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 hotthread  Author  Topic: Eltanin Antenna  (Read 6361 times)
icepick
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xx Re: Eltanin Antenna
« Reply #15 on: Dec 8th, 2011, 07:59am »

Points noted MOKSHA. But I do catch many of the anomalies you refer to. But the antenna could simply have been torn loose from its mounting. This has happened to those twenty mile long towed arrays as well.

A little point of trivia perhaps, but our current subs can't reach the bottom just anywhere either. Our navy says 800 feet, but we all know that's a crock. A submarine is basically a blimp. It doesn't float under the sea so much as it flies. They have weight restrictions as a result, restrictions which limit how deep they can dive.

Another crock is that 35 knot top speed. Modern subs are called fast attacks for a reason. They scream. After all, they have to be fast enough to catch their quarry. In the western world, this is usually a Russian fast attack. Those are fast enough to catch their primary quarry, which would be our aircraft carriers. And those are limited by no top speed, but how fast they can turn their propeller shafts without twisting them in two. Unofficially, an aircraft carrier can build speed by increments indefinitely. But a realistic figure would probably be a little over fifty knots. Which is amazing. Fast attacks can probably make sixty knots, but only when submerged. On the surface, hull design severely limits their speed to under twenty knots.

Whew! All of that just to point out that modern submarines are indeed impressive craft. I would love to have a surplus WWII Gato Class. Wouldn't you?

But as for those antennas the Germans allegedly tried to use, weren't they strictly experimental? I do know all WWII subs had to rise to periscope depth to use their radios. Deep water transmission is actually pretty new. And once you go below an inversion layer, which is where they like to hang out and hide, that's it. One of HAARP's primary purposes is to find a way to communicate with submarines that are running below inversion layers. We'll see if it's successful in that endeavor or not.

Seems kind of strange though, doesn't it? Whales at the north pole can communicate directly with whales at the south pole. Water is a great medium for sound waves. But it can stop our radio transmissions cold. Weird.

Take care
Tim
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xx Re: Eltanin Antenna
« Reply #16 on: Dec 8th, 2011, 6:49pm »

Just, this AM I was, stopped on a draw bridge, and got to witness porpoises, swimming by, and thought about their communicative skills, which IMO, is far superior then our most complex devises, not including our own 6th sense, "IF THAT EXISTS".
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xx Re: Eltanin Antenna
« Reply #17 on: Dec 11th, 2011, 7:41pm »

Yeah, we have a 6th sense. And probably a whole lot more.

Porpoises are highly intelligent, but not as much as I had thought. The seafood facility I worked at had a problem with them getting tangled in nets. They had a really tough time figuring out how to avoid that. It makes you nauseated to see that happen to one of them.

Considering they can be trained to avoid submarine nets while entering a harbor to attach magnetic mines to ships, I would have expected they'd be able to avoid nets somewhat on their own. Otherwise they're supposed to be highly intelligent.

I'm not sure about their long distance communication though? I know that whales excel at this, but I don't know about any other sea creature. The navy experimented with transmissions through the water, but those appeared to be messing up the sea life's sense of direction, so they stopped. They probably wish they could though. Towing miles of wire behind a sub for communications really isn't very efficient.
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