Board Logo
« Mirage Men »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jul 27th, 2017, 09:40am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  16 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Mirage Men  (Read 22040 times)
drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 6591
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #75 on: Jul 6th, 2014, 3:45pm »

Dedicated to sys:



User IP Logged

jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #76 on: Jul 6th, 2014, 6:20pm »

Thanks, guys. Thanks for the info about peyote, Sys. I had not read that before.

Hey, Sys, if you find the evolution of drugs interesting, you (or others) might find particular parts of Marks's The Search for the Manchurian Candidate a worthy read, in the event you haven't yet. The book is available free at the link below, and can be searched by pressing F3 on a standard keyboard, which is a great feature:

http://lilleprinsforlag.com/The%20Search%20for%20the%20Manchurian%20Candidate.pdf

Sys, you might especially find Chapter 7 of interest, as Marks describes (based on declassified docs) how the CIA sent a crew to the Mexican jungle in search of what the locals called "God's flesh": magic mushrooms. The chapter is a rather entertaining read at parts, as you might imagine.

One of the things I find quite interesting about the bigger picture is that it becomes apparent the Agency was not only searching for substances that would trip someone into next month, but had a specific interest in possibilities that might be facilitated by understandings of esoteric and mystical circumstances. One cannot help but draw such conclusions when they review the available material.

However, it becomes even more apparent that what the Agency primarily eventually created was an unmanageable situation involving, by any other name, psychotic drug addicts who happened to be on the payroll. I think this comes back around to the points we were recently considering, drwu23, about why intel officers might do the things they did (and are suspected of doing): they were crazy.

An absolutely excellent article on the topic, which I would very strongly recommend to all interested parties, ran in The New Yorker in December, 2012. Operation Delirium covers the manic insanity within the IC during the MKULTRA era about as well as any source of which I'm aware:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/12/17/121217fa_fact_khatchadourian?currentPage=all
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #77 on: Jul 6th, 2014, 9:38pm »

whoa that was a good one!! stunning insight on Edgewood and the detachment emotionally of these people..and those soldiers who went on with fractured lives..the same detachment The social scientists of facebook the military which employed at least 25 percent of them and their collaborative university projects..
And you are right..charming madmen.

people are surprised to learn that Churchill and the US were quite ready to employ wmds during wii

http://www.julianlewis.net/essays-and-topics/3805:the-plan-that-never-was-churchill-the-anthrax-bomb-1982-02-01
and had no qualms

Somehere there are bizarre recent articles on the use of phermones to make soldiers behave bizarrely in the trenches.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/4174519.stm
The US defence department considered various non-lethal chemicals meant to disrupt enemy discipline and morale.

The 1994 plans were for a six-year project costing $7.5m, but they were never pursued.

The US Air Force Wright Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, sought Pentagon funding for research into what it called "harassing, annoying and 'bad guy'-identifying chemicals".

The plans were obtained under the US Freedom of Information by the Sunshine Project, a group which monitors research into chemical and biological weapons.

'Who? Me?'

The plan for a so-called "love bomb" envisaged an aphrodisiac chemical that would provoke widespread homosexual behaviour among troops, causing what the military called a "distasteful but completely non-lethal" blow to morale.

Scientists also reportedly considered a "sting me/attack me" chemical weapon to attract swarms of enraged wasps or angry rats towards enemy troops.

A substance to make the skin unbearably sensitive to sunlight was also pondered.

Another idea was to develop a chemical causing "severe and lasting halitosis", so that enemy forces would be obvious even when they tried to blend in with civilians.

In a variation on that idea, researchers pondered a "Who? Me?" bomb, which would simulate flatulence in enemy ranks.

Indeed, a "Who? Me?" device had been under consideration since 1945, the government papers say.

However, researchers concluded that the premise for such a device was fatally flawed because "people in many areas of the world do not find faecal odour offensive, since they smell it on a regular basis".

Captain Dan McSweeney of the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate at the Pentagon said the defence department receives "literally hundreds" of project ideas, but that "none of the systems described in that [1994] proposal have been developed".

He told the BBC: "It's important to point out that only those proposals which are deemed appropriate, based on stringent human effects, legal, and international treaty reviews are considered for development or acquisition."

« Last Edit: Jul 6th, 2014, 9:42pm by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #78 on: Jul 7th, 2014, 12:33am »

on Jul 6th, 2014, 12:32pm, drwu23 wrote:
Some of us have a life outside this forum,,,,especially around the holidays, you should try it.

btw are you trying to be the new johnny b...?

wink


That is interesting you say that.DR..if you are a Doctor..if not..its ok...because it make you feel important..I will never make you feel less than what you are..only you can do that..and I will never permit you to treat less than I know of what I am..

..you never know when someone is homebound..cannot move away from where he or she is..the inside..Home is everything..
to them I would say to all trapped bycircumstances beyond their control. alone...welcome..this is your house too..maybe...we can be your outside world for you..maybe..we can bring a little excitement and enlightenment..we can show you the wonders of stars and universe ..even if you are not a scientist..maybe a little fantasy.maybe..I can be a clown for you to bring a smile..or maybe share your pain...no one has all answers..but this we do for you. here..you are on holiday...and we enjoy together ..yes especially for holidays..I am with you.
.that is my answer Mr Doctor.

John B





User IP Logged

jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #79 on: Jul 7th, 2014, 09:39am »

Yeah, Operation Delirium is quite the piece. Would be funny at times if the circumstances weren't so tragic at other times.

How 'bout when the doc came in sans pants and with acid taped to his wrist - to check on the status of the research subjects? Sounds like something out of a Beatles song... or a 1970's movie in which Elliot Gould and Donald Sutherland play the maniacal Army intellectuals.

And then there was this gem:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/12/17/121217fa_fact_khatchadourian?currentPage=all

"Once, Ketchum walked into his office and found a barrel the size of an oil drum standing in a corner. No one explained why it was in his office, or who had put it there. After a couple of days, he waited until evening and opened it. Inside, he found dozens of small glass vials, each containing a precisely measured amount of pure LSD; he figured there was enough to make several hundred million people go bonkers—and later calculated the street value of the barrel to be roughly a billion dollars. At the end of the week, the barrel vanished just as mysteriously as it had appeared. No one spoke about it. He never learned what it was for."

And this one:

“I was going to New York, and Colonel Lindsey tells me, ‘How about taking a vial of nerve gas to New York to make a demonstration.’ And I am looking at the guy and thinking, If I have an accident on the Thruway, I could kill thousands of people—thousands of people..."

In 'Operation Paperclip', author Jacobsen did a good job of transferring her interpretation that such men seem to almost suffer from some type of tunnel vision. It's as if they lack the abilities to weigh the extenuating circumstances due to their insatiable desires to ponder the attractive possibilities... possibilities they label science, whether or not the term actually fits. And as we have discussed and demonstrated, in the case of drug induced madness, an addict is just an addict, be it a doctor or ontel officer or anything else.

on Jul 6th, 2014, 9:38pm, Sysconfig wrote:
whoa that was a good one!! stunning insight on Edgewood and the detachment emotionally of these people..and those soldiers who went on with fractured lives..the same detachment The social scientists of facebook the military which employed at least 25 percent of them and their collaborative university projects..
And you are right..charming madmen.

people are surprised to learn that Churchill and the US were quite ready to employ wmds during wii

http://www.julianlewis.net/essays-and-topics/3805:the-plan-that-never-was-churchill-the-anthrax-bomb-1982-02-01
and had no qualms

Somehere there are bizarre recent articles on the use of phermones to make soldiers behave bizarrely in the trenches.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/4174519.stm
The US defence department considered various non-lethal chemicals meant to disrupt enemy discipline and morale.

The 1994 plans were for a six-year project costing $7.5m, but they were never pursued.

The US Air Force Wright Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, sought Pentagon funding for research into what it called "harassing, annoying and 'bad guy'-identifying chemicals".

The plans were obtained under the US Freedom of Information by the Sunshine Project, a group which monitors research into chemical and biological weapons.

'Who? Me?'

The plan for a so-called "love bomb" envisaged an aphrodisiac chemical that would provoke widespread homosexual behaviour among troops, causing what the military called a "distasteful but completely non-lethal" blow to morale.

Scientists also reportedly considered a "sting me/attack me" chemical weapon to attract swarms of enraged wasps or angry rats towards enemy troops.

A substance to make the skin unbearably sensitive to sunlight was also pondered.

Another idea was to develop a chemical causing "severe and lasting halitosis", so that enemy forces would be obvious even when they tried to blend in with civilians.

In a variation on that idea, researchers pondered a "Who? Me?" bomb, which would simulate flatulence in enemy ranks.

Indeed, a "Who? Me?" device had been under consideration since 1945, the government papers say.

However, researchers concluded that the premise for such a device was fatally flawed because "people in many areas of the world do not find faecal odour offensive, since they smell it on a regular basis".

Captain Dan McSweeney of the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate at the Pentagon said the defence department receives "literally hundreds" of project ideas, but that "none of the systems described in that [1994] proposal have been developed".

He told the BBC: "It's important to point out that only those proposals which are deemed appropriate, based on stringent human effects, legal, and international treaty reviews are considered for development or acquisition."



For the love of Mick...

With intelligence like this, who needs ignorance?
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #80 on: Jul 7th, 2014, 10:56am »

Those two items had me laughing so hard I choked on my coffee....perfect for a dark comedy movie..He may get his fame and his wish that he did more good than bad..so we don't go down that road again..we are doing the same ..but with gadgets now ..see all..know all..fate is strange that way. smiley
« Last Edit: Jul 7th, 2014, 10:58am by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 6591
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #81 on: Jul 7th, 2014, 4:47pm »

on Jul 7th, 2014, 12:33am, Sysconfig wrote:
That is interesting you say that.DR..if you are a Doctor..if not..its ok...because it make you feel important..I will never make you feel less than what you are..only you can do that..and I will never permit you to treat less than I know of what I am..

..you never know when someone is homebound..cannot move away from where he or she is..the inside..Home is everything..
to them I would say to all trapped bycircumstances beyond their control. alone...welcome..this is your house too..maybe...we can be your outside world for you..maybe..we can bring a little excitement and enlightenment..we can show you the wonders of stars and universe ..even if you are not a scientist..maybe a little fantasy.maybe..I can be a clown for you to bring a smile..or maybe share your pain...no one has all answers..but this we do for you. here..you are on holiday...and we enjoy together ..yes especially for holidays..I am with you.
.that is my answer Mr Doctor.

John B



Seriously...?
rolleyes
User IP Logged

Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #82 on: Jul 7th, 2014, 5:39pm »

on Jul 7th, 2014, 09:39am, jjflash wrote:
Yeah, Operation Delirium is quite the piece. Would be funny at times if the circumstances weren't so tragic at other times.

How 'bout when the doc came in sans pants and with acid taped to his wrist - to check on the status of the research subjects? Sounds like something out of a Beatles song... or a 1970's movie in which Elliot Gould and Donald Sutherland play the maniacal Army intellectuals.

And then there was this gem:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/12/17/121217fa_fact_khatchadourian?currentPage=all

"Once, Ketchum walked into his office and found a barrel the size of an oil drum standing in a corner. No one explained why it was in his office, or who had put it there. After a couple of days, he waited until evening and opened it. Inside, he found dozens of small glass vials, each containing a precisely measured amount of pure LSD; he figured there was enough to make several hundred million people go bonkers—and later calculated the street value of the barrel to be roughly a billion dollars. At the end of the week, the barrel vanished just as mysteriously as it had appeared. No one spoke about it. He never learned what it was for."

And this one:

“I was going to New York, and Colonel Lindsey tells me, ‘How about taking a vial of nerve gas to New York to make a demonstration.’ And I am looking at the guy and thinking, If I have an accident on the Thruway, I could kill thousands of people—thousands of people..."

In 'Operation Paperclip', author Jacobsen did a good job of transferring her interpretation that such men seem to almost suffer from some type of tunnel vision. It's as if they lack the abilities to weigh the extenuating circumstances due to their insatiable desires to ponder the attractive possibilities... possibilities they label science, whether or not the term actually fits. And as we have discussed and demonstrated, in the case of drug induced madness, an addict is just an addict, be it a doctor or ontel officer or anything else.



For the love of Mick...

With intelligence like this, who needs ignorance?


Thanks for the hard work and more importantly..the quality work you do JJ ..It may not prove the existence or non existance of UFOs but definitely help remove a lot of the obfuscation that built up over the years.

User IP Logged

jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #83 on: Jul 8th, 2014, 09:54am »

on Jul 7th, 2014, 5:39pm, Sysconfig wrote:
Thanks for the hard work and more importantly..the quality work you do JJ ..It may not prove the existence or non existance of UFOs but definitely help remove a lot of the obfuscation that built up over the years.



Thank you, Sys. I appreciate that. I indeed became less interested as time went by in a seemingly never ending stream of nebulous witness testimony, and more interested in the people and social issues surrounding reported UFOs and entities. I'm not saying there's necessarily nothing to the reports, but, over time, one gets tired of chasing ghosts, both literally and figuratively.
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #84 on: Jul 10th, 2014, 9:08pm »

Put WIT on Your List of Satire Sites, and Somebody Tell Stubblebine and Laibow

The UFO Trail

July 10, 2014

A website hosting the so-called Wyoming Institute of Technology is posting outrageous and unsubstantiated claims, apparently under the increasingly popular click-bait guise of satire. A quick web search indicated several bloggers and forum visitors to be aware of the circumstances, but it seems no one sent retired intelligence expert Gen. Stubblebine or his writer/researcher wife Dr. Laibow a memo.

Stubblebine and Laibow

Regular readers of The UFO Trail are aware of posts involving the activities of retired career intelligence officer Gen. Albert Stubblebine III and his wife, Dr. Rima Laibow. The controversial couple have been splashing the pot in UFO and conspiracy circles for decades now. Their endeavors include Stubblebine being credited with an influential role in Project STAR GATE, a now declassified CIA-funded Remote Viewing initiative. Prominently featured in Jon Ronson's The Men Who Stare at Goats, Stubblebine was also recognized during his career as responsible for redesigning the intelligence structure of the entire US Army. Laibow worked extensively with alleged alien abductees, was a proponent of hypnosis used as a memory retrieval tool and reportedly considers herself an experiencer of such abduction-like phenomena.

It is for such reasons that from time to time I browse the website of the nonprofit organization, Natural Solutions Foundation, founded by the couple. Gen. Bert and Dr. Rima, as they are known to their supporters, regularly post warnings about an alleged band of global elites who aim to murder the vast majority of the human population. This, according to the general and doctor, is being accomplished through such means as turning children into autistic worker drones by way of harmful injections disguised as vaccinations, and poisoning the population via chemtrails. A healthy food supply is also at risk of dwindling into nonexistence, Dr. Rima frequently reports, in addition to numerous other ominous warnings consistently published by the couple.

Laibow's Latest

Laibow's latest piece, published July 7, opened with a warning to readers to hold on to their hats and brace themselves for a rough read. The medical doctor and psychiatrist proceeded to explain how we are virtually all what was termed "specimens in a laboratory", involuntary participants in an experiment "not going well".

Laibow wrote, emphasis hers, "First, scientists at the Wyoming Institute of Technology scanned 3000 people in the US. 1000 of them already were implanted with RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), about which they knew nothing. That's one in three people!"

Whoa! Emphasis mine.

Get outta town, I thought. A study conducted by a credible research facility in which some thousand people were identified as being unwittingly implanted with RFID chips? I would indeed want to read those reports. Was there any such substantiated published work?

Well, no, not really. You saw that coming, didn't ya?

WIT

Turns out the Wyoming Institute of Technology, which uses the acronym WIT (wink, wink...), operates a website which, by all reasonable evaluation, appears satirical, albeit more deceptively so than many might deem appropriate. The RFID story in question stated research subjects were supposedly found to have implants. WIT added that the implants were probably covertly administered during dental procedures and presented the story in somewhat of a format of a research paper.

Serious academic website? Consider the posted conditions of touring the supposed facility, for instance, in which visitors must be willing to take iodine tablets for their own safety due to the "'Halls of Plutonium' exhibit, which is prominently featured along the tour route", and the stipulation that Muslims must obtain written permission from Homeland Security to enter.

Then there are the satirical WIT employment opportunities. Researchers are well paid and offered very attractive bonuses if their findings correlate with expectations of private-sector funding partners. Night shift custodians are needed who will remove "medical waste" stored in black bags a few feet long and weighing a couple hundred pounds or so, and dump them in a river, making sure the bags sink.

Evolving Beliefs

Ha ha. Okay, real funny. Another website detrimental to understanding actuality while twisting and distorting factual aspects of certain circumstances to the point of beyond recognition.

So why is Laibow citing such a story? It took me all of a half hour to form what I felt was a reasonable conclusion of the lack of authenticity of the WIT website and so-called research endeavors. I was so convinced their content is satirical that I chose not to bother to research the authors, browse Wyoming public records and similar options - and suffice it to say I'm neither a career intelligence professional nor married to one.

Perhaps the answers to that question, why Laibow cites such dubious sources, are related to the reasons she and Gen. Stubblebine say and do many of the things they do, whatever those reasons may be. I would not venture an all inclusive conclusion, but I speculate such circumstances represent a greater role in the intentional manipulation of opinions and beliefs than many would prefer to consider.

Original post with supporting links:

http://ufotrail.blogspot.com/2014/07/put-wit-on-your-list-of-satire-sites.html
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #85 on: Jul 11th, 2014, 1:38pm »

their anagrams are funny grin
User IP Logged

jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #86 on: Jul 18th, 2014, 11:03am »

Latest post from Redfern:

UFOs, Project Pandora, MJ12

Nick Redfern's World of Whatever...

July 18, 2014

This is very interesting...

Over at the Department of Defense's website you can find a document that has been declassified via the Freedom of Information Act on the subject of Project Pandora (which, in part, was focused on how microwaves can affect the mind and nervous-system).

It's a fascinating file that dates back to the 1960s.

It's a lengthy file, too: it runs to 469 pages.

But, here's the weird thing...

If you scroll down to page 449, you'll see that it contains a copy of the controversial "MJ12/Eisenhower Briefing Document" on the Roswell affair of 1947!

Of course, as most people within Ufology know, the document is one that has been the subject of much debate regarding its authenticity or otherwise.

Indeed, the copy of the EBD in the Pandora file has a hand-written note on it stating that, "This cannot be authenticated as an official DoD document."

Well, that's fair enough, and something that most people within Ufology would agree with - it has not been authenticated.

But, here's the issue: what is a copy of the EBD doing in a DoD file on Project Pandora...?

Original post with supporting links:

http://nickredfernfortean.blogspot.com/2014/07/ufos-project-pandora-mj12.html

............................................................

Much more on Pandora and related issues may be read in an article I have referenced many times over the years, 'Remote Mind Control Technology' by Anna Keeler. I highly recommend it for those interested in the subject matter:

http://www.spunk.org/texts/altern/pub/keith/sp000435.txt
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 6591
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #87 on: Jul 18th, 2014, 9:05pm »

on Jul 18th, 2014, 11:03am, jjflash wrote:
Latest post from Redfern:

UFOs, Project Pandora, MJ12

Nick Redfern's World of Whatever...

July 18, 2014

This is very interesting...

Over at the Department of Defense's website you can find a document that has been declassified via the Freedom of Information Act on the subject of Project Pandora (which, in part, was focused on how microwaves can affect the mind and nervous-system).

It's a fascinating file that dates back to the 1960s.

It's a lengthy file, too: it runs to 469 pages.

But, here's the weird thing...

If you scroll down to page 449, you'll see that it contains a copy of the controversial "MJ12/Eisenhower Briefing Document" on the Roswell affair of 1947!

Of course, as most people within Ufology know, the document is one that has been the subject of much debate regarding its authenticity or otherwise.

Indeed, the copy of the EBD in the Pandora file has a hand-written note on it stating that, "This cannot be authenticated as an official DoD document."

Well, that's fair enough, and something that most people within Ufology would agree with - it has not been authenticated.

But, here's the issue: what is a copy of the EBD doing in a DoD file on Project Pandora...?

Original post with supporting links:

http://nickredfernfortean.blogspot.com/2014/07/ufos-project-pandora-mj12.html

............................................................

Much more on Pandora and related issues may be read in an article I have referenced many times over the years, 'Remote Mind Control Technology' by Anna Keeler. I highly recommend it for those interested in the subject matter:

http://www.spunk.org/texts/altern/pub/keith/sp000435.txt


That is interesting. What do you think it's doing in there?
User IP Logged

jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #88 on: Jul 19th, 2014, 09:47am »

on Jul 18th, 2014, 9:05pm, drwu23 wrote:
That is interesting. What do you think it's doing in there?


I don't know, but it would be easy to venture a guess that a common thread between Project Pandora and the MJ-12 fiasco would be psy ops. Dr. Heiser blogged some about it last night, considering the possibilities related to Operation Paperclip as a common denominator:

http://drmsh.com/2014/07/18/project-pandora-and-the-mj-12-eisenhower-briefing-document/

Some researchers suspect the state-sponsored covert use of involuntary human research subjects became enmeshed with the alien abduction lore for what might be a variety of reasons. Along those lines, Keeler considered the symptoms of overexposure to microwave pulses (as explored in Pandora). She wrote:

"In a report prepared by Rosalie Bertell, commissioner for International Commission of Health Professionals for Human Rights, a non-governmental organization based in Geneva, Switzerland, the unusual patterns of illness ranged from 'severe headaches, drowsiness, menstrual bleeding at abnormal times or post-menopausal, to bouts of temporary paralysis, faulty speech coordination and in one case apparent circulatory failure requiring hospitalization.'

"Other symptoms documented by peace activist Kim Bealy, who coordinates investigations into reports of illness at specific places around the base, included; vertigo, retinal bleeding, burnt face (even at night), nausea, sleep disturbances and palpitations. Psychbological symptoms included lack of concentration, disorientation, loss of memory, irritability and a sense of panic in non-panic situations. The symptoms have virtually all been associated in medical literature with exposure to microwaves and most listed can be induced through low intensity or non-thermal exposures."

It's not difficult to envision how self-described abductees might misinterpret such circumstances, particularly given the encouragement of the UFO community to attribute such symptoms to alien abduction. Does MJ-12 tie in to it all? I don't know, but it is indeed curious what the EBD is doing in a Pandora file.

By the way, writer/researcher Ryan Dube became extremely suspicious that Col. John "Mr. Non-Lethal" Alexander played a significant role in a state-sponsored MJ-12 disinfo campaign. I wrote about related circumstances at:

http://www.examiner.com/article/grant-cameron-reports-john-alexander-confirmed-mj-12
User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
jjflash
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 1476
xx Re: Mirage Men
« Reply #89 on: Jul 19th, 2014, 1:22pm »

Another consideration, drwu, let's not forget the curiosities surrounding such circumstances as Vallee's research into crop circles, the reported experiences of Lindy Tucker and the anecdotes provided by biophysicist "Lefty" Levengood. Is there a common theme running through all this? I don't claim to be able to conclusively say, but discoveries such as Redfern recently made do lead me to continue to think further research is justified.

I'll put a post from some of our related discussions below for those interested in exploring the possibilities further.

on Jun 14th, 2014, 5:09pm, jjflash wrote:
Here's some related stuff I find fascinating:

Source: http://ufotrail.blogspot.com/2011/04/crop-circles-part-three.html

In 1975 in Orton, Ontario, Lindy Tucker and her neighbors began experiencing events of such high strangeness that Tucker's subsequent investigations led to founding a research organization and having some of her work published in the MUFON Journal.

[...]

Following at least two sightings of unidentified aerial phenomena, in which Tucker perceived what she described as “telepathic contact,” she experienced electronic anomalies, including telephone disconnections and appliances inexplicably turning on. Tucker further reported “compasses spinning” in her hand and “odd rashes or burns after being out late in the fields trying to get closer to this mysterious force.”

While all this was taking place, one day Tucker discovered a nearby field of corn “went down.” Every single stalk in the field, as far as the eye could see, she wrote, was “laid down” and the crops “looked singed.”

Then her garden produced a whopping 75-pound cabbage.

User Image
Tucker with the amazing cabbage

[And get a load of this from the same blog post...]

The work of William C. “Lefty” Levengood... includes examinations of crop circles and cattle mutilations, as well as investigations of alleged alien abduction.

[...]

As the story went, Levengood supplied [a] female abductee with an assortment of hair curlers, each having a plastic capsule stuffed in it which had seeds, allegedly wheat seeds, placed in it. Each night, before going to sleep, she was to put a hair curler in her hair. Each morning, she was to properly date and store the curler, documenting in a journal if she had experienced anything unusual during the previous night or 24 hours.

According to various Internet sources, the woman experienced some type of high strangeness, or possible alien abduction, one night during the experimentation period. Levengood would later find the seeds to indeed be altered which coincided with the date of the strange experience. As the story went, the seeds were completely fried.

I contacted William “Lefty” Levengood in 2010 so I could find out more about such extraordinary claims. Levengood graciously agreed to participate in two telephone interviews conducted during July of 2010. As is often the situation with tales circulating around the Internet, Levengood informed me there is truth mixed with inaccuracy in the hair curler story. However, in this case, I found the truth even more interesting!

[...]

The story did actually happen, as Levengood thought it would be a good idea to use seeds to try to document the presence of abnormal energies surrounding the female abductee.

“I could give you a whole day's lecture on work just with her,” he proclaimed.

The first inaccuracy in the story was the type of seeds. The actual seeds used were Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant in the mustard family commonly used by the international research community.

He said the woman followed instructions very well, doing an excellent job of documenting details of her activities. Every seven days Levengood would retrieve the hair curlers from the previous week while supplying her with seven more, each packed with a plastic capsule containing seeds. He would then dig the plastic capsule out of each returned curler, review the related written information, and, interestingly enough, plant the seeds. He eventually came across the journal entry indicating an experience of high strangeness and the corresponding plastic capsule.

“My God, I was dumbfounded,” Levengood recalled.

The two halves of the capsule shell were melted together, he said, and the entire capsule appeared to be imploded. He carefully worked at the capsule long enough to separate the two halves, at which time he said it made a whooshing noise, indicating it had been placed under some kind of vacuum.

“It was heated, of course,” he said.

I confidently suspect Levengood's assertion the capsule had been heated is why the inaccurate detail circulated that the seeds were fried, a detail that was simply incorrect. According to Levengood, the seeds were not wasted. Quite the contrary. Levengood stated the seeds in question grew with “increased vigor,” significantly outgrowing the other seeds!

Upon discovering this to be the case, I was immediately reminded of Tucker and her 75-pound cabbage. I was therefore eager to hear more about circumstances of which Levengood was aware in which growth rates of plants were obviously altered by whatever was taking place around them. Quite interestingly, one such circumstance included what Levengood called the “most unusual crop formation” he ever saw.

“This crop formation was in Kansas,” he explained. “It had no bent nodes, the crops were not knocked down, there were no expulsion cavities, there were no visible signs, except, in these circles, the wheat grew at a different (increased) height!”

.................................................................

So I suspect the intelligence community may sometimes be stirring the pot. I think it may sometimes be intentionally, while, at other times, just a byproduct of complex events and circumstances.
« Last Edit: Jul 19th, 2014, 1:23pm by jjflash » User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  16 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls