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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 47271 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #975 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 07:40am »

Hey Mur! That does look pretty rough!
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« Reply #976 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 07:42am »

New York Times

September 3, 2010
Blackwater Won Contracts Through a Web of Companies
By JAMES RISEN and MARK MAZZETTI

WASHINGTON — Blackwater Worldwide created a web of more than 30 shell companies or subsidiaries in part to obtain millions of dollars in American government contracts after the security company came under intense criticism for reckless conduct in Iraq, according to Congressional investigators and former Blackwater officials.

While it is not clear how many of those businesses won contracts, at least three had deals with the United States military or the Central Intelligence Agency, according to former government and company officials. Since 2001, the intelligence agency has awarded up to $600 million in classified contracts to Blackwater and its affiliates, according to a United States government official.

The Senate Armed Services Committee this week released a chart that identified 31 affiliates of Blackwater, now known as Xe Services. The network was disclosed as part of a committee’s investigation into government contracting. The investigation revealed the lengths to which Blackwater went to continue winning contracts after Blackwater guards killed 17 Iraqi civilians in Baghdad in September 2007. That episode and other reports of abuses led to criminal and Congressional investigations, and cost the company its lucrative security contract with the State Department in Iraq.

The network of companies — which includes several businesses located in offshore tax havens — allowed Blackwater to obscure its involvement in government work from contracting officials or the public, and to assure a low profile for any of its classified activities, said former Blackwater officials, who, like the government officials, spoke only on condition of anonymity.

Senator Carl Levin, the Michigan Democrat who is chairman of the Armed Services Committee, said in a statement that it was worth “looking into why Blackwater would need to create the dozens of other names” and said he had requested that the Justice Department investigate whether Blackwater officers misled the government when using subsidiaries to solicit contracts.

The C.I.A.’s continuing relationship with the company, which recently was awarded a $100 million contract to provide security at agency bases in Afghanistan, has drawn harsh criticism from some members of Congress, who argue that the company’s tarnished record should preclude it from such work. At least two of the Blackwater-affiliated companies, XPG and Greystone, obtained secret contracts from the agency, according to interviews with a half dozen former Blackwater officials.
A C.I.A. spokesman, Paul Gimigliano, said that Xe’s current duties for the agency were to provide security for agency operatives. Contractors “do the tasks we ask them to do in strict accord with the law; they are supervised by C.I.A. staff officers; and they are held to the highest standards of conduct” he said. “As for Xe specifically, they help provide security in tough environments, an assignment at which their people have shown both skill and courage.”

Congress began to investigate the affiliated companies last year, after the shooting deaths of two Afghans by Blackwater security personnel working for a subsidiary named Paravant, which had obtained Pentagon contracts in Afghanistan. In a Senate hearing earlier this year, Army officials said that when they awarded the contract to Paravant for training of the Afghan Army, they had no idea that the business was part of Blackwater.

While Congressional investigators have identified other Blackwater-linked businesses, it was not the focus of their inquiry to determine how much money from government contracts flowed through the web of corporations, especially money earmarked for clandestine programs. The former company officials say that Greystone did extensive work for the intelligence community, though they did not describe the nature of the activities. The firm was incorporated in Barbados for tax purposes, but had executives who worked at Blackwater’s headquarters in North Carolina.

The former company officials say that Erik Prince, the business’s founder, was eager to find ways to continue to handle secret work after the 2007 shootings in Baghdad’s Nisour Square and set up a special office to handle classified work at his farm in Middleburg, Va.

Enrique Prado, a former top C.I.A. official who joined the contractor, worked closely with Mr. Prince to develop Blackwater’s clandestine abilities, according to several former officials. In an internal e-mail obtained by The New York Times, Mr. Prado claimed that he had created a Blackwater spy network that could be hired by the American government.

“We have a rapidly growing, worldwide network of folks that can do everything from surveillance to ground truth to disruption operations,” Mr. Prado wrote in the October 2007 message, in which he asked another Blackwater official whether the Drug Enforcement Administration might be interested in using the spy network. “These are all foreign nationals,” he added, “so deniability is built in and should be a big plus.”

It is not clear whether Mr. Prado’s secret spy service ever conducted any operations for the government. From 2004 to 2006, both Mr. Prado and Mr. Prince were involved in a C.I.A. program to hunt senior leaders of Al Qaeda that had been outsourced to Blackwater, though current and former American officials said that the assassination program did not carry out any operations. Company employees also loaded bombs and missiles onto Predator drones in Pakistan, work that was terminated last year by the C.I.A.

Both Mr. Prince and Mr. Prado declined to be interviewed for this article.

The company is facing a string of legal problems, including the indictment in April of five former Blackwater officials on weapons and obstruction charges, and civil suits stemming from the 2007 shootings in Iraq.

The business is up for sale by Mr. Prince, who colleagues say is embittered by the public criticism and scrutiny that Blackwater has faced. He has not been implicated in the criminal charges against his former subordinates, but he has recently moved his family to Abu Dhabi, where he hopes to focus on obtaining contracts from governments in Africa and the Middle East, according to colleagues and former company officials.

After awarding Blackwater the new security contract in June, the C.I.A. director, Leon E. Panetta, publicly defended the decision, saying Blackwater had “cleaned up its act.”

But Rep. Jan Schakowsky, an Illinois Democrat and a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said she could not understand why the intelligence community had been unwilling to cut ties to Blackwater. “I am continually and increasingly mystified by this relationship,” she said. “To engage with a company that is such a chronic, repeat offender, it’s reckless.”

It is unclear how much of Blackwater’s relationship with the C.I.A. will become public during the criminal proceedings in North Carolina because the Obama administration won a court order limiting the use of classified information. Among other things, company executives are accused of obtaining large numbers of AK-47s and M-4 automatic weapons, but arranging to make it appear as if they had been bought by the sheriff’s department in Camden County, N.C. Such purchases were legal only if made by law enforcement agencies.

But defense lawyers say they hope to argue that Blackwater had a classified contract with the C.I.A. and wanted at least some of the guns for weapons training for agency officers.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/04/world/middleeast/04blackwater.html?ref=world

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« Reply #977 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 07:48am »

New York Times

September 3, 2010
Syria’s Solidarity With Islamists Ends at Home
By KAREEM FAHIM

DAMASCUS, Syria — This country, which had sought to show solidarity with Islamist groups and allow religious figures a greater role in public life, has recently reversed course, moving forcefully to curb the influence of Muslim conservatives in its mosques, public universities and charities.

The government has asked imams for recordings of their Friday sermons and started to strictly monitor religious schools. Members of an influential Muslim women’s group have now been told to scale back activities like preaching or teaching Islamic law. And this summer, more than 1,000 teachers who wear the niqab, or the face veil, were transferred to administrative duties.

The crackdown, which began in 2008 but has gathered steam this summer, is an effort by President Bashar al-Assad to reassert Syria’s traditional secularism in the face of rising threats from radical groups in the region, Syrian officials say.

The policy amounts to a sharp reversal for Syria, which for years tolerated the rise of the conservatives. And it sets the government on the seemingly contradictory path of moving against political Islamists at home, while supporting movements like Hamas and Hezbollah abroad.

Syrian officials are adamant that the shifts stem from alarming domestic trends, and do not affect support for those groups, allies in their struggle against Israel. At the same time, they have spoken proudly about their secularizing campaign, though they have been reluctant to reveal its details. Some Syrian analysts view that as an overture to the United States and European nations, which have been courting Syria as part of a strategy to isolate Iran and curb the influence of Hamas and Hezbollah.

Human rights advocates say the policy exacerbates pressing concerns: the arbitrary imprisonment of Islamists, as well as the continued failure to allow them any political space.

Pressure on Islamic conservatives in Syria began in earnest after a powerful car bomb exploded in the Syrian capital in September 2008, killing 17 people. The government blamed the radical group Fatah al-Islam.

“The bombing was the trigger, but the pressure had been building,” said Peter Harling, a senior analyst with the International Crisis Group. “After a period of accommodation with the Islamic groups, the regime entered this far more proactive and repressive mode. It realizes the challenge that the Islamization of Syrian society poses.”

The government’s campaign drew wider notice this summer, when a decision to bar students wearing the niqab from registering for university classes was compared to a similar ban in France. That move seemed to underscore a reduced tolerance for strict observance by Muslims in public life. Syrian officials have put it differently, saying the niqab is “alien” to Syrian society.

The campaign carries risks for a secular government that has fought repeated, violent battles with Islamists in the past, most notably in 1982, when Mr. Assad’s father, Hafez al-Assad, razed the city of Hama while confronting the Muslim Brotherhood, killing tens of thousands of people. For the moment there has been no visible domestic backlash, but one cleric, who said he was dismissed without being given a reason two years ago, suggested that could change.

“The Islamists now have a strong argument that the regime is antagonizing the Muslims,” he said.

The government courted religious conservatives as Western powers moved to isolate Syria amid accusations that it was behind the assassination of a former Lebanese prime minister, Rafik Hariri, in 2005. The government appointed a sheik instead of a member of the ruling Baathist party to head the Ministry of Religious Affairs, and allowed, for the first time, religious activities in the stadium at Damascus University.

As the country emerged from that isolation, it focused on domestic challenges, including the fear that sectarian tensions in the region could spread — a recurring fear in Syria, a country with a Sunni majority ruled by Alawites, a religious minority.

The government also focused on conservatives. “What they had nourished and empowered, they felt the need to break,” said Hassan Abbas, a Syrian researcher.

The details of the campaign have remained murky, though Syrian officials have not been afraid to publicize its aims, including in foreign media outlets. In an interview with the American talk show host Charlie Rose in May, Mr. Assad was asked to name his biggest challenge.

“How we can keep our society as secular as it is today,” he said. “The challenge is the extremism in this region.”

Mr. Assad has in the past singled out northern Lebanon as a source of that extremism.

“We didn’t forget Nahr al-Bared,” said Mohammed al-Habash, a Syrian lawmaker, referring to battles in that region three years ago between Lebanese forces and Fatah al-Islam. “We have to take this seriously.”

Beginning in 2008, the government embarked on its new course when it fired administrators at several Islamic charities, according to the former cleric, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he feared reprisal by the government.

The clampdown has intensified in recent months. Last spring, the Qubaisiate, an underground women’s prayer group that was growing in prominence, was barred from meeting at mosques, according to members. Earlier this summer, top officials in Damascus Governorate were fired for their religious leanings, according to Syrian analysts.

Other moves underscore the delicacy of Mr. Assad’s campaign — or perhaps send mixed signals. A planned conference on secularism earlier this year, initially approved by the government, was abruptly canceled for no reason, according to Mr. Abbas.

“Secularism is their version of being secular,” Mr. Abbas said.

Another episode can be seen as a concession to Islamists, or a sign of just how comfortable the conservatives have become. A proposed rewrite of Syria’s personal status law, which governs civil matters, leaked last year, retained provisions that made it legal for men to marry girls as young as 13 years old. Under pressure, including from women’s groups, lawmakers abandoned the draft law.

“There are limits to what they can do,” Mr. Harling, the analyst, said of the Syrian government. “They will try things out and pedal back if things go too far. It says a lot about how difficult it is — even for a regime that is deeply secular itself and whose survival is tied to the secular nature of Syrian society.”

Nawara Mahfoud contributed reporting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/04/world/middleeast/04syria.html?ref=world

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« Reply #978 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 07:57am »

Guardian. Luvey you aren't in New Zealand are you?

Earthquake strikes Christchurch in New Zealand
State of emergency declared after earthquake with magnitude of 7.0 strikes 19 miles west of Christchurch
Jo Adetunji and agencies guardian.co.uk, Saturday 4 September 2010 00.21 BST

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Earthquake damage: buildings in Christchurch, 19 miles from the epi-centre, demonstrate the power of the tremors. Photograph: David Alexander/AP A powerful 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck New Zealand's South Island last night, causing widespread damage to buildings, although there were few injuries.

Christchurch mayor Bob Parker declared a state of emergency four hours after tremors rocked the region, warning that continuing aftershocks could cause masonry to fall from damaged buildings.

The quake hit 19 miles west of the city, on the east coast of the island, at 4.35am local time. Residents reported collapsed buildings and bridges, as well as power cuts. Christchurch, which has a population of around 400,000 people, was then rocked with a series of sharp aftershocks.

No deaths have been reported so far but doctors at Christchurch Hospital said they had treated two men with serious injuries. One was hit by a falling chimney and was in intensive care, while a second was seriously hurt after being cut by glass, a hospital spokeswoman said. Other minor injuries have also been reported.

"There is considerable damage in the central city," police inspector Mike Coleman told New Zealand's National Radio.

Police Inspector Alf Stewart told the station that some people had been arrested for looting. "We have some reports of people smashing [shop] windows and trying to grab some property that is not theirs … we've got police on the streets and we're dealing with that," he said.

Colleen Simpson, a Christchurch resident, said panicked neighbours ran into the streets in their pyjamas. She said some buildings had collapsed, there was no power and the mobile telephone network had failed. "There is a row of shops completely demolished right in front of me," she told the Stuff news website.

Another person from Christchurch, Kevin O'Hanlon, said the jolt was extremely powerful. "I was awake to go to work and then just heard this massive noise and 'boom'," he said. "It was like the house got hit. It just started shaking. I've never felt anything like it."

Bruce Russell, 50, said that although he lives in Lyttelton, a port town to the south of Christchurch, which is on firmer volcanic ground, the earthquake had been "very alarming".

"We were woken up at 4.30am and it swayed like a ship at sea," he said. "It was very alarming. We have no power, which is a problem across [Christchurch]. We're listening to reports on a wind-up radio. It's still very frightening."

Russell said he had not experienced an earthquake on this scale before. There have been local reports that some people many have been trapped in damaged houses.

more after the jump
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/sep/04/earthquake-christchurch-new-zealand

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« Reply #979 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:04am »

Guardian

Stephen Hawking's big bang gapsThe laws that explain the universe's birth are less comprehensive than Stephen Hawking suggests
Paul Davies The Guardian, Saturday 4 September 2010

Cosmologists are agreed that the universe began with a big bang 13.7 billion years ago. People naturally want to know what caused it. A simple answer is nothing: not because there was a mysterious state of nothing before the big bang, but because time itself began then – that is, there was no time "before" the big bang. The idea is by no means new. In the fifth century, St Augustine of Hippo wrote that "the universe was created with time and not in time".

Religious people often feel tricked by this logic. They envisage a miracle-working God dwelling within the stream of time for all eternity and then, for some inscrutable reason, making a universe (perhaps in a spectacular explosion) at a specific moment in history.

That was not Augustine's God, who transcended both space and time. Nor is it the God favoured by many contemporary theologians. In fact, they long ago coined a term for it – "god-of-the-gaps" – to deride the idea that when science leaves something out of account, then God should be invoked to plug the gap. The origin of life and the origin of consciousness are favourite loci for a god-of-the-gaps, but the origin of the universe is the perennial big gap.

In his new book, Stephen Hawking reiterates that there is no big gap in the scientific account of the big bang. The laws of physics can explain, he says, how a universe of space, time and matter could emerge spontaneously, without the need for God. And most cosmologists agree: we don't need a god-of-the-gaps to make the big bang go bang. It can happen as part of a natural process. A much tougher problem now looms, however. What is the source of those ingenious laws that enable a universe to pop into being from nothing?

Traditionally, scientists have supposed that the laws of physics were simply imprinted on the universe at its birth, like a maker's mark. As to their origin, well, that was left unexplained.

In recent years, cosmologists have shifted position somewhat. If the origin of the universe was a law rather than a supernatural event, then the same laws could presumably operate to bring other universes into being. The favoured view now, and the one that Hawking shares, is that there were in fact many bangs, scattered through space and time, and many universes emerging therefrom, all perfectly naturally. The entire assemblage goes by the name of the multiverse.

Our universe is just one infinitesimal component amid this vast – probably infinite – multiverse, that itself had no origin in time. So according to this new cosmological theory, there was something before the big bang after all – a region of the multiverse pregnant with universe-sprouting potential.

A refinement of the multiverse scenario is that each new universe comes complete with its very own laws – or bylaws, to use the apt description of the cosmologist Martin Rees. Go to another universe, and you would find different bylaws applying. An appealing feature of variegated bylaws is that they explain why our particular universe is uncannily bio-friendly; change our bylaws just a little bit and life would probably be impossible. The fact that we observe a universe "fine-tuned" for life is then no surprise: the more numerous bio-hostile universes are sterile and so go unseen.

So is that the end of the story? Can the multiverse provide a complete and closed account of all physical existence? Not quite. The multiverse comes with a lot of baggage, such as an overarching space and time to host all those bangs, a universe-generating mechanism to trigger them, physical fields to populate the universes with material stuff, and a selection of forces to make things happen. Cosmologists embrace these features by envisaging sweeping "meta-laws" that pervade the multiverse and spawn specific bylaws on a universe-by-universe basis. The meta-laws themselves remain unexplained – eternal, immutable transcendent entities that just happen to exist and must simply be accepted as given. In that respect the meta-laws have a similar status to an unexplained transcendent god.

According to folklore the French physicist Pierre Laplace, when asked by Napoleon where God fitted into his mathematical account of the universe, replied: "I had no need of that hypothesis." Although cosmology has advanced enormously since the time of Laplace, the situation remains the same: there is no compelling need for a supernatural being or prime mover to start the universe off. But when it comes to the laws that explain the big bang, we are in murkier waters.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief/2010/sep/04/stephen-hawking-big-bang-gap

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« Reply #980 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:08am »

Telegraph

Residents phoned 999 dozens of times over 'ghost and UFO worries'
Worried residents phoned 999 to report sightings of ghosts and UFOs, including a man who claimed to have seen the spirit of actor Paul Newman, a force has disclosed.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 8:30AM BST 04 Sep 2010

Officers say one emergency call came from a man who rang police claiming to have seen the ghosts of ''two old ladies in a white Fiesta'' on a dual carriageway.

Other worried calls came from people who spotted ghosts or poltergeists on CCTV cameras and another who said he'd seen a ghost which could ''make me a million quid''.

Dozens more calls were also made claiming to have seen aliens including one man reporting that his wife and dog were being abducted by Martians.

More than 150 calls, details of which were released under the Freedom of Information Act, claimed to have seen spooks or UFOs were made to Devon and Cornwall Police over the past 15 years.

One caller claimed a spectre gave him a ''horrible hairstyle and some dodgy photos. Ghost is Paul Newman.''

In one case in October 2003, the force recorded: ''Caller states he has got a ghost on CCTV. Caller wanted advice on who he could contact as the footage was going to make him a million. Advised to go to the press.''

In July 2004 someone from Newton Abbot in Devon reported seeing a ''ghost driver'' on the A38.

The police log recorded: ''Two old ladies in white Fiesta - come onto the A38B carriageway on the off slip facing the wrong way. Stopped on the hard shoulder, trying to reverse back up the off slip.''

A man in Callington, Cornwall, reported his wife and dog being abducted by aliens, while another said he'd seen UFO over a pie factory in Okehampton, Devon.

Other 999 calls were made to report ''a long, white cylinder thing like a train in the sky'' and ''orange balls moving slowly upwards and in all different directions''.

A spokesman for Devon and Cornwall Police said most of the incidents were logged as ''non attendance'' or ''routine'' although in some cases officers were forced to respond.

''Our call centre operators take many types of calls and the vast majority are for emergencies or relate to non urgent inquiries of one type or another," he said.

''There are occasions though when a more unusual call is received.

"These are all dealt with professionally by our highly trained staff who access and process them in an appropriate way.''

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/ufo/7980882/Residents-phoned-999-dozens-of-times-over-ghost-and-UFO-worries.html

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« Reply #981 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:10am »

Telegraph UFO photos gallery

140 years of UFO sightings - Part I

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/howaboutthat/3447508/UFO-sightings-140-years-of-UFO-pictures.html

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« Reply #982 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:12am »

UFO Digest

Missouri couple reports 12-inch UFO moving around bedroom
Submitted by Roger Marsh on Fri, 09/03/2010 - 22:42

A Missouri couple reports being awakened by a bright flash of light in their bedroom at 12:30 a.m. on September 3, 2010, and discovering a "small, disc-like" object hovering in the room, according to testimony from the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) witness reporting database.

The object was described as being 12 inches in diameter, gray metallic in color, with a dome on top and windows around the dome.

The husband first saw the object "move about the room from corner to corner, flashing the strobe-like light (he believes it is a camera of some sort), then it hoovered over his bed." He then woke up his wife, who also saw the object.

The small craft also had small beings inside.

Both husband and wife then say that the object "then moved slowly forward and that is when they saw the tiny beings inside the craft looking out at them - they both sat up in bed and the beings looked surprised, then the craft took off very quickly towards the closet/chimney area and disappeared."

The report states that, "They could not get a good look at the beings inside the craft, but the witness claims that they had large heads for their small bodies, and they looked humanoid. All he could see was a kind of gray skin color and he thinks the eyes looked more like human eyes, not large almond shaped eyes that are like the typical grays"

But once the object disappeared, the event was not over.

"Later, after they had fallen asleep again, the witness again woke up and saw a white-gloved hand floating approximately 10" above his head. He only saw this for a couple of seconds, then it disappeared. He jumped out of bed to investigate but could find nothing in the room."

The couple claim that they have had similar encounters in the past.

Article continues here: http://www.examiner.com/ufo-in-national/missouri-couple-report-12-inch-ufo-moving-around-bedroom

http://www.ufodigest.com/article/missouri-couple-reports-12-inch-ufo-moving-around-bedroom

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« Reply #983 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:15am »

The Hill

BP's spill-recovery costs grow to $8B
By Erika Niedowski - 09/03/10 12:37 PM ET

The latest total includes the cost of the spill response, containment, relief wells, grants to Gulf states, and claims.

BP said Friday that it has spent about $8 billion so far on its oil-spill recovery efforts in the Gulf of Mexico.

The latest total includes the cost of the spill response, containment, drilling of the relief wells, efforts to kill the well (including "static kill" and cementing), grants to Gulf states, claims paid to those affected and other federal costs, the company said in a news release.

The oil giant has agreed to the creation of a $20 billion escrow account to compensate residents and businesses and to spending another $100 million to help oil rig workers displaced by the Obama administration's temporary ban on deepwater drilling.

But The New York Times reported Friday that BP has warned it may not be able to pay out all the damages if Congress passes legislation blocking it from receiving new offshore oil-and-gas leases or drilling permits. The House passed a bill in July containing a provision that would do just that.

“If we are unable to keep those fields going, that is going to have a substantial impact on our cash flow,” David Nagel, BP’s executive vice president for BP America, told the Times. He said that “makes it harder for us to fund things, fund these programs.”

Andrew Gowers, a BP spokesman, added: “We have committed to do a number of things that are not part of the formal agreement with the White House. We are not making a direct statement about anything we are committed to do. We are just expressing frustration that our commitments of good will have at least in some quarters been met with this kind of response.”

http://thehill.com/blogs/e2-wire/677-e2-wire/117131-bps-spill-recovery-costs-grow-to-8b

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« Reply #984 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:18am »

Wired

NASA Footage Sets Scene for Quantum Quest Movie
By Hugh Hart September 3, 2010 | 4:15 pm | Categories: Movies, animation

Footage from seven ongoing NASA space missions provide hyper-realistic scenery for 3-D animated film Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey, which debuts Saturday at the DragonCon sci-fi convention in Atlanta.

For added star power, Quantum producer Harry Kloor wrangled William Shatner, Chris Pine, Mark Hamill, Samuel L. Jackson, James Earl Jones and Hayden Christensen for the voice cast.

Besides guys that pretend to be outer-space adventurers, Quantum also includes features actress Amanda Peet (Syriana, 2012). See exclusive videos of Pine and Peet talking about their participation in Quantum Quest below.

Pine, who played Captain Kirk in 2009’s Star Trek movie, portrays a photon named Dave in Quantum Quest. In the promo clip below, shared exclusively with Wired.com in advance of the DragonCon presentation, he says he enjoyed doing voice work on the educational animated movie.

“There was always one bench filled with dudes in sweat pants who hadn’t shaved in a couple of days and they always looked like they were having the most fun,” Pine says.

Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong also appears in Quantum Quest, for the first time lending his voice to an animated movie in the role of meteorite hunter Jack Doohan.

Kloor met Armstrong at Purdue University while earning Ph.D. degrees in physics and chemistry. “When I asked Neil if he wanted to promote science to the public through a science fiction film as a means to reach all those people who shy away from traditional science and educational or edutainment films, he read the script and liked the approach,” Kloor told Wired.com in an e-mail.

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/underwire/2010/09/quantum-quest/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #985 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 08:38am »

on Sep 3rd, 2010, 08:13am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Telegraph

Four police and a van to fine veteran riding on the path
As a Second World War veteran who likes to keep fit, 84-year-old James Gresty thought hopping on his bike was a sensible way to collect his pension.

Ridiculous! And a guy who walks into a naval facility with no valid ID and a fake uniform won't be pursued. Mad world!

on Sep 3rd, 2010, 6:00pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
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Beautiful! Thank you!

@Crystal
Just because you're posting on a UFO-site doesn't make you whackadoodledandy. wink

@Mur
You're cracy!

That's that kind of weather where I would decide to stay home.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #986 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 12:21pm »

Good afternoon Crystal smiley

I totally love that picture!! Its just gorgeous!

Quote:
Guardian. Luvey you aren't in New Zealand are you?

Earthquake strikes Christchurch in New Zealand
State of emergency declared after earthquake with magnitude of 7.0 strikes 19 miles west of Christchurch
Jo Adetunji and agencies guardian.co.uk, Saturday 4 September 2010 00.21 BST


No Crys, I am an Aussie. I saw that on the news this morning... and thought Oh! My! Gawd... shocked
Back in the late 40s my parents were sailing from England to Christchurch NZ to live... but my mother was pregnant with one of my older brothers, so the ship's captain put them off the ship in West Australia because there was no doctor on board. So my parents stayed here. I really feel for those in Christchurch... what a scary thing to go through. Luckily there are not many hurt.... and I hope the after shocks aren't as strong as that one.

Pen
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #987 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 8:39pm »

on Sep 4th, 2010, 08:38am, philliman wrote:
Ridiculous! And a guy who walks into a naval facility with no valid ID and a fake uniform won't be pursued. Mad world!

Ain't that the truth!


Beautiful! Thank you!

@Crystal
Just because you're posting on a UFO-site doesn't make you whackadoodledandy. wink

@Mur
You're cracy!

That's that kind of weather where I would decide to stay home.


Hey Phil,
Well I'm not a dangerous whackadoodle at least. grin
Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #988 on: Sep 4th, 2010, 9:31pm »

on Sep 4th, 2010, 08:38am, philliman wrote:
@Mur
You're cracy!

That's that kind of weather where I would decide to stay home.


My arms still hurt
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #989 on: Sep 5th, 2010, 08:08am »

LoL! I wonder why that could be. wink

@Crystal
Of course not. smiley
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