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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 149647 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9555 on: Nov 27th, 2013, 2:57pm »

Men Save Shark From choking on Moose






Question popped up as moose are not a normal part of its diet..how did the moose piece get in there?
Hunters using their polar bear hunting / moose hunting catches remains ...hopefully in season..Im not a hunter.

I am sure that will stay a guarded secret...what are chums for anyway. cheesy
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9556 on: Nov 27th, 2013, 4:15pm »

Sys,
Up dere in da great white nort Eh, da moose, dey swim fum Iland to iland and dey get drownded sometime Eh? Dem charks dey munch on da caracsses and dat dere moose hide it be tougher den old bark on a oak tree and wen dey tear offin a chunk dey chock on it sometime!
Lone grin wink
« Last Edit: Nov 27th, 2013, 4:18pm by LoneGunMan » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9557 on: Nov 27th, 2013, 4:53pm »

on Nov 27th, 2013, 4:15pm, LoneGunMan wrote:
Sys,
Up dere in da great white nort Eh, da moose, dey swim fum Iland to iland and dey get drownded sometime Eh? Dem charks dey munch on da caracsses and dat dere moose hide it be tougher den old bark on a oak tree and wen dey tear offin a chunk dey chock on it sometime!
Lone grin wink


That is moooost amoosing! grin Even those kitchen food grinders choke up as well.. that'll teach em to swallow up the ole Bullwinkle grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9558 on: Nov 28th, 2013, 07:44am »





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Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9559 on: Nov 28th, 2013, 2:33pm »

Thank you wings that was beautiful! smiley

Planting seeds on the Moon
http://www.forbes.com/sites/tarunwadhwa/2013/11/20/nasas-next-frontier-growing-plants-on-the-moon/
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A small team at NASA’s Ames Research Center has set out to “boldly grow where no man has grown before” – and they’re doing it with the help of thousands of children, a robot, and a few specially customized GoPro cameras.

In 2015, NASA will attempt to make history by growing plants on the Moon. If they are successful, it will be the first time humans have ever brought life to another planetary body. Along the way, they will make groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of biology, agriculture, and life on other worlds. And though they may fail, the way they are going about their mission presents a fascinating case study of an innovative model for public-private collaboration that may very well change space entrepreneurship.

The Lunar Plant Growth Habitat team, a group of NASA scientists, contractors, students and volunteers, is finally bringing to life an idea that has been discussed and debated for decades. They will try to grow arabidopsis, basil, sunflowers, and turnips in coffee-can-sized aluminum cylinders that will serve as plant habitats. But these are no ordinary containers – they’re packed to the brim with cameras, sensors, and electronics that will allow the team to receive image broadcasts of the plants as they grow. These habitats will have to be able to successfully regulate their own temperature, water intake, and power supply in order to brave the harsh lunar climate.

However, it won’t just be NASA scientists who are watching the results closely – the success of this experiment will require the assistance of schools and citizen scientists.

In a brilliant mix of creativity and frugality, NASA will send schools their own set of habitats so they can grow the same plants that are being sent to the Moon. The reasons for this are two fold. First, every experiment needs a control, and instead of spending the money to duplicate the experiment multiple times, they can crowdsource it. By collecting the data from thousands of experiments, they can gain valuable insights in an entirely new way. Second, it allows children to be part of the moment – to not just watch from afar, but to gain experience and knowledge by actively participating.

It is quite unusual to hear of a significant NASA project that is so simple, small-scale, and low-cost. Thanks to the rapid advances in consumer electronics over the last few years, parts that would have once cost millions of dollars now cost just hundreds. But what really made this project feasible was an unexpected opportunity: the Google Lunar X Prize, the search giant’s twenty-million-dollar incentive prize for a private company to launch a robotic spacecraft that lands on the moon, travels across the surface, and transmits back two “Mooncasts” by December 31, 2015. Multiple teams are competing – and whoever ends up winning will likely fly with this special payload on board.

With this model NASA doesn’t have to spend tens of millions of dollars or wait years for the next mission to the Moon. According to Dr. Chris McKay, a well-renowned planetary scientist, this project would have cost $300 million two decades ago – now, NASA can build and launch it for under $2 million. It serves as a win for both NASA and private space industry. Dr. McKay compared it to the early days of airplanes and airmail, “Just like we buy tickets on commercial airlines, why shouldn’t we buy space on commercial flights?”

Without this opportunity, it’s uncertain this project would have ever gotten off the ground – and that would have meant a major missed opportunity not only for future astronauts, but also for people here on Earth as well.

To Dr. McKay, this is “step one in the quest to develop biological based life support systems on other worlds;” or, to put it another way, “this is the Neil Armstrong of the plant world.” The conditions of the moon are more characteristic of deep space than anywhere else we can access and quite different than growing plants on a space shuttle or space station. This experiment will test whether plants can survive radiation, flourish in partial gravity, and thrive in a small, controlled environment – the same obstacles that we will need to overcome in order to build a greenhouse on the Moon, or create life on Mars.

We may also learn a great deal about how to grow food in inhospitable climates here on our own planet. Dr. Robert Bowman, the team’s chief biologist, described how plants constantly have to cope with harsh environments and threats: “Simply knowing how plants deal with stress on the moon can really tell us a lot about how they deal with stress right here on Earth.” We know how plants are affected by conditions like drought – by exposing them to entirely new factors, we can advance our understanding of how they function.

Even if the seeds fail to germinate on the Moon, the fact that NASA is taking targeted risks without incurring significant costs could change business-as-usual for the once-legendary institution. Like most bureaucracies NASA has become quite risk averse and sensitive to perceptions of failure. But with commercial partnerships, they can experience a flop without necessarily having it make national headlines – they don’t have to put their entire reputation on the line every single time.

It may not be too long before space exploration missions are conducted more like technology startups and less like government programs. Dr. McKay sees a world of possibilities emerging from this democratization: “I see much better, more innovative experiments. When your experiment costs 300 million dollars, and you do one a decade, you can’t take any risks. You’ve got to be very conservative in what you do. But if your experiment is a million dollars and being done by grad students, you can do crazy and brilliant things.”

Whenever we do spread life beyond our own planet, it will fundamentally change our cultural perception of what is possible. As Dr. Pete Worden, Director of NASA’s Ames Research Center, explained excitedly, “The first picture of a plant growing on another world – that picture will live forever. It will be as iconic as the first footprint on the moon.” Just like the Apollo missions drove an entire generation to embrace technology and science, making the final frontier more accessible will inspire us to strive for even greater accomplishments.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9560 on: Nov 28th, 2013, 3:34pm »

GROW WHERE NO MAN HAS GROWN BEFORE grin...LUVIN IT...
DON'T TELL THOSE IN COLORADO...THEY'LL HAVE ANTI-GRAV HYDRO-PONICS IN NO TIME cool...HMMM...ON SECOND THOUGHT...
I'M KIDDING rolleyes

SHALOM...Z
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9561 on: Nov 28th, 2013, 5:56pm »

I remember those in Hightimes..The DEA put a lot of ads in there for those grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9562 on: Nov 29th, 2013, 07:49am »

GOOD MORNING SYS AND Z cheesy

HOPE EVERYONE HAD A LOVELY THANKSGIVING.

WE SURE DID. WATCHED "THE SANTA CLAUS" WITH TIM ALLEN AFTER DINNER. VISITED WITH THE FAMILY IN ARIZONA. IT WAS A GOOD DAY. I HAVE A LOT TO BE THANKFUL FOR.

CRYSTAL


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9563 on: Nov 29th, 2013, 07:53am »

Guardian

China's dispatch of jets ratchets up tension over air defence zone

Analysts fear China may have miscalculated international reaction but cannot step back after raising domestic expectations.

by Tania Branigan in Beijing
Friday 29 November 2013 01.41 EST

Tensions have risen further over China's declaration of an air defence zone in disputed regions of the East China Sea after it sent fighter jets and an early warning aircraft to patrol the area.

The state news agency Xinhua announced the patrols after Japan, South Korea and the US all sent military aircraft through the zone in a clear challenge to the Chinese measure. Beijing had previously responded only by saying it had monitored the flights.

Shen Jinke, a spokesman for the Chinese air force, described Thursday’s dispatch of aircraft as "a defensive measure and in line with international common practices” in the Xinhua report.

"China's air force is on high alert and will take measures to deal with diverse air threats to firmly protect the security of the country's airspace," he said.

A previous patrol took place on Saturday, when the zone was declared.

Many countries have similar zones, requiring aircraft approaching their territorial airspace to identify themselves, and China has said it created the area to defend its national security. But its zone is controversial because it includes the skies over islands known as the Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, which are the subject of a long-running territorial dispute, and overlaps zones established by Japan and South Korea.

Taylor Fravel, an expert on regional security at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said establishment of the zone increased the potential for an incident in the air that could spark a larger crisis. But he said tensions might ease if China continued to clarify the nature of the zone and how it intended to deal with unidentified aircraft, especially those flying through the zone but not heading toward China.

“China has always chafed at Japan's ADIZ, which at some points is less than 150km from China and has been used by Japan to report intrusions into Japan's airspace. China probably wants to level the playing field with Japan and increase the pressure on Tokyo regarding the disputed islands,” he said.

Japan does not acknowledge that the ownership of the islands is disputed. The US does not take a view on sovereignty but recognises Japan’s administrative control and has said the joint security pact covers the islands.

Many analysts think China is laying down a long-term marker, but did not anticipate the forceful response it has received from the US as well as Japan.

“I think the logic is that incrementally it will make other countries accustomed to China exerting an enhanced degree of authority in that space,” said Rory Medcalf of Australia's Lowy Institute.

China is now seeking to dampen the international pushback without appearing weak to other nations or its own people.

Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Asia-Pacific director at the US Institute of Peace, said the creation of its zone had its own momentum.

“The danger in the announcement is that it empowers the People’s Liberation Army, maritime agencies and netizens [internet users] to hold the government to account,” she said.

“Now people are transgressing the zone, they have to make it look to the domestic audience like they are serious. They have given birth to internal pressures.”

Dai Xu, a famously hawkish air force colonel and high profile media commentator, wrote on his Weibo microblog: “The war of public opinion is more interesting than diplomatic war.”

Other users wrote scathingly about China’s muted response to foreign military flights into the zone, describing the government as a paper tiger.

Behind the immediate issues lie regional concerns about China’s growing strength, Beijing’s unease at Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe’s determination to strengthen his country’s forces, and questions about the US presence in and commitment to the region.

The US vice-president, Joe Biden, will visit Beijing, Tokyo and Seoul on a trip beginning this Sunday which is likely to be dominated by discussions of the zone.

"We decline to comment on Chinese flights, but the United States will continue to partner with our allies and operate in the area as normal," a Pentagon spokesman said.

In a statement released on Thursday, the European Union’s foreign affairs chief Lady Ashton expressed concern at the establishment of the zone and China's warning of "emergency defence measures" in the event of non-compliance.

“This development heightens the risk of escalation and contributes to raising tensions in the region. The EU calls on all sides to exercise caution and restraint,” she said.

Yan Xuetong, a foreign relations scholar at Tsinghua University, said: “I think the only problem is Japan because it has taken a confrontational policy. They want clashes and to drag America into military containment against China.

“The international community has ignored the roots of this... Abe has clearly stated that his fundamental goal is to revise the constitution [under which Japan renounces war] and he needs security tensions to legitimise his efforts.”

Tokyo’s military ambitions are particularly sensitive because many in China say Japan has not adequately recognised or atoned for its brutal occupation in the first half of the 20th century.

The state-run nationalist tabloid Global Times warned in an an editorial on Thursday that China was willing to engage “in a protracted confrontation with Japan”.

The newspaper – known for running hawkish pieces that do not always reflect official policy, but reflect the view of some within the power elites – predicted that an imminent conflict might be waged between China and Japan, adding: “If the US does not go too far, we will not target it in safeguarding our air defence zone. What we should do at present is to firmly counter provocative actions from Japan.”

map after the jump:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/29/china-tension-air-defence-zone

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9564 on: Nov 29th, 2013, 08:01am »

International Business Times

UFO Sightings: UFO Photo in North Devon Journal Made Witnesses Share Their UFO Sighting Reports

By Jenalyn Villamarin
November 29, 2013 3:15 PM EST

The North Devon Journal published a strange photo that photographer Rob Tibbles captured on their November 24 story titled "Is this a UFO spotted in the skies above North Devon?" Afterwards, witnesses across the English region contacted the journal to share their strange UFO sighting reports in the North Devon skies.

Rob Tibbles took photos from the Fullabrook wind farm. The photographer was having a look at his pictures when he noticed the strange object hovering on one of the turbines. According to the Open Minds report, the North Devon Journal described the unidentified flying object as "grey in colour, quite large and of an oval shape."

Additionally, the journal decided to contact Chivenor's 22 Squadron search-and-rescue crew to investigate on the sighting. However, no reports on UFO sightings were filed that day in the area.

The witnesses that shared their UFO sightings either claimed they saw the same strange object found on Mr Tibbles' photo or a similar one. A woman named Erica Whiteley contacted the North Devon Journal to share that her husband spotted a strange object above Fullabrook.

Ms Whiteley recounted: "He spotted a strange bright object in the sky on Friday evening at about 5pm. Looking from Swimbridge across to Barnstaple in the direction of the wind turbines. He said it was unusually bright and of similar shape to that in your picture and he was joking around saying he had seen a UFO... When I saw your photo, I couldn't believe it, I thought he was just over exaggerating."

Witness Matt Naughton revealed to the journal that he was driving to Torrington on Thursday night when he saw the strange bright lights up above and further described the experience as very creepy. Another witness, Jacqueline Leighton Boyce, made contact with the North Devon Journal for her UFO sighting report on a strange, very large and bright object in the sky.

"I too saw a strange very large bright thing in the sky on Saturday November 23 about dusk time," Jacqueline shared after seeing the Journal's feature story. The witness even filmed the strange and bright thing that she saw with the help of a friend slowing down the video in order to track the light's movement.

video and more after the jump:
http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/526050/20131129/ufo-sightings-photo-north-devon-journal-witnesses.htm#.UpicYZDTm1s

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9565 on: Nov 29th, 2013, 09:46am »

GOOOOOD MORNING MS. CRYSTAL
AND SYS,LUVEY,...HAL...HE'S CHOPPING SOME CARROTS FOR STEW grin
...PURR...HAS BEEN QUIET...BUT WHEN THOSE CLAWS COME OUT...SHE'S ONE TO NOTICE...
WELL...NOT TO EXCLUDE ANYONE SINCE WE ARE...AN EXCLUSIVELY INCLUSIVE FORUM...GOOD MORNING CASEBOOK....

WELL...YA BETTER NOT SHOUT...BETTER NOT CRY...USED TO BE SANTA CLAUSE...NOW IT'S THE N...S...A...WITH THAT WATCHFUL EYE grin...SANTA CLAUSE IS COMING...TO TOWN...

MERRY CHRISTMAS cool

SHALOM...Z
« Last Edit: Nov 29th, 2013, 09:54am by ZETAR » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9566 on: Nov 29th, 2013, 6:23pm »

on Nov 29th, 2013, 09:46am, ZETAR wrote:
GOOOOOD MORNING MS. CRYSTAL
AND SYS,LUVEY,...HAL...HE'S CHOPPING SOME CARROTS FOR STEW grin
...PURR...HAS BEEN QUIET...BUT WHEN THOSE CLAWS COME OUT...SHE'S ONE TO NOTICE...
WELL...NOT TO EXCLUDE ANYONE SINCE WE ARE...AN EXCLUSIVELY INCLUSIVE FORUM...GOOD MORNING CASEBOOK....

WELL...YA BETTER NOT SHOUT...BETTER NOT CRY...USED TO BE SANTA CLAUSE...NOW IT'S THE N...S...A...WITH THAT WATCHFUL EYE grin...SANTA CLAUSE IS COMING...TO TOWN...

MERRY CHRISTMAS cool

SHALOM...Z


"SANTA CLAUSE IS COMING TO TOWN 2.0" LOL!

THANKS Z, THAT WAS A GOOD ONE grin

CRYSTAL


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9567 on: Nov 30th, 2013, 10:29am »






~

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9568 on: Nov 30th, 2013, 10:31am »




Please be an angel



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http://www.soldiersangels.org/



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9569 on: Dec 1st, 2013, 02:01am »

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/cats-recognise-their-owners-voices-but-never-evolved-to-care-says-study-8966580.html
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Cats recognise their owners' voices but never evolved to care, says study



Any cat owner will tell you that although they are sometimes kept as pets, felines are beholden to no one.

A new study from the University of Tokyo has confirmed this, showing that although pet cats are more than capable of recognising their owner’s voice they choose to ignore them - for reasons that are perhaps rooted in the evolutionary history of the animal.

Carried out by Atsuko Saito and Kazutaka Shinozuka, the study tested twenty housecats in their own homes; waiting until the owner was out of sight and then playing them recordings of three strangers calling their names, followed by their owner, followed by another stranger.

The researchers then analysed the cats’ responses to each call by measuring a number of factors including ear, tail and head movement, vocalization, eye dilation and ‘displacement’ – shifting their paws to move.

When hearing their names’ being called the cats displayed “orientating behaviour” (moving their heads and ears about to locate where the sound was coming from) and although they showed a greater response to their owner’s voices than strangers’, they declined to move when called by any of the volunteers.

“These results indicate that cats do not actively respond with communicative behavior to owners who are calling them from out of sight, even though they can distinguish their owners’ voices,” write Saito and Shinozuka. “This cat–owner relationship is in contrast to that with dogs.”

The study, published by Springer in the Animal Cognition journal, suggests that the reason for cats’ unresponsive behaviour might be traced back to the early domestication of the species, contrasting this with the relationship of humans to dogs.

Recent genetic analysis has revealed that the common ancestor of the modern housecat was Felis silvestris, a species of wildcat that first came into contact with humans around 9,000 years ago. As early societies developed agriculture, these cats moved in to prey on the rodents that were attracted to stores of grain. In the words of the paper’s authors, they effectively “domesticated themselves”.

“Historically speaking, cats, unlike dogs, have not been domesticated to obey humans’ orders. Rather, they seem to take the initiative in human–cat interaction.” This is in contrast to the history of dogs and humans, where the former has been bred over thousands of years to respond to orders and commands. Cats, it seems, never needed to learn.

However, it's unlikely that this will dismay cat owners (or indeed, be of any surprise) and the paper notes that although “dogs are perceived by their owners as being more affectionate than cats […] dog owners and cat owners do not differ significantly in their reported attachment level to their pets”.

The study concludes by observing that “the behavioural aspect of cats that cause their owners to become attached to them are still undetermined.”
« Last Edit: Dec 1st, 2013, 02:01am by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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