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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 111197 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #9645 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 11:50am »

Discovery Communications continues its UFO exploration

Posted by: Jason McClellan
December 17, 2013

The American-based mass media company Discovery Communications continues to flood the market with UFO-related programming on television.

On Sunday, December 15, Discovery’s Animal Planet premiered an episode of a new show titled Uncovering Aliens. In the episode, the show’s team of investigators go to Sedona, Arizona to explore claims of UFO sightings and a possible government cover-up.

In August 2013, Discovery picked up the show Unsealed: Alien Files and added it to the company’s Destination America channel with an aggressive schedule of forty new episodes.

Another show on Destination America titled Monsters and Mysteries in America also features stories of UFOs and extraterrestrial encounters. During the show’s first season, an episode featured the story of Bret Oldham who claims he has been plagued by alien abductions and horrific experiments since childhood. Now in its second season, an upcoming episode will feature the story of twin sisters Audrey and Debbie Hewins. Destination America’s website describes that these twins “were plagued by alien visitors since childhood. As adults, these abductions took a terrifying turn. The twins realized they were being used as the alien’s reproductive slaves.”

Discovery’s Science channel also features regular UFO-related programming. For the past two years, the channel has designated the month of March as an alien-themed month, exploring the question “Are we alone?”

Based on the strong global interest in extraterrestrial topics, it is likely that the trend of alien-themed programming will continue for years to come. And with more than ten channels under the company’s control, Discovery has plenty of delivery platforms from which they can continue to saturate the market with UFO programming.

video after the jump:
http://www.openminds.tv/discovery-communications-continues-ufo-exploration/25463

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« Reply #9646 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 11:53am »

Wired

In Memoriam: The Space Robots We Lost This Year

By Adam Mann
12.17.13
9:30 am

At the end of every year, news sites publish memorials for all the important people the world has lost. But nobody ever mentions the space robots.

Yet in 2013, we had to say goodbye to a lot of great scientific space missions. Far too many space-based telescopes and Earth-observing satellites were either decommissioned, faced unexpected hardware failures, or simply ran out of fuel. That, coupled with the fact that NASA has fairly few future plans for robotic exploration, means a tremendous loss for researchers.

Many of these space probes had lived long past their expected lifetimes. All provided spectacular data that have transformed how scientists think about our planet and our universe. Here, we pay a tribute to the amazing robots we said goodbye to in the last year and look at some of the amazing images and data they collected.

To start with, there was the European Space Agency’s Herschel space telescope. When looking out at the universe, it’s important to have a variety of eyes. We humans see in a fairly narrow wavelength band of the electromagnetic spectrum. But so many other interesting things are hiding just beyond the frequencies we can see.

Launched in 2009, Herschel was able to peer at the cosmos in infrared wavelengths – and was in fact the largest infrared telescope ever put into space. At these frequencies, Herschel could look straight through the gas and dust that typically obscure distant processes. With its infrared eyes, the telescope could watch young stars being born, see organic chemicals form in molecular clouds, and even spot water on Jupiter that was determined to have arrived when comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crashed into the gas giant in 1994.

But in order to see at infrared wavelengths, Herschel required extremely cold liquid helium. That coolant ran out in April as expected, effectively shutting down the spacecraft. Engineers flipped the switch on Herschel, and now it will drift for hundreds of years before coming crashing back and burning up in Earth’s atmosphere.

photo gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/12/goodbye-robots-2013/

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« Reply #9647 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 3:54pm »

Severed hand attached to man's ankle to keep it alive

Doctors at a hospital in China saved a man's hand by grafting it to his ankle after it was severed in an industrial accident, according to reports in the Chinese media.

Xiao Wei lost his right hand in an accident in the factory where he worked but it could not be reattached to his arm right away. Doctors kept the hand alive by stitching it to his left ankle and "borrowing" a blood supply from arteries in the leg.

After a month, they were able to reattach the hand to his arm. Xiao Wei said he would be having another operation in six months but might not be able to regain full use of his hand.

-- Reuters, Agence France-Presse

http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/12/17/21937473-severed-hand-attached-to-mans-ankle-to-keep-it-alive?lite

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« Last Edit: Dec 17th, 2013, 3:56pm by Swamprat » User IP Logged

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« Reply #9648 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 4:36pm »

CHINA SEEMS TO BE AT THE FOREFRONT OF THE PIGGY BACK TISSUE AND ORGAN TECH...I RECENTLY SAW A PICTURE OF A PATIENT WHOM HAD A NEW NOSE GROWING ON HIS FACE TO BE DETACHED AND IMPLANTED WHERE HIS ORIGINAL NOSE WAS TERRIBLY DAMAGED...THIS PRETTY MUCH ADDRESSES ORGAN REJECTION...MIGHT HINDER ONES NIGHT LIFE...OF COURSE TEMPORARILY cool...WHO/WHOM KNOWS/NOSE grin

SHALOM...Z
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« Reply #9649 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 6:53pm »

shocked


"Severed hand attached to man's ankle to keep it alive

Doctors at a hospital in China saved a man's hand by grafting it to his ankle after it was severed in an industrial accident, according to reports in the Chinese media.

Xiao Wei lost his right hand in an accident in the factory where he worked but it could not be reattached to his arm right away. Doctors kept the hand alive by stitching it to his left ankle and "borrowing" a blood supply from arteries in the leg.

After a month, they were able to reattach the hand to his arm. Xiao Wei said he would be having another operation in six months but might not be able to regain full use of his hand."



Thanks for that article Swamprat.

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« Reply #9650 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 6:54pm »

on Dec 17th, 2013, 4:36pm, ZETAR wrote:
CHINA SEEMS TO BE AT THE FOREFRONT OF THE PIGGY BACK TISSUE AND ORGAN TECH...I RECENTLY SAW A PICTURE OF A PATIENT WHOM HAD A NEW NOSE GROWING ON HIS FACE TO BE DETACHED AND IMPLANTED WHERE HIS ORIGINAL NOSE WAS TERRIBLY DAMAGED...THIS PRETTY MUCH ADDRESSES ORGAN REJECTION...MIGHT HINDER ONES NIGHT LIFE...OF COURSE TEMPORARILY cool...WHO/WHOM KNOWS/NOSE grin

SHALOM...Z



HEY Z cheesy

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« Reply #9651 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 7:09pm »

Here is another fantastic development! The "skin gun" for burn victims:

http://www.herpiderp.com/video/1236/the-skin-gun
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« Reply #9652 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 7:10pm »

HEY CRYSTAL...ON THE WINGS OF ANGELS grin

YOU BEEN GETTING SOME COLD WEATHER!!!...BUT ALWAYS HAVE A WARM HEART wink

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« Reply #9653 on: Dec 17th, 2013, 8:37pm »

SWAMPRAT,

THAT IS QUITE AMAZING...STAYING AHEAD OF THE INFECTION TIMELINE...NORMAL EPIDERMIS FOUR DAYS LATER FROM THIRD DEGREE BURNS...REVOLUTIONARY!!!
EXCELLENT POST!

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« Reply #9654 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 12:04am »

so..comes the time you are furious on facebook..and decide to give someone a piece of your mind..then as you look at that brilliant colorful adjective ridden complete with dangling participles literary wonder ...you change your mind..and not let your emotions take the helm..and delete it..

well my friends..what you didn't post may still come back to haunt you..

http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-facebook-donate-button-20131216,0,510500.story
Facebook said tracking users' activity even if they decide not to post a status or comment falls within the company's terms of service. (Daniel Acker / Bloomberg / December 9, 2013)



December 17, 2013, 12:23 p.m.

Facebook has said that it is within its terms of service to see what users are typing even when the status or comment is never posted on the social network.

The Menlo Park, Calif., company confirmed that it can track users' unpublished posts after two Facebook researchers disclosed that they had tracked the activity of about 5 million random Facebook users in the U.S. and England.

The researchers' study looked at how often these users censored themselves while typing posts and comments on Facebook. If users typed more than five characters, the content was tracked. It was considered to be self-censored if it was not published within 10 minutes of being typed.

PHOTOS: The top 10 tech gadgets of 2013

Facebook said the study did not track the exact words and letters that users typed, but whether or not they typed something. The methodology for the study also kept the tracked users anonymous, Facebook said.

“This is something we looked at to understand to what extent people self censor,” Facebook spokesman Matt Steinfeld told The Times.

Facebook said it was no longer tracking any users when it comes to unpublished posts. It also has no plans to track the unpublished words and letters that users type.

But Facebook said the study was conducted in accordance to the terms of service that every user agrees to when they sign up for the social network.
So where in Facebook's terms of service is this justified? The company said this is covered in its Data Use Policy.

"We receive data about you whenever you use or are running Facebook, such as when you look at another person's timeline, send or receive a message, search for a friend or a Page, click on, view or otherwise interact with things .... ," the Data Use Policy says in the section titled "Information we receive and how it is used."

Concerned users can do two things to protect themselves. They can stop using the service, or they can browse the website using a browser with Javascript turned off.

Javascript is the browser software that allowed the Facebook researchers to track whether users typed something or not during the study this summer. It's the same kind of software that allows Gmail to save users' email drafts.

Users can search for instructions for how to turn off Javascript for their browser, which would prevent Facebook from being able to track whether a user has a typed a post or comment, should the company decide to do that again.

But Javascript is an important part of many websites, so users who do turn it off should not be surprised if some of their favorite sites don't function properly.
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« Reply #9655 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 09:47am »

GOOD MORNING ALL cheesy

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« Reply #9656 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 09:50am »

Scientific American

Computers Can Be Hacked Using High-Frequency Sound

A computer's microphone and speakers can covertly send and receive data

By Ker Than and Inside Science News Service
December 18, 2013

(ISNS)—Using the microphones and speakers that come standard in many of today's laptop computers and mobile devices, hackers can secretly transmit and receive data using high-frequency audio signals that are mostly inaudible to human ears, a new study shows.

Michael Hanspach and Michael Goetz, researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Communication, Information Processing, and Ergonomics, recently performed a proof-of-concept experiment that showed that "covert acoustical networking," a technique which had been hypothesized but considered improbable by most experts, is indeed possible.

Their findings, detailed in a recent issue of the Journal of Communications, could have major implications for electronic security.

"If you have a high demand for information security and assurance, you would need to prepare countermeasures," Hanspach wrote in an email to Inside Science.

In particular, it means "air-gapped" computers — that is, computers that are not connected to the Internet — are vulnerable to malicious software designed to steal or corrupt data.

"This is indeed a newsworthy development," said retired Navy Capt. Mark Hagerott, a cybersecurity professor at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.

"These arms races between defensive and offensive advanced technologies have been going on for [a long time], but now, with the low cost of writing code, it may get progressively more challenging to defend against," said Hagerott, who was not involved in the study.

Secret transmissions

In their experiments, Hanspach and Goetz were able to transmit small packets of data between two air-gapped Lenovo business laptops separated by distances of up to about 65 feet (20 meters). Moreover, by chaining additional devices that picked up the audio signal and repeated it to other nearby devices, the researchers were able to create a "mesh network" that relayed the data across much greater distances. Importantly, the researchers were able to emit and record the ultrasonic and near-ultrasonic frequencies, which cannot be detected by humans, using the sound processor, speakers and microphone that came standard with the laptops.

The researchers experimented with a variety of software, but the best one was a program originally developed to transmit data acoustically under water. Created by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics in Germany, the so-called adaptive communication system modem proved more reliable than the other techniques, but it had one significant drawback: it could only transmit data at a paltry rate of about 20 bits per second — a tiny fraction of today's standard network connections.

While not practical for transmitting video or other large files, this low transmission rate is still sufficient for sending and receiving keystrokes and other sensitive data such as private encryption keys or login credentials.

"If you have small-sized files of high value, you do not want to take the risk," Hanspach suggests.

Historical parallels

The low transmission rate would also suffice to send an electronic signal to a malware program that had been inadvertently installed — through a tainted USB stick, for example — onto an air-gapped computer and trigger an electronic attack, said Hagerott.

Moreover, Hagerott said, if history is any guide, it will only be a matter of time before someone refines the technique and increases its maximum transmission rate.

"Once you demonstrate that you can do something like this, other people will keep enhancing it," Hagerott said.

Hagerott also saw parallels between the current cyber arms race and the contest between real-world arms races of past eras. For example, experts once declared that there was no way a plane could sink a battle ship.

"They said, the planes weren't big enough, but then they got bigger and began carrying bigger bombs. But sadly, the experts didn't fully absorb this lesson until two British battleships in 1941 were sent to the bottom," Hagerott said.

Countermeasures

Military history also suggests that countermeasures will eventually be developed against the new security threat that Hanspach and Goetz demonstrated. In their paper, the researchers themselves suggest several that might work. For example, one could simply switch off the audio input and output of devices, or use audio-filtering techniques to block high-frequency audio signals.

Devices running the Linux could implement the latter technique using tools that have already been developed for the operating system, the researchers write. They also propose the use of an "audio intrusion detection guard," a device that Hanspach and Goetz said would "forward audio input and output signals to their destination and simultaneously store them inside the guard's internal state, where they are subject to further analyses."

Oftentimes, though, the weakest links in cyber security systems are not hardware or software, but the humans who interact with them. For example, the Stuxnet virus that spread to air-gapped machines in the Iranian Natanz nuclear facilities and the Conficker digital worm that turned millions of PCs into a giant botnet in the city of Manchester, England, are believed to have been spread when employees used infected USB sticks.

"The human component is a huge part of this," Hagerott said.


http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computers-can-be-hacked-using-high-frequency-sound

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« Reply #9657 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 10:03am »

Der Spiegel

Masked Army: Shadowy Jihadist Group Expands Rapidly in Syria

By Christoph Reuter
18 December 2013



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The sender was unidentified, but the young engineer knew who the email was from as soon as he opened the attachment. Beneath a picture of the brutally mutilated corpse of Muhannad Halaibna, a civil rights activist known throughout the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, was a single sentence: "Are you sad now about your friend?"

Mere hours later, the engineer and 20 other members of the Syrian opposition -- doctors, city council members and activists -- escaped from Raqqa into Turkey. They weren't fleeing Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime, but a new and terrible power that has no face and goes by many names. The official name of this al-Qaida branch, which has broken away from Osama Bin Laden's successors, is the "Islamic State of Iraq and Syria" (ISIS). "Daaisch" is the most common abbreviation of the group's name in Syria. "But we call them the Army of Masks," says Basil, the engineer who fled the country, "because their men rarely show their faces. They dress in black, with their faces covered."

In addition to civil rights activist Halaibna, the group's thugs have kidnapped hundreds of others in Raqqa, where Assad's army was driven out back in March. The jihadists seized the chair of the city council, the heads of the civilian opposition, an Italian Jesuit and six European journalists. Anyone who opposes the ISIS fighters, or who is simply considered an unbeliever, disappears.

ISIS maintains four prisons for holding its hostages in this area alone. And Raqqa was only the beginning. In the last four months, the jihadist group, which was still essentially unknown in Syria at the start of this year, has seized control of several cities, as well as strategically important roads, oil fields and granaries.

What is currently taking place in the north and northeast of the country could catalyze the worst of fears about Syria, bringing about the country's ultimate disintegration. This is not because the Syrian rebels are eager al-Qaida supporters -- as Assad's propaganda has claimed since the spring of 2011 -- but because people are exhausted after three years of destruction and don't have much energy left to oppose the jihadists' rapid expansion.

War on Two Fronts

For two years, the United States and Europe's constant mantra was to deny military support for the Syrian rebels, because there were radicals among them and weapons could fall into the wrong hands. Thus the Syrian rebels, left largely to their own devices, faced a murderous stalemate in the fight against Assad's military machinery, which is backed by Russia and Iran.

Many voices warned against the ignorance of such policies, SPIEGEL among them. "The longer the outside world fails to help, the more likely it is that others will fill the gap, possibly including al-Qaida," argued one commentary published in August 2012, titled "Civil War in Syria: The High Price of Hesitation." Now precisely that commentary's prediction -- "confusion and delusions on the part of governments can produce exactly the thing that they wanted to prevent" -- seems to have come to pass.

The balance of power among the rebels has shifted. The Free Syrian Army (FSA) has steadily shrunk while waiting in the vain hope of military aid from the US. Back when the number of foreign fighters in Syria was still very low, Washington didn't want to support the rebels because of the possibility that al-Qaida might get involved. As a result of that inaction, al-Qaida is now there.

The rebels are being ground down by a war fought on two fronts, with Assad in front and the jihadists behind. To make matters worse, Washington and London now plan to discontinue their meager support of the rebels entirely.

Taking Advantage of Disorganized Rebels

With a force of around 7,000 men, in mid-September ISIS stormed the town of Azaz, in northwestern Syria. Shortly thereafter, they attacked the border town Jarabulus, 200 kilometers (125 miles) to the east, as well as the cities of Dana, Tarib, Binnish, al-Bab and even parts of Aleppo -- all areas that until then had been controlled by local rebels.

Hundreds of people who had managed to more or less maintain infrastructure and a justice system in these liberated areas have fled from al-Qaida to Turkey in recent months. These are the same people who were previously persecuted by the regime in Damascus.

Few dare to stand up to the masked army. When a convoy of ISIS pickup trucks mounted with machine guns rolled into the town of Turmanin in late November, not a shot was fired. The jihadists occupied the town's largest building and set up roadblocks.

With their combination of centralized leadership, brutality and bribery, ISIS has zeroed in on the Syrian rebels' Achilles' heel -- their lack of unity. One eyewitness says that when ISIS attacked the border town of Azaz, the leaders of the major rebel groups in northern Syria convened to discuss whether or not to help the beleaguered FSA unit there fight back.

"No," the leader of the Tawhid Brigade -- the largest group in Aleppo, with around 12,000 fighters -- finally decided, declaring that the group could not afford to open a second front as long as the fight against Assad required all its resources. Instead, the Tawhid Brigade's leaders negotiated a ceasefire -- which lasted only as long as it took ISIS to gather enough masked fighters to subdue the small city for good.

ISIS Attacks Intensified in Fall

The group's forward march began quietly, a result of an internal al-Qaida power struggle. In April, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, head of al-Qaida in Iraq, decreed that his commands would now apply to Syria as well. The jihadists of the al-Nusra Front, whose beginnings lie somewhere in the murky depths of several attacks orchestrated by the regime, disagreed, saying they were subject only to commands issued by Ayman al-Zawahiri, official successor to Osama Bin Laden. But Zawahiri's words, issued from the isolated mountains of western Pakistan, no longer carry much weight. Nearly all the foreign al-Nusra fighters who have infiltrated the country to date have now switched allegiances, joining al-Baghdadi's forces.

As recently as this summer, these foreign ISIS jihadists, who travel into the country via Turkey, were just one force among many in northern Syria. The first abductions occurred, but ISIS did not yet control the roads. The foreign Islamists one met were mainly just bizarre encounters. Take the example of a scene that occurred in one of the last restaurants in the mountains of Latakia, where a group of young Saudi Arabians sat at a table. Wearing an explosive belt complete with a cable and a red plastic switch that he was toying with, one long-haired young man stood up, declaring, "If I push this, boom! Hee hee."

These men seemed threatening, yes, but also more crazy than organized.

That changed this fall, as the ISIS units' attacks grew appreciably more coordinated and better prepared. In Raqqa, they dealt with the small rebel groups one after another. When one FSA brigade refused to acquiesce to ISIS, the jihadists sent four suicide bombers in succession to their headquarters.

Elsewhere, the reputation ISIS had acquired in Raqqa was enough to subdue other competing rebel groups. When an ISIS convoy rolled into the city of al-Bab, the masked fighters told local rebels they only wanted to drive through the city en route to the front in Aleppo. But they had barely reached the center of town before the masked men jumped down from their pickup trucks and occupied the city center without any considerable resistance. "It was like a movie," recalls one witness. "All these monstrous figures in black."

Once ISIS has established itself, as it did in al-Bab, the local emir begins issuing a constant stream of new decrees, the witness continues. "First it was that women were only allowed on the streets in an abaya" -- an ankle-length outer robe -- "then no one was allowed to be outside during prayer time. Then smoking was forbidden, and recently music as well. Now they check weddings to make sure no music is being played. They're worse than the regime."

It is hard to explain why people who rose up against the destructive power of Assad's fighter jets are now collapsing when faced with a band of masked murderers. "Against Assad, things were clearer," one person who fled Aleppo says in an attempt to explain. "Everyone knew why we opposed him. Now it's less clear. Have the Americans come to help us? The Europeans? No one came except the jihadists, who say they are our brothers."

There are also rumors that the ISIS terrorists actually work for Assad, but they make a concerted effort not to be perceived as a fifth column of the regime. Occasionally a few of them will engage in a skirmish against the army, for example in early August, when two ISIS suicide bombers assisted in the capture of a military airport near Aleppo. But the bulk of the group's fighting capabilities are applied to bringing towns and areas in the rebels' sphere of influence under their control.

In return, Assad's regime doesn't challenge ISIS. In Raqqa, the group has taken up headquarters in the governor's palace, a massive complex that's hard to miss. Yet Assad's air force has never attacked the building, nor any other ISIS-held buildings in or around Raqqa.


more after the jump:
http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/isis-shadowy-jihadist-group-expands-rapidly-in-syria-a-939561.html

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« Reply #9658 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 11:09am »

Whats The Frequency Bro?


Billion dollar race: Soviet Union vied with US in ‘mind control research’


RT
December 18, 2013

Competing with the US during the Arms Race, the Soviet Union put extensive effort in unconventional research seeking to outflank its rival in understanding behavior control, remote influencing and parapsychology, a new survey has revealed.


Image: Crystal Brain (Wikimedia Commons).
The survey published by Cornell University Library is based on open scientific and journalistic materials and provides an overview of unconventional research in the USSR and then in its successor, Russia, in the period between 1917 and 2003 – as compared to the USA.

The report by Serge Kernbach showed that unconventional weapons took the scientists in both countries to areas bordering sci-fi which nowadays would be seen in TV programs featuring UFOs, the supernatural and superpowers.

Due the Iron Curtain, Soviet and American scientists knew little about each other’s secret work – still, they focused on same themes.

In the Soviet Union, among the areas of particular interest, were, for instance, “the impact of weak and strong electromagnetic emission on biological objects, quantum entanglement in macroscopic systems, nonlocal signal transmission based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and ‘human operator’ phenomena,” the survey says.

Soviet scientists were developing a field they dubbed “psychotronics.” The country spent between $0.5-1 billion on research of the phenomena, Kernbach who works, at the Research Center of Advanced Robotics and Environmental Science in Stuttgart, Germany, found out.

Some of the programs in psychotronic research – even those launched decades ago – have not been officially published.

“For instance, documents on experiments performed in OGPU and NKVD – even 80 years after – still remain classified,” Kernbach noted. The OGPU (Joint State Political Directorate) was the Soviet secret police and the NKVD (The People’s Commissariat for Internal Affairs) was the main law enforcing body, which was later transformed into the Internal Ministry and a security organization which was part of it – into the KGB.

According to the survey, Soviet and American areas of interest often mirrored each other. In particular, Kernbach recalls the Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) scandalous human research program MKUltra which involved the use of various methods to manipulate an individual’s mental states and alter brain functions.

“As mentioned in the public documents, the program to some extent was motivated by the corresponding NKVD’s program, with similar strategies of using psychotropic (e.g. drugs) substances and technical equipment,” Kernbach said.

In the 60s and the 70s, the Soviet Union was actively researching the influence of electromagnetic fields on human physiological and psychological conditions. Several authors point to the application of research results in the form of new weapons in the USA and the Soviet Union.

“Over the past years, US researchers have confirmed the possibility of affecting functions of the nervous system by weak electromagnetic fields (EMFs), as it was previously said by Soviet researchers. EMFs may cause acoustic hallucination (’radiosound’) and reduce the sensitivity of humans and animals to some other stimuli, to change the activity of the brain (especially the hypothalamus and the cortex), to break the processes of formation processing and information storage in the brain. These nonspecific changes in the central nervous system can serve as a basis for studying the possibilities of the direct influence of EMFs on specific functions of CNS,” read an article in Nauka (Science) magazine in 1982.

Kernbach’s analysis lacks details on practical results of unconventional research in the USSR.

He mentions though a device invented by Anatoly Beridze-Stakhovsky – the torsion generator ‘Cerpan’. The exact structure of the device is unknown, as the scientist feared it would be put to unethical uses. Cerpan was designed on the “shape effect” produced by torsion fields. Some sources claim that the device – a 7-kilo metal cylinder – was used to heal people, including Kremlin senior officials.

Kernbach’s overview of unconventional research in USSR and Russia suggests that following the collapse of the USSR in 1991, these programs were first reduced and then completely closed in 2003.

“Due to academic and non-academic researchers, the instrumental psychotronics, denoted sometimes as torsionics, still continue to grow, but we cannot speak about government programs in Russia any longer,”he said.

However, based on the number of participants at major conferences, the number of psychotronics researchers in Russia is estimated between 200 and 500, the report said.

Last year, the now-fired Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said his ministry was working on futuristic weaponry.

“The development of weaponry based on new physics principles; direct-energy weapons, geophysical weapons, wave-energy weapons, genetic weapons, psychotronic weapons, etc., is part of the state arms procurement program for 2011-2020,” Serdyukov said at a meeting with the then Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, cited RIA Novosti.

That followed a series of Putin’s presidential campaign articles, one of which focused on national security guarantees. Speaking about new challenges that Russia may face, and which armed forces should be ready to respond to, he wrote:

“Space-based systems and IT tools, especially in cyberspace, will play a great, if not decisive role in armed conflicts. In a more remote future, weapon systems that use different physical principles will be created (beam, geophysical, wave, genetic, psychophysical and other types of weapons). All this will provide fundamentally new instruments for achieving political and strategic goals in addition to nuclear weapons.”

Kernbach’s analysis lacks details on practical results of unconventional research in the USSR.

He mentions though a device invented by Anatoly Beridze-Stakhovsky – the torsion generator ‘Cerpan’. The exact structure of the device is unknown, as the scientist feared it would be put to unethical uses. Cerpan was designed on the "shape effect" produced by torsion fields. Some sources claim that the device – a 7-kilo metal cylinder – was used to heal people, including Kremlin senior officials.

Kernbach’s overview of unconventional research in USSR and Russia suggests that following the collapse of the USSR in 1991, these programs were first reduced and then completely closed in 2003.

“Due to academic and non-academic researchers, the instrumental psychotronics, denoted sometimes as torsionics, still continue to grow, but we cannot speak about government programs in Russia any longer,” he said.

However, based on the number of participants at major conferences, the number of psychotronics researchers in Russia is estimated between 200 and 500, the report said.

Last year, the now-fired Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said his ministry was working on futuristic weaponry.

“The development of weaponry based on new physics principles; direct-energy weapons, geophysical weapons, wave-energy weapons, genetic weapons, psychotronic weapons, etc., is part of the state arms procurement program for 2011-2020,” Serdyukov said at a meeting with the then Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, cited RIA Novosti.

That followed a series of Putin’s presidential campaign articles, one of which focused on national security guarantees. Speaking about new challenges that Russia may face, and which armed forces should be ready to respond to, he wrote:

“Space-based systems and IT tools, especially in cyberspace, will play a great, if not decisive role in armed conflicts. In a more remote future, weapon systems that use different physical principles will be created (beam, geophysical, wave, genetic, psychophysical and other types of weapons). All this will provide fundamentally new instruments for achieving political and strategic goals in addition to nuclear weapons.”


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« Reply #9659 on: Dec 18th, 2013, 3:12pm »

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MIT Review

Biodegradable Batteries to Power Smart Medical Devices

Prototype batteries that dissolve safely in the body could power ingested devices.

By Katherine Bourzac on December 18, 2013

Batteries made from pigments found in cuttlefish ink may lead to edible, dissolvable power sources for new kinds of medical devices. Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University materials scientist Christopher Bettinger demonstrated the new battery. “Instead of lithium and toxic electrolytes that work really well but aren’t biocompatible, we chose simple materials of biological origin,” Bettinger says.

Conventional battery materials are not safe inside the body unless they’re encased in bulky protective cases that must eventually be surgically removed. Electronics that can either be swallowed or implanted in the body without causing harm could monitor wound healing and disease progression, release drugs, and enable more sensitive neural and cardiovascular sensors and stimulators.

The prototype sodium-ion battery from the CMU researchers uses melanin from cuttlefish ink for the anode and manganese oxide as the cathode. All the materials in the battery break down into nontoxic components in the body.

The CMU group is working on edible electronics that can be swallowed like pills. These electronic medicines could let doctors deliver sensitive protein drugs—which are ordinarily destroyed in the stomach—orally rather than by injection. This could make therapies such as arthritis drugs that currently have to be given intravenously at the hospital much easier to take. Smart pills, says Bettinger, could carry sensors and circuits and release drugs only after they’ve passed the harsh environment of the stomach and reached the intestine, where the drugs would be absorbed into the body. Edible electronics could also be used by athletes to monitor their core body temperature and other body metrics.

The melanin batteries don’t match the performance of lithium-ion batteries, but they don’t have to in order to be useful, says Bettinger, who was named one of MIT Technology Review’s 35 innovators under 35 in 2011. The prototypes, described in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, currently provide enough power to run simple sensors. Bettinger says they’re working to improve their power output and storage capacity by experimenting with different forms of melanin.

Bettinger’s group is not the first to propose electronic pills. A few companies, including Olympus, already make capsules that contain cameras; but these kinds of systems, which use traditional electronic and optical components to image the digestive system, can’t be swallowed regularly, says Bettinger.

Another company, Proteus Digital Health of Palo Alto, California, makes a personal-health monitoring system that includes pills affixed with digital identification tags. A small chip that stores an identifying number is sandwiched between two metal foils that act as a partial battery that the company’s chief technology officer, Mark Zdeblick, calls a “biogalvanic cell.” When the pill is swallowed, the metals come into contact with ions in the stomach, activating the device by enabling current to flow between the metal foils. The chip modulates the current flowing between the metal foils to produce a weak electrical field that is sensed by a patch worn by the patient. This allows people and medical professionals to monitor when they take their drugs.

John Rogers, a materials scientist who makes biodegradable electronics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, says more power will be required for more sophisticated edible and implantable electronics, and one way to provide that is with full batteries like Bettinger’s.

Rogers is also working on biodegradable batteries for medical use. In a paper that will be published in the journal Advanced Materials, his team describes batteries made out of the dissolvable metals and trace minerals magnesium and molybdenum. Biodegradable batteries, Rogers says, will enable “devices that go into the body monitor wound healing, deliver therapy as necessary, and then naturally disappear after the wound is completely healed, thereby eliminating unnecessary strain on the body.”

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/522581/biodegradable-batteries-to-power-smart-medical-devices/

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