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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed  (Read 37689 times)
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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #855 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 03:16am »

Purr I have polished my Takedowns!
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« Reply #856 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 06:19am »

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #857 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 08:16am »

...If we all agree ...no one is really thinking ...

Maybe, maybe not.

I mean, we all agree that there were more people on the Mall at Obama's inauguration. Don't we ?

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #858 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 08:22am »

After watching the North Korean missile launch I was intrigued by the delay in the engine firing up after the thing left the tube. It almost stopped.

Now, the thinking seems to be that, although it only went about 500 Kilometre, that was because it was launched straight up.
I suggest that, had it been launched at 45 degree, as it would have had to be to attain its full 2000 Kilometre range, it would probably have fallen on the floor before the motor ignited.

Which would have been interesting as a solid fuel motor can't be turned off once lit.

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #859 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 09:54am »

on Feb 13th, 2017, 8:38pm, Swamprat wrote:
Today in 1633 Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome to stand trial for advocating that the Earth revolves around the Sun, a criminal heresy to the Roman Catholic Inquisition. Galileo was found "vehemently suspect of heresy" and sentenced to indefinite house arrest, where he will remain until his death in 1642.

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Thanks for that Swamprat

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #860 on: Feb 14th, 2017, 10:01am »

GOOD MORNING LOVELY UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy

Nautilus

Does Dark Matter Harbor Life?

An invisible civilization could be living right under your nose.

By Lisa Randall

Even though we know that ordinary matter accounts for only about one-twentieth of the universe’s energy and a sixth of the total energy carried by matter (with dark energy constituting the remaining portion), we nonetheless consider ordinary matter to be the truly important constituent. With the exception of cosmologists, almost everyone’s attention is focused on the ordinary matter component, which you might have thought to be largely insignificant according to the energy accounting.

We of course care more about ordinary matter because we are made of the stuff—as is the tangible world in which we live. But we also pay attention because of the richness of its interactions. Ordinary matter interacts through the electromagnetic, the weak, and the strong nuclear forces—helping the visible matter of our world to form complex, dense systems. Not only stars, but also rocks, oceans, plants, and animals owe their very existence to the nongravitational forces of nature through which ordinary matter interacts. Just as a beer’s small-percentage alcohol content affects carousers far more than the rest of the drink, ordinary matter, though carrying a small percentage of the energy density, influences itself and its surroundings much more noticeably than something that just passes through.

Familiar visible matter can be thought of as the privileged percent—actually more like 15 percent—of matter. In business and politics, the interacting 1 percent dominates decision making and policy, while the remaining 99 percent of the population provides less widely acknowledged infrastructure and support—maintaining buildings, keeping cities operational, and getting food to people’s tables. Similarly, ordinary matter dominates almost everything we notice, whereas dark matter, in its abundance and ubiquity, helped create clusters and galaxies and facilitated star formation, but has only limited influence on our immediate surroundings today.

more after the jump:
http://cosmos.nautil.us/feature/134/does-dark-matter-harbor-life

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #861 on: Feb 15th, 2017, 03:33am »

on Feb 14th, 2017, 08:16am, INT21 wrote:
...If we all agree ...no one is really thinking ...

Maybe, maybe not.

I mean, we all agree that there were more people on the Mall at Obama's inauguration. Don't we ?

HAL
INT21


Truth be told I never gave it any thought really..Lightlie and greyfib did some stellar work on that..cheesy Their word is gospel in many quarters.

Good thinking on that solid fuel rocket..I am in agreement..I wonder if it was to emulate a sub launch or sometin.Kims better half was assasinated and contrary to popular thinking I don't think it was because he was a rival heir or liked Disneyland.



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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #862 on: Feb 15th, 2017, 08:12am »

GOOOOD MORNING cheesy

Scientific American

Can Artificial Intelligence Predict Earthquakes?

The ability to forecast temblors would be a tectonic shift in seismology. But is it a pipe dream? A seismologist is conducting machine-learning experiments to find out

By Annie Sneed on February 15, 2017

Predicting earthquakes is the holy grail of seismology. After all, quakes are deadly precisely because they’re erratic—striking without warning, triggering fires and tsunamis, and sometimes killing hundreds of thousands of people. If scientists could warn the public weeks or months in advance that a large temblor is coming, evacuation and other preparations could save countless lives.

So far, no one has found a reliable way to forecast earthquakes, even though many scientists have tried. Some experts consider it a hopeless endeavor. “You’re viewed as a nutcase if you say you think you’re going to make progress on predicting earthquakes,” says Paul Johnson, a geophysicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. But he is trying anyway, using a powerful tool he thinks could potentially solve this impossible puzzle: artificial intelligence.

Researchers around the world have spent decades studying various phenomena they thought might reliably predict earthquakes: foreshocks, electromagnetic disturbances, changes in groundwater chemistry—even unusual animal behavior. But none of these has consistently worked. Mathematicians and physicists even tried applying machine learning to quake prediction in the 1980s and ’90s, to no avail. “The whole topic is kind of in limbo,” says Chris Scholz, a seismologist at Columbia University’s Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory.

But advances in technology—improved machine-learning algorithms and supercomputers as well as the ability to store and work with vastly greater amounts of data—may now give Johnson’s team a new edge in using artificial intelligence. “If we had tried this 10 years ago, we would not have been able to do it,” says Johnson, who is collaborating with researchers from several institutions. Along with more sophisticated computing, he and his team are trying something in the lab no one else has done before: They are feeding machinesraw data—massive sets of measurements taken continuously before, during and after lab-simulated earthquake events. They then allow the algorithm to sift through the data to look for patterns that reliably signal when an artificial quake will happen. In addition to lab simulations, the team has also begun doing the same type of machine-learning analysis using raw seismic data from real temblors.

This is different from how scientists have attempted quake prediction in the past—they typically used processed seismic data, called “earthquake catalogues,” to look for predictive clues. These data sets contain only earthquake magnitudes, locations and times, and leave out the rest of the information. By using raw data instead, Johnson’s machine algorithm may be able to pick up on important predictive markers.

Johnson and collaborator Chris Marone, a geophysicist at The Pennsylvania State University, have already run lab experiments using the school’s earthquake simulator. The simulator produces quakes randomly and generates data for an open-source machine-learning algorithm—and the system has achieved some surprising results. The researchers found the computer algorithm picked up on a reliable signal in acoustical data—“creaking and grinding” noises that continuously occur as the lab-simulated tectonic plates move over time. The algorithm revealed these noises change in a very specific way as the artificial tectonic system gets closer to a simulated earthquake—which means Johnson can look at this acoustical signal at any point in time, and put tight bounds on when a quake might strike.

For example, if an artificial quake was going to hit in 20 seconds, the researchers could analyze the signal to accurately predict the event to within a second. “Not only could the algorithm tell us when an event might take place within very fine time bounds—it actually told us about physics of the system that we were not paying attention to,” Johnson explains. “In retrospect it was obvious, but we had managed to overlook it for years because we were focused on the processed data.” In their lab experiments the team looked at the acoustic signals and predicted quake events retroactively. But Johnson says the forecasting should work in real time as well.

Of course natural temblors are far more complex than lab-generated ones, so what works in the lab may not hold true in the real world. For instance, seismologists have not yet observed in natural seismic systems the creaking and grinding noises the algorithm detected throughout the lab simulations (although Johnson thinks the sounds may exist, and his team is looking into this). Unsurprisingly, many seismologists are skeptical that machine learning will provide a breakthrough—perhaps in part because they have been burned by so many failed past attempts. “It’s exciting research, and I think we’ll learn a lot of physics from [Johnson’s] work, but there are a lot of problems in implementing this with real earthquakes,” Scholz says.

Johnson is also cautious—so much so that he hesitates to call what he is doing “earthquake prediction.” “We recognize that you have to be careful about credibility if you claim something that no one believes you can do,” he says. Johnson also notes he is currently only pursuing a method for estimating the timing of temblors, not the magnitude—he says predicting the size of a quake is an even tougher problem.

But Scholz and other experts not affiliated with this research still think Johnson should continue exploring this approach. “There’s a possibility it could be really great,” explains David Lockner, a research geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey. “The power of machine learning is that you can throw everything in the pot, and the useful parameters naturally fall out of it.” So even if the noise signals from Johnson’s lab experiments do not pan out, he and other scientists may still be able to apply machine learning to natural earthquake data and shake out other signals that do work.

Johnson has already started to apply his technique to real-world data—the machine-learning algorithm will be analyzing earthquake measurements gathered by scientists in France, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and from other sources. If this method succeeds, he thinks it is possible experts could predict quakes months or even years ahead of time. “This is just the beginning,” he says. “I predict, within the next five to 10 years machine learning will transform the way we do science.”

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-artificial-intelligence-predict-earthquakes/

Crystal



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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #863 on: Feb 15th, 2017, 8:46pm »


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KQZ102OoJ4


grin
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xx Re: Stuff and Nonsense Unleashed
« Reply #864 on: Feb 15th, 2017, 9:06pm »

grin

That reminds me of you Ak ! grin

At the moment, I'm ~ baffled ~ laugh about comet 2p Encke.

Stay tuned. cool

https://theskylive.com/encke-info

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« Reply #865 on: Feb 16th, 2017, 12:15am »

SWAMP,

EXCELLENT WORK!

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« Reply #866 on: Feb 16th, 2017, 06:51am »

GOOD MORNING YOU WONDERFUL PEOPLE cheesy

BBC

Winston Churchill's views on aliens revealed in lost essay

By Paul Rincon
Science editor, BBC News website

15 February 2017

A newly unearthed essay by Winston Churchill reveals he was open to the possibility of life on other planets.

In 1939, the year World War Two broke out, Churchill penned a popular science article in which he mused about the likelihood of extra-terrestrial life.

The 11-page typed draft, probably intended for a newspaper, was updated in the 1950s but never published.

In the 1980s, the essay was passed to a US museum, where it sat until its rediscovery last year.

The document was uncovered in the National Churchill Museum in Fulton, Missouri, by the institution's new director Timothy Riley. Mr Riley then passed it to the Israeli astrophysicist and author Mario Livio who describes the contents in the latest issue of Nature journal.

Churchill's interest in science is well-known: he was the first British prime minister to employ a science adviser, Frederick Lindemann, and met regularly with scientists such as Sir Bernard Lovell, a pioneer of radio astronomy.

This documented engagement with the scientific community was partly related to the war effort, but he is credited with funding UK laboratories, telescopes and technology development that spawned post-war discoveries in fields from molecular genetics to X-ray crystallography.

Despite this background, Dr Livio described the discovery of the essay as a "great surprise".

He told the BBC's Inside Science programme: "[Mr Riley] said, 'I would like you to take a look at something.' He gave me a copy of this essay by Churchill. I saw the title, Are We Alone in the Universe? and I said, 'What? Churchill wrote about something like this?'"

Dr Livio says the wartime leader reasoned like a scientist about the likelihood of life on other planets.

Churchill's thinking mirrors many modern arguments in astrobiology - the study of the potential for life on other planets. In his essay, the former prime minister builds on the Copernican Principle - the idea that human life on Earth shouldn't be unique given the vastness of the Universe.

Churchill defined life as the ability to "breed and multiply" and noted the vital importance of liquid water, explaining: "all living things of the type we know require [it]."

More than 50 years before the discovery of exoplanets, he considered the likelihood that other stars would host planets, concluding that a large fraction of these distant worlds "will be the right size to keep on their surface water and possibly an atmosphere of some sort". He also surmised that some would be "at the proper distance from their parent sun to maintain a suitable temperature".

Churchill also outlined what scientists now describe as the "habitable" or "Goldilocks" zone - the narrow region around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for life.

Correctly, the essay predicts great opportunities for exploration of the Solar System.

"One day, possibly even in the not very distant future, it may be possible to travel to the Moon, or even to Venus and Mars," Churchill wrote.

But the politician concluded that Venus and Earth were the only places in the Solar System capable of hosting life, whereas we now know that icy moons around Jupiter and Saturn are promising targets in the search for extra-terrestrial biology. However, such observations are forgivable given scientific knowledge at the time of writing.

In an apparent reference to the troubling events unfolding in Europe, Churchill wrote: "I for one, am not so immensely impressed by the success we are making of our civilisation here that I am prepared to think we are the only spot in this immense universe which contains living, thinking creatures, or that we are the highest type of mental and physical development which has ever appeared in the vast compass of space and time."

Churchill was a prolific writer: in the 1920s and 30s, he penned popular science essays on topics as diverse as evolution and fusion power. Mr Riley, director of the Churchill Museum, believes the essay on alien life was written at the former prime minister's home in Chartwell in 1939, before World War II broke out.

It may have been informed by conversations with the wartime leader's friend, Lindemann, who was a physicist, and might have been intended for publication in the News of the World newspaper.

It was also written soon after the 1938 US radio broadcast by Orson Welles dramatising The War of the Worlds by HG Wells. The radio programme sparked a panic when it was mistaken by some listeners for a real news report about the invasion of Earth by Martians.

Dr Livio told BBC News that there were no firm plans to publish the article because of issues surrounding the copyright. However, he said the Churchill Museum was working to resolve these so that the historically important essay can eventually see the light of day.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38985425

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« Reply #867 on: Feb 16th, 2017, 08:23am »

Chelsea Needs a Thesaurus

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/02/chelsea-clinton-supports-six-time-deported-violent-convicted-criminal-illegal-alien/

“I need a thesaurus. What’s another word for horrifying? Sick? Awful? Running out of adjectives these days that mean unconscionably terrible”


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« Reply #868 on: Feb 16th, 2017, 10:49am »

Come on down, Aliens! You can't be any weirder than Earth humans.


Harvard Computer Science Students in Trouble for Dating App With Only Two Genders


By Emily Zanotti
February 15, 2017

Members of the Harvard Computer Club just wanted to have a little fun for Valentine’s Day, so they created a system called “Datamatch’ that would help students find companions for the holiday. But unfortunately for the HCC, they included only two genders in Datamatch’s options—and now they’re in big trouble.

Twenty six members of Harvard’s Undergraduate Council signed a letter admonishing the dastardly programmers for not including other genders (including “genderqueer” and “non gender-conforming”) in their list of options.

Instead, Datamatch simply had a small box in the profile allowing students to elaborate on their sexual identification and preferences, if they first selected either “male” or “female.”

Students said that such a setup was insufficient because it implied that the “gender binary” was “normal.” “Calling gender non-conformity or any gender non-binary identity ‘extra’ is sort of tactless nomenclature,” one student told the Harvard Crimson.

Harvard’s BGLTQ+ Caucus chair, Nicholas Whittaker, presented the letter. “I’m proposing an undersigned letter, a statement of support with the gender non-conforming and gender queer community after Datamatch implicitly excluded them from the experience,” Whittaker said during a meeting on the subject Sunday. “The idea of it being romantic does not necessitate the idea that it be stuck upon strict gender bearings.”

They say they understand how much work went into the Valentine’s Datamatch program—which is a tradition for the Computer Club dating back to the mid-90s—but that the offense was so dire that if HCC didn’t commit to changing the algorithm next year, Whittaker’s group would consider making it a condition of their continued funding.

HCC says that, for their part, they will commit to making the program, which already serves more than 4,000 Harvard students, more inclusive next year.

They have already proposed a “modified system” for next year’s Valentine’s event, and according to one HCC member’s Facebook post, they are trying to work with the UC to make it as nuanced as possible, so as to accommodate all students, of all genders.

http://heatst.com/culture-wars/harvard-computer-science-students-in-trouble-for-dating-app-with-only-two-genders/

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« Reply #869 on: Feb 16th, 2017, 3:34pm »

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-02-16/monumental-stupidity-%E2%80%98refreezing%E2%80%99-arctic

Scientists Have Announced a Plan to 'Refreeze' the Arctic ... Desperate times call for desperate measures, and with temperatures near the North Pole hitting an unheard-of 20°C (36°F) warmer than average last year, things in the Arctic are undeniably grim right now. But rather than sit by and watch as the sea ice disappears from the region at an unprecedented rate, scientists have hatched a crazy plan to 'refreeze' the Arctic, by installing some 10 million wind-powered pumps over the ice cap to spray sea water over the surface and replenish the sea ice. -

Science Alert

This is a strange idea that only gets stranger as the article continues. Ultimately the idea is to put 10 million blowers on the Arctic ice in order to refreeze it. Total cost: in excess of $500 billion.

That's what global warming scientists want to do. "Our only strategy at present seems to be to tell people to stop burning fossil fuels," lead researcher Steven Desch, told The Guardian.

But the alternative he and others have come up with is to use 10 million wind-powered pumps to add up to an extra metre to the sea ice in the area. "Thicker ice would mean longer-lasting ice," he told the Guardian newspaper. "In turn, that would mean the danger of all sea ice disappearing from the Arctic in summer would be reduced significantly."

More:

The team predicts that pumping 1.3 metres of water on the surface will result in the ice being thicker by 1 metre (3.2 feet). In other words, that's 7.5 kg per second of water (16.5 pounds), or 27 metric tonnes per hour.

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"It is noteworthy that half of the Arctic sea ice currently has a mean annual thickness of only 1.5 metre [4.9 feet]," they report. "Adding 1 metre of ice in the course of one winter is a significant change."



... [I]t would require a wind turbine with blades on order 6 metres in diameter [19 feet], with weight on the order of 4,000 kg of steel [8,818 pounds]. To keep this afloat would require the buoy contain a roughly equal weight of steel. As a round number, we estimate about 10,000 kg of steel [22,046 pounds] would be required per device."

Scientists have actually thought about this before. They've discussed "whitening" the arctic by dispersing aerosol particles that will repel solar radiation. They've also talk about adding cloud cover to prevent heat from reaching the ice.

Because it would cost so much, nations from around the world would have to pitch in. And the money would go to basically creating a gigantic air conditioning system.

Not doing something risks losing polar bears, cod and most importantly, the ability to use ice to radiate heat away from the arctic. According to these scentists, the result of waiting would be catastrophic.

"The records [for the Arctic] are astounding because there are so many of them. The extra warming that is happening up in the Arctic - the 'Arctic amplification' - has been the greatest we've ever seen," Jennifer Francis from the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University reportedly told Fischetti.

But while the article doesn't say it, at least some of the data used to generate the grimmest outcomes has likely been faked.

Recent papers were published using temperatures were used that were higher than those based on ordinary calculations. They were developed from ships rather than from normal weather outlets. This sort of fakery goes back many years and includes other other faked data that apparently appeared in various publications.

Additionally, while Arctic ice may be losing ground - and that's a big if - antarctic ice is gaining in thickness and length. What these scientists are saying may or may not be true, with an emphasis on the "not".

Generally speaking, there doesn't seem much broad evidence of global warming, and what there is of it, if any, is regional, not worldwide.

Conclusion: It's about raising the alarm again rather than focusing on what's really going on. And that's too bad.
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