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 thread  Author  Topic: dreams and their meaning  (Read 309 times)
SHARLY
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xx dreams and their meaning
« Thread started on: Jul 4th, 2016, 4:19pm »

Hello.
what does it mean when one dreams of falling stars and strange writings on a clear sky?
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purr
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xx Re: dreams and their meaning
« Reply #1 on: Jul 4th, 2016, 4:32pm »

on Jul 4th, 2016, 4:19pm, SHARLY wrote:
Hello.
what does it mean when one dreams of falling stars and strange writings on a clear sky?


Hi SHARLY, welcome to UFO Casebook! What it means? Kinda depends. Could you tell your dream, all you can remember from start to finish. What did you feel and see? What was the strangest thing in your dream?

I'm no expert, but I'll try give my best answer.


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xx Re: dreams and their meaning
« Reply #2 on: Jul 4th, 2016, 4:39pm »

on Jul 4th, 2016, 4:19pm, SHARLY wrote:
Hello.
what does it mean when one dreams of falling stars and strange writings on a clear sky?


I would not put a lot of stock into "dreams".

Copied from an old web site but it still makes a convincing argument.



The advent of the computer and silicone chips of which memory is made provide a brain analogy. Dreams can be better understood if relating the function of our brains and memory to resemble that of the computer (and apparently not too dissimilar). I can better understand dreams (or at least my own) when thinking that the brain, our memory and dreams are much the same as when you turn off the PC; dreams are the disgorgement of the unstructured, disorganized, tidbits of memory (both long-term and short-term) put together by the brain without the benefit of the memory controller.

In a computer there is a memory controller which provides information to the CPU as needed from memory. A picture for example is merely a collection of three colors in a pixel all reflecting the binary code in memory consisting of many transistor switches which are either on or off. But yet when translated to a computer screen or monitor we have what is recognized as a picture. If you crop or resize or somehow alter the picture all the data for each pixel is altered ultimately in memory before a permanent map of that memory is stored as the saved picture.

Memory itself has to be refreshed on a continual basis and it is the job of the memory controller to know what segments of memory are pertinent when called upon. I would encourage anyone to read about memory and how it works in a PC to help understand dreams.

Here is another analogy, or if you will, extension of the human brain analogy. Consider the cognitive part of the brain as the CEO or boss of the company. I think the memory controller in humans acts as an executive assistant providing the boss pertinent information to hear and filtering out superfluous or unfamiliar information not worthy of further consideration at or for the moment.

Likewise this process sometimes is flawed. This is for example, how our brain plays tricks on us. It fills in tidbits of information that are consistent with the immediate situation, a selective interpretation. For example this may be how a policeman accidentally shoots what he thinks is a perpetrator with a gun when the individual was merely pointing with his finger. Without time for deep analysis survival mode kicks in and the memory controller sifts the information and fills in with a priority code (survival) based on past experience, leading the police officer to believe he is in danger.

Without time for further analysis action must be taken based on the information at hand. But the memory controller has delved deep into the patrolmen's past experience sought out the relevant information and passed it forward. Now if in the past, the patrolmen had shot an innocent person, this information as well might be passed forward leaving the ultimate decision up to the CEO (patrolman’s higher functioning brain). But the memory controller has done its job selecting and organizing the pertinent information as required.

Additionally, oftentimes an eyewitness may have a totally disparate account of an incident from the person standing next to him witnessing the same event. This is just a simple example. I'm sure there are many other examples which can taint the credibility of witnesses in a crisis situation.

The point is to emphasize how the memory controller pulls information from both short-term and long-term memory. To continue the analogy to the human brain consider that when the brain is asleep the memory controller (is asleep as well) out of the picture, the brain or in the CEO analogy, the boss, continues to be fed information but without the assistance of the memory controller and consequently does a rather poor job of interpreting and sorting the data stream as millions of neurons (binary code transistor switches) physiologically refurbish themselves. Tidbits of information from long-term and short-term are mixed together sometimes in a coherent fashion and other times not, forming what is recalled sometimes in a dream. However, this was information or data that was never intended to be acted upon by the boss. It's just a disgorgement of memory similar in effect to millions of transistors switching off when you turn the memory off in the PC. In the case of a psychic dream there is no memory controller to sort the information into familiar and logical recognizable patterns. So the boss or in this case the brain is unimpeded in its interpretation (or misinterpretation) of the data stream.

Now if there is actually some meaning to the data stream, the brain is unencumbered to interpret all the data without selective interpretation. How meaningful data resides in the brain in the first place is the sum total of one's own experience and interaction with the environment including cultural and social interactions and experience.

This collective experience forms the data pool or long-term memory and is similar to what would be called ROM. RAM on the other hand would be analogous to our short-term memory and analysis. And again all of this is under control of the memory manager and without this control (when asleep), memory in the brain is being reset or disgorged but it is a data stream nonetheless and as it flows by is reconstituted and becomes what we know of as a dream; sometimes making sense other times not even close. And I can't help but wonder how many times in the past, dreams which to me are just a physiological process, played such significance in history by Kings, Queens, dictators and even presidents?

The analogy is just a metaphor to help understand the physiology of the brain and why dreams can occur. And with the understanding that during sleep the process of cell energy rejuvenation occurs. I seem to recall the Krebs cycle and adenosine triphosphate etc. it's been a while since physiology and biochemistry but all of that can be retrieved with a few search terms.
Dreams in my opinion are merely a side effect of the rejuvenation process. There is probably no significance as an evolutionary factor or attribute, except perhaps in the realm of cultural evolution in the case when some leader having a bad dream affects population dynamics.
When the human population was very small (compared to now) any shift in population dynamics even for a small group could have a significant affect on future populations. For example let's say that a tribal leader has a dream that a tall man kills him. He then makes a decree that all tall men under his rule shall be eliminated. This would be tantamount to genetic engineering because from henceforth the genes for tall men in that population would be rare.
Also there is a relation within evolution concerning behavior.
The lower forms of life tend to have a large component of their behavior, as instinct. Higher forms tend to nurture. For example some sharks are eating their siblings before they're even born. After birth they are completely independent of the mother shark and every bit as ferocious except smaller in scale. They are prepared from birth with all the components needed for survival behavior. So their behavior for the most part is instinctive (inherited). And this is a survival tactic that has worked quite well. Spiders instinctively build webs. Newly hatched turtles instinctively seek the ocean. Birds instinctively know how to build a nest. There are many examples but somehow behavior with survival value becomes encoded in the DNA.
By contrast the human baby takes years of nurturing before it can exist on its own and there is very little instinctive behavior involved. I suppose there are some components but I can't think of any offhand. So essentially all our behavior is learned. And this is where cultural evolution is more important than instinctive organic adaptive evolution.
It would be nice however if learning could be passed on but even that might be restrictive since the cultural environment is changing so fast that past learned experiences could be obsolete. For example if your ancestor learned that it was good not to stand behind a horse because you might get kicked such a learned behavior would have little relevance today. Recorded information (as a means to pass a learned behavior) in the form of tribal traditions, cave paintings, rituals, and most recently written records and the digital age all provide a reference of the past which is important for future cultural affairs since past experience could be used as a basis for future decisions.
Dreams may have more importance in providing ideas to an artist but in general have little meaning especially when you realize they are simply part of a physiological process. But this is just one persons opinion and others may put a lot of personal stock into their dreams.


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