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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 98316 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9870 on: Jan 19th, 2014, 09:25am »




Please be an angel



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9871 on: Jan 19th, 2014, 2:16pm »

Meow,

...rather than one big disclosure I am sure its like an intermission between orchestra concerts and instruments players tweaking their instruments for last second changes and a new score.. ..those are fun to watch...

Indeed.

It seems to go something like this.

Weather analysts notice a change in pattern over the last three hundred years. It is mentioned in science circles; then put to one side.

Someone takes an interest and wonders if there is anything in this 'anomaly'. Talks to colleagues. Colleagues say probably not, but not my field'.

'Someone' has trouble sleeping. something not quite right.

Someone digs deeper into records and talks to cosmology friends. Cosmology friends say ' ah well, we had noticed something unusual, but didn't want to appear as trouble causers. You know how it is;grants and all that'.

Big meeting is called.

Fingers are pointed, blame apportioned. heads demanded on platters. careers hang in the balance.

Things begin to appear in New Scientist, Scientific American etc. BBC do a item on it.

People start to worry a bit, especially those in Northern regions.

Energy producers order their new Mercedes.

HAL
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« Last Edit: Jan 19th, 2014, 2:24pm by INT21 » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9872 on: Jan 19th, 2014, 3:13pm »

Geee or should I say GE ..I would call that a wrap Hal..well said. grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9873 on: Jan 19th, 2014, 4:40pm »

http://www.alternet.org/drugs/americas-number-one-prescription-sleep-aid-could-trigger-zombies-murder-and-other-disturbing?ak_proof=1&akid=.1121926.wDJK8-&rd=1&src=newsletter948677&t=11&paging=off¤t_page=1#bookmark



America's Number One Prescription Sleep Aid Could Trigger 'Zombies,' Murder and Other Disturbing Behavior
Ambien is becoming better known for triggering bizarre behavior than it is for treating insomnia.


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9874 on: Jan 19th, 2014, 6:45pm »

on Jan 19th, 2014, 4:40pm, Chairman Meow wrote:
http://www.alternet.org/drugs/americas-number-one-prescription-sleep-aid-could-trigger-zombies-murder-and-other-disturbing?ak_proof=1&akid=.1121926.wDJK8-&rd=1&src=newsletter948677&t=11&paging=off¤t_page=1#bookmark



America's Number One Prescription Sleep Aid Could Trigger 'Zombies,' Murder and Other Disturbing Behavior
Ambien is becoming better known for triggering bizarre behavior than it is for treating insomnia.


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CM,
I have a relative whom I'm close to who has recurring problems due to taking Ambien!

She stopped taking this 4 years ago after my 21 year old niece died in her sleep 6 months after she was prescribed Ambien for her sleep disorder!

She's 23 years old and literally a prisoner because of this drug and it's side effects!

She sleep walks to a very dangerous and disturbing degree and has even driven her car to the local coffee shop at three AM and awakened in her pajamas sitting at the counter!


Needless to say she panicked and the police were called!
She has had to put alarms on all her doors that alert others in the home that she is wondering around!


It's disturbing to everyone there because her parents have had to move her to their house and they don't have any idea how to help her and physicians are reluctant to make any determination as to how to treat her!


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9875 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 01:10am »

Wow LG I"M glad I posted I had no idea that was so widely prescribed....some real horror stories..and its use as a date rape drug just as appalling..I dont know if medicaid or health insurance covers sleep disorders or not..but I sure hope they switch back to a glass of warm milk...I bet people even take it for snoring..lol..
« Last Edit: Jan 20th, 2014, 01:11am by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9876 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 08:12am »

Hey ya'll cheesy

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« Reply #9877 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 08:16am »

Telegraph

Women seek al-Qaeda fighter husbands in Syria online

Women have been using the internet to try and find husbands among British men fighting with al-Qaeda in Syria, it was claimed.

20 January 2014

By Miranda Prynne

Women have been going online to forge links with British extremists fighting with al-Qaeda in Syria in the hope of finding a husband.

Female al-Qaeda supporters have sought advice on how to join the militants and what they require in a wife, The Times reported.

Some women have contacted a British blogger, who writes about his life fighting with the Islamic extremists in Syria, demanding romantic tips while others have travelled to Syria to support al-Qaeda’s Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

The move is being encouraged by ISIS which aims to create an Islamic state in Syria but faces a challenge because so many of its fighters are single young men from foreign countries including Britain.

News of efforts to lure foreign women to Syria comes as an ISIS defector told the Telegraph British fighters in the war-torn country were being trained as “jihadists” then encouraged to return to the UK to launch attacks.

Al-Qaeda is believed to have set up a special base for women who make the journey to Syria to support its work.

The British blogger appears to have answered a number of queries from women who appear to be from the UK in the last week alone.

Last Tuesday he wrote: “We had two sisters delivered in safely yesterday. As for now the borders are closed but we will do our best to keep you all informed.”

His update just days after stricter controls were placed on foreigners crossing the border from Turkey into Syria.

After being asked where unmarried ‘sisters’ stayed, the blogger revealed there was a separate ‘sisters’ base.

One woman wrote: “I’d love to marry a mujahid wallah [a fighter, I swear] but idk [I don’t know] if I could handle it or maybe it’s just shaytan [the devil] whispering . . . what characteristics does one require if one wants to?”

“Aqeedah”, he told her, meaning religious faith.

He went on to claim mujahideen fighters struggled to find suitable wives among Syrian women because they lacked “aqeedah”.

He wrote: “No one here wants these Syrian women because the majority lack in aqeedah or have none.”

The blogger was asked if he knew any “sincere brothers” who wanted to marry then “make hijra” [emigrate].

He said that if the woman sent him a private message he would “see what I can do”.

The move to lure foreign women to Syria has sparked criticism among several radical scholars who claim it encourages them to enter the battle-field.

Security sources claim women are not involved in frontline fighting in Syria but help with transporting funds, equipment or cooking for the men, while others travel there to find husbands.

Shiraz Maher, from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King’s College London, said: “Although some fighters don’t have a problem with taking their wives, apart from the logistical hurdles, the issue of single women is far more controversial, because many jihadists don’t believe women have a role on the battlefield.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/al-qaeda/10583393/Women-seek-al-Qaeda-fighter-husbands-in-Syria-online.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9878 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 08:20am »

Wired

Out in the Open: These Hackers Want to Give You Coding Superpowers

By Klint Finley
01.20.14
6:30 AM

Chris Granger is a computer programmer who thinks programming kinda sucks. It’s too complicated and too esoteric and too sprawling. But he hopes that his latest invention can change all that.

Built alongside friend and colleague Robert Attorri, his creation is called Light Table, and he believes it can not only improve programming for seasoned engineers like himself, but put the power of coding into the hands of so many others. “We consider programming a modern-day superpower. You can create something out of nothing, cure cancer, build billion-dollar companies,” he says. “We’re looking at how we can give that super power to everyone else.”

The problem with coding, he says, is that you can’t see the results of your work until after you’re done. In that sense, programming is unlike almost every other craft. “When a chef adds an ingredient, he can smell it, he can taste it,” Granger says. “When an artist makes a stroke on a canvas, he can see it. But programming isn’t that way.”

Programmers may spend hours or days working on code before they can make sure it actually works. “We have to play computer in our heads,” he says. “We write each line, imagine what it will do. You have to act like a computer. The problem with that is that we’re pretty crappy computers.” But Light Table seeks to bridge that gap.

Light Table is an open source programming tool that lets programmers see the results of their code as their write it. It’s not an entirely new idea. In the mid-1960s, an educational tool called Logo gave programming students immediate feedback. More recently, languages like the kid friendly Scratch and artist friendly Processing have offered a kind of visual feedback, giving coders more insight into their programs as they’re written.

But applying those ideas to professional software — complex applications with thousands or even millions of lines of code — is another matter. Light Table tackles such software by not only by displaying the results of the code you’re working on right now, but by showing how it relates to other parts of your software and how data flow from one chunk of code to another. It also weaves documentation throughout the code, while offering new ways to organize and visualize the code in any application.

But Granger and his team want to extend this beyond what we typically think of as programming. Millions of data analysts, scientific researchers, and other workers spend their days wrangling data in applications like Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and SPSS. They don’t think of themselves as programmers, but they face many of the same challenges as people like Granger: they spend hour after hour putting something together, and they can’t tell if it works until after they’re done. “Excel is a form of programming,” he says. “Excel is really the most common programming language.”

Light Table grew out of an idea for a new kind of medical software. In 2012, Granger and Attorri, an old high school friend, started a company together. Granger was fresh off a stint at Microsoft, where he worked on the company’s popular Visual Studio programming tool, and Attorri, a biologist by training, had just dropped out of grad school. They applied to the Y Combinator startup incubator, pitching an app meant to make life easier for medical researchers, but just weeks later, IBM announced a similar project based on its Watson supercomputer, and that was the end of their pitch.

Then Granger went to visit his grandparents. They didn’t have internet access, and that gave him time to think and code without the usual online interruptions. He kept thinking about the new breed of user interface he and Attorri had hoped to land on the world of medical research, and at one point, he realized this same interface could be applied to a code editor. So he spent a week hacking out a prototype.

When Granger returned from vacation, he showed the prototype to Attori, who suggested he post a demo to the web. Within a week, the site received over a million pageviews. “It dawned on us that these principles of computing that we were talking about were better suited to this code editor,” Attori says. “Then anyone could build this sort of software.”

Many who saw the demo suggested the team launch a Kickstarter to raise money for the project, and eventually, they did. “I really didn’t expect our Kickstarter to succeed,” says Granger. “But I thought if a few people backed it, we could take those numbers to investors and say: ‘Look, people are interested enough in this that they put up money up front for it.’” But they asked for $200,000, and they ended up with $316,720. Soon, they reapplied to Y Combinator, and this time, they got in.

According to Granger, thousands of developers are already using Light Table on a daily basis. But since it’s “free as in beer” as well as open source, it’s not generating any revenue. That’s where the company’s “Project Aurora” comes in. The team is tight-lipped about what this is exactly, but Granger’s nod to Excel is a big hint at where the company is going. “We’re trying to make everyone as competent as a programmer without having to necessarily know programming,” Attori says.

In other words, they want to create a form programming that doesn’t suck — at all.

video after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2014/01/light-table/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9879 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 10:48am »

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« Reply #9880 on: Jan 20th, 2014, 5:54pm »

Hey Swamprat cheesy

Thanks for the laugh!




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« Reply #9881 on: Jan 21st, 2014, 10:03am »

Der Spiegel

Probing America: Top German Prosecutor Considers NSA Investigation

By SPIEGEL Staff
January 20, 2014 – 05:49 PM

Last Tuesday, on the sidelines of an Social Democrat party caucus in Berlin, German Justice Minister Heiko Maas ran into Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier. Maas pulled his fellow SPD member aside and warned him about what could become a difficult matter. "Something may be coming our way," Maas whispered, and noted that the foreign minister could be affected as well. Germany's federal prosecutor, Maas intimated, is currently considering opening an investigation into the scandal surrounding the surveillance of Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone by US intelligence. It's a step that would undoubtedly be considered an affront by the Americans.

Steinmeier listened attentively and nodded several times, but he didn't say much. At the start of his second posting as foreign minister (he previously served for four years from 2005-2009), Steinmeier is facing the extremely tricky problem of new discord in German-American relations.

The current difficulties got their start in October, when SPIEGEL reported that US intelligence services were interested in Merkel's mobile phone. When the magazine published its report, the National Security Agency's curiosity suddenly became an open act of provocation.

Merkel Fights Back

In short, US President Barack Obama allowed Angela Merkel, his "friend," to be eavesdropped upon. It didn't go uncommented either. "We're no longer living in the Cold War," Merkel's spokesman countered. The chancellor also complained personally to Obama. Merkel staffers said Obama's reaction had been contrite, that he said he would quickly rectify the situation and that he offered far-reaching concessions. But Germany has been waiting in vain ever since.

The Americans may be primarily to blame for the delay, but it is nevertheless becoming a problem for Merkel -- not least because the revelations from the archive of former spy Edward Snowden continue to flow. The risk is high that she will appear as powerless in the face of US obstinancy as her former interior minister, Hans-Peter Friedrich, did last summer. After his fruitless trip to Washington, he was ridiculed in the press and became the butt of numerous jokes.

It is a scenario Merkel would like to avoid. But a showdown is not in her interests either -- and formel investigative proceedings would mark the next step toward escalation. In conflicts like this, there are often many losers, but seldom winners.

Avoiding Further Mistakes

Chancellor Merkel has recognized the dimensions of her problem. After missteps last year, she strengthened the Chancellery's role in addressing the spying scandal. She has assigned the task to her new chief of staff, former environment minister Peter Altmeier, and Klaus-Dieter Fritsche, a former deputy minister in the Interior Ministry. She expects the two to finally make headway on the issue.

In the close to eight months that have passed since the first reports were published about the National Security Agency's massive spying operations, the only things Germany has been given by the US are well-meaning assurances. Last summer, the German government sent a list of questions about their surveillance programs to the Americans and the British, whose GCHQ intelligence agency has likewise been accused of conducting espionage against European Union member countries. To this day, neither has provided complete answers. Instead, ever more threads are becoming visible in the global spying network. It is also slowly dawning on the Germans that the parameters of a No-Spy Agreement announced by the NSA will never become a reality. German government representatives last week denied media reports claiming that negotiations were close to collapsing. At the same time, hopes are no longer high.

Merkel's staff sensed as far back back as November that a full-fledged No-Spy Agreement might not be possible. Pointing to Germany's privacy of correspondence, posts and telecommunications law, which is anchored in the constitution, Gerhard Schindler, the head of the country's foreign intelligence agency, the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), demanded concrete commitments, but the Americans fought over demands they said would be equivalent to sacrificing any espionage at all.

Instead NSA chief Keith Alexander called for an agreement that would include more detailed provisions for closer cooperation between the intelligence agencies, particularly on issues such as counter-terrorism. But then the White House took over negotiations from the NSA and began questioning compromises that had already been reached. To this day, the US has refused to offer a full explanation in response to allegations about spying on Merkel's mobile phone.

Obama's speech on Friday didn't change much. Music played from violins and NSA chief Alexander and a number of important senators, including Dianne Feinstein, sat inside the Justice Department as they waited for what could have been a historical speech. But it soon became clear that Obama wanted to use the opportunity to announce a kind of democratic version of total surveillance. None of the NSA's disputed spying programs would be ended, but more independent controls would be imposed, including a panel of legal experts. What Obama did do is reiterate his promise that he would not eavesdrop on the leaders of countries that are US allies in cases where there are no pressing security reasons for doing so. He said he had ordered his national security team and the intelligence community to "rebuild trust" going forward. He added, however, "Now let me be clear: Our intelligence agencies will continue to gather information about the intentions of governments … around the world."

Germans Seek Clarity

Few view that as true peacemaking, and voices within the German government calling for a tougher approach are growing more numerous. Domestic policy experts have been openly placing their hopes on German Federal Public Prosecutor Harald Range, who has spent months looking into a possible official investigation into the NSA for spying on German soil.

Michael Hartmann, a domestic policy expert with the SPD, says he expects "clarity as soon as possible." His colleague Clemens Binninger of the CDU, recently elected as chairman of the Parliamentary Control Panel, the body in parliament responsible for supervision of the intelligence services, concluded, "It seems quite clear to me that the law was violated on German soil." He says it would be understandable if an investigation were opened.

The official line at the Public Prosecutor's Office is that it remains unclear what will become of the allegations against the NSA. The office is treating the surveillance as two separate instances. One is the allegation that the NSA spied on the data of Germans millions of times. The other is the allegation that it eavesdropped on the chancellor's mobile phone. Thus far, the Prosecutor's Office has told parliament that there isn't yet enough evidence to pursue a formal investigation.

It's a position that Hans-Christian Ströbele, a member of parliament with the Green Party who gained global headlines by visiting Edward Snowden in Moscow in late 2012, considers absurd. "They're just looking for reasons to shirk responsibility because the issue is too controversial for them," he says. Gregor Gysi, the head of the parliamentary group of the far-left Left Party, rails against what he describes as government "yes-men" when it comes to America. "The fact that the German government and the Federal Prosecutor isn't acting shows that their fear of the US government is greater than their respect for our legal system."

However, one person is giving serious consideration to doing just the opposite: Prosecutor Range himself. He already signaled to Merkel's last government that there was sufficient evidence for him to launch an investigation into the issue of the chancellor's mobile phone. It's an assessment he has since shared with the new leadership inside the Justice Ministry, despite some concerns within his own agency. "Who's going to spring into action like a tiger if they know they will wind up a bedside rug?" posits one source close to the proceedings.

more after the jump:
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/nsa-syping-scandal-a-944415.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9882 on: Jan 21st, 2014, 10:08am »

Japan Times

Japan scrambled jets against Chinese planes 138 times from October to December

Kyodo
Jan 21, 2014

Air Self-Defense Force fighter jets scrambled against Chinese aircraft 138 times in the last three months of 2013, second only to first three months of last year, when they scrambled 146 times, the Defense Ministry’s Joint Staff said Tuesday.

The ministry has been closely monitoring Chinese air activities amid heightened tension over the Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea, especially after China included airspace above the islets as part of an air defense identification zone it designated in November.

The ministry, which has released scramble data for every three-month period since fiscal 2005, said ASDF fighters scrambled against Chinese aircraft that came close to Japanese airspace 69 times from April to June, and 80 times from July to September.

Many of the Chinese aircraft of concern during the latest period were fighters.

The ASDF scrambled fighters against Russian aircraft 110 times from October to December, compared with 105 times during the preceding three months.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/01/21/national/japan-scrambled-jets-against-chinese-planes-138-times-from-october-to-december/#.Ut6au5DTm1s

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9883 on: Jan 21st, 2014, 8:27pm »

The night is dark, and dreary with the north wind howling with snow mixed in.

The temperature is 8 F or -13 C, and I told my wife we had to come up with chicken noodle soup.

We found a can of chicken soup and a pack of spaghetti, so we had chicken soup spaghetti.

This cold polar vortex makes me want soup and chili with tamales.

I hope you do well with this latest polar vortex outbreak.
« Last Edit: Jan 21st, 2014, 8:28pm by Silver » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9884 on: Jan 22nd, 2014, 01:51am »

Where is Zetar?
What has happened to him?
Does anyone have presence of mind and can communicate with him?
shocked
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