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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 12361 times)
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« Reply #9465 on: Nov 15th, 2013, 09:18am »

Wired

Giant Fembots Dance With Dinosaurs in the Weirdest Show on Earth

By Cade Metz
11.15.13
6:30 AM



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TOKYO — Outside, the city is bracing for the most violent typhoon of the past decade, a storm with winds topping 75 mph that’s already dumping endless sheets of rain from the night sky. Yet it all seems mild compared to what’s happening inside a bunker of a theater two floors below the wind and the rain.

You sit in the back row, stuffed into something a lot like a grade-school writing desk, a Bento box and green tea untouched on the tray in front of you. The food is almost inedible — cold rice and fish one step below what you’d find in a Japanese convenience store — but even if it were the finest sushi on Earth, you wouldn’t be eating. It’s hard to eat when watching bikini-clad go-go dancers do mock battle with pseudo-metallic automations from some alternate future universe — not to mention the blaring electronica, flashing lights, giant Fembots, robotic dinosaurs, stuffed panda ninjas, roving Segways, rainbow afro wigs, virtual fireworks, kabuki-style play acting, a Captain America shield, medieval iconography, and a sea of waving glow sticks.

This is Robot Restaurant, a 10 billion yen creation in the Kabukicho section of Tokyo’s Shinjuku neighborhood. Kabukicho is the city’s red light district, where the narrow, car-less streets are flanked by a seemingly endless number of towering, multi-colored, brightly backlit signs. It’s famous for its nightclubs, host and hostess clubs, short-stay hotels, and late-night eateries, but Robot Restaurant is a step beyond the usual fare (see photos above).

It combines pole dancing with oversized Transformers. It gives you spinning Tron-like cycle chairs alongside a phalanx of white-wigged women banging Taiko drums strapped with lights too garish for your Christmas tree. And though you’re two floors underground in a theater about the size of a racquetball court, the burlesque is punctuated with the sort of combustion-powered vehicles you’d see on a dirt track in rural America.

In the West, Japan is known for its uniquely bizarre pop culture, and for some, Robot Restaurant feels like a shameless attempt to cash in on this Western view of what actually is a small part of Japan’s culture — a stage show so overtly bizarre it couldn’t possibly be authentic.

At the same time, there’s something very Japanese about it. It may very well be a tourist trap, but underneath the lights and the noise and the costumes, it’s more than that. It’s a tourist trap that says something about Japan.

For Ken Shishido, a Japanese native sitting on the front row, Robot Restaurant demonstrates the unique way the Japanese lend their imagination to popular entertainment. Historically, he says, Westerners had more experience to draw from in creating their pop culture. The Japanese were forced to draw from somewhere else.

“In the U.S., you had your Wild West period. You conquered other people,” he says. “But we remained on an island, and then we stopped fighting each other. So, we used our imagination. Imaginary things are unlimited.”

‘Weird for the Sake of Being Weird’

Alisa Freedman, a professor of Japanese studies at the University of Oregon who spends at least a few months each year in Tokyo, calls it the “WTF? aspect” of modern Japanese life. “The kind of quirky culture that’s popular in the United States, Europe, and Latin America,” she says, “is not the type of quirky culture that’s popular in Japan.”

This phenomenon is somewhat difficult pin down. It’s a blend of cartoon characters, electronic technology, stuffed animals, garish colors, and traditional Japanese values turned inside-out. If you don’t quite grasp what we’re getting at, take a look at Sophia Coppola’s 2003 film Lost in Translation, where Bill Murray turns up on a kind of Japanese Tonight Show where the set is a sea of swirling shapes, plastic icons, and blinking lights, and the Japanese Johnny Carson, wearing a suit with diagonal stripes, spends an awful lot of time screaming into the camera.

That’s not just a movie moment. If you turn up in Tokyo, you’ll see this kind of thing almost everywhere you turn, from a morning news show where a female anchors wears what appears to be a Mardi Gras mask, to the ubiquitous billboards that all seem to include some sort of cuddly cartoon animal.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/business/2013/11/robot-restaurant/all/

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« Reply #9466 on: Nov 16th, 2013, 12:30am »

@wings our kids are doomed..

LOL!

http://www.infowars.com/new-xbox-to-produce-child-porn/

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System can be hacked and exploited by pervs

Adan Salazar
Infowars.com
November 15, 2013

If the successes of its past game console launches are any indicator, sales of Microsoft’s latest effort – set to hit the market November 22 – can be expected to be strong. However, this console, which seeks to be your living room’s all-in-one home entertainment unit, is immensely different from the rest.

Above new Kinect device, below Xbox One console.
In line with the pervading surveillance culture, where microphones and cameras embedded within tablets, cell phones, laptops, light posts, vehicles and other devices watch and listen intently, Microsoft is making sure to load its gaming device with the latest spy tech goodies, which they claim will enhance users’ experiences.

But the most disturbing and worrisome Xbox One/Big Brother gossip is not that Xbox maker Microsoft was reportedly involved in the NSA PRISM scandal, or that the console’s Kinect peripheral sits listening with a multi-microphone array 24/7 for voice commands, or that its noise-isolation capabilities enable it to distinguish your voice among a crowd of your friends.

The most startling revelation is that the new Kinect device, to be sold in combination with the XBox One, at times has the ability to map out in high-definition the shape of genitalia, something fine and dandy for consenting adults, but which could ultimately be exploited by hackers and perverts to gain access to images of children.



Likewise, laptops issued by a suburban Philadelphia school in 2010 were also found to be capturing “secret webcam pictures of a high school student when he was partially undressed or sleeping in his bed.” Additionally, a motion filed against the school stated that “Thousands of webcam pictures and screen shots have been taken of numerous other students in their homes…”

And just last August, a hacker spouted insults at a 2-year-old girl — through her baby monitor.

Indeed, every new technology is open to hackers, as evidenced in the case of Google Glass earlier this year. By this metric, it is no stretch to say the new Xbox will undoubtedly be compromised by hackers or perverts, and that this system needs to be investigated.

It was already widely known that the new Kinect’s sensors would be highly invasive, but this should add a whole new level of unease for parents who buy their kids all the latest, trendiest gadgets.

For instance, it was already known that the Kinect’s high-definition camera creates a model of your human skeleton and can track you moving about in your home, in addition to being able to monitor your heart rate in order to gauge your level of enjoyment.

And, it was already known that the Kinect will carefully study users’ eye movements and facial expressions in order to “reward” them with meaningless “virtual rewards” like avatars, in addition to creating profiles of individuals’ likes and dislikes, allowing it to serve up customized ads, services, or shows it thinks users might like.
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« Reply #9467 on: Nov 16th, 2013, 09:01am »

Good morning Sys cheesy

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« Reply #9468 on: Nov 16th, 2013, 09:03am »






I'll Be Seeing You 1944

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« Reply #9469 on: Nov 16th, 2013, 09:06am »




Please be an angel



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« Reply #9470 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 03:21am »

Buenos Dias wings!


This is one of My teachable Moments on an Unpleasant Topic..
It will Be myth Busting on the pilloried and Hilloried (that should be a verb by all rights) Recluse....Spider!
Has the best shot yet of one.
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/11/poor-misunderstood-brown-recluse/

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t’s hard to think of a critter that inspires as much hyperbolic hysteria as the brown recluse spider. They’re pretty much universally hated. If you believe the tales, these small arachnids are biting people all day, every day, producing massive, stinking flesh-craters that require months of intensive care and perhaps a prosthetic appendage. Sometimes, it seems these spiders have nothing better to do than hunker down in dark corners throughout North America, waiting for tender human skin to present itself.

Though there are strands of truth in the hype, on the whole, it’s bunk.

Verified bite of L. reclusa. William V. Stoecker/Swanson & Vetter, New England Journal of Medicine, 2005

It is true that some of the spider’s bites lead to necrotic skin lesions, but around 10 percent of them. The others (like the one at right), aren’t that bad. The brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) only lives in a few states – basically, the warmer ones between the Rockies and the Appalachians. And they don’t really want to bite you. It’s actually not that easy for them.

The brown recluse reality is obscured by a number of factors, not the least of which involves gnarly internet photos. First, spiders in general are easy to fear, and misinformation about this species in particular abounds. Second, bite wound statistics are clouded by misreporting. Third, many other conditions can be misdiagnosed as brown recluse bites (like MRSA and fungal infections). Lastly, many other spiders (and insects) are mistaken for brown recluses.

“There is a really strong emotional and psychological aspect to the brown recluse,” said arachnologist Rick Vetter, now retired from the University of California, Riverside.

Inspired by the comments left on a story we did about the silk of a closely related recluse spider, the South American brown recluse, we decided to take a close look at our own continent’s most despised brown spider and the myths surrounding it.

First, a truth: Brown recluse bites can be bad. “They are a potentially dangerous spider,” said Vetter, who has spent decades studying the brown spiders. “They’re not harmless,” he says. “But the reputation they have garnered in this country is just amazing.”

Cases of Mistaken Identity

Much of Vetter’s work has involved verifying the identity of spiders purported to be brown recluses. In 2005, Vetter published the results of a nationwide appeal for spider specimens suspected to be L. reclusa: Please send me the spiders you think are brown recluses, and tell me where you’re from. He received 1,773 specimens, from 49 states. Less than 20 percent — 324 — were brown recluses. All but four of those came from states with endemic brown recluse populations.

“An initial goal of this study was to determine the spider characteristics that people were misconstruing as that of a brown recluse,” he wrote. “It became evident early in the study that all that was required was some brown [body] coloration and eight legs.”
‘People jump at the chance to hate spiders. It’s easier to vilify them than to adore their biology and natural history.’

Along the way, Vetter realized that authorities — such as poison control centers and physicians — aren’t much better at identifying the brown recluse. Even trained entomologists can get it wrong.

In 2009, Vetter took a close look at 38 arachnids incorrectly identified as recluses by 35 different authorities such as “physicians, entomologists, pest control operators – people you’d think would have reliable opinions,” Vetter said. Misidentifications included a solifuge (which isn’t even a spider), a grass spider pulled from a patient’s ear, and a desert grass spider that had bitten a young boy.

Part of the problem is that the brown recluse is small and brown and about the size of a quarter — like many other arachnids and insects. The best way to identify a brown recluse is to count its eyes: They’re among a few species of North American spiders that have six eyes instead of eight, arranged in three pairs of two.

But your typical spider-squisher isn’t going to get in a spider’s face with a magnifying glass and count its eyes. Some people may try to find the marking most commonly described as identifying a brown recluse: a violin shape on the spider’s head, oriented with the violin’s neck pointing toward the spider’s butt.

However, people are incredibly good at “seeing” violin markings on every portion of a spider’s body, Vetter says, which means this marking isn’t an especially helpful diagnostic.


Over the years, Vetter and his colleagues have compiled a list of about 40 things that can masquerade as recluse bites: bacterial infections, viral infections and fungal infections; poison oak and poison ivy; thermal burns, chemical burns; bad reactions to blood thinners; herpes.

“People want to believe [the culprit] is a spider species,” said entomologist Chris Buddle of McGill University, noting that it’s easier to blame a spider than something less familiar, like drug-resistant bacteria.

Most physicians don’t have a lot of experience discriminating between a recluse bite and something like necrotizing Staphylococcus. And even if a patient brings in a spider for identification, it’s unlikely the ER doctor has been trained to ID a brown recluse.
Over the years, Vetter and his colleagues have compiled a list of about 40 things that can masquerade as recluse bites: bacterial infections, viral infections and fungal infections; poison oak and poison ivy; thermal burns, chemical burns; bad reactions to blood thinners; herpes. continue at article

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« Reply #9471 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 09:09am »

Good morning Sys cheesy

We have so many spiders here that it boggles the mind. I'm used to them now but when we first got here! WOW!

If I find one in the house he gets moved outside.

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« Reply #9472 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 09:17am »

Jerusalem Post

Report: Mossad working with Saudis on contingency plans for potential attack on Iran

By JPOST.COM STAFF
11/17/2013 03:57

The Mossad is working with Saudi officials on contingency plans for a potential attack on Iran in the event that Tehran's nuclear program is not sufficiently curbed in the deal that may be concluded between Iran and world powers in Geneva this week, The Sunday Times reported.

Both Jerusalem and Riyadh have expressed displeasure at the deal being formulated between Iran and the P5+1 group of world powers that they see as doing little to stop Tehran's progress toward a nuclear weapon.

According to the Times, Riyadh has already given its consent for Israel to use Saudi airspace for a potential attack on Iran.

The paper quoted a diplomatic source as saying the Saudis were willing to assist an Israeli attack by cooperating on the use of drones, rescue helicopters and tanker planes.

“Once the Geneva agreement is signed, the military option will be back on the table. The Saudis are furious and are willing to give Israel all the help it needs,” the Times quoted the source as saying.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu said in an interview with French daily Le Figaro on Saturday that there is a “meeting of the minds” between Israel and the “leading states in the Arab world” on the Iran issue – “one of the few cases in memory, if not the first case in modern times.

“We all think that Iran should not be allowed to have the capacities to make nuclear weapons,” he said. “We all think that a tougher stance should be taken by the international community. We all believe that if Iran were to have nuclear weapons, this could lead to a nuclear arms race in the Middle East, making the Middle East a nuclear tinderbox.”

Saying that an Iran with nuclear arms would be the most dangerous development for the world since the mid-20th century, and stressing that the “stakes are amazing,” Netanyahu urged the world’s leaders to pay attention “when Israel and the Arabs see eye-to-eye.”

“We live here,” he said. “We know something about this region. We know a great deal about Iran and its plans. It’s worthwhile to pay attention to what we say.”

Netanyahu made the comments as French President Francois Hollande was set to arrive in Israel for talks on Iran on Sunday.

French objections are widely viewed as having held up an agreement with Iran last Saturday night in Geneva. The nuclear talks are set to resume in Geneva on Wednesday, and US officials have suggested that a deal may likely be signed.

Diplomatic officials said one reason for France’s tough position on Iran – the toughest position among the P5+1 states that also include the US, Russia, China, Britain and Germany – has something to do with its close ties to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, which are as adamantly opposed to Iran getting nuclear weapons as is Israel.

Herb Keinon contributed to this report.

http://www.jpost.com/Iranian-Threat/News/Report-Mossad-working-with-Saudis-on-contingency-plans-for-potential-attack-on-Iran-331961

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« Reply #9473 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 09:22am »

LA Times

Fuel cell cars from Toyota, Honda, Hyundai set to debut at auto shows

Toyota, Honda and Hyundai will debut fuel cell cars this week amid regulators' push for zero-emission vehicles, with all three in showrooms by 2015. Price and few fuel stations present a challenge.

By Jerry Hirsch
November 17, 2013, 5:00 a.m.

For decades, hydrogen fuel cell cars have been the automotive technology of tomorrow: the big idea, for someday far in the future.

No longer. At auto shows in Los Angeles and Tokyo this week, Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co. and Hyundai Motor Co. will introduce hydrogen-powered cars. Hyundai's will reach U.S. showrooms next year, while the other models will begin selling a year later.

It amounts to "a coming out party for hydrogen," said John Krafcik, chief executive of Hyundai Motor America.

Toyota's car, being unveiled at the Tokyo Motor Show, "has the same potential as the first Prius," said Bill Fay, general manager of Toyota's U.S. sales arm. Fuel cell offerings from the two other automakers will debut in L.A.

In a little more than a decade, the Prius has become America's favorite hybrid and California's bestselling vehicle.

The global automakers believe cars powered by fuel cells represent the best path to building the zero-emission vehicles now demanded by regulators in California and many other states and, increasingly, by consumers. Using hydrogen to create electricity, fuel cells combine the best of electric and gasoline cars without the downsides, the automakers say. They drive like electric cars — quietly, with tons of off-the-line power — but can be refueled just like gasoline-powered cars.

"Hydrogen vehicles allow you to be lean and green with the same range as an internal combustion engine," said Thilo Koslowski, an analyst at Gartner Inc.

The challenge: Producing them cheaply enough to entice consumers and building enough hydrogen fueling stations to keep them on the road. Initially, the cars are expected to cost more than comparable gasoline-powered and electric vehicles, though they probably will qualify for government incentives to buyers. The sticker prices are expected to come down if automakers can sell the cars in volume.

None of the automakers have revealed prices yet. The cars are likely to be offered first as three-year leases.

Even before these fuel cell cars hit dealer lots, they are causing a schism in the green car community, as advocates of electric and hydrogen vehicles compete for limited government funds for fueling stations and incentives needed to jump-start sales, Koslowski said.

Elon Musk, a technology tycoon and Tesla Motors' chief executive, disparaged fuel cell cars, using an obscenity to describe the vehicles and calling them a marketing ploy by the mainstream auto companies.

"Hydrogen is quite a dangerous gas," said Musk, who also runs SpaceX, the rocket company formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp. "It's suitable for the upper stage of rockets, but not for cars."

Not true, says Matt McClory, one of the principal engineers of the Toyota fuel cell vehicle. And he has a bullet to prove it. In safety tests, Toyota's engineers shot rifle bullets at its high-pressure hydrogen tanks to see if they would explode or catch fire.

"The smaller-caliber bullets would just bounce off the tank," McClory said. "It took a 50-caliber armor-piercing bullet to penetrate the tank, and it then just left a hole and the gas leaked out."

Hyundai has set its entire car ablaze without triggering an explosion. When the temperatures rise high enough, the hydrogen vents in a flair pattern through a pressure valve but burns off quickly.

Gasoline cars can be fully engulfed in flames when their tanks break, the automakers noted, and in the last few months three Tesla vehicles have burned when in severe accidents.

Still, this "Hindenburg" perception — referring to the 1937 disaster that consumed a German airship in a hydrogen fireball — is something automakers will have to tackle, said Mike O'Brien, Hyundai's vice president of product and corporate planning.

"The car meets the same crash standards of any other car we sell," O'Brien said. "But only miles on the road, and people in the seats of these vehicles, will overcome those perceptions."

The cars are likely to get those miles because of California's stringent environmental regulations, which require 15% of the new cars sold in the state by 2025 to be zero-emission vehicles. An additional nine states have adopted the same sales goals, with a target of having 3.3 million zero-emission vehicles on the road by 2025. That's what's behind the automakers' efforts to bring hydrogen autos to the U.S. market now.

All three of the vehicles to be introduced this week will have a range of 300 miles or more, compared with about 75 miles for most battery-using electric cars and more than 200 for the high-end Tesla Model S, which starts at $71,070. The fuel cell cars drive like normal vehicles and have about the same amount of interior space as vehicles of similar size. They take three to five minutes to fuel up. The fuel nozzle locks into the car to prevent hydrogen leaks but is otherwise similar to a gasoline pump.

Hyundai's offering will be a hydrogen version of its Tucson sport utility vehicle and will be built on the same South Korean assembly line as the gasoline model of the small SUV. That's helping the automaker bring down the cost of producing the vehicle, O'Brien said.

It will use the same sheet metal that comes out of the giant body panel stamping machines at the factory in Uslan. Both versions will share interiors and much of the electronics. Hyundai can do this because the hydrogen drivetrain fits into the space that otherwise would be occupied by a gas engine and transmission, O'Brien said.

Honda will be showing off the concept for what will be its next-generation Clarity hydrogen car. The automaker already leases about two dozen Claritys in California as part of an experimental program to learn how people drive hydrogen cars. It will go on the market in the U.S and Japan in 2015 and later in Europe.

Toyota's is a four-seater that looks like a futuristic and aggressive Prius. The automaker has reduced expenses by tapping an electric powertrain it already uses on one of its hybrid vehicles and other common parts, McClory said.

"It is a very intriguing proposition for us," said Fay, the Toyota executive. "We think it could be the best zero-emissions solution that hits the market."

To start, consumers will pay about the same amount per mile for hydrogen as they would for gasoline, but analysts expect the price to slide below gasoline as more cars reach the road and more filling stations are built.

For now, there are few places to fuel the cars, although three stations are spaced along the busy 405 Freeway in Torrance, Fountain Valley and Irvine, and there are some similar clusters on the East Coast.

There are plans to build more as automakers start to sell fuel cell cars. California is spending as much as $20 million a year to help bring the number of fueling stations up to 100 within the next five years or so, according to the California Fuel Cell Partnership. There should be 28 hydrogen stations spread across California's metropolitan areas by 2015, when all three of these hydrogen models will be for sale.

Another hitch is persuading consumers to adapt to a radically new technology that, for the foreseeable future, makes them have to plan where to fuel up rather than stopping off at the corner gas station.

"We are seeing just how hard that is with electric vehicles," Koslowski said. "The electric vehicles are being sold at big discounts from their original prices, but that's not in line with the profits the car companies need."

Hydrogen cars are getting their opening because automakers and regulators don't expect any significant advances in battery chemistry that would solve the limited range issue for electric cars. Batteries just don't pack enough energy.

"If we are sitting around waiting for a battery breakthrough that will give us four times the range than we have now, we are going to be waiting for a long time," said Matthew Mench, an engineering professor and energy storage expert at the University of Tennessee.

As they move into production, fuel cell cars should gain a price advantage over vehicles that run on battery power, said Daniel Sperling, director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis.

The lesser weight and higher energy density of fuel cells also enable them to be used in a wider range of vehicles, from a family sedan to full-size trucks to city buses, Sperling said.

In the U.S., the fuel cell car business will also benefit from an abundant supply of natural gas, which is the main feedstock for producing hydrogen.

"You don't have a well of hydrogen, you have to manufacture it," Mench said. "The natural gas being inexpensive, and indigenous to the U.S., allows us to become energy independent."

Converting natural gas into hydrogen does throw off some carbon emissions, but that's in a controlled environment where it is easier to manage the pollution, he said. "There is just one smokestack instead of a million tailpipes."

As demand grows for the fuel, more will be made from renewable energy sources, including wind energy produced at night when there is low demand for electricity, human waste at water treatment plants and manure from dairy farms.

All of this is going to take time to play out, said Stephen Ellis, Honda's manager of fuel cell vehicle marketing.

"This is like a marathon," Ellis said. "You can't run it if you don't commit to it, train for it and then show up at the starting line."

http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/la-fi-hy-fuel-cell-cars-20131117,0,6537623,full.story#axzz2kusVDvCi

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9474 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 09:22am »

...Report: Mossad working with Saudis on contingency plans for potential attack on Iran ..

Ah yes. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9475 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 09:51am »

WHEN SELF PRESERVATION/EXISTENTIALISM IS AT CRITICAL MASS...AT LEAST SOME LEADERS...SEE THE WRITING ON THE WALL...ONE MIGHT WANT TO SEE WHOM THE MONEY MAN FOR ARAB SPRING ACTUALLY IS/WAS...THE GREAT DECEPTION...PLAYING ONE AGAINST THE OTHER...DOES IT NOT REFLECT WHAT IS GOING ON IN WASHINGTON...THE EPITOMY OF HISTRIONICS...PATTERN AFTER PATTERN...ONE ONLY HAS TO...THINK cool

SHALOM...Z

EDIT TO ADD:

YA GOTTA FIGURE THE THOUSANDS OF YEARS OF HISTORY EMBODIED IN THE REGION...MAY GLEEN SOME INSIGHT...CLEARLY THE WEAKNESS/INABILITY/POLITICAL WRANGLING ON PENNSYVAINIA AVE...HAS THEM SO DISTRACTED...THAT OTHER LEADERS OBVIUOSLY VIEW SUCH AS NON-BENEFICIAL TO THEIR INTERESTS...YEP...THE BALL HAS BEEN FUMBLED IN SO MANY AREAS...ONE CAN ONLY HOPE IS WAS MERELY HYPER-INSULATION...OR WAS IT rolleyes
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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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« Reply #9476 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 3:31pm »

http://thehill.com/blogs/defcon-hill/navy/190492-drone-malfunctions-strikes-us-cruiser


The U.S. Navy is investigating a drone malfunction that resulted in injuries to two sailors when the aircraft struck a guided missile cruiser.


A spokesperson for the U.S. Third Fleet told the Associated Press that the sailors from the USS Chancellorsville were treated for minor burns after the incident, on Saturday afternoon off the coast of Southern California.

The ship was conducting a weapons training exercise when a drone used to test radar tracking veered out of control and struck the cruiser, Lt. Lenaya Rotklein added.

The ship is returning to San Diego for damage assessmen



Ex-drone-tech
• 4 hours ago

This is the second crash of a Navy drone in the past few years (the other one at Patuxtent River, Maryland). Recently, a toy drone crash and killed its civilian operator in New York. Congress directed the FAA to allow drones in airspace over the nation and its cities. Drones are dangerous and have not changed since I was a electronic tech working on them in the 1960s (Navy QH-50 drone helicopter)., Congress should gets its head out of drone manufactures wallets.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9477 on: Nov 17th, 2013, 9:34pm »

D.C. insurance commissioner fired a day after questioning Obamacare fix
Whisper of dissent not allowed


http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/dc-insurance-commissioner-fired-a-day-after-questioning-obamacare-fix/2013/11/16/b88eaea0-4f17-11e3-9890-a1e0997fb0c0_story.html

By Aaron C. Davis, Published: November 16 E-mail the writers

A day after he questioned President Obama’s decision to unwind a major tenet of the health-care law and said the nation’s capital might not go along, D.C. insurance commissioner William P. White was fired.

White was called into a meeting Friday afternoon with one of Mayor Vincent C. Gray’s (D) top deputies and told that the mayor “wants to go in a different direction,” White told The Washington Post on Saturday.


Commissioner William P. White said he felt compelled to say there would be problems with extending old plans.

White said the mayoral deputy never said that he was being asked to leave because of his Thursday statement on health care. But he said the timing was hard to ignore. Roughly 24 hours later, White said, he was “basically being told, ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ ”

White was one of the first insurance commissioners in the nation last week to push back against Obama’s attempt to smooth over part of the botched rollout of the Affordable Care Act: millions of unexpected cancellations of insurance plans.

In persuading Congress to vote for the health-care overhaul, Obama had promised that Americans who liked their insurance plans would be able to keep them. When that turned out to not be the case, Obama apologized last week. And to stem growing bipartisan dissent, he announced Thursday that plans slated to be canceled next year to comply with the legislation could be extended for one year.

While the president’s plan sounded like a simple fix, it rattled the insurance industry, which had set prices for next year based on many of its products changing to comply with the health-care law. Allowing some plans to continue beyond Jan. 1 could also run afoul of provisions in laws passed by dozens of states and the District to implement the Affordable Care Act.

In a statement issued Thursday, White hinted strongly that he opposed the idea.

“The action today undercuts the purpose of the exchanges, including the District’s DC Health Link, by creating exceptions that make it more difficult for them to operate,” the statement said.

He also pointed to a statement issued by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners that said the Obama order “threatens to undermine the new market, and may lead to higher premiums and market disruptions in 2014 and beyond.”

“We concur with that assessment,” White said Thursday.

White’s statement was removed from the department’s Web site sometime before Friday morning. Asked about the removal Friday, spokesman Michael Flagg said the department’s statement had changed.

“Our statement now is that we’re taking a close look at the implications of the president’s announcement on the District’s exchange and we will soon recommend a course of action after taking into consideration the positions of all the stakeholders,” Flagg wrote in an e-mail.

On Saturday, Flagg declined to comment on whether White had been fired, saying the department doesn’t comment on personnel issues.

A senior city official said White’s initial statement was sent to the mayoral communications director, Pedro Ribeiro, only minutes before it was issued publicly. It was not sent to Deputy Mayor Victor Hoskins, White’s immediate supervisor, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak about a personnel matter.

A formal statement critical of the president should have been closely vetted and approved by the mayor’s office, and White refused to acknowledge the misstep, the official said. White said Hoskins fired him Friday.

White said he thought he would have been derelict in his duties to not quickly make a statement on the president’s announcement.

“Everyone was looking for responses from the regulators. One of my chief concerns is always consistency and clarity in the marketplace — you can’t have something that big sitting out there without responding to it,” he said.

White had served as Gray’s commissioner for the D.C. Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking since February 2011. Prior to last week, his most high-profile and controversial role had been as chief of the department that took control of Chartered Health Plan, the city’s largest manager of health care for low-income residents, amid questions about “irregularities” in its finances.

Chartered was owned by businessman Jeffrey E. Thompson, who has been implicated in funding a $650,000 “shadow campaign” to elect Gray. White oversaw the successful sale of the insurer’s assets, and his department’s handling of the transition has been generally viewed positively.

White said he had known since he took the job that he served at the pleasure of the mayor. He said he was proud of his record and would have stayed.

On the president’s proposed health-care fix, he said: “I wasn’t saying I was against it, I also was saying I didn’t know enough to fully support it — I want to be clear, and I think it is, I was not speaking for Mayor Gray.”
« Last Edit: Nov 17th, 2013, 9:35pm by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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« Reply #9478 on: Nov 18th, 2013, 09:49am »

Good morning cheesy


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« Reply #9479 on: Nov 18th, 2013, 09:54am »

Wired

Flying Car Company Turns to Crowdfunding to Attract Investors

By Jason Paur
11.18.13
6:30 AM



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Terrafugia, the Massachusetts company building a “roadable aircraft” that most of us call a flying car, is turning to crowdfunding to continue development of its driving/flying machine. The company has been around since 2007 and has built and flown two prototypes thanks in large part to the $10 million in investor money it has already raised. Now the company is turning to Wefunder in hopes of finishing up the design of their third prototype.

Wefunder is a bit different than the more popular Kickstarter or Indiegogo sites. Instead of collecting a little money here and there from anybody with an account, Wefunder accepts accredited investors who will own stock in the company and is regulated by the federal government. According to a note on Terrafugia’s Wefunder page, company founder Carl Dietrich says, “we offer Wefunder investors a note which will convert to stock at a price that is determined by the next large investment round (greater than $1 million).”

Terrafugia’s Transition model uses a four-cylinder Rotax engine to power both the wheels when it drives and the propeller when it flies. The wings fold in close to the fuselage allowing the airplane to… well… transition from the airport to the roads. As an airplane, the Transition can cruise at 100 mph and has just over a 400 mile range. Both prototypes have flown successfully.

On its Wefunder page, Terrafugia claims a widely ranging market size of 200-400 vehicles per year by year four of production. The current price of the Transition is listed at $279,000.

In addition to the Transition, which has yet to go into production, the company is also working on its next high flying car, the TF-X. The TF-X includes an electric hybrid drive with batteries powering it on the roads, and assisting during takeoff and landing. A gasoline motor will provide the power for the flying part of your trip. Oh, and it also has vertical takeoff and landing capabilities — because you might as well go big when it comes to flying cars.

Currently Terrafugia shows it has raised $57,000 of the $500,000 it hopes to raise through Wefunder.

http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/11/flying-car-crowdfunding/

Crystal

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