off," he said.

"I didn't actually see it at all, I was just driving and quickly took a snap, and the rest is history."

Mr Thompson, who is originally from Darwin and also lived in Indonesia and Portugal for many years, said he had never seen anything like the UFO before in his time living around the world. "I've occasionally seen lights in the sky and just thought, oh, shooting star, or whatever nothing that crazy," he said.

Kenneth Armitage, from Townsville City Council's parks department, said he was not aware of any reports from Palmetum staff about unusual activity in the sky this week.

http://www.news.com.au/national/queensland/student-doc-spies-ufo-over-douglas/story-fnii5v6w-1226755517569

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9389 on: Nov 8th, 2013, 09:52am »

on Nov 8th, 2013, 07:53am, Swamprat wrote:
Groundbreaking Research! grin



The Tao of Pee: The Science Behind Urination

Nov. 7, 2013 — Although we don't often think about it, fluid dynamics touches almost every aspect of our lives, from a billowing breeze that buffets a flag, to swirling river currents that shape canyons to the surging blood that sustains our lives. One of the basest of bodily functions -- urination -- is governed primarily by the equations of fluid motion.

Later this month, at the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting in Pittsburgh, Pa., two teams of researchers reveal new insight into the physics of peeing.

In the laboratory of Georgia Tech's David Hu, scientists and engineers look to nature for engineering ideas. In work that could help in the design of scalable hydrodynamic systems, researchers from the Hu lab recently filmed the urination habits of 16 animals of varying sizes -- five mice, five rats, one dog, two goats, two cows, and one elephant. The results? Size matters. Although small animals such as mice and rats take about 2 seconds to pee, urination "events" in animals larger than about 5 kilograms consistently clocked in at an average of 21 seconds.

"An elephant has a large bladder and a urethra with dimensions comparable to a household pipe," says graduate student and study leader Patricia Yang. As gravity pulls fluid down to the bottom of the urethra, Yang explains, the flow speed increases, causing urine to be eliminated more quickly than in a medium-sized animal, like a dog, which has a shorter urethra and gets less of a boost from gravity. The dog, however, has a smaller bladder, and "this is why an elephant and a dog empty their bladder in the same time," she says.

When it comes to urination accuracy, however, speed and size are less important than angle, says fluid dynamicist Randy Hurd of Brigham Young University, who will present a study of the dynamics of urinal use. Hurd and his graduate advisor, Tadd Truscott, got the idea for the work during a caffeine- and sugar-fueled midnight road trip from San Diego following last year's DFD meeting. The two were brainstorming about new and creative projects for Truscott's "Splash Lab," which uses high-speed imaging techniques to study fluid behavior.

At the Splash Lab, Hurd and his colleagues created an artificial male urethra on a 3D printer. The urethra -- a cylinder with a 8 mm x 3 mm elliptical channel running down the center -- was attached with tubing to a pressurized container, allowing it to deliver a steady stream of dyed water at 21 milliliters per second, the expected flow rate for a healthy, middle-aged male. High-speed cameras were used to visualize the flow as it struck both a solid surface (representing the porcelain back wall of most urinals) and a "free" surface (representing standing water); white paper was placed below the surfaces to track where splash droplets ended up.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the researchers found that it is indeed possible to use a urinal without splashing onto yourself or your own clothing. The key? Angle.

"For typical male urination, the stream breaks up into droplets before impacting the urinal wall or the water surface," he says. Significant splash-back occurs if that stream is angled perpendicular to the urinal wall, down to angles of about 45 degrees. But when this impact angle becomes very small, "it is much easier for the droplets to only slightly change direction, and slide along the porcelain surface without generating large splashes," says Hurd, who hopes to eventually create an optimization function to find the ideal approach for urinal usage.

"Although reducing the impact angle would also work in traditional toilets, these angles tend to only present themselves around the rim of the bowl, simultaneously increasing the chances of missing the bowl entirely," says Hurd. "I wouldn't recommend this approach to anyone but military snipers."

The presentation, "The Hydrodynamics of Urination: to drip or jet," is on November 24, 2013 in the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

The presentation, "Urinal Dynamics," is on November 24, 2013 in the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131107132622.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fmatter_energy+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Matter+%26+Energy+News%29


Swamprat, I fear that these findings have been watered down!




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Ordinary workday for the experts doggedly engaged in urinary research.




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purr
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