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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 3278 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9900 on: Jan 24th, 2014, 08:34am »

Top of the morning everyone!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9901 on: Jan 24th, 2014, 09:04am »

The Verge

Astronomers say Monet's 'Sunset' masterpiece was painted at 4:53PM on February 5th, 1883

Forensic astronomy sheds new light on impressionist work

By Amar Toor on January 24, 2014 04:32 am



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Researchers from Texas State University have used forensic astronomy to uncover new details about Claude Monet's Étretat: Sunset — a stunning seascape that the impressionist master painted during a trip to the Normandy coast in 1883. Their findings, published in the February 2014 issue of the magazine Sky & Telescope, reveal the exact spot and time at which Monet painted the work, based on extensive fieldwork and astronomical data.

Led by astrophysicist Donald Olson, the team traveled to the cliffs of Normandy in 2012, where they used postcard-size replicas of Monet's works to identify the precise vantage point from which he painted Étretat: Sunset. Once they identified the location, they used planetary software to determine what a 19th century sky would have looked like, focusing on the position of the moon and sun.

Monet created a series of paintings during his three-week winter trip to the region, though Sunset is the only one that includes the low-setting sun, depicted to the right of a seaside cliff and needle-shaped rock formation. Olson and his team visited the area during the summer, so the sun wasn't in the same position, but the crescent moon and star fields allowed them to determine the path along which the sun would've set. Based on their calculations, they concluded that Monet must have painted the work between February 3rd and 7th. After studying the letters Monet wrote during that time, as well as historical weather and tidal data, they narrowed the precise date to February 5th, 1883 at 4:53 PM local time.

Olson has spent his career doing similar analysis, covering paintings by Edvard Munch and Van Gogh, as well as works by Shakespeare and Walt Whitman. Reaction from art historians has been mixed over the years, with some questioning the merit of Olson's work, but the astrophysicist says his analysis doesn't diminish

"You can't ruin a painting's mystique through technical analysis," Olson said in a 2009 interview with Smithsonian Magazine. "It still has the same emotional impact. We are just separating the real from the unreal."

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/24/5340688/astronomers-say-monets-sunset-masterpiece-was-painted-at-4-53-pm-on

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« Reply #9902 on: Jan 24th, 2014, 09:14am »

Science Daily

Timing Is Everything: How the Brain Links Memories of Sequential Events

Jan. 23, 2014 — Suppose you heard the sound of skidding tires, followed by a car crash. The next time you heard such a skid, you might cringe in fear, expecting a crash to follow -- suggesting that somehow, your brain had linked those two memories so that a fairly innocuous sound provokes dread.



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This cross-section of the hippocampus shows
island cells (green) projecting to the CA1 region of the hippocampus.
(Credit: Takashi Kitamura)


MIT neuroscientists have now discovered how two neural circuits in the brain work together to control the formation of such time-linked memories. This is a critical ability that helps the brain to determine when it needs to take action to defend against a potential threat, says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience and senior author of a paper describing the findings in the Jan. 23 issue of Science.

"It's important for us to be able to associate things that happen with some temporal gap," says Tonegawa, who is a member of MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. "For animals it is very useful to know what events they should associate, and what not to associate."

The interaction of these two circuits allows the brain to maintain a balance between becoming too easily paralyzed with fear and being too careless, which could result in being caught off guard by a predator or other threat.

The paper's lead authors are Picower Institute postdocs Takashi Kitamura and Michele Pignatelli.

Linking memories

Memories of events, known as episodic memories, always contain three elements -- what, where, and when. Those memories are created in a brain structure called the hippocampus, which must coordinate each of these three elements.

To form episodic memories, the hippocampus also communicates with the region of the cerebral cortex just outside the hippocampus, known as the entorhinal cortex. The entorhinal cortex, which has several layers, receives sensory information, such as sights and sounds, from sensory processing areas of the brain and sends the information on to the hippocampus.

Previous research has revealed a great deal about how the brain links the place and object components of memory. Certain neurons in the hippocampus, known as place cells, are specialized to fire when an animal is in a specific location, and also when the animal is remembering that location. However, when it comes to associating objects and time, "our understanding has fallen behind," Tonegawa says. "Something is known, but relatively little compared to the object-place mechanism."

The new Science paper builds on a 2011 study from Tonegawa's lab in which he identified a brain circuit necessary for mice to link memories of two events -- a tone and a mild electric shock -- that occur up to 20 seconds apart. This circuit connects layer 3 of the entorhinal cortex to the CA1 region of the hippocampus. When that circuit, known as the monosynaptic circuit, was disrupted, the animals did not learn to fear the tone.

In the new paper, the researchers report the discovery of a previously unknown circuit that suppresses the monosynaptic circuit. This signal originates in a type of excitatory neurons discovered in Tonegawa's lab, dubbed "island cells" because they form circular clusters within layer 2. Those cells stimulate inhibitory neurons in CA1 that suppress the set of excitatory CA1 neurons that are activated by the monosynaptic circuit.

This circuit creates a counterbalance that limits the window of opportunity for two events to become linked. "This pathway might provide a mechanism for preventing constant learning of unimportant temporal associations," says Michael Hasselmo, a professor of psychology at Boston University who was not part of the research team.

The findings are "an important demonstration of the functional role of different populations of neurons in entorhinal cortex that provide input to the hippocampus," Hasselmo adds.

Deciphering circuits

The researchers used optogenetics, a technology that allows specific populations of neurons to be turned on or off with light, to demonstrate the interplay of these two circuits.

In normal mice, the maximum time gap between events that can be linked is about 20 seconds, but the researchers could lengthen that period by either boosting activity of layer 3 cells or suppressing layer 2 island cells. Conversely, they could shorten the window of opportunity by inhibiting layer 3 cells or stimulating input from layer 2 island cells, which both result in turning down CA1 activity.

The researchers hypothesize that prolonged CA1 activity keeps the memory of the tone alive long enough so that it is still present when the shock takes place, allowing the two memories to be linked. They are now investigating whether CA1 neurons remain active throughout the entire gap between events.

The research was funded by the RIKEN Brain Science Institute, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the JPB Foundation.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140123141959.htm

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9903 on: Jan 24th, 2014, 11:06pm »

I've been trying to arrest sys for ages! Foiled again! angry grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9904 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 06:11am »

@ Tommi Impossible I"m between servers right now grin

Unusual Claim here Maybe it was metallic too..I have read mention of large circular artifacts under the ocean.recently in fact..this would be amazing even more if linked..

Relic reveals Noah's ark was circular
• Newly translated tablet gives building instructions
• Amateur historian's find was almost overlooked
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Maev Kennedy
The Guardian, Friday 1 January 2010 17.35 EST

Noahs ark
A 19th-century illustration by Currier & Ives shows the traditional vision of Noah’s ark. Photograph: Brooklyn Museum/Corbis


That they processed aboard the enormous floating wildlife collection two-by-two is well known. Less familiar, however, is the possibility that the animals Noah shepherded on to his ark then went round and round inside.

According to newly translated instructions inscribed in ancient Babylonian on a clay tablet telling the story of the ark, the vessel that saved one virtuous man, his family and the animals from god's watery wrath was not the pointy-prowed craft of popular imagination but rather a giant circular reed raft.

The now battered tablet, aged about 3,700 years, was found somewhere in the Middle East by Leonard Simmons, a largely self-educated Londoner who indulged his passion for history while serving in the RAF from 1945 to 1948.

The relic was passed to his son Douglas, who took it to one of the few people in the world who could read it as easily as the back of a cornflakes box; he gave it to Irving Finkel, a British Museum expert, who translated its 60 lines of neat cuneiform script.

There are dozens of ancient tablets that have been found which describe the flood story but Finkel says this one is the first to describe the vessel's shape.

"In all the images ever made people assumed the ark was, in effect, an ocean-going boat, with a pointed stem and stern for riding the waves – so that is how they portrayed it," said Finkel. "But the ark didn't have to go anywhere, it just had to float, and the instructions are for a type of craft which they knew very well. It's still sometimes used in Iran and Iraq today, a type of round coracle which they would have known exactly how to use to transport animals across a river or floods."

Finkel's research throws light on the familiar Mesopotamian story, which became the account in Genesis, in the Old Testament, of Noah and the ark that saved his menagerie from the waters which drowned every other living thing on earth.

In his translation, the god who has decided to spare one just man speaks to Atram-Hasis, a Sumerian king who lived before the flood and who is the Noah figure in earlier versions of the ark story. "Wall, wall! Reed wall, reed wall! Atram-Hasis, pay heed to my advice, that you may live forever! Destroy your house, build a boat; despise possessions And save life! Draw out the boat that you will built with a circular design; Let its length and breadth be the same."

The tablet goes on to command the use of plaited palm fibre, waterproofed with bitumen, before the construction of cabins for the people and wild animals.

It ends with the dramatic command of Atram-Hasis to the unfortunate boat builder whom he leaves behind to meet his fate, about sealing up the door once everyone else is safely inside: "When I shall have gone into the boat, Caulk the frame of the door!"

Fortunes were spent in the 19th century by biblical archaeology enthusiasts in hunts for evidence of Noah's flood. The Mesopotamian flood myth was incorporated into the great poetic epic Gilgamesh, and Finkel, curator of the recent British Museum exhibition on ancient Babylon, believes that it was during the Babylonian captivity that the exiled Jews learned the story, brought it home with them, and incorporated it into the Old Testament.

Despite its unique status, Simmons' tablet – which has been dated to around 1,700 BC and is only a few centuries younger than the oldest known account – was very nearly overlooked.

"When my dad eventually came home, he shipped a whole tea chest of this kind of stuff home – seals, tablets, bits of pottery," said Douglas. "He would have picked them up in bazaars, or when people knew he was interested in this sort of thing, they would have brought them to him and earned a few bob."

Simmons senior became a scenery worker at the BBC, but kept up his love of history, and was very disappointed when academics dismissed treasures of his as commonplace and worthless. His son took the tablet to a British Museum open day, where Finkel "took one look at it and nearly fell off his chair" with excitement.

"It is the most extraordinary thing," Simmons said of the tablet. "You hold it in your hand, and you instantly get a feeling that you are directly connected to a very ancient past – and it gives you a shiver down your spine."
Raiders of the lost ark

The human fascination with the flood and the whereabouts of the ark shows few signs of subsiding.

The story has travelled down the centuries from the ancient Babylonians and continues to fascinate in the 21st century.

Countless expeditions have travelled to Mount Ararat in Turkey, where Noah's ark is said to have come to rest, but scientific proof of its existence has yet to be found.

Recent efforts to find it have been led by creationists, who are keen to exhibit it as evidence of the literal truth of the Bible.

"If the flood of Noah indeed wiped out the entire human race and its civilization, as the Bible teaches, then the ark constitutes the one remaining major link to the pre-flood world," says John D Morris of the Institute for Creation Research.

"No significant artefact could ever be of greater antiquity or importance."

In the Victorian era some became obsessed with the ark story. George Smith – the lowly British museum assistant who, in 1872, deciphered the Flood Tablet which is inscribed with the Assyrian version of the Noah's ark tale – could apparently not contain his excitement at his discovery.

According to the museum's archives: "He jumped up and rushed about the room in a great state of excitement and to the astonishment of those present began to undress himself."
« Last Edit: Jan 25th, 2014, 06:23am by Equalizer » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9905 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 09:22am »

on Jan 24th, 2014, 11:06pm, tomi01uk wrote:
I've been trying to arrest sys for ages! Foiled again! angry grin



Hang in there Tomi, you'll get him! grin

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« Reply #9906 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 09:23am »

Thank you for that great article Meow, and good morning to you and fellow CaseBookers cheesy

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« Reply #9907 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 09:28am »

Science Daily

Psychologists document the age our earliest memories fade

January 24, 2014

Although infants use their memories to learn new information, few adults can remember events in their lives that happened prior to the age of three. Psychologists at Emory University have now documented that age seven is when these earliest memories tend to fade into oblivion, a phenomenon known as "childhood amnesia."

The journal Memory published the research, which involved interviewing children about past events in their lives, starting at age three. Different subsets of the group of children were then tested for recall of these events at ages five, six, seven, eight and nine.

"Our study is the first empirical demonstration of the onset of childhood amnesia," says Emory psychologist Patricia Bauer, who led the study. "We actually recorded the memories of children, and then we followed them into the future to track when they forgot these memories."

The study's co-author is Marina Larkina, a manager of research projects for Emory's Department of Psychology.

The Bauer Memory Development Lab focuses on how episodic, or autobiographical memory, changes through childhood and early adulthood.

"Knowing how autobiographical memory develops is critically important to understanding ourselves as psychic beings," Bauer says. "Remembering yourself in the past is how you know who you are today."

Scientists have long known, based on interviews with adults, that most people's earliest memories only go back to about age 3. Sigmund Freud coined the term "childhood amnesia" to describe this loss of memory from the infant years. Using his psychoanalytic theory, Freud made the controversial proposal that people were repressing their earliest memories due to their inappropriate sexual nature.

In recent years, however, growing evidence indicates that, while infants use memory to learn language and make sense of the world around them, they do not yet have the sophisticated neural architecture needed to form and hold onto more complex forms of memory.

Instead of relying on interviews with adults, as previous studies of childhood amnesia have done, the Emory researchers wanted to document early autobiographical memory formation, as well as the age of forgetting these memories.

The experiment began by recording 83 children at the age of three, while their mothers or fathers asked them about six events that the children had experienced in recent months, such as a trip to the zoo or a birthday party.

"We asked the parents to speak as they normally would to their children," Bauer says.

She gives a hypothetical example: "The mother might ask, 'Remember when we went to Chuck E. Cheese's for your birthday party?' She might add, 'You had pizza, didn't you?'"

The child might start recounting details of the Chuck E. Cheese experience or divert the conversation by saying something like, "Zoo!"

Some mothers might keep asking about the pizza, while another mother might say, "Okay, we went to the zoo, too. Tell me about that."

Parents who followed a child's lead in these conversations tended to elicit richer memories from their three-year-olds, Bauer says. "This approach also related to the children having a better memory of the event at a later age."

After recording these base memories, the researchers followed up with the children years later, asking them to recall the events that they recounted at age three. The study subjects were divided into five different groups, and each group of children returned only once to participate in the experiment, from the ages of five to nine.

While the children between the ages of five and seven could recall 63 to 72 percent of the events, the children who were eight and nine years old remembered only about 35 percent of the events.

"One surprising finding was that, although the five-and-six year-old children remembered a higher percentage of the events, their narratives of these events were less complete," Bauer says. "The older children remembered fewer events, but the ones they remembered had more detail."

Some reasons for this difference may be that memories that stick around longer may have richer detail associated with them and increasing language skills enable an older child to better elaborate the memory, further cementing it in their minds, Bauer says.

Young children tend to forget events more rapidly than adults do because they lack the strong neural processes required to bring together all the pieces of information that go into a complex autobiographical memory, she explains. "You have to learn to use a calendar and understand the days of the week and the seasons. You need to encode information about the physical location of the event. And you need development of a sense of self, an understanding that your perspective is different from that of someone else."

She uses an analogy of pasta draining in a colander to explain the difference between early childhood and adult memories.

"Memories are like orzo," she says, referring to the rice-grained-sized pasta, "little bits and pieces of neural encoding."

Young children's brains are like colanders with large holes trying to retain these little pieces of memory. "As the water rushes out, so do many of the grains of orzo," Bauer says. "Adults, however, use a fine net instead of a colander for a screen."

Now that Bauer has documented the onset of childhood amnesia, she hopes to hone in on the age that people acquire an adult memory system, which she believes is between the age of nine and the college years.

"We'd like to know more about when we trade in our colanders for a net," she says. "Between the ages of 9 and 18 is largely a no-man's land of our knowledge of how memory forms."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140124135705.htm

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« Reply #9908 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 09:31am »

Associated Press

Bombings rock Egyptian capital, killing 6 people

By MAGGIE MICHAEL and SARAH EL DEEB
— Jan. 24, 2014 6:07 PM EST

CAIRO (AP) — A truck bomb struck the main security headquarters in Cairo on Friday, one of a string of bombings targeting police within a 10-hour period, killing six people. The most significant attack yet in the Egyptian capital fueled a furious backlash against the Muslim Brotherhood amid rising fears of a militant insurgency.

The mayhem on the eve of the third anniversary of Egypt's once-hopeful revolution pointed to the dangerous slide Egypt has taken since last summer's military ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi: A mounting confrontation between the military-backed government and Islamist opponents amid the escalating violence.

In the hours after the blast, angry residents — some chanting for the "execution" of Brotherhood members — joined police in clashes with the group's supporters holding their daily street protests against the government. Smoke rose over Cairo from fires, and fighting around the country left 14 more people dead.

Saturday, the anniversary of the start of the 18-day uprising that ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak, raised the potential for new violence, as both military supporters and the Islamists vowed to take to the streets with rival rallies.

After Friday's blasts, interim President Adli Mansour vowed to "uproot terrorism," just as the government crushed a militant insurgency in the 1990s. The state "will not show them pity or mercy," he said. "We ... will not hesitate to take the necessary measures."

That could spell an escalation in the crackdown that the government has waged against Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood since his July 3 ouster.

Thousands of Islamists have already been arrested and hundreds killed, with authorities accusing the group of being behind militant violence. The Brotherhood, which allied with some radical groups while in power, denies the claim, saying the government is using it to justify its drive to eliminate it as a rival. The crackdown has expanded to silence other forms of dissent, with arrests of secular activists critical of the military, security forces and the new administration.

For activists, that has raised deep concerns over a return of a police state despite the government's promises of democracy.

But among a broad swath of the public, those concerns are eclipsed by fear of the wave of militant bombings and shootings since the coup, which have largely targeted police but increasingly hit in public areas taking civilian casualties. And the public fury has been funneled at the Brotherhood: After Friday's bombings, TV stations aired telephone calls from viewers pleading with army chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to definitively crush the group.

"Execution for Morsi and his leaders!" one man shouted through a megaphone as an angry crowd gathered outside the Cairo security headquarters, hit in Friday's first bombing.

"Morsi is the butcher and el-Sissi will slaughter him!" screamed a woman, holding up a picture depicting the Brotherhood as sheep.

The day's violence began with the 6:30 a.m. blast at the security headquarters, located on downtown Bab el-Khalq Square. Security camera footage showed a white pick-up truck pulling up to the building's gate. A man jumped out of it, got into another car and drove off. Two policemen inspected the truck for a moment before returning to the headquarters. Two minutes later, it exploded.

The powerful blast ripped down a main avenue, knocking out shop windows for more than 500 meters (yards). The eight-story headquarters' facade was shattered, with air conditioning units left dangling out of broken windows, and a 6-foot crater was blasted into the pavement.

The explosion also wrecked Cairo's renowned Islamic Arts Museum, directly across the street, blasting out its windows, causing ceilings to collapse, smashing display cases of porcelain and glasswork and breaking water pipes that sprayed over manuscripts. Museum experts said key pieces in its collection of Islamic artifacts were damaged.

Abdullah el-Sayyed, a 26-year-old salesman who lives behind the headquarters, said he was wakened by the blast, followed by heavy gunfire by frantic policemen. "They were firing their guns in panic as if to call for rescue," he said.

He said he plans to return to his home village in Fayoum, south of Cairo, because he no longer feels safe. "It's not worth it anymore to stay here. Every day I ride the metro and go past here," he said.

After the blast, several police officers sat on the sidewalk outside the building, weeping as ambulances rushed in. A body lay on the ground, covered by a sheet as a crowd of distraught-looking residents surveyed the damage.

Touring the site, Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim, who is in charge of police, called the bombings a "vile terrorist act" and implicitly blamed the Brotherhood, without naming it. "They will reach a point where coexistence will be impossible," he said.

Security officials later said three suspects had been identified in the security headquarters attack, adding that they belonged to the Brotherhood and "extremist groups." The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release the information.

About two hours after the Bab el-Khalq blast, attackers threw a bomb at a police car near a metro station in the Dokki district on the other side of the Nile River, killing one person and wounding eight others, the prosecutors' office said.

A third, smaller blast targeted the Talbiya police station about four kilometers (two miles) from the famed Giza Pyramids but caused no casualties, security officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

Hours after the attacks, the Brotherhood held its daily protests that they have vowed to step up ahead of Saturday's anniversary. The marches quickly turned into clashes with police, joined by residents furious at the Brotherhood, in several districts of Cairo and in cities across the country. The Health Ministry said 14 people were killed in the violence.

In one Cairo neighborhood, pro-Morsi protesters clashing with security forces set fire to a police kiosk, sending a pall of smoke in the air. In the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, residents throwing stones and firing rounds of birdshot killed one Brotherhood supporter when they attacked Islamists marching after the funeral of a student protester killed a day earlier.

As police drove back from clashes with Brotherhood supporters in the capital's Giza district, they were hit by the day's fourth bombing — a roadside explosive that killed one person and wounded four others.

Police and soldiers have been targeted by multiple attacks in recent months. In December, a suicide car bombing blasted the main security headquarters of a Nile Delta province, killing 16 people. The interior minister survived an attempted car-bombing assassination attempt in Cairo in September.

An al-Qaida-inspired group, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, or the Champions of Jerusalem, has claimed responsibility for most attacks, saying they aimed to avenge the killings of Morsi's supporters in the post-coup crackdown. On Thursday, the group issued an online audio statement warning police and soldiers to defect or face new attacks.

The Islamist alliance grouping the Brotherhood and its allies condemned Friday's attacks and blamed them on the Interior Ministry, saying it wanted to turn the public against the Islamists.

It vowed to push ahead with protests Saturday, saying, "the revolution will continue down its peaceful track to bring down the military coup."

Government supporters are also planning giant rallies on Saturday to show their backing for the military — and to call for army chief el-Sissi to run for president.


Associated Press journalists Laura Dean, Maamoun Youssef, Mamdouh Thabit and Khalil Hamra contributed to this report.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/egypt-state-tv-reports-large-explosion-cairo

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #9909 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 3:24pm »

Heart surgeon declares on what really causes heart illness

by Dr. Dwight Lundell - from: PreventDisease

We physicians with all our experience, know how and authority often acquire a rather large selfishness that tends to make it hard to accept we are wrong. So, here it is. I openly admit to being mistaken. As a heart surgeon with 25 years experience, having done more than 5,000 open-heart surgeries, today is my day to right the wrong with medical and scientific proof.

I trained for many years with other prominent physicians labelled “opinion makers.” Bombarded with scientific literature, continually attending education seminars, we opinion makers insisted heart disease resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol.

The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake. The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart disease. Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

It Is Not Working!

These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible. The discovery a few years ago that inflammation in the artery wall is the real cause of heart disease is slowly leading to a paradigm shift in how heart disease and other chronic ailments will be treated.
The long-established dietary recommendations have created epidemics of obesity and diabetes, the consequences of which dwarf any historical plague in terms of mortality, human suffering and dire economic consequences.

Despite the fact that 25% of the population takes expensive statin medications and despite the fact we have reduced the fat content of our diets, more Americans will die this year of heart disease than ever before.

Statistics from the American Heart Association show that 75 million Americans currently suffer from heart disease, 20 million have diabetes and 57 million have pre-diabetes. These disorders are affecting younger and younger people in greater numbers every year.

Simply stated, without inflammation being present in the body, there is no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel and cause heart disease and strokes. Without inflammation, cholesterol would move freely throughout the body as nature intended. It is inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.

Inflammation is not complicated — it is quite simply your
body’s natural defence to a foreign invader such as a bacteria, toxin or virus. The cycle of inflammation is perfect in how it protects your body from these bacterial and viral invaders. However, if we chronically expose the body to injury by toxins or foods the human body was never designed to process,a condition occurs called chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is just as harmful as acute inflammation is beneficial.

What thoughtful person would willfully expose himself repeatedly to foods or other substances that are known to cause injury to the body? Well, smokers perhaps, but at least they made that choice willfully.

The rest of us have simply followed the recommended mainstream diet that is low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, not knowing we were causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. This repeated injury creates chronic inflammation leading to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity.

Let me repeat that: The injury and inflammation in our blood vessels is caused by the low fat diet recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

What are the biggest culprits of chronic inflammation? Quite simply, they are the overload of simple, highly processed carbohydrates (sugar, flour and all the products made from them) and the excess consumption of omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean, corn and sunflower that are found in many processed foods.

Read more http://www.tunedbody.com/heart-surgeon-declares-really-causes-heart-illness/
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« Reply #9910 on: Jan 25th, 2014, 10:05pm »

Look at the medical history of your parents, and then you will know what will happen to you.

The family genes is everything.
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« Reply #9911 on: Jan 26th, 2014, 10:26am »

Good morning Swamprat and Silver cheesy

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« Reply #9912 on: Jan 26th, 2014, 10:28am »

Reuters

Snowden says NSA engages in industrial espionage

By Erik Kirschbaum

BERLIN
Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:25am

(Reuters) - The U.S. National Security Agency is involved in industrial espionage and will grab any intelligence it can get its hands on regardless of its value to national security, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden told a German TV network.

In text released ahead of a lengthy interview to be broadcast on Sunday, ARD TV quoted Snowden saying the NSA does not limit its espionage to issues of national security and he cited German engineering firm, Siemens as one target.

"If there's information at Siemens that's beneficial to U.S. national interests - even if it doesn't have anything to do with national security - then they'll take that information nevertheless," Snowden said, according to ARD, which recorded the interview in Russia where he has claimed asylum.

Snowden also told the German public broadcasting network he no longer has possession of any documents or information on NSA activities and has turned everything he had over to select journalists.

He said he did not have any control over the publication of the information, ARD said.

Questions about U.S. government spying on civilians and foreign officials burst into the open last June when Snowden, leaked documents outlining the widespread collection of telephone records and email.

The revelations shocked Germany, a country especially sensitive after the abuses by the Gestapo during the Nazi reign and the Stasi in Communist East Germany during the Cold War.

Reports the NSA monitored Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone have added to the anger in Germany, which has been pushing for a 'no-spy' agreement with the United States, a country it considers to be among its closest allies.

TARGETS

Snowden's claim the NSA is engaged in industrial espionage follows a New York Times report earlier this month that the NSA put software in almost 100,000 computers around the world, allowing it to carry out surveillance on those devices and could provide a digital highway for cyberattacks.

The NSA planted most of the software after gaining access to computer networks, but has also used a secret technology that allows it entry even to computers not connected to the Internet, the newspaper said, citing U.S. officials, computer experts and documents leaked by Snowden.

The newspaper said the technology had been in use since at least 2008 and relied on a covert channel of radio waves transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards secretly inserted in the computers.

Frequent targets of the programme, code-named Quantum, included units of the Chinese military and industrial targets.

Snowden faces criminal charges after fleeing to Hong Kong and then Russia, where he was granted at least a year's asylum.

He was charged with theft of government property, unauthorised communication of national security information and giving classified intelligence data to an unauthorised person.

(Editing by Sophie Hares)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/26/us-security-snowden-germany-idUSBREA0P0DE20140126

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« Reply #9913 on: Jan 26th, 2014, 10:31am »




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« Reply #9914 on: Jan 26th, 2014, 11:10am »

On this:
Reuters

Snowden says NSA engages in industrial espionage

By Erik Kirschbaum

This is something that was brought up by several pundits right after all this came to light!

Ever wonder exactly how nearly everyone in DC connected to the Congress ends up filthy rich so fast after they get elected?

Their supposed 'Blind Trusts' seem to always be at the forefront of great earnings and almost never do these stocks and bonds their trusts purchase go bust!

Wonder exactly how blind their trustees are to the information available the NSA gleans from the surveillance?

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\"The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.\"
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