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 thread  Author  Topic: Assessing Photos and Images  (Read 1479 times)
jjflash
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xx Assessing Photos and Images
« Thread started on: Oct 20th, 2013, 3:08pm »

Perhaps the following posts might assist us in sometimes better understanding what we might be looking at in any given photo or video. This is not to necessarily suggest all photos should be attributed to incorrectly perceived matters of perspective, but increasing our awareness of how images can be manipulated or capture objects out of context will only help our understanding of the overall situation.


on Aug 28th, 2013, 9:10pm, jjflash wrote:
Matters of perspective...


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Thanks to Bored Panda for the above images. The lesson in perspective below is provided compliments of Neatorama.


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What might at first appear to be a large head between two men is, upon closer look, a child sitting on the lap of the man on the left. The "eye" is the head of the child, the "nose" is the child's arm, etc.:


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jjflash
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #1 on: Oct 20th, 2013, 3:13pm »

From Tech Blog, These Are Not Real Cars, Just a Mind-Bending Optical Illusion (note the clever inclusion of shadows in the photos):


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elevenaugust
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #2 on: Oct 22nd, 2013, 2:31pm »

Great examples on how our senses can be fooled.

Bravo! grin
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IPACO, the new tool for photo and video analysis is on-line ! www.ipaco.fr
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #3 on: Oct 22nd, 2013, 2:56pm »

on Oct 22nd, 2013, 2:31pm, elevenaugust wrote:
Great examples on how our senses can be fooled.

Bravo! grin



I agree! Nicely done JJ!
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jjflash
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #4 on: Oct 27th, 2013, 11:26am »

Thanks, guys. Some more examples of how difficult it may sometimes be to accurately assess what we observe:








Thanks to Phil Plait for writing about such topics at Bad Astronomy on Slate.
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #5 on: Oct 27th, 2013, 10:32pm »

I've posted somewhere around the forum a tutorial on how to create an UFO sighting video. I will try to find it sometime and re-post it here.
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #6 on: Nov 30th, 2013, 7:06pm »

I love eye candy smiley Thanks a Jillion! grin
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #7 on: Aug 15th, 2014, 07:54am »

I don't fully understand this, but I think our ability to detect falsified photos will become harder as this new technology emerges......


New tool makes a single picture worth far more than a thousand words

August 14, 2014
University of California Ė Berkeley


User ImageUsers can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbertís shoulder, and then observe Colbertís typical body posture among those results. Credit: Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images?

New software developed by UC Berkeley computer scientists seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa's lap, housecats, or brides and grooms at their weddings. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

Users can also give extra weight to specific features to create subcategories and quickly sort the image results. In this way, blue-winged butterflies or orange tabby cats might rise to the top of photo collections.

The research, led by Alexei Efros, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, was presented Aug. 14 at the International Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, or SIGGRAPH, in Vancouver, Canada.

The authors noted that since photography was invented, there have been an estimated 3.5 trillion photos taken, including 10 percent within the past year. Facebook reports 6 billion photo uploads per month on its site, and YouTube gets 72 hours of video uploaded every minute.

"Visual data is among the biggest of Big Data," said Efros, who is also a member of the UC Berkeley Visual Computing Lab. "We have this enormous collection of images on the Web, but much of it remains unseen by humans because it is so vast. People have called it the dark matter of the Internet. We wanted to figure out a way to quickly visualize this data by systematically 'averaging' the images."

Efros worked with Jun-Yan Zhu, UC Berkeley computer science graduate student and the paper's lead author, and Yong Jae Lee, former UC Berkeley postdoctoral researcher, to develop the system, which they have dubbed AverageExplorer.

The researchers provided examples of potential applications of this system, such as in online shopping, where a consumer may want to quickly home in on two-inch wedge heels in the perfect shade of red. Or perhaps media analysts would like to see Stephen Colbert's typical body posture when the face of President Barack Obama appears in the graphic over his shoulder.

Lee, now an assistant professor in computer sciences at UC Davis, said the system could also be used to help improve the ability of computer vision systems to distinguish key features in an image, such as the tires on a car or the eyes on a face. When users mark those features on an average image, the entire collection of images is automatically annotated as well.

"In computer vision, annotations are used to train a system to detect objects, so you might mark the eyes, nose and mouth to teach the computer what a human face looks like," said Lee. "Lots of data is needed to accurately train the system, so reducing the amount of effort and time to do this is critical. Instead of annotating each image individually, with AverageExplorer, we only need to annotate the average image, and the system will automatically propagate the annotations to the image collection."

The researchers were inspired by artists like James Salavon, who has created average images from hundreds of photos of kids with Santa, newlyweds or baseball players to illustrate a concept. Average images can provide interesting insights, such as the convention in Western culture for brides to wear white and stand to the right of the groom in formal portraits, or for youth baseball players to get down on one knee in their official photo.
Many of the manual steps Salavon used to sort and align his images are now automated through the UC Berkeley tool.

Funding from Google, Adobe and the Office of Naval Research helped support this work.
________________________________________
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Berkeley. The original article was written by Sarah Yang.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140814192354.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fmatter_energy+%28Matter+%26+Energy+News+--+ScienceDaily%29

« Last Edit: Aug 15th, 2014, 07:55am by Swamprat » User IP Logged

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jjflash
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xx Re: Assessing Photos and Images
« Reply #8 on: Nov 3rd, 2014, 6:58pm »

Some helpful explanations worth a look and consideration, in my opinion:


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