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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed  (Read 7278 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #1485 on: May 22nd, 2017, 6:18pm »

HEY CLIFF, HAL, SWAMP grin

IT'S HOT HERE..................UGH!

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #1486 on: May 22nd, 2017, 7:28pm »


It's bout 75 here. Girlfriend, beer, at the lake (home), guitar, sunset, ,,darn the luck. grin

Tokes cool

« Last Edit: May 22nd, 2017, 9:54pm by Cliff-67 » User IP Logged

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #1487 on: May 22nd, 2017, 11:32pm »

wink

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SHALOM...Z
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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #1488 on: May 23rd, 2017, 08:27am »

on May 22nd, 2017, 7:28pm, Cliff-67 wrote:
It's bout 75 here. Girlfriend, beer, at the lake (home), guitar, sunset, ,,darn the luck. grin

Tokes cool




SOUNDS LOVELY! ENJOY!

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« Reply #1489 on: May 23rd, 2017, 08:30am »

on May 22nd, 2017, 11:32pm, ZETAR wrote:
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SHALOM...Z



Z YOU ARE A MASTER!

GOOD MORNING TO YOU AND ALL OF OUR WONDERFUL
UFOCASEBOOK MEMBERS cheesy





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« Reply #1490 on: May 23rd, 2017, 09:08am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK

"Z YOU ARE A MASTER!" ~ YOUR KIND WORDS ARE MOST APPRECIATED!

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« Reply #1491 on: May 23rd, 2017, 11:58am »





~

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #1492 on: May 23rd, 2017, 12:14pm »

R.I.P. 007 Roger Moore cry
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« Reply #1493 on: May 23rd, 2017, 6:04pm »

on May 23rd, 2017, 12:14pm, Swamprat wrote:
R.I.P. 007 Roger Moore cry






~

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« Reply #1494 on: May 24th, 2017, 09:36am »

GOOD MORNING LOVELY PEOPLE cheesy

Vancouver Sun

Four bodies found inside tent just 850 metres shy of Mount Everest summit

by Binaj Gurubacharya
The Associated Press 05.24.2017

KATHMANDU — Almost every year, the reports filter down from the highest mountain in the world, and talk among the climbing teams at Everest Base Camp turns to the latest person to die.

On Everest, tragedy is almost normal. Ten people have died so far in a series of accidents this climbing season, four more than mountaineering officials expect in a typical year.

On Wednesday, authorities said Sherpa rescuers found the bodies of four climbers including a woman inside a tent at the highest camp on Everest, a few thousand feet from the summit. The rescuers were in the area to recover the body of 49-year-old Slovakian solo climber Vladimir Strba who had died over the weekend.

“It is most likely they died from carbon monoxide poisoning by using their stoves in the tent without proper ventilation,” U.S. climber Alan Arnette, who blogs on Everest, said in a post.

The four bodies found in the tent were at Camp 4 at the South Col, located at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet). That is the last stop before climbers make their final push for the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) summit. Any recovery attempt would require many Sherpas who would have to bring the bodies down to Camp 2, where they can be winched into helicopters.

The identities of the four dead climbers found in the tent were still unknown, and other rescuers were heading there to learn more details.

“Some years there are more, and some years there are less, but deaths on the mountain are normal,” said Jiban Ghimire, who runs a prominent expedition company, Shangrila Nepal Trek. Most in the climbing world know tragedy will touch them at some point. “It is the nature of work. We can’t say what will happen on the mountain,” he said.

“I have lost many good friends on the mountains, which is very difficult to deal with, but that is the reality of mountaineering,” Ghimire said.

Many of the victims remain on the mountain, entombed in snow, because it is too difficult to bring their bodies down.

The weather on Everest, already one of the most unforgiving places on Earth, was especially hard this year.

“This year it was colder, windy and snowed much more than in previous years,” said Ang Tshering, president of the Nepal Mountaineering Association. “Even now climbers are struggling with weather.”

The worst years are even more deadly. In 2014, the year an avalanche swept through Everest’s Khumbu icefall, there were 16 deaths. In 2015, when an earthquake and subsequent avalanche struck during the climbing season, 19 people died.

Indian climber Ravi Kumar, American doctor Roland Yearwood, Slovak climber Vladimir Strba and Australian Francesco Enrico Marchetti died over the weekend, and two climbers died earlier. The climbing season begins in March and runs through the end of May to take advantage of the best weather conditions on Everest.

Recent decades have brought improvements in climbing equipment, weather forecasting and communications equipment. That makes climbing safer – but also allows less-experienced climbers to attempt the Everest summit.

The Nepalese Tourism Department issued a record 371 permits this year to people to scale the mountain. The increased number of climbers is likely because many people were unable to climb in 2014 and 2015, when the deadly avalanches disrupted climbing seasons.

Climbers who had permits for the 2014 season were allowed to receive a free replacement permit until 2019, while climbers with 2015 permits were given only until this year. The permits normally cost $11,000.



Associated Press writer Tim Sullivan in New Delhi contributed to this report.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/world/four+bodies+found+inside+tent+just+metres+mount+everest+summit/13393579/story.html

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« Reply #1495 on: May 24th, 2017, 09:47am »

Scientific American

Gorillas Hum and Sing While They Eat to Say, “Do Not Disturb”

Our gorilla cousins sing as they supper

By Steve Mirsky
May 2017 Special Edition

Where, an old joke asks, does a 400-pound gorilla sleep? Anywhere it wants to, the superannuated gag answers. In keeping with that line of reasoning, a 400-pound gorilla should similarly hum anytime it wants to. The scientifically verified answer, however, is that the gorilla in question actually hums when he's eating—if the gorilla in question is a socially prominent male, anyway, according to a study recently published in the journal PLOS ONE. The humming sounds more like rumbling Dolby Audio in a theater showing a Fast & Furious movie than what you and I might come up with when we're doing the dishes. But it's definitely a hum coming out of that huge, hairy head.

The same study found that some gorillas may even sing when they're chewing on a favorite piece of vegetation. (And you thought it was impolite to even talk with your mouth full.) Gorilla singing doesn't approach the mellifluous stylings of, say, the Monkees, but it's vaguely musical, and the logical thing to call this sound that clearly isn't humming would be singing. Just as humans who perform “Aba Daba Honeymoon,” with the immortal line “Baba daba daba daba daba daba dab, said the monkey to the chimp,” are certainly singing, even if the work is “the nadir of all American expression,” according to Thomas Pynchon.

That gorillas produce such noises was not a total shock. “We know from studies on chimpanzees and bonobos that great apes produce certain vocalizations while they're feeding, so-called food-associated calls,” said one of the authors of the study, Eva Luef of the Seoul National University, in an interview for Scientific American's Science Talk podcast. “And our study wanted to investigate whether gorillas do the same.”

So Luef and her colleagues trooped off to the Republic of the Congo to spend some time with two different populations of western lowlands gorillas, which have the easy-to-remember Linnaean subspecies designation of Gorilla g. gorilla. (See if you can guess what the “g” stands for.)

Primatologist Dian Fossey, who died in Rwanda in 1985, noted that gorillas hum and sing. She categorized such sounds as “belch vocalizations,” which often seemed to signal contentment—can you believe some people still don't accept that gorillas and humans have a common ancestor?

The current research, however, is the first to really track the vocalizations and connect them to specific behaviors. “And we found that it was [males—blackback adolescents and silverback adults—that] were the most frequent callers,” Luef revealed. “This is not surprising as adult males are usually the most frequent callers, concerning any gorilla vocalization. And then we found that the food calls were produced when they were feeding on certain foods. So aquatic vegetation or seeds elicited a lot of food calls. And... they never called when they were eating insects like termites or ants.” Because feasting on Formicidae or ingesting Isoptera is nothing to sing about. Even among gorillas.

So what's with all the Sturm und Sang? “We believe that the food calls have a social function in gorillas,” Luef said. “They may signal to [other gorilla] listeners that an individual is busy eating at the moment. Silverback males have a special role in gorilla society.... They are most often the ones making group decisions. So when the silverback sits and eats, the others eat as well. And [when] he gets up and starts to ... travel in the forest..., the others follow him. So it makes sense for the silverback to signal to his group mates that he's still eating and then signal that he has finished eating when he stops calling.” In other words, humming and singing may be the dominant male's Do Not Disturb sign. And his eventual silence could be gorilla for “Ladies and almostmen, may I have your attention?”

In fact, Luef and her colleagues plan to do more in-depth analysis of gorilla vocalizations to see if they can learn anything about how we came to yap. They want to study “how the gorillas compose their food songs,” she said, “and whether they possess a certain repertoire of song notes, which they combine into their little food songs. That would be more similar to human language because [we have] a certain repertoire of sounds we can make, and we combine them into words and different languages. So if gorillas could do the same with their songs, that would just be amazing.” Aba daba indeed.


This article was originally published with the title "Big Hummer"

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gorillas-hum-and-sing-while-they-eat-to-say-ldquo-do-not-disturb-rdquo/

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« Reply #1496 on: May 24th, 2017, 1:05pm »

And the descendants of the gorillas, HUMANS; where are WE headed? Here is one disturbing assessment:


Page 1 of 2



Are we about to witness the most unequal societies in history?


Biotechnology and the rise of AI may split humankind into a small class of ‘superhumans’ and a huge underclass of ‘useless’ people. Once the masses lose their economic and political power, inequality levels could spiral alarmingly.

by Yuval Noah Harari
24 May 2017

Inequality goes back to the Stone Age. Thirty thousand years ago, bands of hunter-gatherers in Russia buried some members in sumptuous graves replete with thousands of ivory beads, bracelets, jewels and art objects, while other members had to settle for a bare hole in the ground.

Nevertheless, ancient hunter-gatherer groups were still more egalitarian than any subsequent human society, because they had very little property. Property is a pre-requisite for long-term inequality.

Following the agricultural revolution, property multiplied and with it inequality. As humans gained ownership of land, animals, plants and tools, rigid hierarchical societies emerged, in which small elites monopolised most wealth and power for generation after generation.

Humans came to accept this arrangement as natural and even divinely ordained. Hierarchy was not just the norm, but also the ideal. How could there be order without a clear hierarchy between aristocrats and commoners, between men and women, or between parents and children?

Priests, philosophers and poets all over the world patiently explained that, just as in the human body not all members are equal – the feet must obey the head – so also in human society, equality will bring nothing but chaos.

In the late modern era, however, equality rapidly became the dominant value in human societies almost everywhere. This was partly due to the rise of new ideologies like humanism, liberalism and socialism. But it was also due to the industrial revolution, which made the masses more important than ever before.

Industrial economies relied on masses of common workers, while industrial armies relied on masses of common soldiers. Governments in both democracies and dictatorships invested heavily in the health, education and welfare of the masses, because they needed millions of healthy labourers to work in the factories, and millions of loyal soldiers to serve in the armies.

Consequently, the history of the 20th century revolved to a large extent around the reduction of inequality between classes, races and genders. The world of the year 2000 was a far more equal place than the world of 1900. With the end of the cold war, people became ever-more optimistic, and expected that the process would continue and accelerate in the 21st century.

In particular, they hoped globalisation would spread economic prosperity and democratic freedom throughout the world, and that as a result, people in India and Egypt would eventually come to enjoy the same rights, privileges and opportunities as people in Sweden and Canada. An entire generation grew up on this promise.

Now it seems that this promise was a lie.

Globalisation has certainly benefited large segments of humanity, but there are signs of growing inequality both between and within societies. As some groups increasingly monopolise the fruits of globalisation, billions are left behind.

Even more ominously, as we enter the post-industrial world, the masses are becoming redundant. The best armies no longer rely on millions of ordinary recruits, but rather on a relatively small number of highly professional soldiers using very high-tech kit and autonomous drones, robots and cyber-worms. Already today, most people are militarily useless.

User Image Humanoid robots work side-by-side with employees on an assembly line in Kazo, Japan. Photograph: Issei Kato/Reuters

The same thing might soon happen in the civilian economy, too. As artificial intelligence (AI) outperforms humans in more and more skills, it is likely to replace humans in more and more jobs. True, many new jobs might appear, but that won’t necessarily solve the problem.

Humans basically have just two types of skills – physical and cognitive – and if computers outperform us in both, they might outperform us in the new jobs just as in the old ones. Consequently, billions of humans might become unemployable, and we will see the emergence of a huge new class: the useless class.

This is one reason why human societies in the 21st century might be the most unequal in history. And there are other reasons to fear such a future.

This is one reason why human societies in the 21st century might be the most unequal in history. And there are other reasons to fear such a future.

With rapid improvements in biotechnology and bioengineering, we may reach a point where, for the first time in history, it becomes possible to translate economic inequality into biological inequality. Biotechnology will soon make it possible to engineer bodies and brains, and to upgrade our physical and cognitive abilities. However, such treatments are likely to be expensive, and available only to the upper crust of society. Humankind might consequently split into biological castes.

Throughout history, the rich and the aristocratic always imagined they had superior skills to everybody else, which is why they were in control. As far as we can tell, this wasn’t true. The average duke wasn’t more talented than the average peasant: he owed his superiority only to unjust legal and economic discrimination. However, by 2100, the rich might really be more talented, more creative and more intelligent than the slum-dwellers. Once a real gap in ability opens between the rich and the poor, it will become almost impossible to close it.

The two processes together – bioengineering coupled with the rise of AI – may result in the separation of humankind into a small class of superhumans, and a massive underclass of “useless” people.

Here’s a concrete example: the transportation market. Today there are many thousands of truck, taxi and bus drivers in the UK. Each of them commands a small share of the transportation market, and they gain political power because of that. They can unionise, and if the government does something they don’t like, they can go on strike and shut down the entire transportation system.

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« Reply #1497 on: May 24th, 2017, 1:08pm »

Page 2 of 2


User Image The jobs market could be irrevocably transformed by the development of self-driving vehicles. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

Now fast-forward 30 years. All vehicles are self-driving. One corporation controls the algorithm that controls the entire transport market. All the economic and political power which was previously shared by thousands is now in the hands of a single corporation, owned by a handful of billionaires.

Once the masses lose their economic importance and political power, the state loses at least some of the incentive to invest in their health, education and welfare. It’s very dangerous to be redundant. Your future depends on the goodwill of a small elite. Maybe there is goodwill for a few decades. But in a time of crisis – like climate catastrophe – it would be very tempting, and easy, to toss you overboard.

In countries such as the UK, with a long tradition of humanist beliefs and welfare state practices, perhaps the elite will go on taking care of the masses even when it doesn’t really need them. The real problem will be in large developing countries like India, China, South Africa or Brazil.

These countries resemble a long train: the elites in the first-class carriages enjoy healthcare, education and income levels on a par with the most developed nations in the world. But the hundreds of millions of ordinary citizens who crowd the third-class cars still suffer from widespread diseases, ignorance and poverty.

What would the Indian, Chinese, South African or Brazilian elite prefer to do in the coming century? Invest in fixing the problems of hundreds of millions of useless poor – or in upgrading a few million rich?

In the 20th century, the elites had a stake in fixing the problems of the poor, because they were militarily and economically vital. Yet in the 21st century, the most efficient (and ruthless) strategy may be to let go of the useless third-class cars, and dash forward with the first class only. In order to compete with South Korea, Brazil might need a handful of upgraded superhumans far more than millions of healthy but useless labourers.

Consequently, instead of globalisation resulting in prosperity and freedom for all, it might actually result in speciation: the divergence of humankind into different biological castes or even different species. Globalisation will unite the world on a vertical axis and abolish national differences, but it will simultaneously divide humanity on a horizontal axis.

From this perspective, current populist resentment of “the elites” is well-founded. If we are not careful, the grandchildren of Silicon Valley tycoons might become a superior biological caste to the grandchildren of hillbillies in Appalachia.

There is one more possible step on the road to previously unimaginable inequality. In the short-term, authority might shift from the masses to a small elite that owns and controls the master algorithms and the data which feed them. In the longer term, however, authority could shift completely from humans to algorithms. Once AI is smarter even than the human elite, all humanity could become redundant.

What would happen after that? We have absolutely no idea – we literally can’t imagine it. How could we? A super-intelligent computer will by definition have a far more fertile and creative imagination than that which we possess.

Of course, technology is never deterministic. We can use the same technological breakthroughs to create very different kinds of societies and situations. For example, in the 20th century, people could use the technology of the industrial revolution – trains, electricity, radio, telephone – to create communist dictatorships, fascist regimes or liberal democracies. Just think about North and South Korea: they have had access to exactly the same technology, but they have chosen to employ it in very different ways.

In the 21st century, the rise of AI and biotechnology will certainly transform the world – but it does not mandate a single, deterministic outcome. We can use these technologies to create very different kinds of societies. How to use them wisely is the most important question facing humankind today. If you don’t like some of the scenarios I have outlined here, you can still do something about it.

Yuval Noah Harari lectures at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and is the author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind and Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. He discusses the history of inequality for the BBC World Service here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p050kvnz

https://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2017/may/24/are-we-about-to-witness-the-most-unequal-societies-in-history-yuval-noah-harari

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« Reply #1498 on: May 24th, 2017, 1:30pm »


Amost scary stuff Swamp.

It (AI) gather's more about us every day. Or does it ?

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« Reply #1499 on: May 24th, 2017, 3:37pm »

Here is another part of the equation that may send us in that direction....


Reporter's notebook: Be warned: $25 oil is coming, and along with it, a new world order

Oriel Morrison
May 23, 2017

The world as we know it, will be no longer. The balance of power on a global scale will shift. All in the next decade.

Sounds dramatic right? But independent think tank RethinkX believes it to be true, because of rapid advances in technology, and specifically the advent of self-drive or autonomous cars.

First and foremost, RethinkX co-founder and Stanford University economist and professor Tony Seba told CNBC's Street Signs that the rise of self-drive cars will see oil demand plummet, the price of oil drop to $25 a barrel, and oil producers left without the political or financial capital they have today.

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Source: FCA FCA delivering 100 uniquely-built Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans to Waymo (formerly the Google self-driving car project) for their self-driving test fleet.

"Oil demand will peak 2021-2020 and will go down 100 million barrels, to 70 million barrels within 10 years. And what that means, the new equilibrium price is going to be $25, and if you produce oil and you can't compete at $25, essentially you are holding stranded assets," Seba said.

"At $25 a barrel, that means deep-water, sands, shell oil, fields, most are going to be stranded, and also all the refineries and pipelines associated with these expensive oils are also going to be stranded. And that is going to reshape worldwide oil, geopolitics and so on."

It's a big call, right? But if you look at what's behind Seba's premise, surprise, surprise, it comes down to money.

He says we are not going to stop driving altogether, just switch to self-drive electric vehicles, which will become a much larger part of the sharing economy. And these electric vehicles are going to cost less to both buy and run.

"The day that autonomous vehicles are approved, the combination of ride hailing, electric and autonomous means that it's going to be ten times cheaper, up to ten times cheaper, to use a robot taxi, transport as a service car, than it is to own a car. Ten times."

Investment case
Interestingly enough, if you believe this thesis, you may want to look at selling out of any exposure you have to car parks. "In fact what is going to happen, in 80 per cent or maybe more, parking spaces are going to be vacant. Because we are going to have, fewer cars on the road" Seba says.

And given that $25 forecast for oil, you certainly want to look at selling oil, and expensive oil producers. Oh, and sell the car makers that are slow to adapt too, given there will be no more petrol or diesel cars, buses and trucks sold anywhere in the world within 8 years. Which also means no more car dealers by 2024.

And wait, you can sell insurers too, as the cost of car insurance will drop dramatically when you take human error out of the equation, and a much lower direct ownership of vehicles in general.

But, according to Seba, it is time to look at buying into anything that will help to produce and manufacture the next generation of cars, which are "computers on wheels."

He says to look at companies that make the operating system, the computer platform, the batteries, mapping software, and those that adapt to the new environment.

"Imagine a Starbucks on wheels. Essentially transportation is going to be so cheap, it's going to be essentially cheaper for Starbucks to run around and take me to work, which is, you know, 60 kilometers away, and give that transportation for free, in exchange for going to buy coffee in that hour of commute."

There is some good news for economic growth too. The savings households make on cars, will drive higher consumer spending in the U.S., which in turn will drive business and job growth. Seba forecasts that productivity gains will boost GDP by an additional $1 trillion.

But on the other hand, outstanding auto loan debt in the U.S. stands at more than $1 trillion. And there are those who see the U.S. subprime-auto market as a big problem already.

Josh Jalinski, president of Jalinski Advisory Group told CNBC's Street Signs that it's a huge risk. "We have a potential auto subprime crisis looming in America, the likes we haven't seen since 2008. … I see the car subprime loan debacle as something that could be the catalyst of upending the Trump train."

Oil and cars
Seba is not alone in his predictions, although others believe the shift will take longer, and will not be so dramatic.

China and India are accelerating the adoption of electric vehicles. China wants to get electric, plug-in hybrids and fuel cell cars to account for 20 per cent of all auto sales by 2025, while India aims to electrify all vehicles in the country by 2032.

But as always with any thesis, there are those who argue for the other side. Oil majors are the obvious ones, with recent reports from both ExxonMobil and BP's suggesting electric cars will comprise less than 10 per cent of the global car fleet by 2035.

As for the auto industry itself, in the latest moves, Ford announced a new CEO, James Hackett, the head of its self-driving subsidiary Ford Smart Mobility LLC. That moves speaks for itself.

Also Monday, Toyota Research Institute ramped up their investment, teaming up with MIT Media lab and five other companies to explore blockchain technology for the development of driverless cars.

And of course, there is the market interest in Tesla. The Elon Musk-backed electric automaker now has a bigger market cap than both Ford and GM.

Trip Chowdhry, managing director and senior analyst at Global Equities Research, points out that while some people think Tesla is an Auto company, it is not.
"It is a cloud computing company, it's a machine and an artificial intelligence company, it is an app company, it is an energy company, and just an automobile is nothing more than a laptop on four wheels."

One point that is agreed, is that the auto industry will look vastly different in the future. The question is, just how long will that change take, and who is going to successfully adapt.

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/23/reporters-notebook-be-warned-us25-oil-is-coming-and-along-with-it-a-new-world-order.html?__source=xfinity|mod&par=xfinity

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