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May 27th, 2017, 7:55pm



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Cliff-67
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xx Re: Here Comes Jupiter
« Reply #15 on: Jul 5th, 2016, 8:11pm »

on Jul 5th, 2016, 05:31am, INT21 wrote:
Cliff,

Looks like it made it.

HAL
INT21



Gracias amigo ! cool

It made it through the burn. Now, it must continue surviving throughout the duration of the mission.Radiation measurements will intensify as Juno gets closer to the planet Jupiter with each orbiting sweep.

Hopefully, the instruments will continue to gather data.....that's a lot of titanium shielding them..... undecided

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« Reply #16 on: Jul 6th, 2016, 9:22pm »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lm2tAADgp8E
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« Reply #17 on: Jul 8th, 2016, 12:49pm »

Wakey Wakey! Juno Spacecraft Turns on Science Gear at Jupiter

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
July 8, 2016

NASA's Juno spacecraft is opening its eyes to prepare for its first good look at Jupiter.

Juno's nine science instruments were off when the probe entered orbit around the solar system's largest planet Monday (July 4), to reduce complications during that night's make-or-break orbit-insertion engine burn.

The mission team powered up five of those instruments Wednesday (July 6) and plans to turn on the other four before the end of the month, NASA officials said. So Juno should be ready to gather some science data when Juno makes its next close pass by the huge planet on Aug. 27. (The probe is currently in a 53-day orbit around Jupiter.)

"Next time around, we will have our eyes and ears open," Juno principal investigator Scott Bolton, of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, said in a statement today (July 8). "You can expect us to release some information about our findings around Sept. 1."

The $1.1 billion Juno mission launched in August 2011 and aims to help scientists better understand Jupiter's magnetic and gravitational fields, composition and interior structure — in particular, whether the huge planet harbors a core of heavy elements.

The probe's observations should shed light on when, where and how Jupiter — and, by extension, the solar system as a whole — came together, mission team members have said.

Juno will make most of its measurements from its highly elliptical 14-day science orbit, which will bring it within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) of Jupiter's cloud tops at its closest approach. The spacecraft will perform a 22-minute engine burn on Oct. 19 to achieve that orbit. (Juno's main engine will also fire up on July 13 for a brief "trajectory-correction maneuver," NASA officials said.)

In total, Juno will loop around Jupiter 37 times before ending its life with an intentional death dive into Jupiter's thick atmosphere in February 2018. This final maneuver is designed to ensure that Earth microbes don't contaminate the Jovian moon Europa, which scientists think might be capable of supporting life.

http://www.space.com/33375-juno-jupiter-probe-turns-on-science-instruments.html

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xx Re: Here Comes Jupiter
« Reply #18 on: Sep 2nd, 2016, 10:04pm »




cool
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xx Re: Here Comes Jupiter
« Reply #19 on: Sep 3rd, 2016, 02:39am »

on Sep 2nd, 2016, 10:04pm, Cliff-67 wrote:



cool




shocked
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« Reply #20 on: Dec 17th, 2016, 1:33pm »

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap161217.html

APOD/NASA/JUNO cool










« Last Edit: Dec 17th, 2016, 1:55pm by Cliff-67 » User IP Logged

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« Reply #21 on: May 6th, 2017, 12:01pm »


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b45JZWWmOqM&feature=em-uploademail

Approaching Jupiter

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/pia21390/approaching-jupiter

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xx Re: Here Comes Jupiter
« Reply #22 on: Yesterday at 11:37am »

More Jupiter Weirdness: Giant Planet May Have Huge, 'Fuzzy' Core

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
May 26, 2017

Jupiter's deep interior appears to be as strange and otherworldly as the gas giant's storm-studded exterior, new observations by NASA's Juno spacecraft suggest.

Scientists have generally thought that Jupiter either harbors a relatively compact core 1 to 10 times as massive as Earth or no core at all, said Juno principal investigator Scott Bolton, who's based at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

But neither of these hypotheses fits with the gravity data collected so far by Juno, which has been orbiting Jupiter since July 2016.

"There seems to be a fuzzy core, and it may be much larger than anybody had anticipated," Bolton said Thursday (May 25) during a NASA press conference announcing the first detailed science results from Juno's mission.

This core may even be partially dissolved, Bolton said, adding that Juno's initial observations are also consistent with "some deep motions or zonal winds" occurring far beneath the enormous planet's cloud tops.

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Diagram of Jupiter’s possible interior structure. Observations by NASA’s Jupiter-orbiting Juno spacecraft are already helping to flesh out this picture; Juno’s gravity data suggest, for example, that Jupiter may have a surprisingly large, partially dissolved core, mission team members have said. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI

Identifying and characterizing Jupiter's core is a key goal of Juno's $1.1 billion mission, which seeks to better understand how the gas giant formed and evolved. Learning about Jupiter's history should yield insights about planet formation and solar-system evolution in general, mission team members have said.

Juno uses its eight science instruments to study Jupiter's structure, composition and gravitational and magnetic fields. The probe collects most of its information during close flybys over the gas giant's poles, which occur once every 53.5 days. (Juno orbits Jupiter on a highly elliptical path.)

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This image of Jupiter's south pole was created by a citizen scientist using data from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset

Juno has completed just five of these data-gathering "perijove" passes to date, so mission scientists still have a lot to learn about Jupiter's core and other characteristics. But they've already been able to determine quite a bit — that Jupiter's weird, bluish poles are very different from the gas giant's belted midsection, for example, and that the mechanisms powering auroras on Earth and on Jupiter are not identical.

"The general theme of our discoveries is really how different Jupiter looks from what we expected," Bolton said.

http://www.space.com/37005-jupiter-fuzzy-core-nasa-juno.html

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