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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 25555 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9450 on: Nov 13th, 2013, 11:37am »

I can imagine invible small killer AUVs..good one Crystal..
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Seattle Police Deactivate Wi-Fi Spy Grid After Privacy Outcry

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SPD admit mesh network was never turned off after DHS testing phase

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 13, 2013

Following a privacy outcry concerning a wi-fi “mesh network” being installed in Seattle with DHS funding that has the capability of recording the last 1,000 locations of anyone in its vicinity, the Seattle Police Department announced last night that it is temporarily deactivating the network.

Image: City of Seattle.

As we highlighted yesterday, the $2.7 million dollar system, a series of white wi-fi boxes affixed to utility poles with which authorities had planned to blanket the entire city, can track cellphones even if they are not connected to the network. The system can also collect a mobile user’s IP address, mobile device type, apps used, current location and even historical locations.

Infowars subsequently obtained documents from a government insider that revealed how the mesh network was far more than just a means of tracking people’s locations, it was also linked with DHS fusion centers and collected a “wealth of information” from the cellphones of people in the coverage area.

The Seattle Police Department responded to the controversy by announcing that it will temporarily deactivate the network, which was rushed through the Seattle City Council with virtually no oversight, and allow public scrutiny of the system before proceeding.

“The wireless mesh network will be deactivated until city council approves a draft policy and until there’s an opportunity for vigorous public debate,” SPD spokesperson Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said last night, adding that turning off the system involves, “a little more than just flipping a switch.”

“Our position is that the technology is the technology,” Whitcomb added, “but we want to make sure that we have safeguards and policies in place so people with legitimate privacy concerns aren’t worried about how it’s being used.”

Whitcomb dubiously asserted that the network was “operational without being operated” because police had switched on the network for DHS grant-mandated testing and then forgot to turn it off again.

Police Chief Jim Pugel gave the order to begin the deactivation yesterday, but a temporary hold on the system is unlikely to satisfy surveillance critics.

If the Edward Snowden revelations about NSA wiretapping have taught us anything it’s that if a technology exists then it will be used to spy on the American people. Most privacy advocates will not be satisfied until the wi-fi mesh network which currently covers downtown Seattle is ripped out completely and abandoned for good.

At the very least, clear and provable safeguards need to be put in place to ensure that devices which are not connected to the network cannot be tracked. The company behind the technology, Aruba Networks, bragged in their promotional material that the grid could track “rogue” or “unassociated” devices.

The fact that an incident involving SPD surveillance cameras, which were supposed to protect the Port of Seattle from terrorists but were subsequently turned inwards to watch residents and not the coastline as intended, was explained as an “accident” by officials is not going to provide much assurance that Seattle authorities have much concern for privacy.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9451 on: Nov 13th, 2013, 11:53am »

http://www.dump.com/meetsdaughter/
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9452 on: Nov 13th, 2013, 6:29pm »

Hey Sys cheesy


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Must Have outfit for the near future grin

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9453 on: Nov 13th, 2013, 6:35pm »

on Nov 13th, 2013, 11:53am, Swamprat wrote:
http://www.dump.com/meetsdaughter/


Aaaawwww Swamp! Thank you cheesy

What a wonderful video.

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9454 on: Nov 13th, 2013, 7:22pm »

on Nov 13th, 2013, 6:29pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hey Sys cheesy


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Must Have outfit for the near future grin

Crystal



Lock and Load! love it smiley
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9455 on: Nov 14th, 2013, 09:38am »

Good morning Sys cheesy

Crystal



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9456 on: Nov 14th, 2013, 09:44am »

Science Daily

Fossil of New Big Cat Species Discovered: Oldest Ever Found

Nov. 13, 2013 — The oldest big cat fossil ever found -- which fills in a significant gap in the fossil record -- was discovered on a paleontological dig in Tibet, scientists announced today.

A skull from the new species, named Panthera blytheae, was excavated and described by a team led by Jack Tseng -- a PhD student at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the time of the discovery, and now a postdoctoral fellow at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York.

"This find suggests that big cats have a deeper evolutionary origin than previously suspected," Tseng said.

The announcement was made in a scientific paper published by the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, on Nov. 13.

Tseng's coauthors include Xiaoming Wang, who has joint appointments at USC, the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) and the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, the AMNH, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS); Graham Slater of the Smithsonian Institution; Gary Takeuchi of the NHM and the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits; Qiang Li of the CAS; Juan Liu of the University of Alberta and the CAS; and Guangpu Xie of the Gansu Provincial Museum.

DNA evidence suggests that the so-called "big cats" -- the Pantherinae subfamily, including lions, jaguars, tigers, leopards, snow leopards, and clouded leopards -- diverged from their nearest evolutionary cousins, Felinae (which includes cougars, lynxes, and domestic cats), about 6.37 million years ago. However, the oldest fossils of big cats previously found are tooth fragments uncovered at Laetoli in Tanzania (the famed hominin site excavated by Mary Leakey in the 1970s), dating to just 3.6 million years ago.

Using magnetostratigraphy -- dating fossils based on the distinctive patterns of reversals in Earth's magnetic field, which are recorded in layers of rock -- Tseng and his team were able to estimate the age of the skull at between 4.10 and 5.95 million years old.

The new cat takes its name from Blythe, the snow-leopard-loving daughter of Paul and Heather Haaga, who are avid supporters of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

The find not only challenges previous suppositions about the evolution of big cats, it also helps place that evolution in a geographical context. The find occurs in a region that overlaps the majority of current big cat habitats, and suggests that the group evolved in central Asia and spread outward.

In addition, recent estimates suggested that the genus Panthera (lions, tigers, leopards, jaguars, and snow leopards) did not split from genus Neofelis (clouded leopards) until 3.72 million years ago -- which the new find disproves.

Tseng, his wife Juan Liu, and Takeuchi discovered the skull in 2010 while scouting in the remote border region between Pakistan and China -- an area that takes a bumpy seven-day car ride to reach from Beijing.

Liu found over one hundred bones that were likely deposited by a river eroding out of a cliff. There, below the antelope limbs and jaws, was the crushed -- but largely complete -- remains of the skull.

"It was just lodged in the middle of all that mess," Tseng said.

For the past three years, Tseng and his team have used both anatomical and DNA data to determine that the skull does, in fact, represent a new species.

They plan to return to the site where they found the skull in the summer to search for more specimens.

"We are in the business of discovery," said Wang, curator of vertebrate paleontology at the NHM; adjunct professor of geoscience and biology at USC; and research associate at AMNH. "We go out into the world in search of new fossils to illuminate the past."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113182604.htm

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9457 on: Nov 14th, 2013, 09:47am »

Wired

A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious

By Brandon Keim
11.14.13
6:30 AM

It’s a question that’s perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? We know it exists, at least in ourselves. But how it arises from chemistry and electricity in our brains is an unsolved mystery.

Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he might know the answer. According to Koch, consciousness arises within any sufficiently complex, information-processing system. All animals, from humans on down to earthworms, are conscious; even the internet could be. That’s just the way the universe works.

“The electric charge of an electron doesn’t arise out of more elemental properties. It simply has a charge,” says Koch. “Likewise, I argue that we live in a universe of space, time, mass, energy, and consciousness arising out of complex systems.”

What Koch proposes is a scientifically refined version of an ancient philosophical doctrine called panpsychism — and, coming from someone else, it might sound more like spirituality than science. But Koch has devoted the last three decades to studying the neurological basis of consciousness. His work at the Allen Institute now puts him at the forefront of the BRAIN Initiative, the massive new effort to understand how brains work, which will begin next year.

Koch’s insights have been detailed in dozens of scientific articles and a series of books, including last year’s Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist. WIRED talked to Koch about his understanding of this age-old question.

WIRED: How did you come to believe in panpsychism?

Christof Koch: I grew up Roman Catholic, and also grew up with a dog. And what bothered me was the idea that, while humans had souls and could go to heaven, dogs were not suppose to have souls. Intuitively I felt that either humans and animals alike had souls, or none did. Then I encountered Buddhism, with its emphasis on the universal nature of the conscious mind. You find this idea in philosophy, too, espoused by Plato and Spinoza and Schopenhauer, that psyche — consciousness — is everywhere. I find that to be the most satisfying explanation for the universe, for three reasons: biological, metaphysical and computational.

WIRED: What do you mean?

Koch: My consciousness is an undeniable fact. One can only infer facts about the universe, such as physics, indirectly, but the one thing I’m utterly certain of is that I’m conscious. I might be confused about the state of my consciousness, but I’m not confused about having it. Then, looking at the biology, all animals have complex physiology, not just humans. And at the level of a grain of brain matter, there’s nothing exceptional about human brains.

Only experts can tell, under a microscope, whether a chunk of brain matter is mouse or monkey or human — and animals have very complicated behaviors. Even honeybees recognize individual faces, communicate the quality and location of food sources via waggle dances, and navigate complex mazes with the aid of cues stored in their short-term memory. If you blow a scent into their hive, they return to where they’ve previously encountered the odor. That’s associative memory. What is the simplest explanation for it? That consciousness extends to all these creatures, that it’s an imminent property of highly organized pieces of matter, such as brains.

WIRED: That’s pretty fuzzy. How does consciousness arise? How can you quantify it?

Koch: There’s a theory, called Integrated Information Theory, developed by Giulio Tononi at the University of Wisconsin, that assigns to any one brain, or any complex system, a number — denoted by the Greek symbol of Φ — that tells you how integrated a system is, how much more the system is than the union of its parts. Φ gives you an information-theoretical measure of consciousness. Any system with integrated information different from zero has consciousness. Any integration feels like something

It's not that any physical system has consciousness. A black hole, a heap of sand, a bunch of isolated neurons in a dish, they're not integrated. They have no consciousness. But complex systems do. And how much consciousness they have depends on how many connections they have and how they’re wired up.

WIRED: Ecosystems are interconnected. Can a forest be conscious?

Koch: In the case of the brain, it’s the whole system that’s conscious, not the individual nerve cells. For any one ecosystem, it’s a question of how richly the individual components, such as the trees in a forest, are integrated within themselves as compared to causal interactions between trees.

The philosopher John Searle, in his review of Consciousness, asked, “Why isn’t America conscious?” After all, there are 300 million Americans, interacting in very complicated ways. Why doesn’t consciousness extend to all of America? It’s because integrated information theory postulates that consciousness is a local maximum. You and me, for example: We’re interacting right now, but vastly less than the cells in my brain interact with each other. While you and I are conscious as individuals, there’s no conscious Übermind that unites us in a single entity. You and I are not collectively conscious. It’s the same thing with ecosystems. In each case, it’s a question of the degree and extent of causal interactions among all components making up the system.

WIRED: The internet is integrated. Could it be conscious?

Koch: It’s difficult to say right now. But consider this. The internet contains about 10 billion computers, with each computer itself having a couple of billion transistors in its CPU. So the internet has at least 10^19 transistors, compared to the roughly 1000 trillion (or quadrillion) synapses in the human brain. That’s about 10,000 times more transistors than synapses. But is the internet more complex than the human brain? It depends on the degree of integration of the internet.

For instance, our brains are connected all the time. On the internet, computers are packet-switching. They’re not connected permanently, but rapidly switch from one to another. But according to my version of panpsychism, it feels like something to be the internet — and if the internet were down, it wouldn’t feel like anything anymore. And that is, in principle, not different from the way I feel when I’m in a deep, dreamless sleep.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/11/christof-koch-panpsychism-consciousness/all/

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9458 on: Nov 14th, 2013, 12:12pm »

@Crystal That was a fabulous article on consciousness..thank you

http://www.breitbart.com/InstaBlog/2013/11/14/Scientists-Confirm-World-s-Oldest-Creature-But-Kill-it-Determining-Its-Age
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Scientists Confirm World's Oldest Creature...But Kill it Determining Its Age by Jon David Kahn 14 Nov 2013, 6:09 AM PDT In 2006, climate change experts from Bangor University in north Wales found a very special clam while dredging the seabeds of Iceland. At that time scientists counted the rings on the inside shell to determine that the clam was the ripe old age of 405. Unfortunately, by opening the clam which scientists refer to as "Ming," they killed it instantly.
Cut to 2013, researchers have determined that the original calculations of Ming's age were wrong, and that the now deceased clam was actually 102 years older than originally thought. Ming was 507 years old at the time of its demise.

According to the Mirror, Ocean scientist Paul Butler from Bangor University said: “We got it wrong the first time and maybe we were a bit hasty publishing our findings back then. But we are absolutely certain that we've got the right age now.The nice thing about these shells is that they have distinct annual growth lines, so we can accurately date the shell material.That’s just the same as what archaeologists do when they use tree rings in dead wood to work out the dates of old buildings.”

The 507-year-old clam shattered the previous unofficial title holder for world's oldest creature held by a 374-year-old Icelandic clam in a German museum.

No information was given as to which scientist murdered the former record holder.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9459 on: Nov 14th, 2013, 2:46pm »

"No information was given as to which scientist murdered the former record holder."

grin

Thanks for that article Sys.

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9460 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 12:31am »

on Nov 10th, 2013, 08:34am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Wired

Power Plants and Other Vital Systems Are Totally Exposed on the Internet

By Kim Zetter
11.08.13
6:30 AM

McMillan isn’t sure why the pharmacy data showed up — a violation of federal HIPAA regulations that tightly control who can access patient data — but he suspects the pharmacy may have been using remote management software to monitor employee activity on the computer and weren’t aware that it was also making the computer desktop accessible to anyone on the internet. A number of the control systems he found also appear to be using TeamViewer to allow manufacturers to monitor and troubleshoot the systems for their customers. A spokesman for TeamViewer, however, says that the software requires a password by default for access.
photo gallery after the jump:

Crystal



in our company, remote management software to monitor employee activity on the computer is used too. we worked under the
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ZETAR
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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9461 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 05:36am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL,PURR,-N-SYS

RISE AND SHINE-N-SHINE AND RISE

SHALOM/SALAM/VREDE...Z
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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9462 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 09:02am »

on Nov 15th, 2013, 12:31am, hesterl wrote:
in our company, remote management software to monitor employee activity on the computer is used too. we worked under the.


Welcome hesterl cheesy

I removed your link. It isn't allowed. Please don't link ad sites.

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9463 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 09:06am »

on Nov 15th, 2013, 05:36am, ZETAR wrote:
GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL,PURR,-N-SYS

RISE AND SHINE-N-SHINE AND RISE

SHALOM/SALAM/VREDE...Z



GOOD MORNING ALL


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CRYSTAL


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9464 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 09:09am »

Guardian

China to loosen one-child policy and abolish labour camps

Ruling Communist party announces that couples can have two children if one parent is an only child

by Jonathan Kaiman in Beijing
Friday 15 November 2013 06.48 EST

China has pledged to loosen its one-child policy and end a controversial "re-education through labour" programme, state media reported on Friday, days after the conclusion of a meeting of top Communist party leaders in Beijing.

Under the new policy, couples in which one member is an only child will be allowed to have two children, according to China's state newswire Xinhua; currently, couples can only have two children if both members are only children themselves.

China will also end its controversial re-education through labour programme, a system of administrative, extralegal detentions which can send people to prison for four years without conviction. Activists and human rights groups have long criticised the system as giving authorities the power to detain critics and opponents without due process. Details of the two policy shifts and timelines for their implementation are still unclear.

The reforms were decided at the Communist party's third plenum, four days of closed-door meetings among about 400 top party leaders, intended to design a blueprint for China's development over the coming decade.

The controversial one-child policy, introduced in 1979 to keep population growth in check, has been gradually relaxed in recent years. While most Chinese people are still only allowed to have one child, some groups, including ethnic minorities and disabled people, are allowed to have two.

The policy change "should lead to a significant reduction in the abuse of human rights, in terms of forced termination", said Steve Tsang, a professor of Chinese studies at the University of Nottingham. "This is still a very, very, very big issue, and it is one of the most regular abuses of human rights that happens in China."

Tsang said China's unwillingness to abolish the policy altogether suggested it was more concerned with the economic, rather than human cost. "Until now, the growth of the Chinese economy has been propelled by a demographic surplus, and that has been turning into a demographic deficit," he said.

Xinhua said the re-education through labour system would be abolished "as part of efforts to improve human rights and judicial practices".

The Communist party established its re-education through labour system in 1957 under Mao Zedong, to penalise "counter-revolutionaries" outside of judicial channels. But more recently, local police use it to extralegally detain petty criminals, such as thieves and prostitutes, as well as political dissidents and members of banned religious groups. Detentions may last up to four years, and while there are no official statistics, as many as 2 million people could be in detention at any given time.

Other, less dramatic reforms emerged during the plenum, including promises to explore ways of setting up an intellectual property court, reduce the number of crimes subject to the death penalty "step by step", and "build a more impartial, sustainable social security system, with an improved housing guarantee mechanism".

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/15/china-one-child-policy-abolish-labour-camps

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